University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
ACVR Residency Training Program Application Form:...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
weeks per year).
IV. Direction and Supervision:
P...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
For each imaging faculty in the program please pr...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
V. Affiliation agreement:
If all of the training ...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
computer.
A summary of these and the other imagin...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Nuclear Medicine
• GE Starport LFOV Gamma Camera
...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Computed Tomography: about 435 in 2008
Nuclear Me...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
rotation as service chief, they dictate reports f...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Total 15,189
Please note: our residents rotate be...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Anatomy Hecht
Radiation protection / biology Adam...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
interact with the residents on a day by day basis...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
(a) Provide the pass rate for first time, second ...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Typical schedule (based on 2 week clinical rotati...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Three-year master schedule:
1st
year 1st
/ 2nd
ye...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Federica Morandi, DVM, MS DACVR, DECVDI
Abbreviat...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
William Hester Adams, DVM, DACVR (Radiology, Radi...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Silke Hecht, Dr.med.vet., Diplomate ACVR, Diploma...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
George A. Henry, DVM, DACVR
Abbreviated Curriculu...
University of Tennessee January 26, 2009
Last Revised: November 25, 2008
Andrea R Matthews, DVM, DACVR
Abbreviated Curricu...
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University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised ...

  1. 1. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 ACVR Residency Training Program Application Form: University of Tennessee This document is to act as a guide for institutions desiring ACVR accreditation of their residency training program. It should be used in concert with the requirements set out in the ACVR Essentials of Residency Training document and it follows the headings of that document. It is intended to streamline the application process and help define what information the RSEC needs to evaluate the program. All terms used in this application have same definitions as defined in the Essentials. II. Objectives: The objective of this three year program is to train the graduate veterinarian in the specialty of veterinary radiology, including small and large animal diagnostic radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine. The ultimate goal is to enable the resident to successfully complete the ACVR board examination. The residency is a clinical training program ("pure" residency program) with no academic degree awarded. III. Training period: What is the total length of the training program in months? 36 months If this is a 4 year program, during what year will the resident be eligible to take the ACVR Preliminary Exam? If the resident is not eligible to take the exam during the beginning of the 3rd year (September), please state the reason. N/A What is the total duration of supervised clinical training in the program? 30 months What are the responsibilities of the resident in the remaining non-clinical portion of the program? In the 6 months of non-clinical training the resident is expected to develop and conduct an original research project under the supervision and guidance of one or more radiology faculty members; write a grant proposal to obtain funding in support of the project; write a scientific paper that details the results of the project, to be submitted to Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound or other peer-reviewed journal; the project will also be presented at the ACVR annual meeting. The remainder time will be dedicated to individual study for board preparation, possible external rotation, and vacation time (two
  2. 2. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 weeks per year). IV. Direction and Supervision: Program Director: Who is the Director of Residency training? Dr Federica Morandi What percentage of this individual’s time is committed to clinical service and teaching of residents? Approximately 50% Faculty: Please list the faculty member of the program accepting PRIMARY responsibility for training in each of the following core areas: Roentgen diagnosis: Faculty: William H Adams, DVM, DACVR (Radiology and Radiation Oncology) Percentage clinical service: approximately 50% Diagnostic ultrasound: Faculty: George Henry, DVM, DACVR Percentage clinical service: approximately 75% Computed Tomography Faculty: Federica Morandi, Dr Med Vet, MS, DACVR, DECVDI Percentage clinical service: approximately 50% Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Faculty: Silke Hecht, Dr Med Vet, DACVR, DECVDI Percentage clinical service: approximately 50% Nuclear Medicine: Faculty: Federica Morandi, Dr Med Vet, MS, DACVR, DECVDI Percentage clinical service: approximately 50% List the names and percentage clinical commitment of additional imaging faculty in the program, and their area(s) of instructional responsibility. Faculty: Andrea Matthews, DVM, DACVR Percentage clinical service: approximately 50% Area(s) of instructional responsibility: Ultrasound, MRI
