Shultz Sedaag 2008
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Shultz Sedaag 2008

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This presentation, co-authored with Charlynn Burd, was given at the 2008 meeting of the Southeastern Division of the AAG.

This presentation, co-authored with Charlynn Burd, was given at the 2008 meeting of the Southeastern Division of the AAG.

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  • 1. BENJAMIN SHULTZ AND CHARLYNN BURD UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE GEOGRAPHY SEDAAG NOVEMBER 25, 2008 The Southern Gentry: Re-Examining Patterns of Growth and Change in the New South
  • 2. Introduction
    • Patterns of nonmetropolitan growth and change
      • Interdisciplinary research for past 3 decades
    • Major research emphasis
      • Traditional economic base rooted in primary and secondary sectors
    • New economic shifts
      • Services, real estate, retail, entertainment, tourism
  • 3. Introduction
    • Economic restructuring and natural amenities
      • Natural amenities population/economic growth
    • “ Quality of Life” migration
      • Growth in nontraditional sectors
    • Heavy focus on “New West”
    • Research on nonmetropolitan South
      • Demise of rural industrial base
      • Disproportionate resources concentrated in suburbs
      • Suburban growth leaving vast nonmetropolitan areas behind
      • Divide between inner city/rural areas and suburbs
  • 4. Introduction
    • Goal of research
      • What are the spatial relationships between growth and natural amenities in the South?
      • To what extent do nonmetropolitan places suffer at the expense of the suburbs?
    • Study area:
      • States must be part of “census South” and
      • Have at least one county in Appalachian Regional Commission
  • 5. Methods
    • County-level data
      • 853 total counties (ten independent VA cities)
    • Examine economic and demographic changes
      • Growth
      • Prosperity
      • Economic Shifts
      • Amenities
  • 6. Methods and Data
    • Growth: US Census Bureau (1990-2005)
        • Population
        • Domestic Migration
        • Median Household Income
        • Total Employment
        • Total Number of People in Poverty
    • Prosperity: Various data sources
        • Poverty Rate
        • Housing Problem Index
        • Unemployment Rate
        • H.S. Dropout
  • 7. Methods and Data
    • Economic Shifts: Bureau Economic Analysis 2005
        • Percent Retail
        • Percent Manufacturing
        • Percent Farming
        • Percent Government
        • Percent Farming
        • Percent Arts, Recreation, and Entertainment
    • Natural Amenity Index: ERS
        • Rescaled for Southeast
  • 8. Amenities
  • 9. Methods
    • 16 total variables
    • K-Means cluster analysis
      • Non-Hierarchical Clustering
      • Calinski and Harabasz Stop Rule
      • Four Group Solution
    • Cluster trends
      • Sunbelt Service (70 Counties)
      • Southern Gentry (239 Counties)
      • Equilibrium (396 Counties)
      • Chronic Poverty (148 Counties)
  • 10. Sunbelt Service
  • 11. Southern Gentry
  • 12. Equilibrium
  • 13. Chronic Poverty
  • 14. Discussion
    • Divide between nonmetropolitan and suburban places exists, but is concentrated
    • Not all growth is good
      • People in poverty in Sunbelt Suburban jumped 62%
      • High costs in desirable places potentially displacing low-income people
      • Internal polarization between rich and poor may be masked by data
      • Suburbs are more diverse than traditionally discussed
        • (i.e. increased Latino population growth)
  • 15. Discussion
    • Many places are neither booming nor declining
      • Steady growth
      • Severe poverty and depopulation are concentrated
      • Old race and class divisions still intact
    • Rise of small towns and accessible rural areas
      • Transcends suburban vs. inner city/rural area divide
    • Natural amenities and growth
      • Not as clear as in New West
  • 16. Thank You!
    • Questions?