Changing Definitions of Literacy and Why Enrolling in the MountPuts You a Leg Up<br />Jerome C. Harste<br />Professor Emer...
Past Definitions – Low End<br /><ul><li>Read the Bible
Sign your name
Speak Correctly
Spell Correctly
Be able to sound out words
Be able to hold a job
Pass a reading test
Spin a good phrase
Have legible handwriting</li></li></ul><li>Both the teaching and learning of reading are theoretical.<br />
Little kids know a lot about reading and writing prior to going <br />to school.<br />
Literacy is a multimodal event.<br />
Early literacy is real literacy.   Behind every professional<br />There was first an amateur.  To call early literacy scri...
We need to build curriculum from children rather than do<br />Curriculum to children.<br />
Curriculum ought to be built from the inquiry question of learners.<br />
Education is inquiry; Inquiry is education.<br />
We want children in the 21st Century to be agents of<br />Text rather than victims of text.<br />
Learning is a social event.<br />
Past Definitions (High End)<br /><ul><li>Spin a good phrase
Read for pleasure
Read to do practical things
Value good literature
Be able to express yourself in writing</li></li></ul><li>More Current Definitions – Low End<br /><ul><li>Make sense of wha...
Monitor your reading in terms of meaning-making
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Changing definitions---Jerry Harste

3,691
-1

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,691
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Changing definitions---Jerry Harste

