The Design Panel

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The Design Panel

  1. 1. “ The Design Panel “ WebVisions 2006 in Portland, Oregon • Friday, July 21, 2006 @ 3:00pm
  2. 2. ZERO. Time to meet the panelists! :D
  3. 3. Say “hi” to, Mike Davidson Also known for: Newsvine. sIFR ( or “siff-er” ). iPod Contests. Not being a Comcast fan.
  4. 4. Say “hi” to, Keith Robinson Also known for: Blue Flavor. Asterisk. Design Eye. Being the Doctor.
  5. 5. Say “hi” to, Dan Cederholm Also known for: Simplebits. Cork’d. Being Bulletproof. Dodgeball.
  6. 6. Say “hi” to, Bryan Veloso Also known for: Avalonstar. Facebook. His RX-8. Dance Dance? o_O;
  7. 7. Say “hi” to, Bryan Veloso Also known for: Avalonstar. Facebook. Revyver. (re-vy-ver) His RX-8. Dance Dance? o_O;
  8. 8. ONE. So, what’s wrong with design today? o_O;
  9. 9. So, what’s wrong with design today? ‣ Internet Explorer. ‣ Revenue being the bottom line in driving design decisions. ‣ The disconnect between graphic design and web design. ‣ Too much focus on technology, technique and the latest trends. ‣ Browsers, HTML, and CSS are still moving forward at a glacial pace. ‣ There are ridiculous arguments about bad design actually being good. ‣ There isn't enough focus on copy as a design element. ‣ We need new heroes.
  10. 10. TWO. So, what’s right with design today? ^_^;
  11. 11. So, what’s right with design today? ‣ Best practices are now part of the quot;standard design skill setquot;. ‣ Designers creating their own products/companies. ‣ People are learning the quot;right wayquot; at an earlier age. ‣ Many different people from different backgrounds in design are trying their hand at the web. ‣ Web designers are maturing, beginning to develop good fundamental bases. ‣ Complexity of design is increasing in proportion with average bandwidth. ‣ We're still able to do an amazing amount with the very few tools we're given as designers. ‣ Flexible platforms like WordPress, Django, and ExpressionEngine make design more leverage-able.
  12. 12. THREE. The most important elements.
  13. 13. The most important elements of any design. ‣ A clear and defined purpose. ‣ A solid concept well executed. ‣ A solid architecture. ‣ Balance. ‣ Answering the quot;who, what, whyquot; questions as quickly as possible. ‣ Making your interface easy enough for beginners but also appropriate for advanced users. ‣ Easy navigation from one area to another... the scent of information. ‣ Personality & Memorability: Standing out from the crowd.
  14. 14. FOUR. Breaking it down.
  15. 15. The comment counters at jeffcroft.com
  16. 16. The photos at thebignoob.com
  17. 17. The “laptop” at 31three.com
  18. 18. The “clean URL’s” at technorati.com
  19. 19. The art and illustrations at veerle.duoh.com
  20. 20. The 5-style style-switcher at dustindiaz.com
  21. 21. The store’s fine print at muledesign.com
  22. 22. The front page widgets at uxmag.com
  23. 23. The flybox at tatteredfly.com
  24. 24. The typography at nytimes.com
  25. 25. The comment ratings at digg.com
  26. 26. The dynamic head at digitalmash.com
  27. 27. The interactive bear at bearskinrug.co.uk
  28. 28. The typography at newyorkmetro.com
  29. 29. FIVE. Reassembly.
  30. 30. Reassembly. ‣ I stumped the panel on this one. ^_^; ‣ Take the elements of design and apply them to your projects. ‣ Find what fits. ‣ Quirky’s cool, but only if it fits in with the overall feel. ‣ Little details can make the most impact, but don’t spend 99% of your time on 1% of the project. ‣ So, you got some inspiration? Make sure to keep the following in mind...
  31. 31. SIX. Spinning it and making it your own.
  32. 32. Spinning it and making it your own. ‣ There are no new ideas... just old ideas spun differently. ‣ Copy at your own risk. ‣ Don't be afraid to experiment or twist conventional models. ‣ Style is something every designer develops eventually. ‣ The need for better checks against theft. ‣ Sometimes it's better to be good than original. (especially on the Web) ‣ Learning from good design is an age old tradition. ‣ Don't steal, use nodes of design inspiration (http://www.cameronmoll.com/archives/000016.html) ‣ Try a glass of wine. ‣ Mix up your process (e.g. if you normally comp in PS first, try designing in CSS initially)
  33. 33. SEVEN. So, any questions? Remember! There are awesome t-shirts at stake!

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