Formalism
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  • 1. Formalism What is it? Why does it matter?
  • 2. What the heck is modernism? Pre – modern era Modern era Society Agrarian – wealth and labor derived from agriculture and trading. Population centered in rural areas. Industrial – wealth and labor derived from manufacturing. Population centered in cities. Politics Monarchies and Empires – People ruled by royal families and empires extend beyond national borders. Revolution – people displace royals with democratic or socialist forms of governments. Science Newton’s Laws – Physical laws are fixed and immutable Einstein’s Relativity – Not all objects in universe follow Newton’s laws. Psychology Associative – Sensory Input + Repetition = Ideas Examination of the make-up of personality – Conscious + Unconscious = Self Art Realist Approach – art’s value rests in how closely it mirrors nature Expressive Approach – art’s value rests in how it allows for individual expression
  • 3. Major Thinkers who epitomized the Modernist Ideal In physics, Albert Einstein puts forth the idea that electromagnetic waves do not conform to the laws of motion put forth by Isaac Newton. This is part of his Theory of Relativity. In psychology Sigmund Freud postulates a theory that personality is made up of subjective, interacting layers. Psychoanalysis is the technique Freud developed to treat patients by bringing thoughts buried in the subconscious back into conscious awareness. Pablo Picasso develops a form of abstract painting that tries to paint all aspects of something simultaneously. This style of painting comes to be known as Cubism because of its shattered, geometric look. Picasso, and others, were trying to represent things as they are not how they look.
  • 4. Arnold Schoenberg String Quartet #2
  • 5. Alfred Jarry
  • 6. Sergei DiaghilevIgor Stravinsky Vaslav Nijinsky Le Sacre du printemps
  • 7. William Bouguereau , Orestes Pursued by the Furies, 1862
  • 8. Henri Fatin-Latour, The Corner of the Table, 1873
  • 9. Gustave Courbet, The Painter’s Studio, A Real Allegory, 1855
  • 10. Edward Manet, Déjeuner sur l'Herbe , 1863
  • 11. Claude Monet, Japanese Bridge, 1918 - 24
  • 12. Auguste Renoir, Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881
  • 13. Vincent van Gogh, A Starry Night, 1889
  • 14. Paul Gauguin, The Spirit of the Dead Watching, 1892
  • 15. Henri Matisse, Le Bonheur de Vivre, 1905
  • 16. Term for any approach to the arts, whether theoretical, critical or historical, that emphasizes the autonomy or primacy of formal qualities. In the case of painting, these qualities are usually understood to be compositional elements such as line, value, colour and texture: Robert Williams
From Grove Art Online Formalism
  • 17. Henri Matisse, Harmony in Red, 1908
  • 18. Paul Cezanne
  • 19. Paul Cezanne, Seated Man, 1906
  • 20. Pablo Picasso, Self Portrait with Uncombed Hair, 1896
  • 21. Pablo Picasso, Self Portrait with Uncombed Hair, 1896
  • 22. Pablo Picasso, Yo, Picasso, 1901
  • 23. Pablo Picasso, the Old Guitarist, 1904
  • 24. Pablo Picasso, Les Mademoiselles d’Avignon, 1907
  • 25. In art theory, FORMALISM is the concept that a work’s artistic value is entirely determined by its form – the way it is made, its purely visual aspects, and its medium.
  • 26. In 1890,painter Maurice Denis wrote in his article 'Definition of Neo-Traditionism' that a painting was 'essentially a flat surface covered in colours arranged in a certain order.' Denis argued that the painting or sculpture or drawing itself, not the subject of the artistic work, gave pleasure to the mind. – Wikipedia Henri Matisse, Harmony in Red, 1908
  • 27. In his 1914 book, Art, Clive Bell wrote that there was a distinction between a thing's actual form and its 'significant form.' For Bell, recognition of a work of art as representational of a thing was less important than capturing the 'significant form', or true inner nature, of a thing. Bell pushed for an art that used the techniques of an artistic medium to capture the essence of a thing (its 'significant form') rather than its mere outward appearance. - Wikipedia Pablo Picasso, Weeping Woman, 1937
  • 28. "The creative force and the expressiveness of painting reside materially in the color and texture of pigment, in the possibilities of form invention and organization, and in the flat plane on which these elements are brought to play. The artist is concerned solely with linking these absolute qualities directly to his wit, imagination, and experience, without the go-between of a 'subject.'‖ – Man Ray, 1916 Robert Delaunay, Circular Forms, 1913 The ―picture plane‖ is the actual flat surface of the canvas where the elements co-exist.
