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Major: Nuclear Medicine Technology

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    Major: Nuclear Medicine Technology Major: Nuclear Medicine Technology Document Transcript

    • Major: Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Director: Bolus Medical Director: Bender Faculty: Bolus, George, Jones-Thomas, Navarrete, The SHP Nuclear Medicine Technology Program is the only program of its kind in Alabama. The nuclear medi- cine technologist (NMT) uses radioactive drugs to obtain information that will aid physicians in diagnosing dis- ease and monitoring therapy. NMTs have direct patient contact and use a variety of radiation detection equip- ment and computers to acquire and process data. They also participate in quality control, preparation of radio- active drugs, and compliance with radioactive materials licensing requirements. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Program graduates are eligible to apply for the certification examination of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Admission Requirements: The student usually will have completed approximately 60 semester hours before transferring to SHP for five to six semesters of professional courses. Acceptance is based upon the student’s academic ability and aptitude for a career in nuclear medicine technology. The candidate is expected to satisfy the following requirements: • be accepted by UAB, • have a minimum cumulative overall grade point average of 2.5 (A=4.0), • have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 (A=4.0) in Natural Sciences and Mathe- matics prerequisite courses in Area III and Area V (under special circumstances and with permis- sion of the faculty, this requirement may be waived), • have a minimum grade of C in each prerequisite course, • complete a personal interview with the selection committee • if accepted, complete the UAB medical history questionnaire and physical, provide proof of re- quired immunizations, and receive satisfactory screening by the UAB Medical Center Student Health Service, and • if accepted, a background check and drug screening will be required prior to clinical placement. Application Procedure: Applications received in the NMT Program office by February 15 preceding the expected term of enrollment for the professional phase are given first priority. Applications received after February 15 are considered on a space-available basis. Applicants should submit the following materi- als:To the UAB Undergraduate Admissions Office: • completed UAB undergraduate application form, indicating pre-nuclear medicine technology as the major, and application fee, if applicable (if enrolled at UAB in another major, complete a Change of School/Major Request indicating pre-nuclear medicine technology as the major; form available from the Office of Registration and Academic Records), and • official transcripts from each college or university attended. To the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program Office, School of Health Professions: • completed application to the professional phase of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program (form available on-line or from the program office), and • completed clinical tour form (form available from the program office). Contact for additional information: Program Director Nuclear Medicine Technology Program School of Health Professions Building University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1212 Telephone: (205) 934-2004 E-mail: bsnmt@uab.edu Web address: www.uab.edu/NMTProgram
    • MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FOR NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY Requirement Fulfilled By: Hrs. Grade and Residency 2.5 GPA overall and in the math/science prerequisites - Requirements All courses completed with a grade of “C” or better Required Mathematics Please see your academic advisor Required Courses Take all of the following courses: 71 AHS 330 NMT 405 NMT 422 NMT 441 NMT 452 NMT 492 AHS 460 NMT 410 NMT 423 NMT 442 NMT 460 NMT 493 NMT 400 NMT 421 NMT 431 NMT 443 NMT 461 NMT 499 NMT 404 NMT 421L NMT 432 NMT 451 NMT 491 Electives NMT 401 NMT 424 NMT 434 NMT 494 NMT 495 Prerequisites AHS 350 BY 115/116 BY 216 PH 201/202 Statistics MA 180 Total Major Requirements: 71 Typical Program Professional Phase Fall Sem. Hrs. AHS 330 Health Care Systems 3 NMT 400 Introduction to Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology 2 NMT 404 Patient Care 2 NMT 410 Medical Radiation Physics 4 NMT 431 Nuclear Medicine Procedures I 4 Spring NMT 421 Instrumentation 3 NMT 421L Instrumentation Lab 1 NMT 441 Radiation Protection and Biology 3 NMT 442 Applications of Radiation Protection & Biology 1 NMT 443 Regulatory Issues 2 NMT 451 Communications Skills 1 AHS 460 Research Methods 3 Summer NMT 405 Cross-Sectional Anatomy 3 NMT 432 Nuclear Medicine Procedures II 4 NMT 452 Health Law for Nuclear Medicine Technology 1 NMT 491 Clinical Practice I 5 Fall NMT 422 Computer Applications & Advanced Instrumentation 3 NMT 423 Computed Tomography 3 NMT 460 Radiopharmacy and Pharmacology 2 NTM 461 Radiopharmacy and Pharmacology 1 NMT 492 Clinical Practice II 7 Spring NMT 493 Clinical Practice III 10 NMT 499 Correlative Imaging 3 Course Descriptions Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) NMT 400 - Intro Clinic Nuclear Med Tech - 2 Overview of professional organizations and nuclear medicine , hospital organization; medical terminology; medical records; introductions to other aspects of nuclear medicine technology including ethics concerning the hospital setting; writing assign- ments on professionalism and hospital ethics. NMT 401 - Introduction to MRI Clinic - 2 This course is designed to provide students with the practical aspect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The role of MRI tech- nologists, patient management, MRI screening and safety procedures, quality assurance procedures and FDA guidelines will be discussed. Prerequisite: NMT 424 with a grade of C