  3. 3. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 For each imaging faculty in the program please provide a one page CV documenting their expertise in the area(s) of assigned responsibility. For each of the specialty colleges listed below please list at least two Diplomates of these colleges who can be expected to regularly interact with radiology residents: ACVIM Joseph Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN Claudia Kirk, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN India Lane, DVM, MS, DACVIM Jennifer Stokes, DVM, DACVIM Dianne Mawby, DVM, DACVIM Amy Holford, VMD, DACVIM Beth Johnson, DVM, DACVIM Jacqueline Whittemore, DVM, PhD, DACVIM Rebecca Gompf, DVM, MS, DACVIM (cardiology) Al Legendre, DVM, MS, DACVIM Amy LeBlanc, DVM, DACVIM (oncology) Jeffrey Phillips, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (oncology) William Thomas, DVM, MS, DACVIM (neurology) Nicholas Frank, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (large animal) Carla Sommardahl, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (large animal) Jerry Roberson, DVM, PhD, DABVP, DACVIM (large animal) Sarel Van Amstel, BVSc, DipMedVet, MMedVet, DABVP, DACVIM (large animal) Karen Kalck, DVM, DACVIM (large animal) ACVS Darryl Millis, DVM, MS, DACVS Joseph Weigel, DVM, DACVS Karen Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS Mark Bohling, DVM, DACVS Patricia Sura, DVM, DACVS Steve Adair, DVM, MS, DACVS (large animal) James Schumacher, DVM, MS, DACVS (large animal) James Blackford, DVM, MS, DACVS (large animal) Amy Plummer, DVM, DACVS (large animal) ACVP Michael Fry, DVM, MS, DACVP Casey LeBlanc, DVM, PhD, DACVP Linden Craig, DVM, PhD, DACVP Robert Donnell, DVM, PhD, DACVP Shelley Newman, DVM, DACVP
  4. 4. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 V. Affiliation agreement: If all of the training will not be accomplished on-site, please attach a copy of the affiliations agreement(s). Include the scope of the training and amount of time the resident will be away from the home institution. The resident has a 4-6 weeks time period allotted for an external rotation during the final year of residency. We do not have formal agreements with other institutions, as these rotations are not necessary to satisfy basic training requirements. We do maintain them to offer the resident the option to gain additional experience/exposure in an area of specific interest, and to give them a chance to observe ‘another way of doing things’. Out-rotations for the most recent past residents: Rita Echandi Tufts MRI Texas A&M Large Animal Radiology Robert Cole Washington State MRI Laurie Head Washington State MRI Janet Nieckarz Colorado State Large Animal Radiology & Echocardiology Kari Anderson UC Davis Large Animal Radiology VI. Facilities: The radiology section currently has two Philips R/F rooms (12 and 15” II) both with Digital Fluoroscopy and retrofitted with Cannon DR plates (CXDI-50G). The DR system was purchased through Eklin (EDR6 Clinical Diagnostic Radiography System). The large animal room has a Philips 100 KW generator and a renovated overhead gantry system with laser alignments. The room was upgraded to digital with the purchase of Eklin’s EDR3 and EDR 5 digital radiography system. The radiology section is currently filmless and all image modalities are interfaced with a PACS system (Sectra IDS5). Two radiology viewstations are present in the main reading room, with and additional viewstation in ultrasound, one in nuclear medicine and one in the main PACS room; in addition, each radiologist has a workstation in their office. Radiology reports are transcribed into the PACS system and both diagnostic images and reports are accessible through a web browser. In addition, necropsy and biopsy reports added into their respective patient folder in the PACS system. Each radiologist and resident has individualized worklists to which diagnostic imaging studies are assigned. We currently have a refurbished helical CT scanner and 3D workstation. We have a Siemens 1.0T MRI located in a trailer which is on site at all times. The radiology section maintains 4 Siemens ultrasound units. The two major units are a Sequoia S512 used primarily for abdominal ultrasound and a Sequoia S512 with Image Arena Workstation used primarily by the cardiology service. In addition, a Siemens G60 is available in radiology (in a second ultrasound room) for teaching and overflow cases, and a Siemens G20 is available in ICU mostly for centesis and stat evaluation of critical, unstable patients. Nuclear Medicine has one GE gamma camera interfaced with a NucLear MAC imaging
