Department of Pharmacy
Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy.
The Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy is intended to provi...
150 Stamford St,
London SE1 9NN
Tel: 020 7848 4809
Fax: 020 7848 4800
Email: anthony.theobald@kcl.ac.uk
TIMETABLE. POST-GRADUATE COURSE IN RADIOPHARMACY – 19 - 23 APRIL 2004
Monday 19 April Lecturer
13.30 – 14.00 Arrival, regi...
Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy
King’s College London, 19 - 23 April 2004
Registration form:
Please return this form ...
Learning objectives for the Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy
1. THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK OF RADIOPHARMACY
The students...
6. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF RADIOPHARMACIES.
The students will be able to:
• describe the types of activities normally unde...
6. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF RADIOPHARMACIES.
The students will be able to:
• describe the types of activities normally unde...
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Lecturer

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Lecturer

  1. 1. Department of Pharmacy Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy. The Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy is intended to provide a basic level of education in Radiopharmacy suitable for those disciplines working in Nuclear Medicine, including technologists, medical doctors, physicists, radiographers and pharmacists. Individuals responsible for the provision of the Radiopharmacy service may require a higher level of training such as that provided by the European Postgraduate Specialisation Programme in Radiopharmacy. The course is run annually for one week at the Franklin-Wilkins building at the Waterloo Campus in central London and consists of a series of 30 lectures and seminars supported by written material and recommendations for further study. The course is designed in such a way as to provide a basic introduction followed by topics covered at an increasingly advanced level throughout the week. Depending upon their background, their level of involvement in the subject and their particular needs, individuals may therefore decide to attend the entire week, or only the more basic or more specialised days. A course certificate will be awarded to those who have attended the entire course and who pass successfully a multiple-choice examination which will be held after its completion. Fees. The cost of the entire week’s course including written material and examination and certification costs will be £300. Individual days may be attended at a cost of £100 per day. For registration forms or further information contact: Dr A.Theobald, Dean, School of Health & Life Sciences, Kings College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building,
  2. 2. 150 Stamford St, London SE1 9NN Tel: 020 7848 4809 Fax: 020 7848 4800 Email: anthony.theobald@kcl.ac.uk
  3. 3. TIMETABLE. POST-GRADUATE COURSE IN RADIOPHARMACY – 19 - 23 APRIL 2004 Monday 19 April Lecturer 13.30 – 14.00 Arrival, registration, course introduction 14.00 - 14.40 Nuclear Medicine – an introduction J Sosabowski 14.50 – 15.30 Introduction to atomic physics A.Theobald 15.50 - 16.30 Radiobiological effects of radiation S Bachelor 16.40 – 17.20 Detection and measurement of radioactivity A.Theobald Tuesday 20 April 09.30 - 10.10 Radionuclides in Nuclear Medicine S.Hesslewood 10.20 - 11.00 Radiopharmaceuticals in routine practice S.Hesslewood 11.30 - 12.10 Radiopharmaceutical chemistry-technetium A.Hall 12.20 - 13.00 Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals -theory P.Maltby 14.00 - 14.40 Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals - practice P.Maltby 14.50 – 15.30 Pharmaceutical regulations and Radiopharmacy M.Connolly 15.50 - 16.30 Design and maintenance of radiopharmacies M Connoly Wednesday 21 April 09.30 - 10.10 An introduction to GMP R.Bateman 10.20 - 11.00 Drug interactions and interventions J.Thom 11.30 - 12.10 Safety in the Radiopharmacy J.Thom 12.20 - 13.00 Radiation Safety – what do the regulations require? S Bachelor 14.00 - 14.40 Radiation Safety – what do we do in practice? S Bachelor 14.50 – 15.30 Blood labelling B.Ellis 15.50 - 16.30 Blood labelling B.Ellis Thursday 22 April 09.30 - 10.10 Production of Radionuclides J.Ballinger 10.20 - 11.00 Packaging and transport of Radiopharmaceuticals J.Ballinger 11.30 - 12.10 Design and formulation of radiopharmaceuticals M.Frier 12.20 - 13.00 Radiopharmacology M.Frier 14.00 - 14.40 Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals G.Croasdale 14.50 – 15.30 Radiopharm chemistry-chelators and complexes A.Hall 15.50 - 16.50 Commercial Radiopharmacy R.Cuesta Friday 23 April 09.30 - 10.10 Receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals S Mather 10.20 - 11.00 PET radiopharmacy TBA 11.30 - 12.10 PET radiopharmacy TBA 12.20 - 13.00 Development and Licensing of Radiopharmaceuticals R.Pickett 14.00 – 15.30 Multiple choice examination and course questionnaire
  4. 4. Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy King’s College London, 19 - 23 April 2004 Registration form: Please return this form with payment† as soon as possible to: Dr A.Theobald, Dean, School of Health & Life Sciences, Kings College, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford St, London SE1 9NN Full name and title: Position: Department: Address Phone: Fax: Email: I wish to attend the WHOLE WEEK / MON / TUE / WED / THUR / FRI* Total Fees remitted: How much previous experience in Radiopharmacy/Nuclear Medicine have you (in whole time equivalents)? Do you have access to the Internet – at work YES/NO* at home YES/NO* Signed: Date: † Course fees are £300 per week or £100 per day. Cheques payable to King’s College, London. * Please delete as appropriate