    • NMT 404 - Patient Care - 2 Basic patient care theory and techniques including standard precautions, infection control, vital signs, venipuncture, patient transfer techniques, immobilization techniques, aseptic and nonaseptic techniques, oxygen administration, and medical emer- gencies which are required for radiation therapy and nuclear medicine students prior to entering clinical training. NMT 405 - Cross-Sectional Anatomy - 3 This course is designed to integrate the student’s knowledge of gross anatomy with the identification and location of structures in cross-sectional images. Computer Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance (MR), and Diagnostic Ultrasound (US) images in various anatomical planes will be used to locate and identify anatomical structures. NMT 421 - Instrumentation I - 3 Theoretical and practical concepts in radiation detection and instrumentation; calibration; maintenance standards; practical uses of gaseous detectors, scintillation detectors, and multichannel analyzers; quality assurance testing for nuclear medicine instrumentation including GM detectors, ionization chambers and scintillation detectors; gamma spectrometry of all commonly used nuclear medicine radionuclides. Principles of in vivo and in vitro counting and imaging using probe counters, well count- ers, and scintillation gamma cameras; scintillation gamma camera quality control; types of collimators used in nuclear medi- cine, their use and function. NMT 421L—Instrumentation I Lab - 1 This lab will introduce the nuclear medicine student to basic radiation and nuclear counting instrumentation. This includes proper calibration and use of the Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) and Geiger Muller (G-M) Counter. The student will learn how to determine the proper operating voltage, detector efficiency, window width, and amplifier gain and energy resolution of the MCA. Proper counting statistics and duel isotope counting labs will emphasize the importance of proper use of nuclear counting instrumentation. NMT 422 - Comp Appl/Adv Instrumentation II - 3 This course applies computer fundamentals to the acquisition and processing of nuclear medicine patient data. Quantitative planar studies as well as SPECT/PET image reconstruction, filtering, and attenuation correction are presented. Quality control of SPECT and PET camera system is also included. Prerequisites: NMT 421 NMT 423 - Computed Tomography - 3 This course is designed to provide the students with the theoretical principles of Computed Tomography (CT). The historical development of CT and the physical principles underlying CT scanning will be discussed. CT Instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing and image quality will also be emphasized. NMT 424 - Physics/Instrumentation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance - 3 Fundamental physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon, including structure of atom, concept of reso- nance, Larmor frequency, gyromagnetic ratio, T1 and T2 , and methods of generating magnetic fields; theory of operation of NMR spectrometers and imagers, including function of basic components, effects of linear gradients, signal processing, slice definition, and image reconstruction. NMT 431 - Nuclear Medicine Procedures I - 4 This course is the first of a two course series that teaches students how various nuclear medicine procedures are performed and what the nuclear medicine technologist’s responsibilities are in completing a procedure. In this first course, procedures involving the skeletal, respiratory, endocrine, gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems are presented. Anatomy and relevant concepts in physiology are reviewed and applied to each procedure. Common pathologies demonstrated with each procedure are also discussed. NMT 432 - Nuclear Medicine Procedures II - 4 This course is the second of two course series that teaches students how various nuclear medicine procedures are performed and what the nuclear medicine technologist’s responsibilities are in completing a procedure. In this course, procedures involv- ing nuclear cardiology, oncology, central nervous and hematopoietic systems, and applications of positron emission tomogra- phy are presented. Anatomy and relevant concepts in physiology are reviewed and applied to each procedure. Common pa- thologies demonstrated with each procedure are also discussed. The basics of three-and twelve-lead ECGs will also be cov- ered. Prerequisites: NMT 431 NMT 433 - Computed Tomography Procedures - 3 This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation of Computed Tomography (CT) Procedures. Basic CT scan- ning concepts and image quality will be reviewed along with detailed discussions about CT positioning criteria, specific selec- tions, and options in protocols. Advanced CT concepts such as interventional imaging, virtual reality imaging, positron emis- sion tomography, and special procedures will also be emphasized. NMT 434 - MRI Scanning and Sequence - 3 This course will provide the students with a solid foundation of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality. Basic MRI theory will be reviewed along with detailed discussion about the imaging sequences, parameter optimizations, and imaging procedures will be extensively discussed. Advanced concepts such as flow imaging, and MR spectroscopy will also be dis- cussed. Prerequisites: NMT 405 and NMT 417 with a grade of C