  5. 5. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 computer. A summary of these and the other imaging components of the radiology section is listed on the following pages. Small Animal Diagnostic Room 1 • Phillips Easy Diagnost RF System with o Tri-mode 12”/9”/7” image intensifier o 60 KW Generator Small Animal Diagnostic Room 2 • Phillips Easy Diagnost RF System with o Tri mode 15”/12”/9” image intensifier o Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy o 80 KW Generator Large Animal Diagnostic Radiology • Phillips CP Super 100 Generator o 100 KW Generator o Crane mounted tube and grid cabinet, servo controlled Diagnostic Ultrasound • Siemens Sequoia S512 with 4 transducers (radiology) • Siemens Sequoia S512 with 3 transducers and the Image Arena Workstation (echocardiography) • Siemens G60 (radiology) • Siemens G20 (ICU) Computed Tomography • Picker PQ 6000 o DICOM interface o Voxel Q Workstation Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Siemens Harmony 1.0T magnet o DICOM interface Mobile C-Arm • Phillips BV 300 Plus Digital C-Arm o Tri-mode 9”/7”/5” Image Intensifier o High Resolution CCD-TV System o 12-Bit Digital Processor o DICOM Interface • Digital C-Arm o Bi-mode 7”/5” Image Intensifier o High Resolution CCD-TV System
  6. 6. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Nuclear Medicine • GE Starport LFOV Gamma Camera o EquiStand Gantry System • NucLear MAC Imaging Computer System Radiation Therapy Linear Accelerator: Varian iX • Dual photon energies (6 MV, 18 MV) • 5 electron energies (range 6 - 20 MEV) • Millenium 120 leaf multileaf collimator Planning Software • Elekta CMS XiO 3D IMRT Film Processing • Mini-Medical/90 Automatic X-Ray Film processor, AFP Imaging • Kodak 8700 Dry Laser Imager VII. Clinical resources: Indicate the approximate number of patients seen annually by the home institution? 13,053 What is the annual imaging caseload? Approximately 11,000 imaging studies performed in 2008 Indicate the approximate breakdown of the patient population according to species. Small animals (canine, feline) 86% 2008 Large animals (equine and food animals) 10% 2008 Exotic animals 4% 2008 What is the approximate annual imaging caseload of the program in: Small Animal Radiology: about 5,860 survey radiographic studies in 2008 Large Animal Radiology : about 541 survey radiographic studies in 2008 Abdominal Ultrasound: about 1,500 in 2008 (excluding echocardiograms, thoracic, musculoskeletal and retinal ultrasounds)
  7. 7. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Computed Tomography: about 435 in 2008 Nuclear Medicine: about 180 in 2008 Magnetic Resonance Imaging: about 230 since installation in April 2008 Other (specify):Radiographic Contrast Procedures about 280 in 2008; Exotic Animal Radiology: about 370 in 2008; Echocardiography: about 770 in 2008; Thoracic, musculoskeletal and retinal ultrasounds combined: about 130 in 2008 VIII. Training content: What percentage of imaging reports are typically available within 48 hours after the examination is conducted in typewritten or electronic form? 90% depending on the caseload for the day and the typist’s schedule; all residents’ reports, however, are prioritized and transcribed within 48 hours If your answer is less than 75% please explain how reports are generated and how long it takes for the report to be available for review in typewritten form. Cases are dictated using a Lanier Digital Dictation System (4 base stations). Dictations are transcribed by the section secretary into the PACS. The draft report is edited before a final report is generated. Voice-recognition software (Dragon) is also available; nuclear medicine reports are usually typed directly by the clinician and approved immediately. Of the preliminary reports generated from the imaging caseload what percentage are initially produced by the resident? The resident on radiology/CT duty is responsible for the dictation of all radiology and CT reports one day a week (Tuesday); similarly, the resident on ultrasound duty is responsible for dictation of all ultrasound reports one day a week (Wednesday). This accounts for about 20% of all ultrasound and about 20% of all radiology/CT reports for the week. In addition, one resident is assigned to morning duty coverage (while the radiology faculty and other residents are in rounds with the students) and is responsible for dictating reports for cases approved during this time (about 20% of all weekly cases). Residents perform almost all special procedures and dictate reports for all of them (even if it is not their official reading day). The residents are assigned to a nuclear medicine / MRI rotation 2-3 times per year (per residents), and during the rotation dictate all nuclear medicine reports; MRI dictations are variable. Finally, the resident on emergency duty dictates reports for cases seen after hours and on weekends. In the last 6 months of the residency, when the residents are assigned to a
