Lesson Nine Example Text I
<ul><li>I will collect the following: </li></ul><ul><li>First Draft </li></ul><ul><li>Rough Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Incl...
Short Reflection Preparation for Final Exam Week 18 Final Portfolio Argument in Life Week 17 Peer Review 2 Peer Review / E...
Your portfolio will count as your  midterm . 10% Participation 20% Portfolio 70% Final Exam Grad i ng
Although we will be looking at many writing skills, we will pay special attention to how the writer develops her ideas by ...
Elements of a P a ragraph <ul><li>Unity </li></ul><ul><li>Coherence </li></ul><ul><li>Topic Sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Ade...
<ul><li>Argum e ntative Body Paragr a phs </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting evidence (think: courtroom) </li></ul><ul><li>Valle...
Methods  o f Guiding <ul><li>Methods of using supporting evidence and guiding your reader through the valleys and hilltops...
Methods of G u iding <ul><li>Exposition: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Discourse designed to convey information or explain what is d...
M e thods of Guiding <ul><li>Interpretation: </li></ul><ul><li>“ To explain or tell the meaning of something.” </li></ul><...
Methods of Gu i ding <ul><li>Signposts </li></ul><ul><li>Signposts are internal aids to assist readers; they usually consi...
E x position <ul><li>The most important material for exposition is source material.  How do we effectively incorporate sou...
Using Sour c es <ul><li>Use your sources as support for your insights, not as the backbone of your paper.  </li></ul>
Using Sourc e s <ul><li>2.  Summarize  (condense a text by stating the main ideas in your own words) and  paraphrase  (say...
U s ing Sources <ul><li>3.  Don't use direct quotes as fillers but because the author says something so aptly or dramatica...
Usi n g Sources <ul><li>4. Explain direct quotes. Readers have to know  why  you include source material where you do. </l...
Using Sourc e s <ul><li>5. If multiple sources say the same thing, summarize what they say and put a few key names in brac...
U s ing Sources <ul><li>6. When you do use direct quotes, the most fluid way to integrate them is to incorporate key words...
<ul><li>7. Don't summarize plots of primary sources. Assume your audience has read the work. Only explain as much as you n...
Computer Assist e d Instruction: Blessing or Bane? By Susan Sexton 1987
Subject:  Computer Assisted Instruction  Purpose:  Argumentative / Informative Audience:  Teachers / Parents Writ i ng Tri...
Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researcher...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>Projects/Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li...
<ul><li>Paragraph 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Builds a context and defines the issue for the audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Direct qu...
<ul><li>Paragraph 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Continues to build background and context. </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning to build info...
<ul><li>Paragraph 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Moves reader toward thesis and focus by questioning value of CAI. </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Paragraph 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses the thesis statement even more.  </li></ul><ul><li>Notice the thesis is not ...
Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researcher...
<ul><li>Note: each section of the body will prove the thesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware ...
The following section on  courseware  will prove, according to the focus stated earlier in the introduction, that CAI may ...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>A. Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>B.  Drill/Practice </li>...
<ul><li>Paragraph 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Use of definitional thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrased material in sentences 5 ...
<ul><li>Paragraph 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Two paraphrases in sentences 2 and 3 bring informative aim into paragraph. </li></ul...
<ul><li>Paragraph 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Argumentative aim evident. </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph summarizes two pages of sourc...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>A. Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>B.  Drill/Practice </li>...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>III.   Projects / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>A. Bas...
Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researcher...
The following section on projects and experiments will prove, according to the focus stated earlier in the introduction, t...
<ul><li>Paragraph 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Purely transitional paragraph, allowing the writer to shift the essay’s focus from t...
<ul><li>Paragraph 9 </li></ul><ul><li>A strongly argumentative paragraph, for the necessity of these “higher-order” thinki...
<ul><li>Paragraph 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Argumentative aim again strongly present as the writer seeks to show weakness in ho...
<ul><li>Paragraph 11 </li></ul><ul><li>The paraphrase that opens the paragraph analyzes the previous quotation with a keen...
<ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>III.   Projects / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>A. Bas...
<ul><li>Draws together separate threads of the writer’s argument clearly and precisely. </li></ul><ul><li>Concludes the es...
