Reform Alabama - Blueprint for Education Reform

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Reform Alabama - Blueprint for Education Reform

  1. 1. Building a Blueprint for Education Reform <ul><li>Putting our children first </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering parents </li></ul><ul><li>Providing management flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Developing and supporting our best teachers </li></ul>
  2. 2. Collaborative effort : I nput and assistance from … <ul><li>Legislative leaders from AL House and Senate </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated education reform advocates </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation for Florida’s Future: Gov. Jeb Bush </li></ul><ul><li>2011 National Summit for Education Reform </li></ul>
  3. 3. Education in Alabama TODAY <ul><li>The ACT: A Comparative Analysis: 20.3 average composite score; consistently below national average with only negligible progress </li></ul><ul><li>Alabama’s High School Graduation Rate: 64.8% </li></ul><ul><li>Remediation Rate at Alabama Colleges: 34.4% </li></ul><ul><li>The High Cost of Remediation: $80 million annually </li></ul>
  4. 4. Education in Alabama TODAY <ul><li>6-Year graduation rates at Alabama’s public colleges: 46.6% </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced Placement investment proves success is possible </li></ul><ul><li>Advances made through A+ College Ready program, especially among minorities, prove success is within our grasp </li></ul>
  5. 5. Education innovations for TOMORROW <ul><li>School Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>School Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce Training </li></ul><ul><li>Budgeting Reform </li></ul>
  6. 6. 2010 ACT composite scores of states testing at least 70% of students 21.0 20.3 * Source: College Board Advocacy and Policy Center, 2011 Nat. Avg. AL 20.3 20.7 22.0 19.4 20.1 22.9 18.8 22.1 21.5 20.0 19.6 21.8 20.0 AK IL KS KY LA MN MS NB ND SD TN UT WY
  7. 7. ACT Performance: Average Composite Score - 1995-2010 20.3 21.0 20.2 20.9 20.2 21.0 20.0 * Source: College Board Advocacy and Policy Center, 2011 ** National Composite Data Not Available for 1995
  8. 8. 66% 65% 52% 48% 45% 32% 30% 22% ACT Performance: Percentage of students meeting key benchmarks * Source: College Board Advocacy and Policy Center, 2011
  9. 9. HS graduation rates --AL, U.S., SE percent progress 1998 - 2008 Nation * Source: Diplomas Count 2011, Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, www.edweek.org/rc AL FL LA TN SC NC GA MS Nation AL FL GA LA MS TN SC NC 71.7 64.8 58.8 59.6 61.4 76.9 58.6 72.8 63.9 + 6.1 + 7.5 + 12.4 + 6.6 + 3.6 + 4.6 + 20.0 + 7.9 + 15.4 65.6 56.0 50.8 52.2 56.8 56.9 57.4 51.6 57.3
  10. 10. 64.8% 71.7% * Source: Diplomas Count 2011, Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, www.edweek.org/rc 57.3% 65.6% Alabama HS graduation rate: State average vs. national average +7.5% +6.1% 87.65%
  11. 11. <ul><li>In 2010 34.4% of Alabama high school graduates who went on to 2- and 4-year colleges had to take at least one remedial course in English, Math or both </li></ul><ul><li>And percentages were higher than that at 223 of Alabama’s 357 high schools </li></ul>REMEDIATION More than one-third of our HS graduates require it * Source: Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 2011
  12. 12. REMEDIATION More than 1/3 of our HS graduates require it * Source: Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 2011 Alabama high schools with highest remediation rates Loachapoka HS Lee County 74% Autaugaville HS Autauga County 73% Calhoun HS Lowndes County 72% Hubbertville HS Fayette County 71% Bessemer City HS Bessemer City 70% Edward Bell HS Tallapoosa County 70% G.W. Carver HS Birmingham City 70% Notasulga HS Macon County 69% Parker HS B’ham City 68% Ashford HS Houston County 68%
  13. 13. The 2010 6-Year graduation rate: Alabama’s public 4-year colleges 67% 48% 66% 40% 45% 40% 37% 37% 35% 34% 29% 28% 22 % * Source: U.S. Dept. of Education, IPEDS 2009-2010 Graduation Rates ** Source: U.S. Dept. of Education, IPDES 2006-2007 Graduation Rates State Average: 46.9% National Average: 55.9%**
  14. 14. <ul><li>Difference in annual earnings between a HS dropout & a HS graduate : $10,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Difference in annual earnings between a HS graduate & a college graduate : $19,940 </li></ul><ul><li>Lost lifetime earnings for Alabama’s 25,000 (2009) high school dropouts: $6.5 billion </li></ul><ul><li>Amount Alabama colleges spend annually for remediation classes: $51 million </li></ul><ul><li>Amount remediation costs Alabama’s economy in lost earnings: $29 million </li></ul>The high price of remediation & maintaining the status quo Source: Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009