  8. 8. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 rotation as service chief, they dictate reports for all cases seen on the service to which they are assigned. Overall, I estimate that the total number of reports dictated by the residents is about 40-50% of the total imaging reports generated in one week. What percentage of resident reports are reviewed by the imaging faculty prior to finalization of the report? All the reports (100%) generated by the residents in the first 30 months of residency are reviewed by one or more radiology faculty; in the last 6 months of the residency, when the resident functions as service chief, only a portion of his/her reports are reviewed by faculty on an as needed basis. When preliminary resident reports are reviewed and edited by the imaging faculty responsible for training, what percentage of the time are two or more faculty present? Radiology and CT reports are reviewed on Thursday morning (from 8AM until 10AM, with additional time dedicated to report review if the allotted 2 hours are not sufficient to approve all cases); one faculty member is assigned to reports review; two or more faculty are present in about 25% of the cases, due to concurrent occurrence of students rounds, early ultrasound cases and other teaching, research or service commitments. Ultrasound reports are reviewed and approved by the faculty on ultrasound duty. Please complete the table below Full time equivalent months Approximate number of cases in the 30 months clinical experience Small Animal Radiology: 14 (75 % of all cases) 10,988 Large Animal Radiology: 3 (85 % of all cases) 1,150 Abdominal Ultrasound: 6 (30 % of all cases) 1,125 Computed Tomography: 2 (80 % of all cases) 870 Nuclear Medicine: 2 (90 % of all cases) 405 Magnetic Resonance Imaging 2 (80% of all cases) 460 Elective (any of above) N/A N/A Required elective (specify): Echocardiogarphy 1 (20% of all cases) About 380
  9. 9. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Total 15,189 Please note: our residents rotate between ultrasound and radiology (which also include CT). Although 2 or 3 two-week rotation in MRI/Nuclear Medicine are formally assigned, the residents still see almost all MRI and Nuclear Medicine cases while on either ultrasound and radiology. The estimates are based on the percentage of cases that our resident typically are involved with, either dictating the case themselves or reviewed the case with the radiologist on duty during the 30 months of supervised clinical training. The total number of cases for 30 months is based on the cases seen in 2005 multiplied by 2.5 to extrapolate from 12 months to 30 months. Please indicate the course number and unit assignment residents are required to take to meet the educational objectives for formal instruction as outlined in the Essentials in the following: Topic Course number Units Radiobiology: The Physics of: Diagnostic Radiology: Nuclear Medicine: Ultrasonography: CT: MRI: If your program does not offer formal courses in any or all of these topics please indicate how these educational objectives for each are met. Use attached sheets if necessary. The program is not attached to an advanced degree; therefore there are no formal classes that the residents are required to take for credit. The resident, however, will have assigned topics of focused learning during their residency training. These learning objectives follow the ACVR written objectives. A radiologist will supervise the learning in these areas and provide minimum reading lists. Informal lectures may also be included. At the end of each section, a comprehensive exam will be given. A schedule of these topics and assigned faculty follows: Topic Assigned radiology faculty Physics Adams Pathophysiology Henry, Matthews
  10. 10. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Anatomy Hecht Radiation protection / biology Adams Special procedures Morandi, Matthews Ultrasound Henry CT Morandi MR Hecht Nuclear Medicine Morandi IX. Research Environment: Over the last 5 years, what is the average number of peer reviewed publications, on which the IMAGING faculty listed under Direction and Supervision in IV above, are included as authors? 33 / 5 years = 6.6 / year What is the number of publications/submissions expected of a resident completing the program? A minimum of one first-authored paper is expected If this is an established program, what percentage of residents have made formal research presentations at the annual ACVR or equivalent national meeting? 100% Is an advanced degree a requirement of the training program? No X. Educational Environment: How many lectures or scientific presentations are expected of each resident during the course of their training? One presentation at the ACVR annual meeting One lecture per year in the radiology junior class (VM855 Radiology) One 30-minute in-house seminar per year (Faculty Rounds) XI. Evaluation: During the program how often is resident performance evaluated in writing? After a preliminary evaluation given by the resident mentor after 3 months, a formal written evaluation is carried out every six months under the responsibility of the resident’s advisor (see attached evaluation form). All radiology faculty complete the evaluation form; in addition, input is also sought from those clinicians who most often
