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Programme Booklet.doc Programme Booklet.doc Document Transcript

  • Department of Allied Health Profe s sion s MSc Medical Imaging Programme information
  • Dear Colleague This booklet contains general information about the MSc Medical Imaging pathways. We trust you will find it a comprehensive guide and we welcome the opportunity to discuss any aspect of the programme or your specific requirements in more detail. Students may register for the MSc programme at any time of year, however, it is best to start either in October or March and do the ‘ rientation module first. O ’ Applicants must have a first degree or a professional diploma in a relevant discipline plus evidence of current practice experience. Due to the workbased nature of the compulsory modules students must arrange their own access to their chosen modality for a minimum of four sessions per week. In addition to this agreed clinical placement students are also required to identify an appropriate clinical supervisor who will be responsible for their clinical education and assessment throughout the module. As all the postgraduate pathways are accredited by the relevant professional body and therefore only Medical departments within the United Kingdom may be considered as clinical placements. Flexible educational opportunities are available via ‘ pen negotiated modules for the following o ’ areas of advanced clinical practice: IVU Clinical Reporting; Barium swallows, meals and 2
  • enemas; Diagnostic angiography; Venography; CT Head Clinical Reporting; Angioplasty; Videofluoroscopy; Hysterosalpingography. Overseas applicants (who have obtained a minimum overall IELTS score of 6.5) may apply. The normal length of time required to complete the MSc as a full-time overseas student is 3 years. The University s International Office sets the fee for overseas students. ’ If you wish to apply or register an initial interest, please contact us as soon as possible to confirm the next start dates for a particular pathway, or if you have any further queries. We look forward to hearing from you. Yours sincerely Gill Dolbear Programme Director MSc Medical Imaging Tel: 01227 782085 Email: gill.dolbear @canterbury.ac.uk Programme Administrator: Maria Pacan maria.pacan@canterbury.ac.uk tel:01227 782401 3
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1 1.0 Programme Information … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 2 1.1 Nature of the Programme … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... 2 1.2 Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... 2 1.3 Modules of the Programme … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 4 1.4 Programme Structure … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 5 1.5 Award Titles … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 6 1.6 Pattern of Attendance … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 9 1.7 Programme Content … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 9 1.8 Credit Exemption … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 9 1.9 Learning and Teaching 9 1.10 Strategies … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... 11 1.11 Assessment … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 11 1.12 … 12 1.13 Procedures and Criteria for 14 1.14 Assessment … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 15 1.15 General Assessment Criteria for Banded Marking 17 1.16 Scheme … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 18 1.17 Poster Assessment 18 1.18 Criteria … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 19 1.19 Criteria for Assessment of Portfolios … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 22 1.20 Summary Criteria for Research 22 Projects … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . Assessment Conventions … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . Concession Requests … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... Plagiarism, Copying and Duplication … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . Responsibilities of Clinical Supervisors … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... Guidelines for the Clinical Supervisor s Report … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . ’ The Modules Orientation ............................................................................................................................................24 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pathway Principles of Science and Technology in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.........................................................27 Clinical Applications and Management I (MRI of Brain, Spine and Knee).......................................................29 Clinical Applications and Management II (Musculo-Skeletal MRI)..................................................................32 Clinical Applications and Management III (Non-Routine Brain, Head & Neck).................................................35 Clinical Applications and Management IV (MRI Body Imaging).....................................................................38 Nuclear Medicine Pathway
  • Principles of Science and Technology in Nuclear Medicine..........................................................................41 Clinical Applications and Management I (Standard Nuclear Medicine Procedures)..........................................43 Clinical Applications and Management II (Complex & Non-Standard Nuclear Medicine Procedures)..................46 Clinical Applications and Management III (Positron Emission Tomography, PET)............................................48 Clinical Applications and Management IV (Radionuclide Therapy)................................................................50 Clinical Applications and Management V (Radiopharmacy and Non-Imaging Diagnostic Tests)........................52 Medical Ultrasound Pathway Principles of Science and Technology in Medical Ultrasound........................................................................54 Techniques in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Imaging … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .57 Clinical Applications and Management I (Obstetrics & Pelvic Ultrasound).......................................................58 Clinical Applications and Management II (Abdominal & Small Parts Ultrasound).............................................60 Clinical Applications and Management III (Musculo-Skeletal Ultrasound).......................................................62 Clinical Applications and Management IV (Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound)...................................................64 Clinical Applications and Management V (Echocardiography)......................................................................66 Modules available across all pathways Open Module (work based learning).........................................................................................................68 Developing a Research Proposal.............................................................................................................70 Undertaking Systematic Reviews.............................................................................................................72 Appendix 1 - Key Skills Matrix for the MSc Medical Imaging Programme … … … … … … … … … … … . … ...........................75 Appendix 2 .....................................................................................................................................................77 - Validated Modules within the MSc Interprofessional Health & Social Care - Modules available from other programmes Appendix 3 - 2007/ 2008 fees…………….……..…………………….……………………………………………………….78 5
  • Introduction Welcome to Canterbury Christ Church University. This programme guide contains specific details about the PgC/PgD/MSc Medical Imaging to supplement general information in the Postgraduate (HE4) Interprofessional Framework Student Information Booklet. I trust you will find it a comprehensive guide and welcome the opportunity to discuss any aspect of the programme or your specific requirements in more detail. The programme offers a range of medical imaging qualifications, Postgraduate Certificate/ Postgraduate Diploma / Master of Science, in either Medical Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical Ultrasound or Nuclear Medicine and Postgraduate Certificate in Radiopharmacy Practice. It has been developed in conjunction with service practitioners and forms part of the portfolio of the Postgraduate Interprofessional Framework. Consonant with the ethos of the Framework, all modules are available for stand alone study. The programme is innovative in nature and requires significant and explicit commitment from students who enter the programme, from all staff within the student’s clinical department and from the relevant employing authorities. As Programme Director I am here to offer individual advice and support about any aspect of the Programme and I hope that you will make as much use of this service as you deem necessary. Position Name Telephon E-mail Room e Framework Director Keith Piper 01227 keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk Jg29 782425 Johnson Framework Susannah 01227 sr112@canterbury.ac.uk Jf24 Administrator Russell 782140 Johnson Programme Director Gill 01227 gmt5@canterbury.ac.uk Jg30 Dolbear MSc Medical Imaging 782085 Johnson Programme Maria 01227 maria.pacan@canterbury.ac.u Jf24 Administrator Pacan k 782401 Johnson 6
  • Gill Dolbear Programme Director Canterbury Christ Church University Tel: 01227 782085 Fax: 01227 451739 Email: g.m.dolbear@canterbury.ac.uk 7
  • 1.0 Programme Information 1.1 Nature of the Programme The Programme consists of work-based Clinical Applications & Management modules as well as taught Principles of Science and Technology , and Techniques in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Imaging modules. The modules are studied at M (Masters) HE4 level and each module carries 20 HE4 level credits. Work-based learning requires commitment of the individual but, more significantly, requires commitment of all staff in the workplace. Students are supported by the Programme Director, their Academic Supervisor, their Clinical Supervisor and by appropriate Learning Agreements. Full and part time modes of study are offered. For example, a full time certificate level programme may be undertaken in a minimum of one year or two years part time, while a full MSc would be expected to take a minimum of two years full time or up to six years part time. Approval for the programme has been gained from the relevant accrediting and professional bodies. 1.2 Programme Aims and Learning Outcome s Programme Aims The overall purpose of the programme is to foster the individual personal and professional development of health care practitioners to a higher level of practice consonant with the ethos of interprofessional work and patient/client centred care. It aims to: • Ensure practitioners develop the knowledge, competences, skills and attitudes needed to demonstrate mastery in both academic and professional capability in their chosen fields of practice; 8
  • • Facilitate a challenging, interprofessional learning environment where practitioners can develop further the critical, analytic and reflective cognitive skills necessary for higher levels of patient/client centred practice and interprofessional working; • Hone practitioners’ research and critical appraisal skills enabling them to make innovative use of evidence for best practice; • Create autonomous, self directed learners who are able to sustain and advance their continuing professional development beyond the programme and support others in the practice environment to develop themselves; • Enable practitioners to be proactive in initiating and leading role developments in their specific fields. 9
  • Programme Learning Outcome s For all certificate, diploma and MSc awards, students who complete their chosen award successfully will demonstrate the following outcomes. The breadth of their achievement will be dependent on the specific scope of practice defined by the pathway selected. • the clinical knowledge, skills and attributes to provide an imaging service within a chosen modality or specialism; • critical and rigorous analysis of literature, research evidence, documentation and policy in relation to higher levels of practice in their chosen field; • appropriate, person centred advice and support for clients/patients and carers; • the ability to engage in critical self evaluation and assessment; • personal skills of reflective critical awareness necessary to respond positively to the challenges of the future through continuing professional development; • the knowledge and expertise to accept or decline service referrals and provide appropriate comment and advice to referring colleagues; • the necessary knowledge, communication skills and critical understanding to provide reports or interpretations on the imaging examinations undertaken, within the scope of their professional practice; • critical awareness of the significance of interprofessional collaboration, liaison and team working. Successful completion of an MSc will require demonstration of; • the ability to plan, manage, execute and interpret a piece of independent research in the student’s chosen field of practice. 10
  • In addition to the above transferable skills practitioners will be expected to demonstrate in their assessments further development of the following key skills where appropriate; • Communication • Application of number • Information technology • Working with others • Problem solving • Improving own learning and performance. A key skills matrix for the programme is shown in Appendix One. 11
  • 1.3 Modules of the Programme The Programme consists of various modules offered at HE Level 4, with each module attracting 20 credit points. The modules offered within the Programme are listed below:- Medical Ultrasound Pathway Code Module Title MMIHF4UPS Principles of Science and Technology in Medical Ultrasound MMIHF4UTM Techniques in Musculo-Skeletal Ultrasound Imaging MMIHF4UCP Clinical Applications and Management I (Obstetric & Pelvic Ultrasound) MMIHF4UCS Clinical Applications and Management II (Abdominal & Small Parts Ultrasound) MMIHF4UCM Clinical Applications and Management III (Musculo-Skeletal Ultrasound) MMIHF4UCV Clinical Applications and Management IV (Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound) MMIHF4UCE Clinical Applications and Management V (Echocardiography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pathway Code Module Title MMIHF4MPS Principles of Science and Technology in Magnetic Resonance Imaging MMIHF4MCK Clinical Applications and Management I (MRI of Brain, Spine and Knee) MMIHF4MCM Clinical Applications and Management II (Musculo-Skeletal MRI) MMIHF4MCN Clinical Applications and Management III (Non-Routine Brain, Head & Neck MRI) MMIHF4MCB Clinical Applications and Management IV (MRI Body Imaging) Nuclear Medicine Pathway Code Module Title MMIHF4NPS Principles of Science and Technology in Nuclear Medicine MMIHF4NCS Clinical Applications and Management I (Standard Nuclear Medicine Procedures) MMIHF4NCC Clinical Applications and Management II (Complex & Non-Standard Nuclear Medicine Procedures) MMIHF4NCP Clinical Applications and Management III (Positron Emission Tomography, PET) MMIHF4NCR Clinical Applications and Management IV (Radionuclide Therapy) MMIHF4NRN Radiopharmacy and Non-Imaging Diagnostic Tests 12
  • The following modules are available across all pathways:- Code Module Title MZZHF4OP1 Open Module MZZHF4USR Undertaking Systematic Reviews MZZHF4DRP Developing a Research Proposal MZZHF4DSS Research Project (two or three modules) 1.4 Programme Structure Consonant with the MSc Interprofessional Health and Social Care (IPHSC) degree, the programme is modular in structure and flexible. All modules attract 20 HE4 credit points and are offered at Master’s level. For the award of an MSc, students are required to successfully complete 9 modules (180 credits). All pathways have a discrete Postgraduate Certificate award comprising 3 modules (60 credits) and a Postgraduate Diploma award comprising 6 modules (120 credits). As befits a professional development programme where skill mix and cross boundary, interprofessional working are integral to the aims, students are required to complete the Orientation taught module in their certificate awards and include one module from the MSc IPHSC in their diploma profile. The choice of 3 exit points in the imaging pathways, Certificate, Diploma and MSc, reflects the need to be service led in the provision of educational programmes. A practitioner wishing to pursue their career in a specific field of imaging practice requires, as a minimum, competence in standard procedures and a demonstrable understanding of the scientific basis of the modality provided by the Postgraduate Certificate. Thus, these awards offer little flexibility, the Orientation and Principles of Science and Technology modules are compulsory, as is one Clinical Applications module. Many will wish to develop their roles further, either by diversifying or becoming competent in more complex procedures, and proceed to the Diploma qualification. Moving from Certificate to Diploma will be a continuous process for some practitioners, but for others, a break in study may be preferred. Some practitioners will wish to continue studying and achieve a full MSc. The modules themselves are a mixture of workplace based, taught and research modules. Workplace based modules are clinically based with five hours contact with the academic 13
  • supervisor. The acquisition of specific competences takes place in the work setting under the supervision of an expert practitioner, underpinned by a learning agreement. With the exception of Techniques in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Imaging and Principles of Science and Technology, taught modules are from the existing MSc Interprofessional Health and Social Care (IPHSC) framework. They comprise 40 hours contact time delivered in 3 x 2 day or 3 x 3 day blocks. This programme offers a menu of approximately 12 modules each academic year, including the compulsory Orientation and Developing a Research Proposal modules. Research modules are independent enquiry, with six hours supervision from a member of the academic staff. A research proposal is developed and assessed within the compulsory taught Developing a Research Proposal module. Integrating the medical imaging pathways with the MSc IPHSC framework means that students can have some flexibility about their degree pathway. All pathways contain modules which develop knowledge and skills in the specific imaging modality. In each, there is a minimum number of competence based modules which must be achieved to gain the certificate and diploma awards. Permitting students to choose their remaining modules from the MSc IPHSC menu allows the programme of study to be focussed on a particular professional interest and gives a broader, interprofessional context to their degree profile. In addition, this approach enables the recruitment of small numbers of students to different pathways whilst maintaining viability. 1.5 Award Titles Students are required to register for a specific pathway. The profile for the pathway and associated award is given below. Medical Ultrasound Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate Medical Ultrasound Module 1 Orientation (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 2 Principles of Science and Technology in Medical Ultrasound (taught) 14
  • Module 3 Clinical Applications & Management (workplace based) Modules 1 & 2 are compulsory, but students may choose any one of the Clinical Applications and Management modules offered. Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Module 1 Techniques in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Imaging Module 2 Principles of Science and Technology in Medical Ultrasound (taught) Module 3 Clinical Applications & Management III (workplace based) All modules are compulsory. Exit award: Postgraduate Diploma Medical Ultrasound Module 4 Clinical Applications & Management (workplace based) Module 5 Clinical Applications & Management (workbased) OR Open module OR one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 6 One from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Students must complete six modules in total. Students must choose at least one but may undertake two further Clinical Applications & Management modules in the Diploma route. Only one open module will be permitted for students on the medical ultrasound, nuclear medicine or MRI pathways. Exit Award: MSc Medical Ultrasound Module 7 Developing a Research Proposal (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Modules 8 & 9 Research Project (two modules) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15
  • Module 1 Orientation (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 2 Principles of Science and Technology in MRI (taught) Module 3 Clinical Applications & Management I (workplace based) All modules are compulsory. Exit award: Postgraduate Diploma Magnetic Resonance Imaging Module 4 Clinical Applications & Management (workplace ba sed) Module 5 Clinical Applications & Management (workplace ba sed) OR Open module OR one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 6 One from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Students must complete six modules in total. Students must choose at least one but may undertake two further Clinical Applications & Management modules in the Diploma route. Only one open module will be permitted for students on the medical ultrasound, nuclear medicine or MRI pathways. Exit Award: MSc Magnetic Resonance Imaging Module 7 Developing a Re search Propo sal (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 8 & 9 Research Project Nuclear Medicine Pathway Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate Nuclear Medicine Module 1 Orientation (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 2 Principle s of Science and Technology in Nuclear Medicine (taught) Module 3 Clinical Applications & Management I (workplace based) All modules are compulsory. Exit award: Postgraduate Diploma Nuclear Medicine 16