    • NMT 441 - Radiation Protection and Biology - 3 Principles and methods of radiation protection, health physics units, measurement, and dose-limiting regulations for occupa- tionally and non-occupationally exposed individuals; radiation surveys; techniques and decontamination methods; monitoring of radioactive waste, radiation dose measurements, and radionuclide accountability; special topics, including precautions with brachytherapy patients, with patients receiving therapeutic amounts of radionuclides, and in management of accidentally con- taminated individuals. Physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms involved in action of different types of radiations on living cells and their components are covered. Emphasis is given to being able to interpret how to respond to a malicious radiological exposure incident in an appropriate manner. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course (QEP). NMT 442 - Applications of Radiation Protection and Biology - 1 This course will introduce the nuclear medicine student to basic radiation physics and radiation protection experiments. Em- phasis will be placed of the ALARA concept and how that relates to radiation biology concepts learned in class. The student will learn basic concepts of radiation safety (including time, distance and appropriate shielding), half-lifes, half value layers for dif- ferent absorbers and radioisotopes, the inverse square law, semi-log graphing and calibration and use of nuclear counting in- strumentation. This includes proper calibration and use of the Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA) and Geiger Muller (G-M) Counter. The student will learn how to determine the proper operating voltage, detector efficiency, and window width. Proper counting statistics and duel isotope counting labs will emphasize the importance of proper use of nuclear counting instrumentation.  NMT 443 - Regulatory Issues - 2 This course provides students with the necessary education and background to plan for and participate in successful radiation safety compliance management program in Nuclear Medicine laboratories in the country. At the conclusion of the course, stu- dents will have basic knowledge of appropriate rules, regulations, and work practices governing the use of radioactive materi- als in the medical setting. NMT 451 - Communication Skills - 1 This course explores the nature of the patient- technologist relationships, technologist-hospital professional relationship and the role of the technologist as a patient educator. Therapeutic communication shills, interviewing skills, and the psychosocial aspects of being a patient are discussed. NMT 452—Health Law for NMT – 1 This course is an introduction to medical law and ethics. It will present an overview of major ethical theories and their r elation to health law. Ethical dilemmas and ethical decision making models and their application to clinical practice will be discussed. Selected legal principles and their application to healthcare, as well as issues concerning professional liability, informed con- sent, and malpractice are also discussed. NMT 460 - Radiopharmacy and Pharmacology - 2 This course presents the fundamentals of radiopharmacy including radionuclide generator design and operation, labeling and quality control of Tc-99m labeled compounds, unit dose preparation, and a review of federal regulations pertinent to radionu- clides and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceutical design and the IND process as well as the basic concepts of internal radiation dosimetry are also included. NMT 461 - Radiopharmacy and Pharmacology - 1 This lab course presents the fundamentals of radiopharmacy including radionuclide generator design and operation, labeling and quality control of Tc-99m labeled compounds, unit dose preparation, and a review of federal regulations pertinent to ra- dionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceutical design and the IND process as well as the basic concepts of inter- nal radiation dosimetry are also included. NMT 491 - Clinical Practice I - 5 Directed clinical practice: in vivo procedures; instrumentation quality control; radiopharmacy; applied radiation safety proce- dures. NMT 492 - Clinical Practice II - 7 Directed clinical practice: in vivo procedures; instrumentation quality control; radiopharmacy; applied radiation safety proce- dures. Prerequisites: NMT 491 NMT 493 – Clinical Practice III – 10 Directed clinical practice: in vivo procedures; instrumentation quality control; radiopharmacy; applied radiation safety proce- dures. Prerequisites: NMT 492 NMT 494 – CT Clinical Practice - 12 The CT clinical component of the nuclear medicine program provides the student with the opportunity to observe, work and train to become certified in CT. This experience is dependent upon many variables. It is the goal of the program to guide and not direct the students, as well as the clinical affiliates, in this process. As such, clinical experiences, level of performance evaluations, final evaluation, and a self-assessment by the students are used to evaluate the experience NMT 495 – MRI Clinical Practice - 12 The MRI clinical component of the nuclear medicine program provides the student with the opportunity to observe, work and train to become certified in MRI. This experience is dependent upon many variables. It is the goal of the program to guide and not direct the students, as well as the clinical affiliates, in this process. As such, clinical experiences, level of performance evaluations, final evaluation, and a self-assessment by the students are used to evaluate the experience.
    • NMT 499 - Correlative Imaging -3 This NMT Program Capstone Course encompasses all aspects of the student’s educational experience within the NMT Program. This course consists of the three aspects of the University Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) including Ethics and Civic Responsi- bility, Writing and Quantitative Literacy. The core focus of this course will be investigating the multifaceted nature of disease diagnosis and treatment in the United States. Current trends in healthcare costs and payment methods will be discussed and analyzed. Healthcare disparities associated with these imaging tests and treatments will also be analyzed and discussed.