  11. 11. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 interact with the residents on a day by day basis. The resident is also graded based on his/her performance in the written mock exams given throughout the residency in preparation for the written board exam. XII. Teaching File: What is the nature and scope of the teaching file available to residents? A teaching file for instruction of junior and senior veterinary students is available. These are typical case examples of a wide variety of radiographic diagnosis and focus mainly on survey radiography and contrast studies. Part of these cases are hard copy films, others are digital files prepared in Power Point format, and contain signalment, history, and answer sheet with list of roentgen signs, radiographic diagnosis and final diagnosis. The cases are arranged according to subject, fie example: Orthopedics, Urogenital, Large Animal, Cardiac etc. In addition, an interesting case list is maintained on a central computer. Each radiologist can also create individual interesting cases lists as separate folders in the PACS system. Key words can be attached to individual cases; at this time, these lists are not searchable. One must scroll through the list and either look at the case, the report, or the keywords to identify a specific case. How is it maintained/updated? It is the responsibility of the radiologist to maintain the teaching files in their area of interest and responsibility. The resident is responsibility to maintain the anatomy teaching file. Individual radiologists record new good cases and add to their individual lists. XIII. Conferences: On average how many Known Case Conferences are conducted annually? 25 (one KCC every two weeks) XIV. Literature resources: What is the geographic relationship between the nearest medical library and the training program? The University of Tennessee John C. Hodges Library (the central campus library) is located within walking distance of the Veterinary Hospital. The Pendegrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library is located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital. XV. Appendix:
  12. 12. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 (a) Provide the pass rate for first time, second time, etc for both the preliminary and certifying exams for your residents for the past 5 years. For example, for all residents finishing your program 5 years ago (Year 5), check the appropriate box. Complete the table for residents finishing 4 years ago (Year 4), 3 years ago (Year 3), etc. Year 5 Year 4 Year 3 Year 2 Year 1 Passed preliminary exam 1st time X X X X X Passed prelim exam 2nd time Passed prelim after 2nd time Passed certifying exam 1st time X X X X X Passed certifying exam 2nd time Passed certifying exam after 2nd time Unsuccessful in all attempts * Because our program accepted a new resident on alternate years until 2007, please note that this table refers to the last five residents enrolled in the program; they became board certified in 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. (b) Provide a clinical schedule for your resident(s). This schedule should provide a weekly or monthly outline of the resident’s clinical responsibilities. This may be in the form of a master schedule or duty roster for your entire radiology section if desired.
  13. 13. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Typical schedule (based on 2 week clinical rotation): FIRST WEEK Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 7:00 MRI Rounds 8:00 House Officers Seminar Radiology Journal Club Dept Meeting (Section meet last Wed of month ) Residents Dictations Review Faculty Rounds 9:00 Administer Anatomy Quiz to senior students Participate in student rounds 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 SECOND WEEK Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 7:00 MRI Rounds Nuclear Medicine Rounds 8:00 House Officers Seminar Radiology Journal Club Dept Meeting (Section meet last Wed of month ) Residents Dictations Review Faculty Rounds 9:00 Participate in student rounds Participate in student rounds Participate in student rounds 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 NOTE: * KCC day and time TBE by radiologist in charge Following morning rounds and seminars, the resident are either assigned to radiology/CT or ultrasound; the residents also take a two week nuclear medicine/MRI rotation 2 to 3 times per year. See also attachment “Spring 2009_Schedule_Ex”
  14. 14. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Three-year master schedule: 1st year 1st / 2nd year 2nd / 3rd year 3rd year Jan Write grant proposal for resident research project* 1st week: nuclear medicine mock exam Feb Mar 1 wk off 4th week: pathophysiology mock exam 4th week: CT and MR mock exam 3 wks out-rotation Apr 1 wk off May Jun 1 wk off 4th week: anatomy mock exam Jul Start of residency program First year: 4 wks technician duties 4th week: radiation protection/biology mock exam Off 4 wks End of residency program Aug First year: 2 wks technician duties + 2 weeks US 3 wks off for research Off 4 wks Sep First year: On call with formal backup +start reading cases Write paper detailing research results* PRELIMNARY (written) EXAM CERTIFYING (oral) EXAM Oct 1st week: physics mock exam Nov 1 wk off 3rd week: ultrasound mock exam Dec 3rd week: special procedures mock exam Note: additional off clinic time consists of 2 weeks / year of vacation. The total off-clinics time totals 24 weeks (6 months) *Some flexibility in these dates is permitted; however all efforts should be made to complete the research project prior to the written board exam