<ul><li>I will collect the following: </li></ul><ul><li>First Draft </li></ul><ul><li>Rough Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Incl...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Lesson 9: Example Text I

5,646

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,646
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
92
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Lesson 9: Example Text I

  1. 1. Lesson Nine Example Text I
  2. 2. <ul><li>I will collect the following: </li></ul><ul><li>First Draft </li></ul><ul><li>Rough Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Include you thesis statement at the top of your paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, label your assignments at the top of the page or mark the page. </li></ul>Ne x t Week
  3. 3. Short Reflection Preparation for Final Exam Week 18 Final Portfolio Argument in Life Week 17 Peer Review 2 Peer Review / Editing Week 16 Second Draft / Formal Outline / Reading notes Example Text Week 15   Introductions / Conclusions Week 14 Peer Review 1 Peer Review / Revision Week 13 First Draft / Outline Quotations & Citations Week 12   Example Text Week 11
  4. 4. Your portfolio will count as your midterm . 10% Participation 20% Portfolio 70% Final Exam Grad i ng
  5. 5. Although we will be looking at many writing skills, we will pay special attention to how the writer develops her ideas by using body paragraphs. Today’s O bjective
  6. 6. Elements of a P a ragraph <ul><li>Unity </li></ul><ul><li>Coherence </li></ul><ul><li>Topic Sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate Development </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Argum e ntative Body Paragr a phs </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting evidence (think: courtroom) </li></ul><ul><li>Valleys and mountains (think: tour guide) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Methods o f Guiding <ul><li>Methods of using supporting evidence and guiding your reader through the valleys and hilltops: </li></ul><ul><li>Exposition </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Signposts </li></ul>
  9. 9. Methods of G u iding <ul><li>Exposition: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Discourse designed to convey information or explain what is difficult to understand.” </li></ul><ul><li>facts / individual bits / evidence </li></ul>
  10. 10. M e thods of Guiding <ul><li>Interpretation: </li></ul><ul><li>“ To explain or tell the meaning of something.” </li></ul><ul><li>inductive / deductive reasoning </li></ul>
  11. 11. Methods of Gu i ding <ul><li>Signposts </li></ul><ul><li>Signposts are internal aids to assist readers; they usually consist of several sentences or a paragraph outlining what the article has covered and where the article will be going. </li></ul>
  12. 12. E x position <ul><li>The most important material for exposition is source material. How do we effectively incorporate source material into our body paragraphs? </li></ul>
  13. 13. Using Sour c es <ul><li>Use your sources as support for your insights, not as the backbone of your paper. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Using Sourc e s <ul><li>2. Summarize (condense a text by stating the main ideas in your own words) and paraphrase (say the same thing in a different way) much more often than you use direct quotes (same words as the original, in quotation marks). </li></ul>
  15. 15. U s ing Sources <ul><li>3. Don't use direct quotes as fillers but because the author says something so aptly or dramatically that a paraphrase would lose that power. Or, if you're analyzing the language of a passage. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Usi n g Sources <ul><li>4. Explain direct quotes. Readers have to know why you include source material where you do. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Using Sourc e s <ul><li>5. If multiple sources say the same thing, summarize what they say and put a few key names in brackets at the end of the sentence. </li></ul>
  18. 18. U s ing Sources <ul><li>6. When you do use direct quotes, the most fluid way to integrate them is to incorporate key words right into your text. </li></ul><ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;We can see this change when Othello calls his wife a 'strumpet' (4.2.81) . . . .&quot; </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>7. Don't summarize plots of primary sources. Assume your audience has read the work. Only explain as much as you need in order to establish context for an example. </li></ul>Usin g Sources
  20. 20. Computer Assist e d Instruction: Blessing or Bane? By Susan Sexton 1987
  21. 21. Subject: Computer Assisted Instruction Purpose: Argumentative / Informative Audience: Teachers / Parents Writ i ng Triangle
  22. 22. Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researchers have yet to prove that CAI in schools substantially increases learning. Th e sis Statement
  23. 23. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>Projects/Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  24. 24. <ul><li>Paragraph 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Builds a context and defines the issue for the audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Direct quotations used to establish the issue’s importance. </li></ul>Introducti o n
  25. 25. <ul><li>Paragraph 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Continues to build background and context. </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning to build informed and knowledgeable persona (ethos). </li></ul>Introducti o n