  15. 15. Signs of progress: Alabama leads in advanced placement gains Our successful A+ College Ready program proves that Alabama students and teachers at every Alabama public school can achieve high standards and reach high goals with the right support
  16. 16. % of public high schools in Southeast states offering AP in 4 core subjects 33.9% 20.1% 48.6% 59.9% 44.9% * Source: College Board Advocacy and Policy Center, 2011 NationalAverage AL FL GA SC LA TN MS NC 11.7% 28.6% 28.3% 50.2%
  17. 17. 387 269 150 76 2 5 17 27 12 23 43 64 INCREASED AP INVESTMENT 2008 - 2012 A+ College Ready Improvement - 1 * Source: A+ College Ready, A+ Education Partnership, 2011
  18. 18. 2011-12 scores pending 13,401 8,900 5,385 1,671 2,705 743 2,673 INCREASED AP INVESTMENT 2008 - 2012 A+ College Ready Improvement - 2 * Source: A+ College Ready, A+ Education Partnership, 2011
  19. 19. How Alabama AP test scores compare: A+ CR - 3 Scores of 3 or Greater in Math, Science and English per 1,000 Jrs and Srs Enrolled First Year APTIP Cohort 1 First Year APTIP Cohort 2 First Year APTIP Cohort 3 159 78 102 108 183 218 137 132 124 96 67 47 62 51 59 42 116 * Source: A+ College Ready. As of August 8, 2011, College Board, state DOE’s for enrollments, US average in public schools, 2011 is estimated. AL Cohorts 1, 2 and 3 are A+College Ready Program Schools
  20. 20. Innovations for TOMORROW <ul><li>School accountability </li></ul><ul><li>School choice </li></ul><ul><li>Digital learning </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce training </li></ul><ul><li>Budgeting reform </li></ul>
  21. 21. Innovations for TOMORROW: School Accountability <ul><li>School-based report cards: Grades A-F </li></ul><ul><li>Parent-friendly formula and criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Community support & competitive spirit grows with success </li></ul><ul><li>Positive reinforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation by State Board of Education </li></ul>
  22. 26. Innovations for TOMORROW: ACCOUNTABILITY FOR TEACHING OUR TEACHERS <ul><li>The Process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New teachers entering the 2013-2014 school year thereafter will be evaluated based on the performance of their students and other factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher performance will be applied back to the institution that graduated them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cumulative data will be used to grade Alabama’s Colleges of Education and corrective action will be taken as prescribed </li></ul></ul>
  23. 27. Innovations for TOMORROW: APPROPRIATE COMPENSATION FOR GRADUATE DEGREES <ul><li>Establish a policy stipulating that a teacher must be teaching in the area of the graduate degree obtained in order to earn the additional compensation awarded for graduate degree completion. </li></ul>
  24. 28. Innovations for TOMORROW: CHARTER SCHOOLS <ul><li>Authorizing Authority : Local school boards, with appeal if denied to designated special commission; the authorizing authority will operate within the ALSDE </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability: Fully accountable, both academically and financially, within State accountability system </li></ul><ul><li>Funding: Funding follows the child with formula that accounts for services provided; minimum floor established, authorizing authority determines funding total </li></ul>
  25. 29. Innovations for TOMORROW: CHARTER SCHOOLS <ul><li>Autonomy: Certain requirements cannot be waived; but flexibility means charter schools must meet State standards of learning, with autonomy in choosing how to get there </li></ul><ul><li>Uphold Original Purpose: Encourage development of charter schools for underserved students (free and reduced lunch) who are trapped in consistently failing schools </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation: Public charter schools should be welcomed as innovators from which all schools can learn and grow; a valuable addition to Alabama’s public school offerings </li></ul>
  26. 30. Innovations for TOMORROW: CHARTER SCHOOL SYSTEMS <ul><li>Authorizing Authority : Alabama Board of Education; local systems will be required to meet certain, proven standards of effective operation in order to qualify; systems will be relieved of the same rules and regulations from which charter schools are relieved if they meet and maintain the requirements established by the State Board </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability: Same as charter schools </li></ul><ul><li>Funding: Same as charter schools </li></ul>