  15. 15. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Federica Morandi, DVM, MS DACVR, DECVDI Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae Associate Professor of Radiology, Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, UT Director of Radiological Services Residency Program Director EDUCATION 1996 Dottore in Medicina Veterinaria (Dr Med Vet), Graduation Cum Laude; Universita’ di Parma, Facolta’ di Medicina Veterinaria , Parma, Italy 2001 MS, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH SPECIALTY BOARDS 2001 Board certification by the European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging (ECVDI) 2002 Board certification by the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) RESEARCH DESCRIPTION The major areas of interest include computed tomography (CT), especially thoracic CT; nuclear medicine, especially the evaluation of portosystemic shunts in small animal and of liver function; and PET/CT imaging, especially in the diagnosis and staging of small animal tumors. SELECTED PEER-REVIEWD PUBLICATIONS • Hecht S, Lane I, Daniel GB, Morandi F, Sharp D. Diuretic Renal Scintigraphy in Normal cats. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 49(6):589-594 • Sura PA, Tobias KM, Morandi F, Daniel GB, Echandi RL. Comparison of 99m TcO4 - Trans-Splenic Portal Scintigraphy with Per-Rectal Portal Scintigraphy for Diagnosis of Portosystemic Shunts in Dogs. Vet Surg 36(7):654-660 • Morandi F, Cole RC, Echandi R, Daniel GB. Trans-Splenic Portal Scintigraphy using 99m Tc-mebrofenin in Normal Dogs. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound48(3):286-291 • Morandi F, Mays J, Newman JS, Adams WH. Imaging Diagnosis: Bilateral Adrenal Adenomas and Myelolipomas in a Dog. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 48(3):246-249 • Echandi RL, Morandi F, Daniel WTII, Paquette JL, Daniel GB. Comparison of Transplenic Multidetector CT-Portography to Multidetector CT-Angiography In Normal Dogs. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 48(1):38- 44 • Morandi F, Frank N, Avenell J, Daniel GB. Quantitative Assessment of Hepatic Function Using 99m Tc- Mebrofenin in Healthy Horses. J Vet Internal Med 2005,19(5):751-755 • Cole RC, Morandi F, Avenell J, Daniel GB. Trans-Splenic Portal Scintigraphy in Normal Dogs.Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 2005, 46(2): 146-152 • Morandi F, Cole RC, Tobias KM, Berry CR, Avenell J, Daniel GB.Use of 99m TcO4 - Trans-Splenic Portal Scintigraphy for Diagnosis of Portosystemic Shunts in 28 Dogs. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 2005,46(2): 153–161 • Morandi F, Mattoon JS, Lakritz J, Turk JR, Jaeger JQ, Wisner ER. Correlation of Helical and Incremental High-Resolution Thin-Section Computed Tomographic and Histomorphometric Quantitative Evaluation of an Acute Inflammatory Response of Lungs in Dogs. Am J Vet Res 2004, 65(8):1114-1123 • Morandi F, Daniel GB, Gompf RE, Bahr A. Diagnosis of congenital cardiac right-to-left shunts with 99m Tc-MAA. Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 2004,45(2): 97 - 102 • Morandi F, Mattoon JS, Lakritz J, Turk JR, Wisner ER. Correlation of helical and incremental high- resolution thin-section computed tomographic imaging with histomorphometric quantitative evaluation of lungs in dogs. Am J Vet Res 2003,64 (7): 935 - 944
  16. 16. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 William Hester Adams, DVM, DACVR (Radiology, Radiation Oncology) Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae EDUCATION: University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, DVM, with honors, 1984 HONORS: Lindsay Young Teaching Award, University of Tennessee Transworld Award, Veterinary Radiology, University of Florida Hills Award, University of Florida Society of Phi Zeta, University of Florida Graduate with honors, University of Florida UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS: 1984 - 1985 Intern, Small Animal Medicine and Surgery College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 1985 - 1988 Resident, Veterinary Radiology Department of Rural Practice, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. 1988 - 1990 Assistant Professor of Veterinary Radiology Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 5. 1990 - 1996 Assistant Professor of Veterinary Radiology Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. 1996 - Associate Professor of Veterinary Radiology Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. Board Certification: Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Radiology (Radiology), 1988. Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Radiology (Radiation Oncology), 1996. Selected Publications/Book Chapters • Adams WH, Toal RL, Walker MA, Breider MA. Early renal ultrasonographic findings in dogs with experimentally induced ethylene glycol nephrosis. Am J Vet Res 1989; 50: 1370-1376. • Adams WH, Toal RL, Breider MA. Ultrasonographic findings in dogs and cats with oxalate nephrosis attributed to ethylene glycol intoxication:15 cases. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1991; 199: 492-496. • Adams WH, Daniel GB, Pardo AD, Selcer RR. Magnetic resonance imaging of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral spine in 13 dogs (1990 -1993). Vet Radiol & Ultrasound 1995; 36: 3-13. • Adams WH, Daniel GB, Legendre AM. Investigation of the effects of hyperthyroidism on renal function in the cat. Can J Vet Res. 1997; 61: 53-56. • Adams WH. Advanced imaging of the spine. Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice, 1999; 148 - 159 • .Adams WH: Thyroid Radiotherapy - 131 I. In Berry CR and Daniel GB. Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, NCSU Press, 2nd . Edition, 2006.