  • 29. Albers did not attempt to represent any emotional undercurrents, definite theme, or storyline in this series. The focus here was to create different optical responses for the fundamental form (square) in varying situations (color combinations). Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3570319 Josef Albers, Homage to the Square series, begun 1in 1949 and went through the 1960s
  • 30. The Twelve Technical Rules (or How to Achieve the Twelve Things to Avoid) to be followed are: 1. No texture.... 2. No brushwork or calligraphy.... 3. No sketching or drawing.... 4. No forms.... 5. No design.... 6. No colors.... 7. No light.... 8. No space.... 9. No time.... 10. No size or scale.... 11. No movement.... 12. No object, no subject, no matter. No symbols, images, or signs. —Ad Reinhardt Ad Reinhardt, Abstract Painting, Blue, 1952 With his monochromatic canvases of the 1950s and 60s, Ad Reinhardt desired to make ―pure‖ paintings evincing an ―art for art’s sake‖ position rather than working to communicate emotion or the physical act of painting itself.
  • 31. As a kid I drew and drew obsessively. I went to museums, but I wanted the story. I couldn't see the art. – art critic, Clement Greenberg Robert Morris, Untitled, 1965
  • 32. I’m not an abstractionist. I’m not interested in the relationship of color or form or anything else. I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on. – Mark Rothko Mark Rothko, Untitled, 1960
  • 33. Any art worthy of its name should address 'life', 'man', 'nature', 'death' and 'tragedy'. BarnettNewman
  • 34. Mark Rothko Barnett Newman
  • 35. Wassily Kandinsky
  • 36. Wassily Kandinsky
  • 37. Wassily Kandinsky
  • 38. Wassily Kandinsky
  • 39. Wassily Kandinsky
  • 40. Kazimir Malevich
  • 41. Kazimir Malevich
  • 42. Kazimir Malevich
  • 43. Kazimir Malevich
  • 44. Kazimir Malevich
  • 45. Kazimir Malevich
  • 46. Piet Mondrian
  • 47. Piet Mondrian
  • 48. Piet Mondrian
  • 49. Piet Mondrian
  • 50. Piet Mondrian
  • 51. Piet Mondrian
  • 52. Piet Mondrian
  • 53. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 54. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 55. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 56. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 57. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 58. Sophie Tauber Arp
  • 59. Josef Albers
  • 60. Josef Albers
  • 61. Josef Albers
  • 62. Josef Albers
  • 63. Josef Albers
  • 64. Josef Albers
  • 65. Ad Reinhardt
  • 66. Ad Reinhardt
  • 67. Ad Reinhardt
  • 68. Ad Reinhardt
  • 69. Ad Reinhardt
  • 70. Ad Reinhardt
  • 71. Al Held
  • 72. Al Held
  • 73. Al Held
  • 74. Al Held
  • 75. Al Held
  • 76. Al Held
  • 77. Al Held
  • 78. Victor Vassarely
  • 79. Victor Vassarely
  • 80. Victor Vassarely
  • 81. Victor Vassarely
  • 82. Victor Vassarely
  • 83. Victor Vassarely
  • 84. Bridget Riley
  • 85. Bridget Riley
  • 86. Bridget Riley
  • 87. Bridget Riley
  • 88. Bridget Riley
  • 89. Agnes Martin
  • 90. Agnes Martin
  • 91. Agnes Martin
  • 92. Agnes Martin
  • 93. Agnes Martin
  • 94. Frank Stella
  • 95. Frank Stella
  • 96. Frank Stella
  • 97. Frank Stella
  • 98. Frank Stella
  • 99. Frank Stella
  • 100. Frank Stella
  • 101. Kenneth Noland
  • 102. Kenneth Noland
  • 103. Kenneth Noland
  • 104. Kenneth Noland
  • 105. Kenneth Noland
  • 106. Kenneth Noland
  • 107. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 108. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 109. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 110. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 111. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 112. Ellsworth Kelly
  • 113. Sol Lewitt
  • 114. Sol Lewitt
  • 115. Sol Lewitt
  • 116. Sol Lewitt
  • 117. Sol Lewitt
  • 118. Sol Lewitt
  • 119. Sol Lewitt