  1. 1. Changing Definitions of Literacy and Why Enrolling in the MountPuts You a Leg Up<br />Jerome C. Harste<br />Professor Emeritus <br />Indiana University<br />
  2. 2. Past Definitions – Low End<br /><ul><li>Read the Bible
  3. 3. Sign your name
  4. 4. Speak Correctly
  5. 5. Spell Correctly
  6. 6. Be able to sound out words
  7. 7. Be able to hold a job
  8. 8. Pass a reading test
  9. 9. Spin a good phrase
  10. 10. Have legible handwriting</li></li></ul><li>Both the teaching and learning of reading are theoretical.<br />
  11. 11. Little kids know a lot about reading and writing prior to going <br />to school.<br />
  12. 12. Literacy is a multimodal event.<br />
  13. 13. Early literacy is real literacy. Behind every professional<br />There was first an amateur. To call early literacy scribbles or<br />Scribbling is a misnomer.<br />
  14. 14. We need to build curriculum from children rather than do<br />Curriculum to children.<br />
  15. 15. Curriculum ought to be built from the inquiry question of learners.<br />
  16. 16. Education is inquiry; Inquiry is education.<br />
  17. 17. We want children in the 21st Century to be agents of<br />Text rather than victims of text.<br />
  18. 18. Learning is a social event.<br />
  19. 19. Past Definitions (High End)<br /><ul><li>Spin a good phrase
  20. 20. Read for pleasure
  21. 21. Read to do practical things
  22. 22. Value good literature
  23. 23. Be able to express yourself in writing</li></li></ul><li>More Current Definitions – Low End<br /><ul><li>Make sense of what you read
  24. 24. Monitor your reading in terms of meaning-making
  25. 25. Enjoy using reading to keep informed
  26. 26. Use writing to get your voice heard
  27. 27. Know how to use reading and writing to learn
  28. 28. Be able to vary your reading strategies given your purpose</li></ul>and the materials being read<br />
  29. 29. More Current Definitions – High End<br /><ul><li>Use writing as a tool for clarifying one’s thinking
  30. 30. Successfully vary your language to fit the context of situation
  31. 31. Enjoy the lived-through aesthetic experience of reading
  32. 32. Read to nurture the imagination
  33. 33. Read to understand and develop our own and others’ history</li></ul>and cultural values<br /><ul><li>Reading to understand and develop our humanity (those things</li></ul>that make us human)<br />
  34. 34. <ul><li>Recent Definitions
  35. 35. Understand the relationship between language and power
  36. 36. Know how to use the traditional literacies (reading and writing) and</li></ul>the new literacies (visual, digital, and media) to get things done in the world<br /><ul><li>Be able to interrogate and critique the literate and multimodal literate </li></ul>productions one makes as well as those of others.<br /><ul><li>To have the ability to interpret, negotiate, make meaning and critique</li></ul>information presented in the form of an image along with the ability to<br />use design elements of visual texts for one’s own purpose in specific contexts<br />
  37. 37. Some Observations<br /><ul><li>Nothing ever goes away in education
  38. 38. Changing definitions have been interpreted as changing methods (The dominant</li></ul>method being explicit, direct, systematic, and decodable instruction – Publishers<br />package it this way with the assumpytion that teachers will buy it and do it) (The <br />emerging metaphor seems to be education as opportunity – invitations, <br />demonstrations, ownership, strategy lessons, mini-lessons, strategic, counter-<br />narrtives, etc.)<br /><ul><li>(Even meaning-making is often seen as something learned from the teacher</li></ul>rahter than constructed by the individual reader)<br /><ul><li>Teacher have been seen as technicians rather than as professional</li></ul>decision-makers (There still is not widespread belief that one should invest<br />In teachers and professional development)<br /><ul><li>Teachers are seen as knowledge users rather than knowledge producers
  39. 39. Lower class children are seen as needed lower end literacy training</li></li></ul><li>Understand the kid’s in-head theory of reading<br />Believe in the child’s ability to make sense of text<br />Find it pleasurable<br />Growth in Readings equals problem solving with flexibility, <br />independently, and with<br />Increasingly more complex texts.<br />You are not giving kids strategies so much helping them<br />Develop a functional in-head model of reading<br />To do this effectively you need to trust children and trust <br />The learning process<br />To become literate one needs to see oneself in literacy and<br />Find it pleasurable.<br />
  40. 40. Reading is seen as a Linguistic Process<br />*Cue Systems<br />*Incidentally Visual<br />*Syntax is one of our most powerful cuing systems<br /> <br />
  41. 41.  <br />Reading is seen as a Psycholinguistic Process<br />*Language learning is rule governed<br />*Language is learned through use<br />*There is no order to the way in which <br /> language is learned – interest and experience <br /> as opposed to age and stage<br />*Meaning is central to language learning<br />*The very complexity of the reading process <br /> support learning to read<br />*Most of what we know about language <br /> is learned from being in the presence of others<br /> <br />
  42. 42. Reading as a Cognitive Process<br />*Reading is first and foremost a meaning-making<br /> process<br />*Meaning is constructed<br />*Schemata -- Background Knowledge<br />*Schema – Learned<br />*Comprehension – Finding Slots<br />*Comprehension – Affected by Text Structure<br />*Comprehension – Teaching Overrides Text Structure<br />*Metacognition -- Monitoring<br />*Strategies – Underlying Processes<br />
  43. 43. Reading as Reader Response<br />*The Reader, The Text, The Poem – Reading as Transaction<br />*A search for unity drives the reading process<br />*Reading, and literacy more generally, is<br /> a matter of morality and ethics<br />*To understand reading is to understand <br /> the “lived-through” experience of reading<br />*Great books complicate our lives; <br /> our lives ought to complicate great books, in turn.<br /> <br />
  44. 44. Reading as a Sociolinguistic Process<br />*Dialects are not inferior forms of language<br />*Dialects do not make reading more difficult<br />*Context includes not only the words on the page <br /> but the child’s instructional history<br />*Language is inherently social<br />*What you believe about reading affects <br /> what strategies you employ <br /> and has a direct relationship to instruction<br />*Semantics and pragmatics are key systems <br /> if one wishes to understanding meaning-making <br /> and language learning<br /> <br />
  45. 45. Reading as a Critical Process<br />*Literacy is a cultural (community) construction<br />*There is not one literacy but multiple literacies<br />*Literacy is kept in place by the social practices <br /> that are operating<br />*All language is ideological – from letters, words, <br /> sentences, texts, to discourse)<br />*Discourse is never neutral – readers need to become <br /> text analysts who understand the relationship <br /> between language and power<br />*To be literate is to understand how you as a reader <br /> are positioned by text as well as to understand how texts <br /> do the work they do.<br />*Children for the 21st Century need to be agents of texts <br /> rather than victims of text<br />
  46. 46. Reading as a Multimodal Process<br />*Entails being visually literate – be able to read and use the<br /> grammar of visual design for purposes of meaning-making<br /> and critique<br />*Digitally literate – be able to work the information <br /> and communication technologies in a networked environment <br /> as well as understand the social, cultural, and ethical issues <br /> that go along with the use of these technologies<br />*Media literate – to have the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create,<br /> reflect upon, and act with the information products that media<br /> disseminate<br />

×