  • Module 4 Clinical Applications & Management (workbased) OR Radiopharmacy & Non Imaging Diagno stic Tests (workbased) Module 5 Clinical Applications & Management (workbased) OR Radiopharmacy & Non Imaging Diagno stic Tests (workbased) OR Open module OR one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 6 One from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Students must complete six modules in total. Students must choose at least one but may undertake two further Clinical Applications & Management modules in the Diploma route. Only one open module will be permitted for students on the medical ultrasound, nuclear medicine or MRI pathways. Please note: the Radiopharmacy and Non-Imaging Diagnostic Tests module is not compulsory, however, students will be strongly advised to include it in their Postgraduate Diploma. Exit Award: MSc Nuclear Medicine Module 7 Developing a Re search Propo sal (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module s 8 & 9 Research Project (Modality Specific) Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate in Radiopharmacy Practice Module 1 Orientation (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 2 Principles of Science and Technology in NM (taught) Module 3 Radiopharmacy & Non Imaging Diagno stic Tests (workbased) All modules are compulsory. 17
  • Medical Imaging Exit award: Postgraduate Certificate Medical Imaging Module 1 Orientation (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Module 2 Open module or one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 3 Open module or one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 1 is compulsory. If two open modules are completed as modules 2 and 3, no further open modules will be permitted. Exit award: Postgraduate Diploma Medical Imaging Module 4 Open module or one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 5 Open module or one from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Module 6 One from the MSc IPHSC menu (taught) Students must complete six modules in total. Only two open modules will be permitted over all for students on the medical imaging pathway. Exit Award: MSc Medical Imaging Module 7 Developing a Research Proposal (taught) (shared with MSc IPHSC) Modules 8 & 9 Research Project (two modules) 18
  • 1.6 Pattern of Attendance Taught modules, including Developing a Research Proposal, are offered in 3 x 2day blocks per semester. The Orientation taught module is offered in 3 x 3day blocks per semester. Each semester lasts for approximately 18 weeks, from October to February and February to June. Workplace based modules extend over a 26 week period from the time of their registration. Practitioners wishing to pursue a specific, in-depth, individual study may utilise the Open module structure of the MSc Medical Imaging which includes 5 hours of academic tutorial support over a six to nine month period. Research modules may be registered at any time following assessment of the proposal and approval by the Local Research Ethics Committee where applicable. Students have 6 – 9 months to complete their research projects. 1.7 Programme Content The programme content is based on: • Meeting the knowledge and skills base requirements to ensure participants are competent to practise in their chosen imaging modality/field of practice. • The specific learning needs of individual students as identified in a learning agreement developed on an individual basis at the start of the programme. • Providing an education platform from which students, on successful completion, can provide a high quality service to patients / clients and also lead and respond to role development challenges of the future. • The specific needs of the service as identified at the commencement of the programme. 19
  • 1.8 Credit Exemption Consideration will be given to students holding relevant, specific academic credit or having appropriate experience, utilising the Higher Education Institution’s existing APL/APEL policies for up to 50% of the MSc award (90 credits maximum). This includes work place based clinical applications modules, provided that evidence of a match can be demonstrated. There will normally be no exemption from the compulsory Orientation, Principles of Science and Technology and Developing a Research Proposal modules or from the research elements of the Master’s award. 1.9 Learning and Teaching Strategie s Consonant with the University Learning and Teaching Strategy, the programme is learner centred and is oriented significantly towards workplace partnerships; using work based materials and the normal work environment as a source and site of learning. Following discussion with the Pathway Leader in conjunction with MSc Medical Imaging Programme Director, the student will select their preferred modules and a provisional pathway will be agreed and documented. Student responsibility for managing their own learning is assumed, although it is recognised that some support may be required to orientate students to work at this level. Therefore some study skills are included in the compulsory Orientation module. Each of the work based clinical applications modules is founded on an individual learning agreement between the student, the academic supervisor, the clinical supervisor and the workplace manager. Effective work based learning requires such formalised agreements, which clearly identify the respective responsibilities of all parties involved. It also provides a significant opportunity for staff development in relation to learning and teaching in the workplace. The Learning Agreement sets out the nature and scope of the learning opportunities in the 20
  • individual setting and the duties and obligations of the student, the academic tutor, the clinical supervisor and the line manager so that the roles and responsibilities of each party are understood by all. Aims and learning outcomes are specified together with identified learning activities and assessment. This four way agreement will ensure that students are developing their practice in accordance with Trust practices and protocols as well as securing the support of the workplace as the main site and source of learning. In most cases, the student is being sponsored by their workplace to develop skills in line with service objectives and therefore the range of equipment and examinations undertaken can normally meet the student’s development needs. It is part of the role of the Academic Supervisor, as the learning facilitator, to ensure that the clinical environment is adequate. If additional experience is required outside of the normal workplace setting, then it is the responsibility of the student and/or their Line Manager to negotiate an appropriate clinical placement and this is reflected in the learning agreement. Identification of an appropriate Clinical Supervisor is the responsibility of the student and their Line Manager, subject to the approval of the Academic Supervisor. This person will be proficient in the area of competence to be developed and may therefore be a member of a different profession such as a medical practitioner. Since modules are individually negotiated and may be begun at any time, it is impractical to offer supervisors a group induction and training on site at the University. A Guide for Clinical Supervisors has therefore been developed and, when the Academic Supervisor visits the workplace to confirm the learning agreement, a briefing meeting will be arranged with the Clinical Supervisor. Supervisors will be encouraged to contact the Academic Supervisor for support and/or advice as often as necessary. The central learning and assessment tool for work based modules is a Portfolio of Professional and Clinical Development. The Portfolio is a record of the student’s learning and development as a competent practitioner measured against the specified outcomes in the learning agreement. Its role in the formative development of the student is as significant as its assessment function and it therefore contains both formative and summative material in a mix of analytic and reflective styles. The Academic Supervisor and student use the portfolio to monitor and actively manage the student’s development, meeting together approximately three times during the 21
  • period of study. Using all the learning opportunities that arise in the workplace, the aim is to enable students to demonstrate their competence, analyse and reflect on their practice, as well as develop their problem solving, judgement making, interpretation, report writing and communication skills. Learning strategies may include self directed learning activities, attendance at clinical review meetings, shadowing activities, tutorials and supervised and unsupervised practice. Web technology will be utilised, both for learning as in access to image banks, and for student support and information. These should enable the integration of academic learning with attainment of clinical competences such that that each informs the other and deep learning is sustained. 1.10 As s e s sment The rationale for assessment is to enable students to demonstrate a reflective, critical understanding of the relationship between relevant theories and practice knowledge and expertise to facilitate their professional and personal development and contribute to service development. A familiarity with basic literature is assumed and participants are expected to articulate a high level of academic ability through reasoned argument and critical reflection on practice using a variety of assessment modes. Modules are weighted equally and the form of assessment is selected to match the module content and reflect the crucial theory/practice interface and problem solving emphasis in the programme. The assignment for each module is specified in the module outline to ensure accurate and appropriate assessment of learning outcomes. In the case of taught modules, it may be a case study, long essay, situational analysis, practical exercise or report. In many modules students are given the opportunity to present a preliminary plan of their assignment to their peers. This is always formative in the sense that the discussion and feedback generated is useful to students. In a few modules the presentation forms part of the summative assessment schedule. Where professional role development through the acquisition of specific competences is an 22
  • identified outcome, as in a work based competence development module, students are required to demonstrate explicitly in their written work and in practice, how these have been achieved. The Learning Agreement and Portfolio of Professional Practice Development are the chief means by which student attainment is defined, monitored, measured and verified. The Learning Agreement sets out the specific learning outcomes and, where possible, these are matched to occupational standards to ensure consistency. 1.11 Procedures and Criteria for As s e s sment Each module is summatively assessed independently and equitably in accordance with the programme's discrete structure. The module learning outcomes form the basis for assessment and the general assessment criteria of the MSc Medical Imaging are applied to these outcomes to form a judgement on the student's work. To achieve accreditation at Master's level, written assignments will encompass all of the following aspects; coherence in linking theory to practice, breadth of understanding of issues within multiple frameworks, depth in evaluating a limited range of key issues, consistency of argument, clarity of expression and good presentation skills. Breache s of Confidentiality Students are expected to abide by relevant Codes of Practice and maintain appropriate levels of confidence at all times. Patient/client identifying details should be protected at all times. Appropriate consideration should be given to maintaining anonymity of time, place, and persons e.g. carers, colleagues, peers. Repeated breaches of confidentiality or breaches at Master’s level will result in a mark of zero and subsequent requirement for resubmission. Where material is in the public domain it is appropriate to recognise the source of the material- however no patient details must be identifiable. 23
  • 1.12 General As s e s sment Criteria for Banded Marking Scheme The PgC/PgD/MSc Programme uses a marking system with the following bands and categories: Fail Unsatisfactory standard Pass Satisfactory standard Good Pass Very good standard Distinction Exceptional standard Use of Literature Fail Limited, weak selection. Uncritically presented. Limited recognition of significance for the professional context. Pass Appropriate range and choice of literature. Recognition and critical analysis of issues of significance for the professional context Good Pass Good selection of key primary texts with critical evaluation of significant issues for the professional context. Some, limited analysis of related, secondary texts. Distinction Excellent, wide range of key and peripheral primary and secondary texts, demonstrating critical evaluation and synthesis with the professional context. Interface between Theory and Practice in the Profe s sional Context Fail Limited use of theory. Lack of / limited awareness of the relationship between theory and practice. Little integration or critical analysis of the articulation between theory and practice. Pass Clear articulation of the relationship between and critical analysis / evaluation of the significance of relevant theory to specific professional practice. Awareness of how each may be informed by the other. Good Pass Very good, critical analysis / evaluation of the relationship between theory and practice. Some use of multiple theoretical frameworks to evaluate professional practice. Demonstrable synthesis to show how each is informing the other. Some evaluation of their usefulness. Distinction Rigorous critical analysis of the interface between theory and practice, clearly elaborated to evaluate theoretical adequacy and synthesize the development of professional practice. Excellent, creative use of multiple frameworks for evaluation and synthesis of own stance. 24
  • Knowledge and Clarity of Reasoning Fail Knowledge circumscribed. Sense of argument but poorly expressed lines of thought. Conclusions do not always arise from premises. Pass Appropriate, defended knowledge of current, relevant issues. Logical development of arguments where lines of thought are clearly discernible. Relevant, limited conclusions arising from premises. Good Pass Sound knowledge. Ability to discriminate and justify key issues. Arguments are confidently expressed through clear, logical lines of thought. Conclusions are firmly articulated, comprehensive, relevant and arise directly from the premised arguments. Distinction Excellent, comprehensive knowledge base. Ability to discriminate key issues and relate them to the wider context. Lines of thought are transparent and the arguments are confidently expressed to develop and synthesize compelling conclusions. Innovative thinker. Organization of Material Fail Poorly organized, incoherent structure. Poor presentation and referencing. Appropriate supporting material not given / disorganized. Pass Organization and structure is sufficient to support and not obscure the work. Appropriate presentation. All supporting material present. Referencing is sound and appropriate. Good Pass Organization is comprehensive and structure coherent. Well presented, facilitating comprehension. Supporting material is well presented and ordered. Accurate referencing. Distinction Excellent coherent organization and structure which enhances comprehension. Excellent presentation of all material. Referencing is accurate to a high degree. 25
  • 1.13 MSc Medical Imaging - Po ster As s e s sment Criteria Candidate Number Po ster Number: Title of Po ster: The Development of Practice by the use of Musculo skeletal Ultrasound Imaging a s a Clinical As s e s sment Tool Pres entation & Abstract Practice Evidence of critical De sign Development evaluation Structure, Abstract not Po ster fails to Limited evidence of FAIL organisation and pres ent or poorly c onvey a c oherent appropriate reading pre sentation of structured with only me s sage relating to and inadequate information on the a limited summary the propo s ed evidence to po ster is disjointed of the propo s ed practice sub stantiate and difficult to practice development arguments. No follow development critical analysis shown A well de signed Abstract begins to Po ster ha s s ome Some evidence of PASS po ster pres entation summarise the application to the the ability to analyse with good propo s ed practice propo s ed practice and synthe si se c ommunication and development development which concepts with logical flow is clearly defined appropriate application to practice A very well Abstract clearly Good application to Demonstrate s a well GOOD de signed and identifie s the the propo s ed developed ability to PASS c omprehen sive propo s ed practice practice analyse , s ynthe si s e po ster pres entation development and development s hown and evaluate making that Is ea sy to read summarise s this with a logical balanced and follow structure judgements An interesting, Abstract stands An excellent po ster The work DISTINCT innovative and well alone in that s how s the demon strate s an ION de signed po ster summarising the benefit of the exceptional ability to with excellent and propo s ed practice propo s ed practice evaluate critically well structured development development clearly using a wide range c ommunication of of appropriate argument/ideas criteria and reading Comment: First/ Second marker Signature: 1.14 Criteria for As s e s sment of Portfolios The Portfolio contains five elements of assessment, each of which must be completed successfully for the student to pass. Quantitative Record of Practice For each pathway a specific number of examinations must be completed and recorded (see module outlines for details). This number must reflect an appropriate range and depth of
  • experience and, by the time of submission of the portfolio, a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. The number of assisted examinations and the nature of the assistance given will depend on the prior experience and ability of the specific student and will be determined in conjunction with the Clinical Supervisor as the student progresses. The combined total of unassisted and assisted examinations may well exceed the minimum number specified in order to enable both the student and the Clinical Supervisor to be confident that competence has been achieved. Case Studies These will be marked using the general assessment criteria for master’s level work, as described in the Programme Guide. The two 750 word case reports should be in the style of a case history presented for submission to a peer reviewed journal. This will normally be under three headings; a brief introduction to the topic, a synopsis of the case history and an evaluation of the specific case in relation to current available evidence. Images and/or video material will need to be submitted as part of each case study. Patient information normally recorded must be removed from all material submitted. The 2000 word case study is an in-depth case study which evaluates the chosen imaging strategy and its implications for the management of a chosen patient. The study will be analysed in relation to current literature and must include a reflective appraisal of the process and outcomes for the particular patient under consideration. The case study chosen should be one that the student found challenging, either in terms of its complexity or its unusualness. Again, all patient identification information must be removed prior to submitting the case study. Audit & Reflective Analysis of Reports or Commentaries (1500 words) All unassisted examinations in each pathway must be accompanied by a report or commentary on the findings in the style of a clinical report. This must be produced by the student without assistance and prior to the production or sight of the final report issued. (These are used as audit data and are not included in the portfolio.) Where the student’s reports are in addition to the medical report, as in the magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine pathways, they should be audited against the medical report, although the patient’s case records may also be used in the audit as additional audit evidence. Unassisted examinations in medical ultrasound will generally result in the student issuing the
  • report. In this case, students must arrange for at least 10% (and a minimum of 25) of their unassisted examinations to be verified after they have produced the report to be issued. The audit should be both quantitative and qualitative and written up in a properly referenced report. Numerical data relating to the number of examinations conducted, and the concordance or otherwise with the definitive or verifying report must be included, together with an interpretation of the numerical data. Additionally, students are required to reflectively and critically appraise their work, evaluating particularly image quality, imaging appearances and the reports produced. Within the audit report, students must use both the quantitative and qualitative elements to evaluate and judge their development as competent practitioners in the discipline. The written report will be assessed using relevant aspects of the general assessment criteria for master’s level work. Clinical Supervisor’s Report This comprises a detailed appraisal of the student’s development in six categories; knowledge/ value base, skills development, capacity for professional development, professional identity, learning to learn, and the Trust and the Programme. The Clinical Supervisor will recommend a pass or a fail. Personal reflection (500 words) A personal reflection must be included on the role development undertaken throughout the period of the module. The criteria for the assessment of reflection in portfolios are as follows: Fail Some limited reflection but no evidence of learning via theorising and/or implementation of ideas/changes in practice and only limited support for claims in the presented portfolio. No reflection on implications for future learning and development. Limited understanding of role. Pass/Good Pass Reflection on practice with evidence of learning via theorising and/ or implementation of ideas/changes in practice with sound support for claims in the presented portfolio. Able to appraise implications for future learning and development. Good understand of role. Distinction Self critical reflection on practice with evidence of learning via theorising and/or implementation of ideas/changes in practice plus excellent support for claims in the presented portfolio. Able to identify significant implications for future learning and development. Advanced understanding of role.