  17. 17. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Silke Hecht, Dr.med.vet., Diplomate ACVR, Diplomate ECVDI Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae Current Position Assistant Professor of Veterinary Radiology University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine Knoxville, TN 37996-4544 Education and Specialty Training 1998 Veterinary Degree; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich, Germany 2001 Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich, Germany 2002 – 2005 Radiology Residency (ACVR and ECVDI); Tufts University, North Grafton, MA Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications (27 total) 1. Anderson MP, Hecht S*, Holford AL, Hicks DA. What is your diagnosis? – Congenital portosystemic shunt in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc; accepted for publication 2009. 2. Hecht S, Thomas WB, Marioni-Henry K, Echandi R, Matthews AR, Adams WH. Myelography vs. computed tomography in the evaluation of acute intervertebral disc extrusion in chondrodystrophic dogs. Vet Rad Ultrasound; accepted for publication 2008. 3. Little AM, Hecht S*, Kirk CA, Bohling MW. What is your diagnosis? – Diaphragmatic hernia in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc; accepted for publication 2008. 4. Hecht S, Lane I, Daniel GB, Morandi FM, Sharp DE. Diuretic renal scintigraphy in normal cats. Vet Rad Ultrasound 2008; 49: 589-94. 5. Baron ML, Morandi F, Hecht S, LeBlanc AK. What is your diagnosis? – Mucometra in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008; 233: 1401-2. 6. McCain SL, Souza MJ, Ramsay EC, Schumacher J, Thomas WB, Hecht S. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of a Chiari-like malformation in an African Lion (Panthera Leo). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 2008; 39: 421-7. 7. Smith JR, LeBlanc AK, Hecht S. What is your diagnosis? – Tracheal mast cell tumor in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008; 233: 385-6. 8. Rizzo SA, Newman SJ, Hecht S, Thomas WB. Malignant mediastinal extra-adrenal paraganglioma with spinal cord invasion in a dog. J Vet Diagn Invest 2008; 20:372-5. 9. Smith JR, Legendre AM, Thomas WB, LeBlanc CJ, Lamkin C, Avenell JS, Wall JS, Hecht S. Cerebral Blastomyces dermatitidis infection in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007; 231:1210-4. 10. Johnson LM, Hecht S*, Arendse AU, Adams WH. What is you diagnosis? – Cystic meningioma in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007; 231: 861-2. 11. Roach W, Hecht S*. What is you diagnosis? – Gastroesophageal intussusception in a dog. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2007; 231:381-2. 12. Hecht S, Penninck DG, Keating JH. Imaging findings in pancreatic neoplasia and nodular hyperplasia in 19 cats – a retrospective study (1999 – 2004). Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2007, 48: 45-50. Selected Invited Review Articles, Books and Book Chapters (29 total) 1. Hecht S. Röntgendiagnostik in der Kleintierpraxis [Diagnostic Radiology in Small Animal Practice]. Stuttgart: Schattauer 2008 (Editor and contributing author) Selecetd Presentations (19 total) 1. Hecht S. MRI – Lecture series for Radiology and Neurology Residents. Presented at UT SACS, August 4th to September 12th 2008 (6 hours). 2. Hecht S. MRI – Basic Principles. Presented at UTCVM SACS 3/19/08 (1 hour). 3. Hecht S. MRI – Applications in Small Animals. Presented at UTCVM SACS 3/26/08 (1 hour)
