First Do No Harm: Ethics and Online Representation

866 views
790 views

Published on

Where does one find the balance between openness and privacy when dealing with online visual media? As the ability to capture, post, and re-mix images and video becomes increasingly common, people that advocate for the rights of at-risk populations need to weigh the risks involved with the need to tell the stories of those affected.

In this session we will review examples of online media used to expose instances of human rights abuse, political repression, and discrimination. We will examine online media's ability to focus a potentially global audience on an issue as well as the dangers to those both behind and in front of the camera. We will also discuss the tools and technologies for creating and distributing this media. Video is being reworked, remixed and recirculated by many more people. New possibilities for action by a global citizenry have arisen, but these carry with them real dangers. Confronting these challenges will require the collaboration of the people on the front lines as well as the those who create an maintain the technologies used.

Published in: Sports, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
866
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Increase in media production:Ubiquity of technology (cheap cameras, mobile phones) Lower barriers to entry for distribution (Youtube)
  • Human Rights Activists
  • LGBT Groups
  • Labor Groups
  • Reproductive Rights Groups
  • Immigrant Rights Groups
  • Whistleblowers
  • In 2007 Saffron Revolution: Burma – Government Crackdown using images and videos of protestors 2009 Iran – while people were twittering and changing their facebook icons green, the islamic revolutionary guard was using it’s web site to crowd source the identities of protestors. http://globalvoicesonline.org/2009/06/27/iranian-officials-crowd-source-protester-identities-online/
  • Public v. Private Spaces: Which one is right for you? Statement of the Problem: Advocates want to use online visual media to advocate for their causes and constituents. The media can take many forms: video, images.  Can be user generated, produced by the org, aggregated or curated.  Not much conversation happening around safety, consent, ethical issues - especially for those filmed.
  • Know the risks at The time of filming Editing Distribution For: You Your people The people you film What kind of retaliation may you or others face? Is it worth the potential jeopardy? Might your methods backfire in attaining your advocacy goals? Is video the best way to obtain the information you need (vs. audio/written etc.)?
  • Don’t make things up Have a goal in mind Think about the risks you put yourself and depicted in.
  • Don’t make things up Have a goal in mind Think about the risks you put yourself and depicted in.
  • Don’t make things up Have a goal in mind Think about the risks you put yourself and depicted in.
  • Don’t make things up Have a goal in mind Think about the risks you put yourself and depicted in.
  • First Do No Harm: Ethics and Online Representation

    1. 1. First Do No Harm: Ethics and Online Representation #11NTCnoharm Bryan Nunez [email_address]
    2. 2. Session Evaluation Each entry via text or web is a chance to win great NTEN prizes throughout the day! Session Evaluations Powered By: TEXT Text #11NTCnoharm to 69866. ONLINE Use #11NTCnoharm at http://nten.org/ntc/eval
    3. 3. Cameras Everywhere
    4. 4. Cameras Everywhere
    5. 5. Cameras Everywhere
    6. 6. Cameras Everywhere
    7. 7. Cameras Everywhere
    8. 8. Cameras Everywhere
    9. 9. Wrong Place, Right Time
    10. 10. Who’s at Risk? Flickr: zippy
    11. 11. Flickr: shapeshift
    12. 12. Flickr: Dunechaser
    13. 13. Flickr: bluerobot
    14. 14. Flickr: ari
    15. 15. Flickr: fibonacciblue
    16. 16. Flickr: edyson
    17. 17. “Please Identify the Rioters” http://www.gerdab.ir/fa/pages/?cid=422
    18. 18. Protecting Identity
    19. 19. Privacy and Anonymity Flickr: anononabike
    20. 20. Public vs. Private Spaces
    21. 21. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
    22. 22. 3 Things to Remember
    23. 23. 3 Things to Remember <ul><li>Be ethical in its creation (authenticity) </li></ul>
    24. 24. 3 Things to Remember <ul><li>Be ethical in its creation (authenticity) </li></ul><ul><li>Be effective in its advocacy usage (action) </li></ul>
    25. 25. 3 Things to Remember <ul><li>Be ethical in its creation (authenticity) </li></ul><ul><li>Be effective in its advocacy usage (action) </li></ul><ul><li>Do not recklessly endanger those who participate in its creation or are depicted in the media itself (safety) </li></ul>
    26. 26. What’s Your Story? Flickr: sparktography
    27. 27. Thank You! <ul><li>www.witness.org </li></ul><ul><li>Bryan Nunez </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>@tech_wit </li></ul><ul><li>@witnessorg </li></ul>

    ×