  • 1.15 Summary Criteria for Res earch Projects Fail The research question is poorly thought out and the rationale is not well articulated. There is insufficient literature to provide balanced support for the scope of the study and a failure to link the literature to the project aims and objectives. The research design is inappropriate, poorly planned and executed, and not clearly elaborated in the text. The results do not adequately reflect the research question and are poorly demonstrated and explained. There is minimal discussion of and reflection on the findings in relation to the literature and to implications for practice. Conclusions are limited and do not arise from the study directly. Poor standard of presentation, clarity of expression and referencing. Pass The research question is of appropriate scope, adequately stated and justified, and related to professional context. The literature review utilises a range of key primary texts and journals to provide a balanced if rather narrow range of competing perspectives to support the project aims and objectives. The research design is adequately planned and executed to produce sound, reliable evidence which correlates with the research question. Analysis is generally well focused on the evidence and related to the literature. There is reflection on implications for practice leading to sound conclusions. The work is well presented with a clear style and accurate referencing and bibliography. Good Pass The research question well articulated, set in the relevant professional context and communicated clearly. A wide range of literature is consulted, utilising primary and secondary texts. The links between the literature and the student’s study are apparent and a variety of perspectives provides a balanced context. An appropriate methodology is justified and executed with accuracy to provide valid data in respect of the research question. The data is presented using appropriate descriptive/inferential statistics to highlight intended outcomes. The analysis of data is rigorous and comprehensive and includes reflective evaluation of implications for the student’s own professional practice. Good, lucid writing style, well presented with careful and accurate references and bibliography. Distinction There is clear evidence of original thought in constructing the research question and design, building upon a consideration of other researchers in the field of study. The research question is carefully developed and demonstrates how it may add to existing professional knowledge. Rich and detailed use of literature shows original sources some of which are related more peripherally to the intended focus. The review is balanced, analytic and demonstrates perceptiveness. The methodology is fully justified and executed with precision and detailed attention to its reliability and validity. The
  • data is precise in elaborating and answering the research question and used insightfully with appropriate statistical support. The quality of thought and analysis contributes significantly to knowledge in the field and in the development of professional practice. The conclusions may have significant import for further development. The style is transparent and the presentation excellent. 1.16 As s e s sment Convention s • To be eligible for the Post-graduate Certificate students must pass three modules. • To be eligible for the Post-graduate Diploma students must pass six modules. • To be eligible for the MSc degree students must pass all nine modules. • Students are permitted to revise and resubmit a failed piece of work on one occasion only, for a maximum of three modules. One of these three may be the 2 module research module. • For taught modules the timescale for resubmission is normally within two months of the notification of fail and for research and clinical applications modules where the student may need to undertake further clinical development, it may be up to six months. • Successfully resubmitted work can only achieve a basic pass mark. • Students who are required to withdraw from a specific award pathway may be permitted to continue their studies within the generic MSc framework and achieve the MSc Interprofessional Health and Social Care. They will not be permitted to attempt more than eleven modules in the process. • The generic MSc Interprofessional Health and Social Care framework permits a student to ‘carry’ up to two failed modules within their degree profile provided that nine are completed successfully. • A student who fails either the Principles of Science and Technology module or a Clinical Applications and Management module at Postgraduate Certificate level will be required to withdraw from that specific pathway. • Any student who fails the Orientation module will be required to withdraw from the programme.
  • • Students will only be withdrawn from the programme after consultation with the external examiner and will be informed in writing by the Academic Registrar. 1.17 Conce s sion reque sts The possibility to self-certify an illness may not apply, so you may wish to make a case that a longer illness or other serious misfortune has affected your work. In this case you should make a request to the Board of Examiners by writing to the Academic Registrar stating your case and giving appropriate details such as dates and a statement of how your work was affected. This is called a request for concessions. You must write a signed letter; an email will not be accepted. Concessions requests should normally be accompanied with appropriate documentary evidence (e.g. doctor’s note giving evidence of illness or incapacity and dates, letter from a counsellor, evidence of accident or bereavement, etc) and should be sent to the Academic Registrar or handed in at the Registry Helpdesk in Beckett West. On receipt, a copy of the entire request will be sent to your programme director to present to the Board of Examiners and you will receive an acknowledgement. Concessions requests can be made for coursework and/or examinations. For coursework, normally an extension to the submission date would be granted by the programme director but you must (a) request concessions as stated above (b) contact the programme director before the submission date and must get the agreement for a revised submission date in writing. Other concessions requests are considered by your Board of Examiners and appropriate adjustments may be made to your results. If you wish a restricted number of persons on the Board to view your request you may make this clear in your letter. Please remember that for all concessions requests, you should provide a full personal statement explaining the impact of the illness or other serious misfortune on the assessments involved. It is not sufficient to supply a doctor’s note or counsellor’s letter on its own. • Where to hand in a reque st for c once s sions Requests for concessions must be submitted to the Academic Registrar. They may be handed in at the Registry Helpdesk in Beckett West or posted.
  • Requests/evidence should NOT to be given to the University Medical Centre or to a Departmental office or to any other office in the University. If you present your request to any other office other than that of the Academic Registrar, the Board of the Examiners may disregard it. • When to hand in a reque st for conce s sion s You must hand in your request within seven days of missing an examination or within seven days of your return to University if you are absent. If your circumstances are on-going you should hand in your request as soon as you can. Do NOT wait until you get your results from the Exam Board. The Board can only consider your circumstances if you write about them at the proper time and before they meet. You must bear any costs entailed in the production of any concessions evidence. 1.18 Plagiarism, Copying, and Duplication (Summar y) A thesis, dissertation, report, essay or other form of assessment, which is undertaken as part of an award-bearing programme, must be your own work and must not contain plagiarised or duplicated material. If plagiarism is suspected in your work, it will be investigated and adjudicated by a staff panel. 1. Definitions 1.1 Plagiarism is the act of presenting the material, ideas, and arguments of another person/ persons as one’s own. To copy sentences, phrases or even particular striking expressions without acknowledgement in a manner which may deceive the reader as to the source is plagiarism; to paraphrase in a manner which may deceive the reader is likewise plagiarism. Plagiarism is identified in the composition of the work submitted by a student for assessment. 1.2 Copying is an act of plagiarism, incorporating into an assessment material from books, journals, the Web, the work of another student or any other source without acknowledgement and submitting it in verbatim or paraphrased form as one’s own. 1.3
  • Collusion is an act of plagiarism through submission of work for assessment that purports to be a student’s own work but is in fact jointly written with another student or other students. 1.4 Duplication of material means the inclusion in coursework (including essays, projects, reports, dissertations and theses) of a significant amount of material that is identical or substantially similar to material which has already been submitted by the student for the same or any other programme or course at this University or elsewhere. 1.5 Minor and Serious offence s : Minor offences are cases where the amount of plagiarised material is limited (e.g. less than 20% of the whole work) and cases where there appears to have been a lack of diligence or understanding about referencing conventions or about prohibitions to plagiarise. Serious offences include most second and all further offences and all offences where the plagiarism is extensive (e.g. more than 20% of the whole work). 2. Student Obligations to prevent Plagiarism 2.1 In order to ensure that all the work you submit is your own, you should ensure that: (i) phrases, sentences and passages taken verbatim from a published work are placed in quotation marks, or indented, and the source is acknowledged; (ii) paraphrasing, ideas and arguments taken from a published work are clearly referenced; (iii) the inclusion of any other intellectual property, for example, illustrations, diagrams, proofs, designs, computer software, in written text or project work is clearly identified and acknowledged; (iv) the inclusion of material from electronic sources is carefully referenced and only Web sites freely accessible to the marker must be used; (v) the use of the work of others is not of such volume or importance to the submitted work as to compromise your ownership of the work; (vi) no significant collaboration has occurred where you are required to submit the work as an individual piece. Where work is done collaboratively and a single piece of work is submitted, the collaboration must be permitted by the programme director and it must be declared on the work. (vii) You have not presented previously or simultaneously for assessment in this University, or elsewhere, any work that you submit, or any substantial amount of such work.
  • 3. Penalties for minor offences 3.1 Programme Panels may award the following penalties: (i) The student’s mark for the piece of work may be reduced. (ii) The student may be awarded a mark of 0 for the assignment. 3.2 Resubmis sion of work in ca s e s of minor offence s : (i) For assignments at HE Level 1 and below the student may be given the opportunity to resubmit, providing that the assignment is eligible for resubmission; the opportunity to resubmit must be offered where the mark reduction made would result in failure of a course or module. At HE Level 2 and above resubmission is not normally permitted. (ii) Resubmitted work can receive no more than the pass mark and counts as a resubmission under those rules of the programme that permit resubmissions. For resubmitted work, the student will be entitled to no more than the pass mark for the whole course or module. 4. Penalties for serious offences 4.1 Penalties for serious offences are graduated in severity as shown in the list below. The indications of the penalties below are provided as guidance; Panels may exercise discretion in the award of penalties: (i) For a first offence, the student may be awarded a mark of 0 for the assignment normally with no opportunity to resubmit. (ii) For a second offence, the student will be awarded a mark of 0 for the assignment and will not be entitled to resubmit his/her work. (iii) For very serious offences, the student may be awarded a mark of 0 for the course, module, or unit of which the assessed work was a part. Normally no opportunity to retake the course or module will be given and this could result in failure of the whole programme. In addition, Plagiarism Review Panels may award the following penalties: (iv) For very serious offences, particularly repeated offences, the panel may recommend to the Board of Examiners that the degree be reduced by a class.
  • (v) For repeated offences of serious plagiarism, the panel may recommend to the Principal on behalf of the Academic Board that the student be required to withdraw from the programme, forfeiting the right to any exit or staged awards normally allowed from the programme. The complete University procedures for dealing with cases of suspected plagiarism may be accessed in the Student Procedures Booklet (hard copy) and under ‘Student Procedures’ on the University website. 1.19 Respon sibilities of Clinical Supervisors • mentoring and assessment of practice to agreed standards; • contributing to the learning agreement development and review meetings; • meeting regularly together with the student and their Academic Supervisor to discuss and moderate students’ practice, using the questions on the report guidelines as points of discussion; • submission of an interim report; • submission of a final annual report with a recommendation to the Practice Panel (see below). 1.20 Guidelines for the Clinical Supervisor’ s Report Student’ s name Module Title Clinical Supervisors are required to submit a report within the Portfolio, commenting under the following headings: A Knowledge/Value Base B Skills Development C Capacity for Profe s sional Development D Profe s sional Identity E Learning to Learn and Facilitating Learning in Others F The Trust and the Programme
  • In order to assist Clinical Supervisors to address these areas and to increase parity, criteria have been formulated under each of these headings. It is accepted that not all criteria will be relevant for all areas of work. A Knowledge Base A1 Does the student have an identified knowledge base which can be articulated and consciously applied in a range of clinical situations? A2 Is the student able to identify appropriate research evidence relating to their work and draw on relevant practice and policy development in the UK and abroad? A3 Does the student have a sound working knowledge of relevant legislation? A4 Is the student able to think about and conceptualise her/his work coherently to colleagues across all professions? A5 Has the student demonstrated an understanding of the ethical basis of work with patients and clients? B Clinical Skills Development B1 Has the student demonstrated competence in and appropriate use of a full range of examinations? B2 Is the student capable of sophisticated assessment of the value of the examination performed within the context of the overall clinical management of the patient/client? B3 Is the student able to communicate well with patients/clients? B4 Has the student demonstrated skills in communicating and working effectively with other professionals/organisations? C Capacity for Profe s sional Development C1 Is there evidence of the student’s creative thinking and practice? C2 How has the student contributed to the development of practice and protocols?