  18. 18. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 George A. Henry, DVM, DACVR Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae CURRENT POSITION: Clinical Associate Professor of Veterinary Radiology Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, The University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996-4544 EDUCATION: 1973, D.V.M. Auburn University SPECIALTY TRAINING, CERTIFICATION, ACTIVITY: 1983-86, Residency in Radiology, University of Tennessee 1987, Specialty Certification: Diplomate, American College Of Veterinary Radiology 2001-2004 – Councilor, ACVR Executive Council 1997-2000(Member), 2001(Chair), 2002-04(Examiner), ACVR Certification Examination Committee INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: Diagnostic Radiology and Ultrasound Didactic, Laboratory and Clinical Instruction: 1986-1999 Assistant / Associate Professor, Radiology, Oklahoma State University 1999-2003 Associate Professor, Radiology, Texas A&M University 2003-Present Associate Professor, Radiology, University of Tennessee Over 46 University, State and National CE Presentations on Diagnostic Radiology and Ultrasound including following presentations for 2007 and 2008: Small Animal Ultrasound Short Course, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 2007. Seven hours of didactic instruction and 4 hours of wet labs, course coordinator. North American Veterinary Conference Post Graduate Institute, Orlando, Florida, May 2007. Six hours of lectures on diagnostic ultrasound and 24 hours of image reading and ultrasound labs. American Veterinary Medical Association Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., July 2007. Three one and one-half hour presentations on diagnostic ultrasound. General Diagnostic Ultrasound, Urogenital Ultrasound, and Hepatobiliary Ultrasound. Small Animal Ultrasound Short Course, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 2008. Seven hours of didactic instruction and 4 hours of wet labs, course coordinator. North American Veterinary Conference Post Graduate Institute, Orlando, Florida, May 2008. Eight hours of lectures / video presentations on diagnostic ultrasound and 22 hours of ultrasound labs. RECENT PUBLICATIONS: Henry GA, Fracture healing and complications. Textbook of Veterinary Diagnostic Radiology, 5th Ed, Thrall [ed], St. Louis, MO: Saunders Elsevier, 2007. Hecht, S, Henry G. Sonographic evaluation of the normal and abnormal pancreas. Clin Tech small Anim Pract. 22(3), 115-121, Aug, 2007.
  19. 19. University of Tennessee January 26, 2009 Last Revised: November 25, 2008 Andrea R Matthews, DVM, DACVR Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae Current Position Assistant Professor of Radiology Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine Education and Professional Experience 1994-1998 BSc Agriculture Nova Scotia Agricultural College Truro, NS, Canada 1998-2002 Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Atlantic Veterinary College Charlottetown, PE, Canada 2002-2004 Associate Veterinarian Baccalieu Trail Animal Hospital NL, Canada 2004 - 2007 Radiology Residency Tufts University (ACVR) School of Veterinary Medicine September 2007 Diplomate ACVR October 2007 – Assistant Clinical Professor Dept. of Small Animal Clinical September 2008 of Radiology Sciences, University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine Research Interests Diagnostic ultrasonography, with particular interest in the gastrointestinal tract. Magnetic resonance imaging, particularly neuroimaging. Selected Scientific/Veterinary Society Memberships American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) Veterinary Ultrasound Society CT/MRI Society Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Phi Zeta Honor Society of Veterinary Medicine Current Research Projects 1. Ultrasonographic observation of secretin-induced pancreatic duct dilation in healthy cats. Resident Research Project. Funded by ACVR Resident Research Award 2008. In progress. 2. MRI apprearance of Modic vertebral changes in dogs. Primary investigator. In progress Publications 1. Matthews A, Penninck D, Leveille-Webster C. Assessment of the postoperative ultrasonographic appearance of uncomplicated enterotomy or enterectomy sites in dogs. Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, 49(5):477-83 2. Hecht S, Thomas WB, Marioni-Henry K, Echandi RL, Matthews AR, Adams WH. Myelography vs computed tomography in the evaluation of acute intervertebral disc extrusion in small breed dogs. Accepted for publication by Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

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