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E portfolios: An Introduction

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A brief look at why we should be moving philosophically towards an electronic portfolio approach.

A brief look at why we should be moving philosophically towards an electronic portfolio approach.

Published in: Education

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  • 1. Electronic Portfolios
    Gathering, Editing, Evaluating, and Synthesizing the Student Experience
    Presented by Brian Stumbaugh
    for
    The Learning Alternatives Taskforce
    April 14, 2010
  • 2. The Past
  • 3. The Past
  • 4. Present
    e
  • 5. Future (present for some)
    e
    COLLEGE
    WORK
  • 6. So What Are They?
    In education and training contexts, eportfolios are learner-centered and outcomes-based. They are created when individuals selectively compile evidence of their own electronic activities and output as a means to indicate what they have learned or know. In this sense, eportfolios function as a learning record or transcript. But given their developmental character, eportfolios function as both an archive and a developmental repository that is used for learning management and reflections purposes.
  • 7. Portfolio Systems
    Sakai
    E-Portfolio
    Moodle
    Adobe
    Google Apps.
  • 8. Why Do It?
    Portfolios:
    Help assess graduation competencies;
    Allow for student representation of “soft” skills or competencies not reflected in State Assessments;
    Better show student growth (not just achievement) over time;
    Teach key revision, selection, and technical skills;
    Exist as portable records of student accomplishment.
  • 9. Examples
    State: Rhode Island
  • 10. Examples
    District: Ballston Spa CSD
  • 11. Where We Are…
    Blackboard On-Line Learning
    Google Apps integration in Middle School
    TechMondays courses on Adobe Acrobat, wikis, blogs, etc.
    English Department discussions.
  • 12. Recommendations
    Develop core list of graduation competencies;
    Research and adopt a CMS;
    Aggressive professional development;
    Staggered, systemic integration starting in elementary school and expanding upwards.