  • D Profe s sional Identity – please comment on: D1 The student’s level of professional competence and self-confidence in her/his role. D2 The student’s ability to use and own her/his knowledge and skills so as to demonstrate professional responsibility. D3 The student’s ability to provide leadership and to work autonomously while remaining open and accountable in their practice. E Learning to Learn and Facilitating Learning in Others E1 What have been the most important learning developments in the student’s practice? E2 What evidence is there of the student disseminating her/his learning either in formal or informal settings? E3 Does the student support others in their professional development? F The Trust and the Programme F1 How have you experienced your role as a Clinical Supervisor? F2 Have there been constraints not anticipated when the Learning Agreement was negotiated, or has the work progressed broadly as planned? F3 Have you any comments on links with the Programme? FINAL RECOMMENDATION Do you recommend that the applicant should pass/fail? If fail, what is your recommendation for resubmission? Clinical Supervisor’ s signature Date Module Title: Orientation code: MZZHF4CCP credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 40 hours taught & 160 hours independent study academic responsibility: Mary Brown
  • MODULE AIM The aim of the module is to develop a critical understanding of the key theoretical models, evidence base and practical methods relevant to interprofessional collaboration and a patient/client centred practice; to develop the characteristics of research mindedness and learner autonomy, and to enable students to identify strategies for professional and career development. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate: 1. a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, pertinent to interprofessional collaboration and client centred practice in their area of professional practice (KS 1); 2. conceptual understanding to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship on the subject of interprofessional collaboration in health and social care services, to evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, propose new hypotheses (KS 2& 3); 3. the ability to examine complex issues both systematically and creatively, make informed judgements in the absence of complete data and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences (KS 1 & 5); 4. self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, acting autonomously in planning and implementing tasks in an interprofessional context (KS 4 & %); 5. continued commitment to advance their knowledge and understanding and to develop new skills to a high level (KS 6). KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES Demonstrated in assessment as indicated below: Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in writing Application of Number Critically interpret data in a research study (option in oral presentation) Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork when writing about practice (situational analysis) Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development. (formative)
  • MODULE CONTENT The module will provide a conceptual foundation from which students will be able to reflect upon and examine their own professional education and practice. Students will examine and analyse, through reflexive evaluation of their own practice experience:  Working at master’s level: the concept of masters’ worthiness, study skills and expectations; using electronic learning environments and continuing professional development and pathway planning.  Approaches to the concepts of knowledge and research, factivity and validity in the health and social sciences and their application to evidence based practice.  Different perspectives of recent developments in health and social services, particularly, policies strategies and practices intended to promote the modernisation of public services, interprofessional collaboration and client centred care. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Formal lectures introducing novel concepts and theories; practical exercises to facilitate the development and embedding of ideas and expertise and group discussions facilitated by tutors. Workshops to assist study skills development Group exercises and formative seminar presentations Students will be encouraged throughout the course to reflect on their skills development so as to be able to present a reflective and evidenced account within their assessed assignments of the improvements they feel they have made in the six key areas during the module. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Group Oral Presentation (0.5 weighting) Students, working collaboratively in small interprofessional groups select either a review article or a report of an empirical study from a peer reviewed journal and present a critique of chosen work from the perspective of interprofessional working, client centred practice, nature and quality of supporting evidence, methodology and contribution to professional/practice development. (LO 1, 2 & 4 - KS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 20 minutes Situational Analysis (0.5 weighting) A systematic analysis of a practice situation which has an interprofessional context or dimension. Students will choose a situation with which they are closely involved and which seems problematic in terms of interprofessional relations. Using either a case study or through collecting relevant data they will reflect critically on the causes and influences using interprofessional theories to produce a coherent evaluation and propose some solutions. (LO 3, & 5
  • - KS 1, 4, 5, 6) 1500 words A 500 word minimum reflective account, illustrating key skills development throughout the module, to contribute to the portfolio of skills development. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Benner, P. (1999) Clinical Wisdom & Interventions in Critical Care: a thinking in action approach. Saunders. Booth, A. (1996) The SCHARR Guide to Evidence Based Practice. Sheffield Centre for Health and Related Research Occasional Paper. Brown, S. (1999) Knowledge for Health Care Practice- a guide to using research e vidence. Saunders. Colyer, H. and Kamath, S. (1999) ‘Evidence Based Practice: a philosophical and political & analysis.’ Journal of Advanced Nursing 29 (1) 188-193 Downie, R. and Macnaughton, J. (2000) Clinical Judgement Evidence in Practice Oxford University Press.DH (1997) The New NHS . H.M.S.O. DH (1998) Modernising Social S er vices . H.M.S.O DH (2000) The NHS Plan . H.M.S.O DH (2001) Working Together, Learning Together . HMSO Fink, A. (1998) Conducting Res earch Literature Reviews from Paper to the Internet . Sage. Grahame-Smith, D. (1995) ‘Evidence-based medicine Socratic dissent’. British Medical Journal 310; 1126-7 Hill, A. (2000) What’s gone wrong with Health Care. Kings Fund. Hornby, S. (2000) Collaborative Care . Blackwell. Lockett, T. (1997) Evidence based and cost effective medicine. Radcliffe. McSherry, R., Simmons, M. and Abbott, P. (eds). (2001) Evidence - informed Nursing Routledge. Miller, C. and Freeman, M. (2001) Interprofessional Practice in Health and Social Care . Kingsley. Ovretveit, J. et al (1997) Interprofessional Working for Health and Social Care Macmillan. Pratt, J et al (1998) Partnership fit for Purpose? Kings Fund. Rolfe, G., Freshwater, D., and Jasper, M.(2001) Critical Reflection For Nursing and The Helping Professions . Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan Rosenberg, W. and Donald, A. (1995) ‘Evidence-based medicine: an approach to clinical problem solving.’ British Medical Journal 310 1122-6 Sackett, D., Strauss, S. (2000) Evidence Based Medicine. Churchill Livingstone. Trinder, L. (2000) Evidence Based Practice: a critical approach. Blackwell. JOURNALS Critical Social Policy
  • Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology Sociology Journal of Interprofessional Care Health Service Journal Radiography British Journal of Occupational Therapy Journal of Advanced Nursing British Journal of Social Work Journal of Evidence Based Medicine Evidence Based Nursing WEBSITES www.doh.gov.uk/nhs www.cgsupport.org/ http://www.doh.gov.uk/cno/quality-assurance-jtstatementoct03.pdf http://www.doh.gov.uk/agendaforchange/ http://www.doh.gov.uk/healthinequalities/programmeforaction/index.htm www.nelh.nhs.uk www.library.utoronto.ca/medicine/ebm www.mc.duke.edu/mclibrary/respub/guides/question.html Module Title: Principles of Science & Technology in Magnetic Resonance Imaging code: MMIHF4MPS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 40 hours taught & 160 hours independent study academic responsibility: Dr Kevin Carlton MODULE AIM The aim of the module is to provide practitioners with a through knowledge and practical awareness of the scientific principles and technology of MRI and its unique environment. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to magnetic resonance imaging, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of the science of MRI;
  • 2. evaluate different MRI systems; 3. appraise critically image production, sequence choice, factor manipulation, image quality and artefact reduction; 4. evaluate the principles of contrast agents in MRI; 5. understand the basic principles and applications of proton MR spectroscopy; 6. evaluate the relationship of MRI to other diagnostic imaging techniques, and recognise the areas where MRI will have maximum benefit to patient management; 7. differentially appraise the roles and responsibilities of the interprofessional MRI team KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret data in research studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Relate and interact effectively with individuals and groups 5 Problem Solving Use relevant information sources. Identify and solve problems associated with study skills and assessment at M level 6 Improving own learning and Manage own time in achieving objectives performance MODULE CONTENT Physical principles of magnetic resonance imaging; Safety and the MRI environment; MR system hardware and software choices; Image production, sequences, sequence factor manipulation and their impact on the image; Image quality, artefact recognition and reduction techniques; Principles of contrast agents; Basic principles and applications of spectroscopy. Professional roles and relationships in the MR work environment. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Formal lectures, workshops, practical exercises, group tutorials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT The assessment will comprise: A 20 minute oral presentation to the cohort (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S 1-6) A 2000 word fully referenced synopsis (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S 1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
  • Students will present a critical evaluation of how imaging parameters may affect image quality and perceptibility of diagnostic information. The presentation will be derived from material gathered from the student’s clinical centre and make use of the equipment, quality control phantoms, homemade phantoms and relevant clinical examples. Reflecting safe, current practice, it should demonstrate a sound knowledge of the relevant fundamental physics, the features and capabilities of the equipment, the nature of particular imaging parameters over which the practitioner has control, the interrelationships between them and their influence on image quality. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Elster, A. (2001), Questions & Answers in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Moseby Hashemi, R. & Bradley, W (1997), MRI, the Basics. Williams & Wilkins NRPB (1991), Board Statement on Clinical Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Procedures, NRPB NessAiver, M. (1997), All you really need to know about MRI physics. NessAiver Shellock, F. & Kanal, E. (1996), Magnetic Resonance Bioeffects, Safety and Patient Management. Lippincott-Raven Westbrook, C & Kaut, C. (1998), MRI in Practice. Blackwell Science WEBSITES: www.mritutor.org www.topspins.com - about MR angiography www.mrieducation.com www.med.harvard.edu www.t2star.com www.ismrm.org www.mrisafety.com www.cis.rit.edu JOURNALS Magnetic Resonance Imaging Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Physics in Medicine and Biology
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management I (MRI) (Brain, spine & knee) code: MMIHF4MCK credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Chris Jeffery MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a skilled, competent and confident practitioner of MRI in relation to the ‘routine’ brain, spine and knee. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of MRI in the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students should be able to: 1. demonstrate competence in the MR imaging of the ‘routine’ brain, the spine and the knee, and a sound understanding of sequence choice and rationale; 2. interpret images and produce a written commentary in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate accurate recognition of common anatomy and pathology in the relevant areas, and their MRI manifestations; 4. critically evaluate sequence choice and manipulation in relation to the relevant anatomy and physiology; 5. examine critically the relationship of MRI to other diagnostic imaging techniques, evaluating where MRI will have maximum benefit to patient management; 6. distinguish artefacts, image quality and sequence problems, and evaluate ways in which they could be rectified; 7. demonstrate a comprehensive awareness of issues in relation to safe practices in MRI; 8. demonstrate a thorough understanding of the psychological issues surrounding MRI and the patient/client. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context
  • 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology of the brain, the knee and the spine;. Comparative imaging techniques; Patient management including psychological issues; Caring for children having MRI; Safety and the MRI environment; The principles of MRI science and technology relative to the ‘routine’ brain, spine & knee; Quality assurance and image quality pertaining to the brain, knee and spine, including artefact recognition and reduction techniques; Critical imaging; caring for patients in relation to sedation and general anaesthetics. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 60 cases, demonstrating that the full range of magnetic resonance imaging examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and comparative, reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of commentaries with reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Barkovich, A. (1995), Paediatric Neuroradiology 2nd edition. Raven Berquist, T. (1995), Pocket Atlas of MRI Body Anatomy. Lippincott-Raven
  • Durham, D. (1997), Atlas of MR Pathology. W.B.Saunders Kelly, L. &. Petersen, M.(1997), Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals. Mosby Shellock, F. & Kanal, E. (1996), Magnetic Resonance Bioeffects, Safety and Patient Management. Lippincott-Raven St Amour, T. et al (1994), MRI of the Spine. Raven Press Stark, D. & Bradley W. (Eds), (1998), Magnetic Resonance Imaging 3rd edition, Mosby Year Book Westbrook, C. (1999), Handbook of MRI Technique. Blackwell Science WEBSITES: www.mritutor.org www.cis.rit.edu www.ismrm.org www.mrisafety.com www.topspins.com - about MR angiography www.mrieducation.com www.med.harvard.edu JOURNALS American Journal of Roentgenology British Journal of Radiology Clinical Radiology Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Physics in Medicine and Biology RadioGraphics <http://radiographics.rsnajnls.org> Radiologic Clinics of North America Radiology http://radiology.rsnajnls.org> Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MR
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management II (MRI) (Musculo-skeletal) code: MMIHF4MCM credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Chris Jeffery MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a skilled, competent and confident practitioner of MRI of the musculo-skeletal system. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of MRI in the management of patients. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students should be able to: 1. demonstrate competence in the MR imaging of the musculo-skeletal system and a sound understanding of sequence choice and rationale and the appropriate use of contrast agents; 2. interpret images and produce a written commentary in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate accurate recognition of common anatomy and pathology in the relevant areas, and their MRI manifestations; 4. critically evaluate sequence choice and manipulation in relation to the relevant anatomy and physiology; 5. demonstrate a sound, practical knowledge of sequence choice, factor manipulation, image quality and image post processing techniques; 6. examine critically the relationship of MRI to other diagnostic imaging techniques, evaluating where MRI will have maximum benefit to patient management. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development
  • MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology of the musculo-skeletal system; Comparative imaging techniques; The principles of MRI science and technology relative to the musculo-skeletal system; Quality assurance and image quality pertaining to the musculo-skeletal system, including artefact recognition and reduction techniques. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-6 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 60 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of musculo-skeletal imaging examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and comparative, reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of commentaries with reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Berquist, T. (1995), Pocket Atlas of MRI Musculo-skeletal Anatomy. Lippincott-Raven Berquist, T. (Ed) (1995), MRI of the Musculo-skeletal system. Lippincott-Raven Durham, D. (1997), Atlas of MR Pathology. W.B.Saunders Kelly, L. &. Petersen, M.(1997), Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals. Mosby Pomeranz, S. (1991), Orthopaedic MRI: a teaching file. Lippincott-Raven
  • Stark, D. & Bradley W. (Eds), (1998), Magnetic Resonance Imaging 3rd edition, Moseby Year Book Stoller, D. (1997), Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine 2nd edition. Lippincott-Raven Westbrook, C. (1999), Handbook of MRI Technique. Blackwell Science WEBSITES: www.mritutor.org www.cis.rit.edu www.ismrm.org www.mrisafety.com www.topspins.com - about MR angiography www.mrieducation.com www.med.harvard.edu www.t2star.com JOURNALS American Journal of Roentgenology British Journal of Radiology Clinical Radiology Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Physics in Medicine and Biology RadioGraphics <http://radiographics.rsnajnls.org> Radiologic Clinics of North America Radiology http://radiology.rsnajnls.org> Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MR
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management III (MRI) (Non-routine brain, head & neck) code: MMIHF4MCN credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Chris Jeffery MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a skilled, competent and confident practitioner of MRI in the non-routine brain, and head and neck, including the principles and applications of MR Angiography (MRA), diffusion and perfusion imaging, and contrast agents. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of MRI in the management of patients. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students should be able to: 1. demonstrate competence in the MR imaging of the brain and associated structures, and head and neck, demonstrating a sound understanding of sequence choice and rationale and the appropriate use of contrast agents; 2. interpret images and produce a written commentary in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate accurate recognition of common anatomy and pathology in the relevant areas, and their MRI manifestations; 4. critically evaluate sequence choice and manipulation in relation to the relevant anatomy and physiology; 5. demonstrate a sound, practical knowledge of sequence choice, factor manipulation, image quality and image post processing techniques; 6. examine critically the relationship of MRI to other diagnostic imaging techniques, evaluating where MRI will have maximum benefit to patient management; 7. appraise critically the principles and applications, current and future, of MRA. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context
  • 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology of the brain and associated structures, head and neck; Comparative imaging techniques; The principles of MRI science and technology relative to the brain and associated structures, and the head and neck; The principles, sequences and applications of functional imaging (perfusion and diffusion); The use of image registration (e.g. MRI, CT and PET), including post processing and image manipulation techniques; MR Angiography – time of flight, phase contrast and contrast enhanced studies; Diffusion and perfusion imaging; Principles and applications of proton MR spectroscopy; MRI contrast agents; Quality assurance and image quality pertaining to the non-routine brain, head and neck, including artefact recognition and reduction techniques. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-7 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 60 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of non-routine brain and head and neck imaging examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and comparative, reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of commentaries with reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence.
  • ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Berquist, T. (1995), Pocket Atlas of MRI Body Anatomy. Lippincott-Raven Durham, D. (1997), Atlas of MR Pathology. W.B.Saunders Higgins, C. Hrikak, H. Helms, C. (Eds) (1997), Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Body, Lippincott-Raven Kelly, L. &. Petersen, M. (1997), Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals. Mosby Stark, D. & Bradley W. (Eds), (1998), Magnetic Resonance Imaging 3rd edition, Moseby Year Book Westbrook, C. (1999), Handbook of MRI Technique. Blackwell Science WEBSITES: www.mritutor.org www.cis.rit.edu www.ismrm.org www.mrisafety.com www.topspins.com - about MR angiography www.mrieducation.com www.med.harvard.edu www.t2star.com JOURNALS American Journal of Roentgenology British Journal of Radiology Clinical Radiology Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Physics in Medicine and Biology RadioGraphics <http://radiographics.rsnajnls.org> Radiologic Clinics of North America Radiology http://radiology.rsnajnls.org> Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MR
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management IV (MRI) (Body imaging) code: MMIH4NPS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Chris Jeffery MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a skilled, competent and confident practitioner of MR body imaging, including cardiac and breast imaging; To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of MRI in the management of patients. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students should be able to: 1. demonstrate competence in body imaging, cardiac imaging and breast imaging, including an evaluation of sequence choice and rationale and the appropriate use of MRI contrast agents; 2. interpret images and produce a written commentary in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate accurate recognition of common anatomy and pathology in the relevant areas, and their MRI manifestations; 4. critically evaluate sequence choice and manipulation in relation to the relevant anatomy and physiology; 5. demonstrate sound knowledge of sequence choice, factor manipulation, image quality and image post processing techniques; 6. examine critically the relationship of MRI to other diagnostic imaging techniques, evaluating where MRI will have maximum benefit to patient management; 7. demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles and techniques used in fast imaging, including their current and future applications, and their specific advantages in body imaging; 8. evaluate current MRI systems and critically evaluate the future development opportunities. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context
  • 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology of the abdomen, pelvis, cardiac and breast; Comparative imaging techniques; The principles of MRI science and technology relative to imaging the body; The principles, sequences and applications of cardiac imaging; Fast scanning techniques (e.g. echo-planar imaging, breath-hold); MRI contrast agents used in the body; Future developments in MRI; Quality assurance and image quality pertaining to body imaging, including artefact recognition and reduction techniques. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 60 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of magnetic resonance imaging technique examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and comparative, reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of commentaries with reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Heywang-Kobrunner, S. & Beck, R. (1996), Contrast Enhanced MR of the Breast, Springer
  • Higgins, C. Hrikak, H. Helms, C. (Eds) (1997), Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Body, Lippincott-Raven Lardo, A.C., Fayad, Z.A., Chronos, N.A.F. & Fuster V.(2003) Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Mirowitz, S. (1996), Pitfalls, Variants and Artefacts in Body MR Imaging, Moseby Ros, P. & Bidgood, W. (1998), Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Moseby Stark, D. & Bradley W. (Eds), (1998), Magnetic Resonance Imaging 3rd edition, Moseby Year Book Westbrook, C. (1999), Handbook of MRI Technique. Blackwell Science WEBSITES: www.mritutor.org www.cis.rit.edu www.ismrm.org www.mrisafety.com www.topspins.com - about MR angiography www.mrieducation.com www.med.harvard.edu www.t2star.com JOURNALS American Journal of Roentgenology British Journal of Radiology Clinical Radiology Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging Physics in Medicine and Biology RadioGraphics <http://radiographics.rsnajnls.org> Radiologic Clinics of North America Radiology http://radiology.rsnajnls.org> Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MR
  • Module Title: Principles of Science & Technology in Nuclear Medicine code: MMIHF4NPS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 40 hours taught & 160 hours independent study academic responsibility: Chris Jeffery MODULE AIM The aim of the module is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of the science, technology and mathematics necessary to become a competent practitioner in Nuclear Medicine LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. discuss the various types of radioactive decay processes and their relationship to nuclear medicine procedures; 2. demonstrate understanding of the interaction of radiation with matter and competence with the associated mathematical functions; 3. understand the physical principles, chemical processes and radiation protection principles applicable to radiopharmaceutical production; 4. evaluate the processes which contribute to degradation of radiopharmaceuticals; 5. appraise critically the methods for detecting and measuring radiation and the uses of various devices in nuclear medicine and their continuing development. 6. evaluate methods available for storage and hard copy of images and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret data in research studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Relate and interact effectively with individuals and groups 5 Problem Solving Use relevant information sources. Identify and solve problems associated with study skills and assessment at M level 6 Improving own learning and Manage own time in achieving objectives performance MODULE CONTENT Atomic structure, radioactive decay processes, the interaction of radiation with matter and their applications in nuclear medicine.
  • The mathematics of decay processes, isotope production and radionuclide generators. The production of radiopharmaceuticals, metal-ligand chemistry and breakdown of radiopharmaceuticals by radiation and chemical processes. Radiation safety and protection. The use of radiation detectors e.g. Geiger-Muller tubes and sodium iodide detectors. Gamma cameras and their development including single, double and triple headed cameras, the latest crystal detectors and digital imaging heads. The measurement of radioactivity using ionization chambers. Image generation, hard and soft copy and routine image manipulation, enhancement and display. The use of computer technology to facilitate fast image transfer within and between imaging centres and mass storage devices. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Formal lectures, case study presentations, group tutorials, practical demonstrations. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT The assessment will comprise: A 20 minute oral presentation to the cohort (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S 1-6) A 2000 word fully referenced synopsis (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S1, 2, 3, 5, 6) Students will present a critical evaluation of how imaging parameters may affect image quality and perceptibility of diagnostic information. The presentation will be derived from material gathered from the student’s clinical centre and make use of the equipment, quality control phantoms, homemade phantoms and relevant clinical examples. Reflecting safe, current practice, it should demonstrate a sound knowledge of the relevant fundamental physics, the features and capabilities of the equipment, the nature of particular imaging parameters over which the practitioner has control, the interrelationships between them and their influence on image quality. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bernier, Christian & Langan (Eds), (1997), Nuclear Medicine - Technology and Techniques 4th Edition. Mosby Chandra, R., (2005), Nuclear Medicine Physics the Basics, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Farr & Allisy-Roberts, (1997), Physics for Medical Imaging, W.B. Saunders IPEMB report no73, (1996), Mathematical Techniques in Nuclear Medicine, IPEM IPEM, (1991), Radiation Protection in Nuclear Medicine and Pathology IPEM Knoll, G., (1989), Radiation Detection and Measurement, Wiley Steves, A., (1992), Review of Nuclear Medicine Technology, Society of Nuclear Medicine WEBSITES www.bnms.org www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm www.nycomed-amersham.com
  • www.nud.co.uk www.asnc.org www.snm.org JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Communications The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management I (Standard NM Procedures) code: MMIHF4NCS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Peter Milburn & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a competent and confident practitioner of Nuclear Medicine in relation to standard imaging procedures. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of standard nuclear medicine images in the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce images of diagnostic quality for standard nuclear medicine procedures using safe working practices, identifying those factors which optimize/degrade image production; 2. demonstrate the ability to interpret normal and abnormal appearances on standard nuclear medicine images, recognise artefacts and produce a written commentary/report in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate understanding of the underlying physiology and pathology pertaining to each investigation; 4. discuss the relationship of nuclear medicine to other complementary or alternative imaging modalities, evaluating benefits to patient management; 5. appraise critically the role of nuclear medicine with particular regard to cost, radiation safety and availability; 6. demonstrate a comprehensive awareness of legislation governing nuclear medicine and its implications for service delivery; 7. acknowledge the particular needs of patients and clients in relation to nuclear medicine procedures and offer appropriate care. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals performance and professional development
  • MODULE CONTENT Image acquisition, optimization of image quality, quality control of images, image media, and radiation protection. Anatomy, physiology and pathology of standard nuclear medicine imaging including bone, renal, lung, cardiac, (para)thyroid, brain, liver, infection imaging, oncology and bone densitometry. Image processing, image enhancement and post acquisition techniques. Identification of abnormal pathology and diagnostic pathways incorporating other imaging modalities. The legislative controls on the use of unsealed sources in nuclear medicine, radiation safety and patient safeguarding. Patient – professional interaction. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-7 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 125 cases, demonstrating that the full range of standard nuclear medicine procedures has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary/report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bernier, Christian& Langan(Eds),(1997), Nuclear Medicine - Technology and Techniques 4th Edition. Mosby Fogelman, I (Ed) (1987), Bone Scanning in Clinical Practice, Springer-Verlag Gelfand, M. Thomas, S. (1988), Effective Use of Computers in Nuclear Medicine
  • Gerson, M., (1991), Cardiac Nuclear Medicine 2nd Edition, Mc-Graw-Hill Lee, K., (1991), Computers in Nuclear Medicine: A Practical Approach, Society of Nuclear Medicine Maisey, Britton, Collier. (1998), Clinical Nuclear Medicine 3rd Edition, Chapman and Hall Medical Mistry, R., (1988), Manual of Nuclear Medicine Procedures, Chapman and Hall Medical Murray, I. & Ell, P. (1998), Nuclear Medicine in Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment, Churchill Livingstone Pennell, D. (1992), Thallium Myocardial Perfusion Tomography in Clinical Cardiology, C. Livingstone Peters, M. (2003) Nuclear Medicine In Radiological Diagnosis, Woolf, Anthony D. (1988), Osteoporosis – A Clinical Guide, Dunitz WEBSITES www.bnms.org www.snm.org www.asnc.org www.nycomed-amersham.com www.nud.co.uk www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Communications The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Osteoporosis International
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management II (Complex & Non-standard NM Procedures) code: MMIHF4NCC credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Peter Milburn & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a competent and confident practitioner of Nuclear Medicine in relation to complex and non standard imaging procedures. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of complex and non standard nuclear medicine images in the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce images of diagnostic quality, using safe working practices, for complex and non standard nuclear medicine procedures; 2. demonstrate the ability to interpret normal and abnormal appearances on complex and non standard nuclear medicine images, recognise artefacts and produce a written commentary/report in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate understanding of the underlying physiology and pathology pertaining to each investigation; 4. discuss the relationship of nuclear medicine to other complementary or alternative imaging modalities, evaluating future developments and potential benefits to patient management; 5. acknowledge the particular needs of patients and clients in relation to complex and non standard nuclear medicine procedures and offer appropriate care. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development INDICATIVE MODULE CONTENT Image acquisition, optimization of image quality, quality control of images and radiation protection.
  • Anatomy, physiology and pathology of complex and non standard nuclear medicine imaging including brain perfusion, antibody infection imaging and new developments in the diagnosis of malignancy. Image processing, image enhancement and post acquisition techniques including tomographic reconstruction, filtering and 3D rendering. Identification of abnormal pathology and diagnostic pathways incorporating other imaging modalities and anticipation of the likely direction of advancements. Patient – professional interaction. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-5 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 75 cases, demonstrating that the full range of complex and advanced nuclear medicine procedures has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary/report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bernier, Christian& Langan(Eds) (1997), Nuclear Medicine - Technology and Techniques 4th Edition. Mosby Gelfand, M. Thomas, S. (1988), Effective Use of Computers in Nuclear Medicine George et al. (1991), Neuroactivation and Neuroimaging with SPET, Springer-Verlag Gerson, M. (1991), Cardiac Nuclear Medicine 2nd Edition, Mc-Graw-Hill Goris, M. Bretille, J. (1992), A Colour Atlas of Nuclear Cardiology, Chapman & Hall Larock et al. (1993), New Developments in Myocardial Imaging, Martin Dunitz Lee, K (1991), Computers in Nuclear Medicine: A Practical Approach, Society of Nuclear Medicine Maisey, Britton, Collier (1998), Clinical Nuclear Medicine 3rd Edition, Chapman and Hall Medical Mistry, R. (1988), Manual of Nuclear Medicine Procedures, Chapman and Hall Medical Murray, I. & Ell, P. (1998), Nuclear Medicine in Clinical Diagnosis & Treatment Vols I & II. Churchill Livingstone Pennell, D. (1992), Thallium Myocardial Perfusion Tomography in Clinical Cardiology C.
