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The Politics of Aesthetic Judgment

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The Politics of Aesthetic Judgment The Politics of Aesthetic Judgment Presentation Transcript

  • Barbara R Waltersbwalters@kbcc.cuny.eduAnnual Meeting of the American Sociological AssociationSan Francisco, CAAugust 2004
  • The Politics of Aesthetic Judgment examinesImpressionism in the context of the changingworldview and institutional structures for artin fin-de-siècle France. These changes areempirically connected to new patronagegroups for art, especially third generationEuropean Jews for whom group identitybecame salient during the Dreyfus Affair, andAmericans, whose social aspirations resistedemulation of an earlier aristocracy.
  •  entry number name of artist date purchased by Durand-Ruel price paid dimensions of the canvas painting identification number specification of the work as either oil, charcoal, water color, lithograph, or pen and ink name of person selling painting to Durand-Ruel the retail price requested by Durand-Ruel name of person to whom the painting was sold the date sold by Durand-Ruel the actual price paid to Durand-Ruel at the time of sale
  •  French: any purchaser whose name was French in origin, and for whom no other category was believed to apply. Titled Nobility: any purchaser whose name was French in origin, not Jewish, and titled, e.g. Count Camando would be classified as Jewish. Artist: any purchaser whose name is generally associated with his or her contribution to the arts as a writer, painter, performer, composer. Jewish: any purchaser whose name was identified as European Jewish. U.S.: any purchaser whose name was American, and who purchased a painting from the gallery in Paris, France. All paintings shipped to Durand-Ruel’s branch gallery in New York were also placed in this category Museum: any museum. Unknown: names not identified as any of the above.
  • FIGURE 1ATABLE 1A Distribution of Patrons: 1890-1912Distribution of Patrons: 1890-1912 Patrons % N French (Non-Jewish) 36 (173) Unknown 13% Titled Nobility 2 ( 10) Museum 3% Artist 3 ( 12) French (Non- Other European Jewish 25 (115) Jewish) 2% 36% US 16 ( 74) US 16% Other European 2 ( 11) Museum 3 ( 12) Titled Nobility Unknown 13 ( 59) 2% Jewish Artist Total 100 (466) 25% 3%
  • TABLE 1B FIGURE 1B Distribution of Transactions: 1890-1912 Distritution of Transactions: 1890-1912Patrons % N UnknownFrench (Non-Jewish) 26 (367) 6%Titled Nobility 1 ( 14) Museum 2% French (Non- Other European Jewish)Artist 1 ( 14) 2% 26%Jewish 26 (371)US 36 (511) Titled Nobility US 1%Other European 2 ( 23) 36% ArtistMuseum 2 ( 24) 1%Unknown 6 ( 89) JewishTotal 100 (1413) 26%
  • # of French Transactions 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 1890 1892 1894 1896 1898 1900Year GRAPH 1 1902 1905 Transactions by Year: French 1907 1909 1911
  • # of US Transactions 20 40 60 80 0 100 120 140 160 180 1890 1892 1894 1896 1899 1900Year GRAPH 2 1902 1905 Transactions by Year: US 1907 1909 1911
  • # of Jewish Transactions 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1890 1892 1894 1896 1898 1900Year GRAPH 3 1902 1905 Transactions by Year: Jewish 1907 1909 1911
  • # of Transactions 0 100 150 200 250 50 1890 1892 1894 1896 1898 1900 GRAPH 4Year 1902 1905 Transactions by Year: All 1907 1909 1911
  • FIGURE 2 1890- 1895- 1900- 1905- 1910- Distribution by Purchasers: 1894 1899 1904 1909 1914 More than Fifteen TransactionsPurchaser TotalMuseum 4% 2% 2% 8% 3% 3% M useum ( 12) ( 6) ( 6) ( 5) ( 2) ( 31) 3%French 41% 11% 7% 34% 0% 19% (113) ( 38) ( 19) ( 20) ( 0) (190) Jewish 30%Jewish 5% 22% 61% 42% 49% 30% ( 14) ( 74) (156) ( 25) ( 33) (302) US 48%US 50% 65% 29% 15% 48% 48% (140) (216) ( 75) ( 9) ( 32) (472)Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% (279) (334) (256) ( 59) ( 67) (995) French 19%
  • FIGURE 3 Patrons of Salon Art: 1841-1899Patrons of Salon Art: 1841-1899 Patrons % N French (Non-Jewish) 62 ( 5) Unknown Titled Nobility 14 ( 0) 16% Other European Jewish 3 ( 8) 5% US 0 ( 0) US 0% Other European 5 ( 1) Jewish Unknown 16 ( 7) 3% Totals 100 ( 23) Titled Nobility -French (Non 14% (Jewish 62%