  26. 26. <ul><li>Paragraph 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Moves reader toward thesis and focus by questioning value of CAI. </li></ul><ul><li>Longer quotation to establish authority of facts and figures, building informed persona. </li></ul><ul><li>Informative aim for audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Notice this is not emotional or irrational. </li></ul>Introducti o n
  27. 27. <ul><li>Paragraph 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses the thesis statement even more. </li></ul><ul><li>Notice the thesis is not entirely explicitly stated or connected. </li></ul><ul><li>Thesis/focus comes at the end of the introduction. </li></ul>Introducti o n
  28. 28. Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researchers have yet to prove that CAI in schools substantially increases learning. Th e sis Statement
  29. 29. <ul><li>Note: each section of the body will prove the thesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>Projects/Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  30. 30. The following section on courseware will prove, according to the focus stated earlier in the introduction, that CAI may work, but only in ideal circumstances with ideal students . O u tline
  31. 31. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>A. Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>B. Drill/Practice </li></ul><ul><li>C. Simulation </li></ul><ul><li>D. Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>III. Project / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  32. 32. <ul><li>Paragraph 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Use of definitional thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrased material in sentences 5 and 6. Note how author’s name is part of the paraphrase. </li></ul><ul><li>Final sentence is a signpost. </li></ul>B o dy
  33. 33. <ul><li>Paragraph 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Two paraphrases in sentences 2 and 3 bring informative aim into paragraph. </li></ul><ul><li>Longer quotation provides insight into how CAI programs work. </li></ul><ul><li>Final sentences uses paraphrase and writer’s own ideas to analyze significance of long quotation </li></ul>B o dy
  34. 34. <ul><li>Paragraph 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Argumentative aim evident. </li></ul><ul><li>Paragraph summarizes two pages of source material with Susan’s analysis interspersed. </li></ul><ul><li>Elements of a reasonable persona added. </li></ul>B o dy
  35. 35. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>A. Tutorial </li></ul><ul><li>B. Drill/Practice </li></ul><ul><li>C. Simulation </li></ul><ul><li>D. Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>III. Projects / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  36. 36. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>III. Projects / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>A. Bass/Perkins Experiment </li></ul><ul><li>B. Shalvoy Study </li></ul><ul><li>C. Pogrow Study </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  37. 37. Educational institutions should seriously analyze advocacy of Computer Assisted Instruction because educational researchers have yet to prove that CAI in schools substantially increases learning. Th e sis Statement
  38. 38. The following section on projects and experiments will prove, according to the focus stated earlier in the introduction, that projects and experiments are inconclusive, at best, by the admission of the researchers themselves. O u tline
  39. 39. <ul><li>Paragraph 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Purely transitional paragraph, allowing the writer to shift the essay’s focus from types of CAI programs to the effects CAI has on “higher-order” thinking skills. </li></ul><ul><li>A clear, precise summary of ideas creates a persona reflecting intelligence and reasonable objectivity. </li></ul>B o dy
  40. 40. <ul><li>Paragraph 9 </li></ul><ul><li>A strongly argumentative paragraph, for the necessity of these “higher-order” thinking skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Quotations used to define and analyze this need. </li></ul>B o dy
  41. 41. <ul><li>Paragraph 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Argumentative aim again strongly present as the writer seeks to show weakness in how scholarly research on CAI has been used. </li></ul><ul><li>Fourth sentence begins a summary that builds a context so that audience can understand the material in question. </li></ul><ul><li>Quotation is obviously necessary because of the complexity of the material. </li></ul>B o dy
  42. 42. <ul><li>Paragraph 11 </li></ul><ul><li>The paraphrase that opens the paragraph analyzes the previous quotation with a keen argumentative edge taken from Bass and Perkins’ own study. </li></ul><ul><li>The writer uses researchers’ own admission of weakness to support her argument through a key, but telling, direct quotation. </li></ul>B o dy
  43. 43. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Courseware </li></ul><ul><li>III. Projects / Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>A. Bass/Perkins Experiment </li></ul><ul><li>B. Shalvoy Study </li></ul><ul><li>C. Pogrow Study </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Conclusion </li></ul>O u tline
  44. 44. <ul><li>Draws together separate threads of the writer’s argument clearly and precisely. </li></ul><ul><li>Concludes the essay with implications that both teachers and parents should consider. </li></ul><ul><li>Persona appears concerned and intelligent. </li></ul>Concl u sion
  45. 45. <ul><li>I will collect the following: </li></ul><ul><li>First Draft </li></ul><ul><li>Rough Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Include you thesis statement at the top of your paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, label your assignments at the top of the page or mark the page. </li></ul>Ne x t Week
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×