  • Livingstone WEBSITES www.bnms.org www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm www.nycomed-amersham.com www.nud.co.uk www.asnc.org www.snm.org JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine Communications
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management III (Positron Emis sion Tomography, PET) code: MMIHF4NCP credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Peter Milburn & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a competent and confident practitioner of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of PET imaging in the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce PET images of diagnostic quality, using safe working practices; 2. demonstrate the ability to interpret normal and abnormal image appearances, recognise artefacts and produce a written commentary/report in relation to clinical presentation; 3. demonstrate understanding of the underlying anatomy, physiology and pathology; 4. demonstrate appreciation of the particular radiation protection requirements and radio-pharmaceutical preparation; 5. evaluate the relative contribution of PET imaging to the management of patients and clients; 6. critically appraise PET imaging as a diagnostic tool, differentially evaluating its use in terms of cost, patient radiation doses and availability; 7. acknowledge the particular needs of patients and clients in relation to PET imaging and offer appropriate care. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals performance and professional development
  • MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology of PET imaging, including brain, cardiac and whole body imaging in oncology. Cyclotron operation, PET radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control. The acquisition and processing of PET images. Radiation protection. The cost of PET and the role of PET imaging today and in the future. The merits of PET gamma cameras. Patient –professional interaction LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module learning intended outcomes 1-7 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 50 cases, demonstrating that the full range PET nuclear medicine procedures has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unassisted examinations must include a written commentary/report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of reports; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Larock et al (1993), New Developments in Myocardial Imaging, Martin Dunitz Maisey, Wahl & Barrington Arnold (1999), Atlas of Clinical Positron Emission Tomography Marcel P.M. Stokkel (1999), The Clinical Applicability of F18-FDG Detection with a Dual Head Coincidence Camera, Ponsen & Looijen Gerson, (1991), Cardiac Nuclear Medicine 2nd Edition, Mc-Graw-Hill WEBSITES www.bnms.org
  • www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm www.nycomed-amersham.com www.nud.co.uk www.asnc.org www.snm.org JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Communications The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management IV (Radionuclide Therapy) code: MMIHF4NCR credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Peter Milburn & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIM The aims of the module are: To enable the student to become a competent and confident practitioner of radionuclide therapy. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the contribution of radio nuclide therapy procedures to the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. undertake the administration of therapeutic doses of radio nuclides using safe working practices; 2. evaluate the role of radionuclide therapy and understand the technical and logistical problems associated with unsealed source treatment; 3. be aware of the needs of the patient undergoing radionuclide therapy and examine restrictions imposed on patients and their effects. 4. evaluate the differential uses of radionuclide therapy in patient management; KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT Anatomy, physiology and pathology relating to radionuclide therapy procedures. The role of unsealed source therapy in relation to teletherapy and chemotherapy. Calculation of radiation doses
  • (MIRDOSE) and radiation protection and contamination issues during treatment. Waste disposal and public dose restrictions relating to radionuclide radiotherapy, including the role of carers and support workers. Developments in therapeutic agents. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-4 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 20-30 cases, demonstrating that the full range of standard radionuclide therapy procedures has been observed. Participative procedures must include a written commentary/report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a randomly selected number of procedures; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bernier, Christian& Langan(Eds) (1997), Nuclear Medicine - Technology and Techniques 4th Edition. Mosby Maisey, Britton, Collier (1998), Clinical Nuclear Medicine 3rd Edition Chapman and Hall Medical Murray, I. & Ell, P. (1998), Nuclear Medicine in Clinical Diagnosis & Treatment Vols I & II. Churchill Livingstone Spencer, Richard P. (1978) Therapy in Nuclear Medicine , Grune and Stratton WEBSITES www.bnms.org www.snm.org www.asnc.org www.nycomed-amersham.com www.nud.co.uk www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm
  • JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Communications The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
  • Module Title: Radiopharmacy and Non-imaging Diagno stic Tests code: MMIHF4NRN credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Peter Milburn & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable students to produce radiopharmaceutical products safely and accurately and to perform a range of non- imaging investigations in nuclear medicine. To enable students to reflect on and critically evaluate the use of non imaging investigation in the management of patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. produce sterile radiopharmaceutical products within the guidelines of good manufacturing practice, incorporating aseptic technique, radiation protection practice and safe dispensing; 2. demonstrate a sound knowledge of factors affecting radiopharmaceutical manufacture; 3. demonstrate the ability to undertake quality control procedures such as environmental monitoring, sterility testing of products and radio nuclide/radiochemical purity measurement; 4. evaluate the role of blood cell labelling procedures and perform leucocyte and red/platelet radio labelling; 5. perform a range of non-imaging nuclear medicine procedures, GFR/ERPF measurement, carbon-14 breath testing, vitamin B12 malabsorption tests, and red cell mass measurement. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT Legislation and MCA recommendations controlling the environment and working practices of radio pharmacy units.
  • Radiopharmacy procedures, aseptic technique, quality assurance/control, radiation protection. Handling of radio nuclides as regards receipt, storage and disposal. Blood radio labelling techniques including leucocyte, erythrocyte and platelet labelling. The physiology and pathology of nuclear medicine non-imaging tests. Practical aspects of the tests and evaluation of the results. Critical appraisal of the tests in comparison with complementary techniques. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Formal lectures, practical radiopharmacy sessions, group discussions. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-5 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 100 radiopharmaceutical preparations, 10 blood labelling procedures and 20-30 non-imaging case studies demonstrating a full range of types, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted; 1x 2000 word case study on a non-imaging nuclear medicine investigation; 1 x 2000 word assignment on the working practices of a radiopharmacy; Clinical supervisor’s report and verification of competence. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bernier, Christian& Langan (Eds) (1997) Nuclear Medicine - Technology and Techniques 4th Edition. Mosby IPEM (1991), Radiation Protection in Nuclear Medicine and Pathology, IPEM Maisey, Britton, Collier (1998) Clinical Nuclear Medicine 3rd Edition, Chapman and Hall Medical Medicines Control Agency (1997) Rules and Guidance for Radio pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Distributors 1997, HMSO Mistry, R. (1988) Manual of Nuclear Medicine Procedures, Chapman and Hall Medical Murray, I. & Ell, P. (1998) Nuclear Medicine in Clinical Diagnosis & Treatment Vols I & II. Churchill Livingstone Steves, A. (1992) Review of Nuclear Medicine Technology, Society of Nuclear Medicine WEBSITES www.bnms.org www.snm.org
  • www.asnc.org www.nycomed-amersham.com www.nud.co.uk www.mallinckrodt.nl/nucmed/noframes/nuclear/resources.htm JOURNALS The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology Nuclear Medicine Communications The European Journal of Nuclear Medicine The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
  • Module Title: Principles of Science & Technology in Medical Ultrasound code: MMIHF4UPS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 40 hours taught & 160 hours independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear MODULE AIM The aim of the module is to provide practitioners with a sound knowledge of the scientific principles and technologies in ultrasound which underpin the provision of quality services to patients and clients. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to medical ultrasound, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge, understanding and application of the scientific principles underpinning medical diagnostic ultrasound imaging; 2. Evaluate ultrasound technologies used in medical ultrasound practice; 3. Utilise ultrasound technology effectively to produce appropriate diagnostic images and spectra, ensuring that image quality is optimized and exposure to ultrasound minimised according to clinical need; 4. Evaluate the formation of artefacts and differentiate between artefacts and true pathology; 5. Carry out effective quality monitoring in relation to ultrasound technology used in practice. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret data in research studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Relate and interact effectively with individuals and groups 5 Problem Solving Use relevant information sources. Identify and solve problems associated with study skills and assessment at M level 6 Improving own learning and Manage own time in achieving objectives performance MODULE CONTENT The physics of ultrasound and the scientific principles underpinning ultrasound imaging. The nature of artefacts and the problems they can give rise to. The range of ultrasound equipment that can and might be used, including the role of Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging techniques and the relative scientific roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities.
  • Performance measurements needed to ensure technical quality assurance. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Formal lectures, practical work, exercises and demonstrations, group tutorials, student led seminars. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT The assessment will comprise: A 20 minute oral presentation to the cohort (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S 1-6) A 2000 word fully referenced synopsis (50% weighting) (LOs 1-7) (K/S 1, 2, 3, 5, 6) Students will present a critical evaluation of how imaging parameters may affect image quality and perceptibility of diagnostic information. The presentation will be derived from material gathered from the student’s clinical centre and make use of the equipment, quality control phantoms, homemade phantoms and relevant clinical examples. Reflecting safe, current practice, it should demonstrate a sound knowledge of the relevant fundamental physics, the features and capabilities of the equipment, the nature of particular imaging parameters over which the practitioner has control, the interrelationships between them and their influence on image quality. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Evans, D.H., McDicken, W.N. (2000), Doppler Ultrasound: Physics, Instrumental, and Clinical Applications 2nd Edition, John Wiley and Sons. Fish, P. (1997), Physics and Instrumentation of Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound 5th Edition, John Wiley and Sons. Hedrick, W.R. (1994), Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation Mosby. Hoskins, P.R., Thrush, A., Diagnostic Ultrasound Physics and Equipment Greenwich Medical Media. Martin, K. & Whittingham T.A. (2003) Kremkau, F.W. (1997), Diagnostic Ultrasound: Principles and Instruments, WB Saunders Company. Nelson, T.R. (1999), Three-dimensional Ultrasound, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. Zagzebski, J.A. (1996), Essentials of Ultrasound Physics Mosby. WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.aium.org/consumer/obus.htm
  • JOURNALS Physics in Medicine and Biology Module Title: Techniques in Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound Imaging code: MMIHF4UTM credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 40 hours taught/ 160 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Kate Springett & Gill Dolbear MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To enable practitioners to transfer knowledge of physical principles of ultrasound imaging safely, efficiently and appropriately to musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging techniques. To facilitate development of ability in critical interpretation of musculoskeletal ultrasound images in varying clinical contexts relevant to the student’s own scope of practice. To appreciate the role of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging in practice and research. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to musculo-skeletal ultrasound, by the end of the module, students should be able to:
  • 1. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of different ultrasound imaging techniques relevant to different tissues, pathologies and body sites (K/S 1, 2, 3, 6); 2. Demonstrate an in depth understanding of visual interpretation, perception and orientation of musculoskeletal ultrasound images as relevant to their area of work/scope of practice (K/S 1, 2, 3, 6); 3. Reflect critically on the ethical and medico-legal implications of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging in an interprofessional context (K/S 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6); 4. Critically appraise published research on musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging and analyse its validity for health and social care practice (K/S 1, 2, 3, 4, 6). KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret data in published research 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the Internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork when writing about practice (poster) 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on ethical and medico-legal aspects of musculo-skeletal ultrasound in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance and professional development. (formative) MODULE CONTENT The appearance of pathology within different tissues when assessed using a range ultrasound imaging techniques (including aspects of perception, spatial awareness, orientation of images, B-mode imaging, Doppler imaging and movement during imaging). A review of the different imaging modalities available for the demonstration of different pathologies (purpose, cost effectiveness and impact on services and patients as individuals). The ethics and medico-legal implications of using ultrasound imaging for the assessment and diagnosis of musculo- skeletal disorders and injuries. The validity of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging research for health and social care practice.
  • LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Key note lectures, seminars, ‘hands-on’ workshops, demonstrations, web-based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Poster design (LO 1, 3 and 4) (K/S 1-6) (40%) and presentation (LO 1, 2, 3 and 4) (K/S 1, 2, 3, 5, 6) (60%) to demonstrate in depth understanding and critical awareness of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging as a clinical assessment tool. (The poster and presentation marking criteria will be in accordance with the Faculty of Health Masters Level Framework.) A 500 word minimum reflective account, illustrating key skills development throughout the module. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Adler, R., Sofka, C.M., Positano, R.G. (2004) Atlas of Foot and Ankle Sonography. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins: Philadelphia. Bennett, G.Y., El-Khoury D.L., Stanley, M.D. (2002) Essentials in Musculoskeletal Imaging. Bradley, M. and O’Donnell P. (2004) Atlas of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Anatomy. GMM: London. Brukner, P. and Khan, K. (2002) Clinical Sports Medicine. McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Eisenberg, R.L. (2003) Comprehensive Radiographic Pathology. Mosby. Fletcher, C.D.M. (Editor) (2004) Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone (World Health Organisation Classification of Tumours). Oxford University Press. Fornage, B.D. (Editor) (1995) Musculoskeletal Ultrasound (Clinics in Diagnostic Ultrasound). Churchill Livingstone: Philadelphia McNally, E. (2004) Practical Musculoskeletal Ultrasound. Churchill Livingstone: Philadelphia. Miller, C. and Freeman, M. (2001) Interprofessional Practice in Health and Social Care. Kingsley. Sevenhuijsen, S. (1998) Citizenship and the Ethics of Care. Routledge. WEBSITES http://www.bmus.org http://www.doh.gov.uk/nhs http://www.podiatricultrasound.com/ http://www.ultrasound.net JOURNALS American Journal of Sports Medicine Journal of Clinical Ultrasound
  • Journal of Interprofessional Care Radiography Skeletal Radiology The Foot Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management I (Obstetric & Pelvic Ultrasound) code: MMIHF4UCP credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Hazel Colyer MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To ensure the student becomes a skilled, competent, confident practitioner in both obstetric and pelvic ultrasound. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of pregnant and non-pregnant women. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to the pregnant abdomen and female pelvis, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce high quality diagnostic images using technique appropriate to the clinical condition and history, and manipulating the ultrasound controls effectively; 2. identify normal ultrasound appearances in relation to the relevant anatomy and physiological processes; 3. demonstrate a thorough knowledge base of the pathology that can affect pregnancy, the foetus and the female pelvic organs; 4. evaluate common pathological conditions demonstrated on ultrasound imaging, and discuss the related image patterns and disease mechanisms; 5. demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of ultrasound in the clinical management of the patient; 6. critically assess the relationship of the ultrasound report to other diagnostic tests, as well as its impact on patient management; 7. appraise critically the role of other imaging modalities; 8. acknowledge the particular patient care demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound investigations. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context
  • 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT The normal and abnormal anatomy, physiology and pathology of the pregnant abdomen and female pelvis related to the ultrasound imaging appearances. The relative roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities, including plain and contrast studies, computed tomography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Particular patient care and management demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound examinations, paying particular attention to children and those with fertility or pregnancy complications. Ethical and legal constraints to the practice of sonographers in this field of ultrasound imaging. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 250 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of obstetric and pelvic examinations has been carried out. Of these, a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unaided examinations must include a written report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a random number of interpretations/reports; Verification of competence in obstetric and pelvic ultrasound evidenced by the clinical supervisor’s report. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Allan, L.D. (1986), Manual of Foetal Echocardiography, MTP Press Limited. Benaceraff. (1998), Ultrasound of Foetal Syndromes, Churchill Livingstone Bonnar, J. (1998), Recent Advances In Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Churchill Livingstone Dewbury, K., Meire, H., Cosgrove, D. (1993), Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Churchill Livingstone. Dodson, M. (1995), Transvaginal Ultrasound 2nd Edition, Churchill Livingstone England, M.A. (1996), Life Before Birth 2nd Edition, Mosby-Wolfe. Fleischer, A.C., Kepple, D.M. (1992), Transvaginal Sonography A Clinical Atlas, J.B.Lippincott Company.
  • Impey, L. (1999), Obstetrics and Gynaecology Blackwell Science Limited. Johnston, P.G.B. (1998), The Newborn Child Churchill Livingstone Nicolaides, K.H., Sebire, N.J., Snijders, J.M. (1999), The 11-14 week scan. The diagnosis of foetal abnormalities, Parthenon. Nyberg, D.A., Mahony, B.S., Pretorius, D.H. (1990), Diagnostic Ultrasound of Foetal Anomalies: Text and Atlas Mosby. Rumack, C.M., Wilson, S.R., Charboneau, J.W. (1998), Diagnostic Ultrasound 2nd Edition, Mosby. Sanders, R.C., Smith, N. (1997), Clinical Sonography A Practical Guide, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. Sanders, R.C. (1996), Structural Foetal Abnormalities The Total Picture, Mosby. WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.ectopic.org.uk w-cpc.org/fetal.html www.genecare.com/amnio.html JOURNALS American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Gynaecologic Oncology Journal of Clinical Ultrasound Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology British Medical Journal Fertility and Sterility Human Reproduction Obstetric and Gynaecology Survey Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management II (Abdominal & Small Parts Ultrasound) code: MMIHF4UCS credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Hazel Colyer MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To ensure the student becomes a skilled, competent, confident practitioner abdominal ultrasound
  • To enable the student to carry out some small parts examinations competently To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of patients presenting for abdominal or small parts examinations. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to the abdomen and nominated small parts examinations, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce high quality diagnostic images using technique appropriate to the clinical condition and history, and manipulating the ultrasound controls effectively; 2. identify normal ultrasound appearances in relation to relevant anatomy and physiological processes; 3. demonstrate a thorough knowledge base of the pathology that can affect the abdomen, the breast, the thyroid gland and the testes; 4. evaluate common pathological conditions and discuss the related image patterns and disease mechanisms; 5. demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of ultrasound in the clinical management of the patient; 6. critically assess the relationship of the ultrasound report to other diagnostic tests, as well as its impact on patient management; 7. appraise critically the role of other imaging modalities; 8. acknowledge the particular patient care demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound investigations. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT The normal and abnormal anatomy, physiology and pathology of the abdomen and nominated small parts, related to the ultrasound imaging appearances. The relative roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities, including plain and contrast studies, computed tomography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Particular patient care and management demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound examinations. Ethical and legal constraints to the practice of sonographers in this field of ultrasound imaging.
  • LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 250 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of abdominal examinations and some nominated small part examinations has been carried out. A substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unaided examinations must include a written report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a random number of interpretations/reports; Verification of competence in abdominal and small parts ultrasound evidenced by the clinical supervisor’s report. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bates, J.A. (1999), Abdominal Ultrasound How, Why and When, Churchill Livingstone. Bissett, R.A.L., Khan, A.N. (1991), Differential Diagnosis in Abdominal Ultrasound, 2nd Edition, Bailliere Tindall. Evans, R., Ahuja, A. (1999), Practical Head and Neck Ultrasound, Greenwich Medical Media. Hickey, J., Goldberg, F. (1999), Ultrasound Review of the Abdomen, Male Pelvis & Small Parts, Lippincott. Lees, W.R., Lyons, E.A. (1996), Invasive Ultrasound, Martin Dunitz Rumack, C.M., Wilson, S.R., Charboneau, J.W. (1998), Diagnostic Ultrasound 2nd Edition, Mosby. Sanders, R., Smith, N. (1997), Clinical Sonography a Practical Guide, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.limit.ac.uk/pancreas.htm www.brisbio.ac.uk/roads/subject-listing/orchitis.html www.prostatitis.org JOURNALS
  • American Journal of Radiology British Medical Journal British Journal of Radiologists British Journal of Surgery British Journal of Urology Journal of Ultrasound Medicine Lancet Paediatrics Radiology Surgery
  • Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management III (Musculo-skeletal Ultrasound) code: MMIHF4UCM credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Peter Milburn MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To ensure the student becomes a skilled, competent, confident practitioner in musculo-skeletal ultrasound. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of patients suffering from musculo-skeletal disease or injury. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to musculo-skeletal ultrasound, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce high quality diagnostic images using technique appropriate to the clinical condition and history, and manipulating the ultrasound controls effectively; 2. identify normal ultrasound appearances in relation to relevant anatomy and physiological processes; 3. demonstrate a thorough knowledge base of the pathology and trauma that may be present; 4. evaluate common traumatic and pathological conditions and discuss the related image patterns and disease or trauma mechanisms; 5. demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of ultrasound in the clinical management of the patient; 6. critically assess the relationship of the ultrasound report to other diagnostic tests, as well as its impact on patient management; 7. appraise critically the role of other imaging modalities; 8. acknowledge the particular patient care demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound investigations. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development
  • MODULE CONTENT The normal and abnormal anatomy, physiology and pathology of the musculo-skeletal system, related to the ultrasound imaging appearances. The relative roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities, including plain and contrast studies, computed tomography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Particular patient care and management demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound examinations. Ethical and legal constraints to the practice of sonographers in this field of ultrasound imaging. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 250 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of musculo-skeletal examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unaided examinations must include a written report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a random number of interpretations/reports; Verification of competence in musculo-skeletal ultrasound evidenced by the clinical supervisor’s report. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Chhem, R., Cardinal, E. (1998), Guidelines and Gamuts in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound, John Wiley and Sons Enzinger, F.M., Weiss, S.W. (1995), Soft Tissue Tumours 3rd Edition, Mosby. Fornage, B.D. (1989), Ultrasonography of muscles and tendons: Examination technique and atlas of normal anatomy of the extremities Springer-Verlag Gibbon, W.W. (1996), Musculoskeletal Ultrasound: The essentials, Oxford University Press Harries, M., Williams, C., Stanish, W.D., Micheli, L.J., (1994), Oxford Textbook of Sports Medicine, Oxford University Press. Rumack, C.M., Wilson, S.R., Charboneau, J.W. (1998), Diagnostic Ultrasound 2nd Edition, Mosby.
  • WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.aium.org/consumer.htm JOURNALS American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Radiology British Journal of Surgery Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Journal of Clinical Ultrasound Journal of Paediatric Orthopaedics Journal of Neurosurgery Lancet Radiology Skeletal Radiology Surgery Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management IV (Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound) code: MMIHF4UCV credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Peter Milburn MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To ensure the student becomes a skilled, competent, confident practitioner in peripheral vascular ultrasound. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of patients with peripheral vascular disease. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to the peripheral vascular system, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce high quality diagnostic images using technique appropriate to the clinical condition and history, and manipulating the ultrasound controls effectively;
  • 2. identify normal ultrasound appearances in relation to relevant anatomy and physiological processes; 3. demonstrate a thorough knowledge base of the pathology that can affect the peripheral vascular system; 4. evaluate common pathological conditions and discuss the related image patterns and disease mechanisms; 5. demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of ultrasound in the clinical management of the patient; 6. critically assess the relationship of the ultrasound report to other diagnostic tests, as well as its impact on patient management; 7. appraise critically the role of other imaging modalities; 8. acknowledge the particular patient care demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound investigations. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development MODULE CONTENT The normal and abnormal anatomy, physiology and pathology of the peripheral vascular system, related this to the ultrasound imaging appearances. The relative roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities, including plain and contrast studies, computed tomography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Particular patient care and management demands of patients of all ages undergoing ultrasound examinations. Ethical and legal constraints to the practice of sonographers in this field of ultrasound imaging. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing:
  • A record of 250 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of Peripheral Vascular examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unaided examinations must include a written report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; Audit and reflective analysis of a random number of interpretations/reports; Verification of competence in peripheral vascular ultrasound evidenced by the clinical supervisor’s report. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Jamieson, C.W., Yao, J.S.T.(1994), Vascular Surgery 5th Edition, Chapman and Hall Medical. Kim, D., Orron, D.E. (1992), Peripheral Vascular Imaging and Intervention, Mosby. Krebs, C.A. (1998), Ultrasound Atlas of Vascular Diseases, Appleton and Lange. Rumack, C.M., Wilson, Charboneau, J.W. (1998), S.R., Diagnostic Ultrasound 2nd Edition, Mosby. Thrush, A., Hartshorne, T., (1999), Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound How, Why and When Churchill Livingstone. Zwiebel, W.J. (2000), Introduction to Vascular Ultrasonography 4th Edition, W.B. Saunders. WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.aium.org/consumer.htm JOURNALS American Journal of Medicine American Journal of Radiology British Journal of Surgery Circulation Clinical Radiology Journal of Clinical Ultrasound Journal of Ultrasound Medicine Lancet Medicine Radiology
  • Stroke Surgery Module Title: Clinical Applications & Management V (Echocardiography) code: MMIHF4UCE credit rating: 20 HE4 credits duration: 5 hours academic support / 100 hours clinical supervision/ 95 hrs independent study academic responsibility: Gill Dolbear & Peter Milburn MODULE AIMS The aims of the module are: To ensure the student becomes a skilled, competent, confident practitioner in adult echocardiography. To enable the student to reflect on and critically evaluate the role of ultrasound in the management of patients with heart disease. LEARNING OUTCOMES In relation to the heart, by the end of the module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate the ability to produce high quality diagnostic images using technique appropriate to the clinical condition and history, and manipulating the ultrasound controls effectively; 2. identify normal ultrasound appearances in relation to relevant anatomy and physiological processes; 3. demonstrate a thorough knowledge base of the pathology that can affect the heart; 4. evaluate common pathological conditions and discuss the related image patterns and disease mechanisms; 5. demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of ultrasound in the clinical management of the patient; 6. critically assess the relationship of the ultrasound report to other diagnostic tests, as well as its impact on patient management; 7. appraise critically the role of other imaging modalities; 8. acknowledge the particular patient care demands of patients undergoing ultrasound investigations. KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret quantitative data in research and/or audit studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and
  • development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and performance professional development INDICATIVE MODULE CONTENT The normal and abnormal anatomy, physiology and pathology of the adult heart related to the ultrasound imaging appearances. The relative roles of ultrasound imaging and other imaging modalities, including plain and contrast studies, computed tomography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging. Particular patient care and management demands of patients of undergoing ultrasound examinations. Ethical and legal constraints to the practice of sonographers in this field of ultrasound imaging. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Work based supervision and practice, shadowing activities, clinical meetings and tutorials, expert lectures, self directed study, web based materials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT Portfolio of Clinical and Professional Development, to meet module intended learning outcomes 1-8 and K/S 1-6, containing: A record of 250 examinations demonstrating that a wide range of Echocardiography examinations has been carried out, of which a substantial number must have been completed unassisted. Unaided examinations must include a written report; 2 x 750 word case reports to the standard of an academic journal; 1 x 2000 word in depth case study; (video/dynamic material is essential in each of the case studies.) Audit and reflective analysis of a random number of interpretations/reports; Verification of competence in echocardiography evidenced by the clinical supervisor’s report. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Boudreau Conover, M. (1996), Understanding Electrocardiography, 7th Edition, Mosby. Braunwald, E. (1997), Heart Disease Volume H2 5th Edition, B. Saunders Company. Chambers, J. (1995), Clinical Echocardiography British Medical Journal. Haslett, C., Chilvers, E.R., Hunter, J.A.A., Boon, N.A. (1999), Davidson’s Principles and Practice of Medicine
  • 18th Edition, Churchill Livingstone Schmailzl, K.J.G., Ormerod, O. (1994), Ultrasound in Cardiology Iowa State, University Press WEBSITES www.ultrasound.net www.aium.org/consumer/obus.htm JOURNALS American Journal of Medicine British Medical Journal Circulation Heart Journal of Ultrasound Medicine Journal of Clinical Ultrasound Lancet Medicine Stroke
  • Module Title: Open Module (Work-based learning) code: MZZHF4OP1 level: HE4 duration: 5 hours academic support plus 195 hrs independent work based practice and/or private study academic responsibility: Appropriate academic supervisor and professional/clinical supervisor MODULE AIMS The aim of an open module is to enable the accreditation of a negotiated profession development experience conducted outside the College, assisting the practitioner in their autonomous self development through a critical, systematic, circumscribed enquiry into an aspect of professional development which includes the opportunity for considered reflection and self evaluation. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the module and in relation to the specific topic or professional role development, students should be able to: 1. organise documentation to convey clearly the processes undertaken and what has been achieved, including their own learning and competence development where specified; 2. critically appraise contemporary relevant literature; 3. analyse the focus and processes of development through insightful recording of actions and reactions in the practice situation; 4. synthesise theoretical perspectives in relation to the particular professional practice; 5. demonstrate rigorous self evaluation of the process and outcomes of the development experience. In addition, where competences are being developed and ass ess ed, students should be able to: 6. demonstrate the achievement of specified competences in the work place situation KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES Key Skills 1 Communication Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature in writing 2 Application of Number Critically interpret data in research studies 3 Information Technology Access and use efficiently the internet, College databases and computer software for assignment content and presentation 4 Working with Others Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork 5 Problem Solving Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context 6 Improving own Learning and Performance Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and professional development MODULE CONTENT
  • The Learning Agreement A learning agreement is formulated between the student, the academic institution and the work place. The agreement outlines the background to the study, the aim of the module, how intended learning outcomes will be met, the mode of study and the timescale for completion. It is signed by all relevant parties. THE ROLE OF THE COLLEGE The College undertakes to provide academic support, relevant guidance materials and access to resources. The Programme Director will facilitate the learning agreement and registration. An Academic Supervisor will be appointed having the following duties: 1. to provide clear guidance on professional research and develop issues in the context of the topic chosen; 2. to engage in approximately three one-to-one tutorials; 3. to facilitate links with other sources of information and expertise; 4. to provide detailed feedback on interim material submitted; 5. to act as the first marker of the final submission. THE ROLE OF THE WORKPLACE Students must ensure that they have the co-operation of their Line Manager prior to the commencing study for an open module. The nature of the module should be such that the Line Manager can appreciate the potential benefits to service provision and facilitate the enquiry without detriment to service delivery. Where competence development is part of the learning outcomes specified in the learning agreement, the Clinical Supervisor will be required to verify evidence of the student’s professional competence as part of their final Clinical Supervisors’ report. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES These are specified in the individual learning agreement. ASSESSMENT The enquiry report, portfolio or essay will comprise 5000 words equivalent undertaken in one of the following four modes over a period of six to nine months: Work Based (without practice competence development): 1. Empirical Study with Report This comprises a research based study of a practice situation. The accompanying report will encompass literature review, justification of method, reflection and recommendations. 2. Action Research and Portfolio A professional action is taken and a systematic evaluation of that action is undertaken. All the relevant documentation of the evaluation and reflection process are included in a portfolio; e.g. initial statement, reports on group discussions, support from manager, enquiry report, critical analysis and reflection.
  • Work Based (with practice competence development): 3. Profes sional Role Development The role to be developed is identified and a programme of professional practice is instigated, underpinned by the development of the appropriate knowledge/value base. The nature of the competence is generally at a higher level or advanced practice in line with published professional standards. Over the study period, a Portfolio of Professional Practice Development containing formative and summative relevant material forms the learning and assessment tool. Specific elements for assessment include a record of practice, in-depth case studies, critical, reflective evaluation and a practice supervisor’s verification report. Literature Based: 4. Extended e s say An in depth, critical analysis by extended essay of the body of literature relevant to a specific work place situation in order to elaborate and develop the arguments. The essay explores all relevant perspectives, demonstrates personal development and proposes a practical response, applicable to the workplace. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY/JOURNALS/WEBSITES Appropriate to the students area of professional practice.
