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Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
Choosing a topic
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Choosing a topic

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English Composition I. Choosing a topic.

English Composition I. Choosing a topic.

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  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • For some people, choosing a topic to write about is simple. For others, choosing a topic to write about can be incredibly difficult, and even painful. This is especially true if you start a research project without knowing what you want to write about. It ’s easy when your instructor gives you a prompt question or some kind of theme to get you moving. But what happens when you have the freedom to write an evidence-based essay on anything you like? Academic freedom can have its consequences... If you are one of those writers that spends a lot of time choosing a topic, and then even when you choose a topic you feel uncertain that it ’s good enough, the process described in this learning packet is something that might help. The process asks you to take six steps. These steps begin by asking you to start with a topic. The second step is to describe it a little more specifically. The third step is to write a phrase (it doesn ’t need to be complete) and be even more specific. If you have gotten as far as the third step, you are close. The fourth step is to change any vague words or phrases and make them more specific. The fifth step is to turn what you have so far into a complete sentence. The sixth and final step is to make the sentence arguable. By this time you should have a sentence that you can use to write a first draft or perhaps streamline your research efforts. For best results, try using this method several times so that you can choose between different topics. The main idea is to break down general topics into smaller, more detailed, and more manageable topic areas that make more sense.
  • Transcript

    1. Choosing and Narrowing a Topic to Write About for research papers Alex Bruno University of El Salvador
    2. writing about anything
    3. academic freedom can be hard to put into practice
    4. the struggle to find a topic can make writing seem more like a drudgery than an act of discovery
    5. take a moment, clear your mind, and try out this method of choosing a topic
    6. six steps 1 2 3 4 5 6
    7. step 1: choose a topic video games
    8. step 2: be a little more specific video games and learning
    9. step 3: be even a little more specific first person shooter video games and their effect on learning behavior
    10. step 4: change any vague words and make them more specific first person shooter games and their effect on the ability of adolescents to learn how to socialize with their peers
    11. step 5: write a complete sentence The effect of first person shooter games affects the ability of adolescents to learn positive social behaviors.
    12. step 6: write a complete (and arguable) sentence When played in peer groups, first person shoot video games significantly influence the ability of adolescents to develop and enhance positive group social behavior.
    13. t | o | p | i | c

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