  27. 31. Innovations for TOMORROW: CHARTER SCHOOL SYSTEMS <ul><li>Autonomy: Same as charter schools </li></ul><ul><li>Uphold Original Purpose: Same as charter schools </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation: Public charter schools should be welcomed as innovators from which all schools can learn and grow; a valuable addition to Alabama’s public school programs </li></ul>
  28. 32. Innovations for TOMORROW: CHARTER SCHOOLS <ul><li>“ Crucially, the data show that charters' success isn't attributable to attracting students who are better equipped to learn from the start. &quot;The African American populations in charter public and traditional public schools are very similar,&quot; notes the report, with the same level of parental education, similar household income and nearly identical attrition rates. “The real difference is that charter schools are free of the traditional school system's union contracts and bureaucratic rules, which shorten the school day, stifle innovation and protect ineffective teachers. This autonomy doesn't guarantee charter success, but it allows the schools—and their students—to benefit from creativity, competition and accountability.” The Wall Street Journal October 26, 2011 </li></ul>
  29. 33. Innovations for TOMORROW: DIGITAL LEARNING <ul><li>Remove legal and regulatory obstacles preventing online learning/curriculum choice </li></ul><ul><li>Continue to allow textbook funds to be used for online learning tools </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage innovation, productivity, flexibility and cost-savings. Consider “Innovation Incentives” </li></ul><ul><li>Implement a partnership among state Colleges of Education for research and development </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development in technology: Increase teacher knowledge of available technology </li></ul>
  30. 34. From The Alliance for Excellent Education Equipping Students and Classrooms with the Tools Necessary for Online Learning Matt Akin, Piedmont City Schools, Alabama In September, Piedmont became one of the first school districts in Alabama to, in Akin’s words, “engage in a bona fide one-to-one laptop initiative that provides a computer for students’ use 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for all students in grades four through twelve.” Innovations for TOMORROW: DIGITAL LEARNING
  31. 35. With the help of a federal technology grant, the district acquired 800 MacBooks through a lease-purchase agreement. As a result, the project—called MPower Piedmont—has put a computer in 500 homes that never had one before… But Akin didn’t stop there. Realizing that 65 percent of his students were eligible for free or reduced-price lunches, he worried that wireless access might not be available to them at home. So he worked with local businesses and churches to bridge the digital gap. As a result, two of Piedmont’s three fast food restaurants now offer free Wi-Fi access. Additionally, churches are now offering free wireless access and supervision of students. Innovations for TOMORROW: DIGITAL LEARNING
  32. 36. Innovations for TOMORROW: WORKFORCE TRAINING <ul><li>Fund a seed program to develop an Alabama Corporate College to assist 2-year colleges in servicing business and industry </li></ul><ul><li>Expand the Career Ready Alabama program to prepare for certification of all K-12 students </li></ul><ul><li>Remove stringent earmarks in budget language that impede our ability to fund projects most needed in meeting regional workforce development needs </li></ul>
  33. 37. Innovations for TOMORROW: WORKFORCE TRAINING <ul><li>Fund dual-enrollment courses for all high school students so that skills training can begin earlier </li></ul><ul><li>Expand the College Connection program so that Alabamians who don’t have a high school diploma or GED can obtain a GED and skills training at a 2-year college simultaneously </li></ul><ul><li>Fund Career Coaches statewide to assist adults and students in making sound college and career choices </li></ul>
  34. 38. Innovations for TOMORROW: BUDGETING REFORM <ul><li>Increase management flexibility and local control as proposed in Charter School and Charter School System policy. </li></ul><ul><li>Repeal current laws and regulations that practically restrict the outsourcing of transportation, food preparation and maintenance. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement zero-based budgeting </li></ul>
  35. 39. Building a Blueprint for Education Reform

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