  • Module Title: Developing a Research Propo sal code: MZZHF4DRP level: HE4 duration: 40 hours contact (including 5 hours of tutorials), 160 hours private independent study academic responsibility: Professor Stephen Clift MODULE AIMS The module provides students with practical guidance on the development of a research proposal and enables them to develop practical skills in the use of common methods of data gathering and analysis. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the module students should be able to: 1. demonstrate ability to systematic search appropriate databases and produce a comprehensive and critical review of recent and relevant literature related to their proposed research (KS 1, 2, 3); 2. produce clear and specific aims and objectives for their project which are both grounded in appropriate literature and related to professional practice (KS 1, 4, 5, 6); 3. demonstrate a critical understanding of research design and methods in health research and justify their decisions regarding the approach to be adopted (KS 1, 2, 5); 4. demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic principles of quantitative and qualitative analysis and justify their decisions regarding the analytic methods to be used (KS 1, 2, 5); 5. demonstrate a sound understanding of basic ethical principles governing health research, taking account of current guidance from local ethics committees (KS 1, 4, 5, 6). KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES Key Skills 1 Communication Present in writing, a clear, succinct and evidence-based rationale for the intended project, which demonstrates a critical appraisal of a wide variety of information. 2 Application of Number Demonstrate an understanding of the role and limitations of statistical techniques in health research. Be able to competently interpret tables of data in research papers. 3 Information Technology Demonstrate competent and efficient use of the WWW, CLINIC and other electronic databases. 4 Working with others Seek advice from peers, managers and colleagues associated with the local R&D department and ethics committee, in the development and refinement of research proposals. 5 Problem solving Formulate a plan of action for a project which will serve to provide answers or solutions to professionally focused research problems. 6 Improving own learning and Demonstrate self-reflection, self-motivation, advanced skills of independent performance learning, and the ability to identify and seek appropriate guidance for improving performance. MODULE CONTENT
  • Useful starting points for identifying a research topic. Strategies for finding research information relevant to proposed topic. Practical guidance in undertaking a systematic literature review. Use of key research databases to locate literature. Approaches to the critical analysis of research. Practical aspects of quantitative and qualitative research designs, specific methods of data collection and a consideration of ethical principles in research. The importance of working within practical constraints, resource limitations and a clear timetable. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES Through lectures, discussions and group work, emphasis will be given to the practical issues involved in using a range of methods currently employed in research in health and social care. Each student will be expected to identify a recent research report relevant to their area of research interest for critical discussion by the group within sessions. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT A detailed research proposal of 4000 words encompassing rationale, a critical review of key literature, research question(s)/hypothesis to be tested, and justified research design (LO 1-6) (K/S 1-6) (100%) A 500 word minimum reflective account, illustrating key skills development throughout the module, to contribute to the portfolio of skills development. Research proposals must be assessed as satisfactory before students are permitted to proceed with submission to the local research and development and ethics committees, if required, and the undertaking of fieldwork. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Bowling, A. (1997) Res earch Methods in Health: Investigating Health and Health S er vices. Open University Press. Bryman, A. and Cramer, D. (1999) Quantitative Data Analysis for Social Scientists. London: Routledge. Dey, I. (1999) Qualitative Data Analysis: a user-friendly guide for social scientists. London: Routledge. Dochartaigh, N.O. (2001) The Internet Res earch Handbook: A Practical Guide for Students and Res earchers in the Social Sciences. Sage. Flick, U. (1998) An Introduction to Qualitative Res earch. London: Sage. Gomm, R., Needham, G. and Bullman, A. (eds.)(2000) Evaluating Res earch in Health and Social Care. Sage and Open University. Grbich, C. (1999) Qualitative Res earch in Health: an introduction. London: Sage. IUHPE (1999) The Evidence of Health Promotion Effectivenes s . Brussels: European Commission/IUHPE Mason, J. (1996) Qualitative Res earching . London: Sage. May, T. & Williams, M. (eds), (1998). Knowing the Social World. Buckingham, Open University. Robson, C. (1993) Real World Res earch: A Resource for Social Scientists and Practitioner-Res earchers. Oxford: Blackwell. Scolari software (2000) Methodologist’s Toolchest . London: Sage. Scolari software (2000) WinMax. London: Sage.
  • Tones, K. and Tilford, S. (2001)(3rd Edition) Health Promotion: Effectiveness, Efficiency and Equity. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes. JOURNALS Evidence based Healthcare. Published by Harcourt Publishers Ltd Evidence Based Medicine. Published by American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine Evidence Based Mental Health. Published by HighWire Press Evidence Based Nursing. Published by BMJ Publishing Group WEBSITES Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York http://agatha.york.ac.uk/ CLINIC http://clinic.cant.ac.uk/ Health Development Agency Evidence Base http://www.hda.nhs.uk/evidence/ King’s Fund http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/ National Electronic Library for Health http://www.nelh.nhs.uk/cochrane.asp National Statistics Office http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=313 South East Public Health Observatory http://www.sepho.org.uk/
  • Module Title: Undertaking Systematic Reviews code: MZZHF4USR level: HE4 duration: 40 hours taught plus 160 hours private independent study academic responsibility: Douglas MacInnes MODULE AIM The aim of the module is to enable students to develop answerable questions in evaluating the effectiveness of health care practices. The module will also focus on teaching the skills that are needed to be able to conduct systematic reviews to address these questions. The module is also a pre-requisite for those students wishing to undertake a systematic review for their practice development project. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the module students should be able to: 1. Understand the principles and methods underpinning systematic reviews (KS 1,2,3,5); 2. critically evaluate rationale/criteria for considering specific studies for inclusion in a review (KS 1,2,5,6); 3. devise search procedures to locate relevant information relating to health care practices (KS 1,3,4,6); 4. evaluate critically the quality of studies(KS 1,2,3,4,6); 5. analyse the statistical meta-analysis procedures which determine the overall statistical evidence of particular interventions/procedures(KS 2,5,6); 6. be aware of the methods of effectively disseminating the results of the systematic review (KS 1,4,5,6) KEY SKILLS OUTCOMES Key Skills 1 Communication Evaluate critically the systematic review and meta analyses literature, in writing 2 Application of Number Analyse the statistical meta analyses and evaluate the statistical data contained within the systematic review. 3 Information Technology Use extensively the internet, college databases, and search engines to gain access to the relevant information for the assignment; use of computer software to organise their assignment content and presentation; and use of statistical computer software to help with statistical analysis. 4 Working with others Show awareness of the implications of the findings of the review for professional and inter professional practice 5 Problem solving Critically evaluate the efficacy of procedures used in undertaking the systematic review and the confidence that could be placed in the findings. 6 Improving own learning and Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals performance and professional development (Formative) MODULE CONTENT The distinction between and uses of systematic reviews, overviews and meta analyses. Procedures to develop a clear research question, devise a study protocol, cost the project and determine the length of time need to complete the project.
  • Which sources to include and exclude from a study. Developing search strategies to ensure that the review is comprehensive in its range of bibliographic sources. Methods to review the scope of the literature and ways of modifying the search, with examination of the specialist tools that can be utilised to help with this process. Specific tools used to collect and extract data. Different approaches to appraising the quality of the studies collected for a review. Statistical meta-analysis procedures which can be undertaken to statistically analyse data from a number of studies in order to synthesise the results. Key features of presenting and disseminating the results of a systematic review to ensure the target audience is given clear and concise information relating to the topic under review. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES The module will include a range of different strategies including formal lectures, group discussions, workshops, formative seminar presentations, practical exercises and individual tutorials. ILLUSTRATIVE ASSESSMENT The module is assessed by a 4000 word assignment to meet the learning outcomes. The assignment will develop a proposal to undertake a systematic review. This would require the student to critically discuss the following issues and design specific procedures for the following areas of the review. 1. Formulation of the review question 2. Definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria 3. Development of search procedures (relating to obtaining research evidence) 4. Development of selection procedures (to evaluate the eligibility criteria of the studies). 5. Development of validity assessment (to evaluate the methodological quality of the studies) 6. Development of data extraction form (to detail the process for extracting all of the relevant data from each study). 7. An overview of how the results would be analyzed and presented. (KS 1-6), (LO 1-6) A 500 word minimum reflective account, illustrating key skills development throughout the module, to contribute to the portfolio of skills development. Research proposals must be assessed as satisfactory before students are permitted to proceed with submission to the local research and development and ethics committees, if required, and the undertaking of fieldwork. ILLUSTRATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY Chalmers. I. & Altman. D. (eds) (1996) Systematic reviews . BMJ Publishing. Cook. D., Mulrow., C. & Haynes. R. (1997) Systematic reviews: synthesis of best evidence for clinical decisions. Annals of Internal Medicine 126(5): 376-80. Cooper. H., Carlisle. C., Watkins. C., & Gibbs. T. (2000) Using qualitative methods for conducting a systematic
  • review . Nurse Researcher 8: 28–38 Crombie. I. (1996) The Pocket Guide to Critical Appraisal. BMJ Publishing. Eggars. M., Davey Smith. G., & Altman. D. (2001) Systematic Reviews in Health Care: Meta Analysis in Context. BMJ Books. Entwistle. V., Sowden. A., & Watt. I. (1998) Evaluating interventions to promote patient involvement in decision making: by what criteria should effectiveness be judged? Journal of Health Service Research Policy 3: 100-7 Meade. M. & Richardson. S. (1997) S electing and appraising studies for a systematic review . Annals of Internal Medicine 127(7): 531-7 Milne. R. & Chambers. L. (1993) Asse ssing the scientific quality of review articles . Journal of Epidemiological Community Health 47: 169-160. Muir Gray, J. (1997) Evidence-Based Healthcare . Churchill Livingstone. Mulrow. C. (1994) Rationale for systematic reviews . British Medical Journal 409: 597 –99. Mulrow, C. & Oxman, A. (eds) (1997) Cochrane Collaboration Handbook. In; The Cochrane Library (The Cochrane Collaboration). Update Software, Issue 4, Oxford NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (1996). Undertaking systematic reviews of research effectiveness. CRD Report No. 4. York, York publishing services Ltd. Sackett. D., Rosenberg. W., Muir Gray. J., Haynes. & Richardson. W. (1996) Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t. British Medical Journal 3 12: 71–72 Sutton. A., Jones. D., Abrams. K., Sheldon. T., & Song. F. (1999) Systematic reviews and meta-analysis: a structured review of the methodological literature . Journal of Health Services Research Policy 4: 49–55. JOURNALS Evidence based Healthcare. Published by Harcourt Publishers Ltd Evidence Based Medicine . Published by American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine Evidence Based Mental health. Published by HighWire Press Evidence Based Nursing. Published by BMJ Publishing Group WEBSITES CASP (The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme) - http://www.phru.org.uk Centre for Evidence Based Child health - http://www.ich.bpmf.ac.uk/ebm/ebm.htm Centre for Evidence Based Medicine - http://www.cebm.jr2.ox.ac.uk/ Cochrane Database - http://www.cochrane.org/ NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination- http://www.york.ac.uk
  • Appendix 1
  • KEY TRANSFERABLE SKILLS MATRIX KEY: M1 = Orientation module M2 = Science and Technology modules M3 = Clinical Applications modules M4 = Open modules M5 = Developing a Research Proposal module M6 = Research Dissertation Key Transferable Outcome Outcome Description M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 M6 Skill Communication 1 Evaluate critically empirical and √ √ theoretical literature in writing 2 Evaluate critically empirical and theoretical literature, both orally and in √ √ writing 3 Present, both orally and in writing, a clear, succinct and evidence based rationale for the intended project which demonstrates a critical appraisal of a wide variety of information √ 4 Communicate research findings through analysis and interpretation of data √ Application of number 5 Critically interpret data in a research study √ (option in oral presentation) 6 Critically interpret data in research studies √ √ 7 Critically interpret quantitative data in √ research and/or audit studies 8 Have an understanding of the role and limitations of statistical techniques in health research. Be able to competently interpret tables of data in research papers √ 9 Critically interpret data and undertake appropriate statistical analysis in √ quantitative research designs
  • Information 10 Access and use efficiently the internet, Technology College databases and computer √ √ √ √ √ software for assignment content and presentation 11 Competent and efficient use of the WWW, CLINIC and other electronic databases. Ability to access and use at least one computer package for statistical and for √ textual analysis Working with Others 12 Demonstrate interprofessionality and teamwork when writing about practice (situational analysis) √ 13 Relate and interact effectively with √ individuals and groups 14 Demonstrate interprofessionality and √ √ √ teamwork 15 Actively contribute towards peer support and shared learning in the development and refinement of research proposals. √ Ability to offer help and constructive criticism Problem Solving 16 Use relevant information sources. Identify and solve problems associated with study skills and assessment at M level √ 17 Reflect critically on professional practice and strategies for service improvement √ √ √ and development in an interprofessional context 18 Ability to formulate a plan of action which will serve to provide answers or solutions √ to professionally focused research problems 19 Reflect critically on research findings for professional practice and strategies for service improvement and development in an interprofessional context √
  • Improving own 20 Manage own time in achieving objectives √ Learning and Performance 21 Determine an appropriate pathway for the achievement of academic goals and √ √ √ professional development 22 Demonstrate self reflection, self motivation, advanced skills of independent learning and the ability to identify and seek appropriate guidance for improving performance √ 23 Plan and manage the research process for the achievement of academic and professional development goals √
  • Appendix 2 Validated Modules within the MSc Interprofes sional Health and Social Care MZZHF4CCP Orientation MZZHF4DRP Developing a Research Proposal MZZH4USR Undertaking Systematic Reviews MHSHF4MKP Knowledge and Power in Health and Social Care MHSHF4ELH Ethic and Law in Health and Social Care MHSHF4PHS Psychology in Health and Social Care MHSHF4HWP Health and Welfare of Older People MHSH4APP Advanced Professional Practice: Creativity and Conflict MHSHF4JDM Judgement and Decision Making in Professional Practice MHSHF4EQP Embedding Quality in Professional Practice MHSHF4LGB Loss, Grief and Bereavement MHSHF4FSM Solution Focused Methods in Health and Social Care MHIHI4WTSC Working Together to Safeguard Children MHSHF4DCD Discourses around Disability Chronic Illness and Physical Impairment MHSHF4LMC Strategic Management and Leadership for Change MHSHF4FPD Facilitating Practice Development MHSHF4AMR Assessment, Management and Reduction of Falls in the Older Person MHSHF4CLS Clinical Supervision: Multi-Professional Perspectives MZZHF4OP1 Open Module Framework (including work based learning) MZZHF4D40 Research Module; 2 modules MZZHF4D60 Research Module; 3 modules Modules available from other programmes • Health, Arts and Humanities • International Perspectives in Health Promotion and Public Health • Principles and Practice of Public Health and Health Promotion • Social and Political Contexts of Health Promotion and Public Health • Psychological Perspectives in Health Promotion and Public Health • Research and Evidence Based Practice in Health Promotion and Public Health • Teaching and Learning in Professional Practice • The Management and Assessment of Professional Practice • Teaching and Assessing in Professional Practice 81
  • Appendix 3 Price Information 2007/ 2008 Fee per module: £455 (11 PTDs) Total price for complete PgC programme: £1365 Total price for complete PgD programme: £2730 Total price for complete MSc programme £4095 Fees for students employed in local trusts (Kent & Medway; and/or Surrey and Sussex Workforce Development Directorates) may be recharged using Personal Training Days (PTDs). Please contact the Programme Director for more information. 82