  5. 5. Learning objectives for the Postgraduate Course in Radiopharmacy 1. THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK OF RADIOPHARMACY The students will be able to: • discuss the impact of regulatory requirements on the practice of Radiopharmacy and describe the mechanisms by which these regulations are applied and policed, • discuss the UK regulatory requirements which apply to the design and operation of radiopharmacies and the different possible solutions to these requirements, • discuss the regulations controlling transport of radioactive materials in the UK and describe how to comply with these regulations. 2. THE CHEMISTRY AND DESIGN OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS The students will be able to: • describe the structure of the atom, the most important means of radioactive decay of unstable nuclei and the types of radiation emitted therefrom, • recognise the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and discuss the relationships between their physical properties, their clinical applications and their strengths and weaknesses, • describe the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of these radionuclides and discuss the influence of these chemical properties on the biodistribution of their radiopharmaceuticals • list the different formulations used in nuclear medicine; describe their properties and the way in which these formulations are prepared; discuss the significance of the development of radiopharmaceutical kits and describe the function of the various reagents used therein, • discuss the physical and chemical properties required of a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and list the products approved for general use in Nuclear Medicine together with their clinical applications. • describe the functions of the different cell types routinely labelled in nuclear medicine, outline the most significant points in the labelling procedures used and list the most common clinical indications for these radiopharmaceuticals. 3. SAFETY IN THE RADIOPHARMACY The students will be able to: • describe in both qualitative and quantitative terms the interactions of radiation with biological systems, discuss the relative risks of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other potentially hazardous life events • describe the principles of the most important types of radiation detectors used in Nuclear Medicine together with the way in which they are normally employed. • discuss the importance of radiation hygiene and safe working in radiopharmaceutical preparation. • Understand and discuss the need for automation in radiopharmaceutical preparation and the possible ways in which this might be achieved, 4. RADIONUCLIDE PRODUCTION The students will be able to: • understand the nomenclature, principles and mechanisms of atomic reactions. • describe the design and principles of particle accelerators and nuclear reactors and their relevance for production of radionuclides used in Nuclear Medicine. • discuss the significance of the development of radionuclide generators for Nuclear Medicine, and the principles of their design and operation, describe the 99-Mo/99m-Tc generator system and give examples of other generators in routine use. 5. QUALITY ASSURANCE The students will be able to: • discuss the general principles of QA in everyday life and in hospital pharmacy in particular and describe the most important means of control of aseptic preparation. • describe how the principles of QA are routinely applied in a radiopharmaceutical production system, • undersatnd the QC parameters which determine the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, • describe the analytical methods by which these parameters are measured.
  6. 6. 6. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF RADIOPHARMACIES. The students will be able to: • describe the types of activities normally undertaken in a hospital radiopharmacy • describe the ways in which radiopharmaceuticals are prepared • describe the types of procedures routinely employed in hospital radiopharmacy management, • describe the organisational and financial aspects of a commercial radiopharmacy and discuss the relative advantages of commercial and non-commercial systems. 7. CLINICAL USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS. The students will be able to: • recognise the different types of radiopharmaceuticals in routine clinical practice together with any particular problems arising from their use • explain the mechanisms by which commonly used radiopharmaceuticals localise in their target tissues • describe those problems which might arise during the preparation and clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and know how to identify and solve them where appropriate, • describe the possibilities for interactions both desired and undesirable between radiopharmaceuticals and other medications, • Access and evaluate sources of reference information on all aspects of radiopharmaceuticals. • describe the general principles of PET imaging, and the organisation of a PET radiopharmacy and list the products most commonly used therein together with their clinical indications
  7. 7. 6. DESIGN AND OPERATION OF RADIOPHARMACIES. The students will be able to: • describe the types of activities normally undertaken in a hospital radiopharmacy • describe the ways in which radiopharmaceuticals are prepared • describe the types of procedures routinely employed in hospital radiopharmacy management, • describe the organisational and financial aspects of a commercial radiopharmacy and discuss the relative advantages of commercial and non-commercial systems. 7. CLINICAL USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS. The students will be able to: • recognise the different types of radiopharmaceuticals in routine clinical practice together with any particular problems arising from their use • explain the mechanisms by which commonly used radiopharmaceuticals localise in their target tissues • describe those problems which might arise during the preparation and clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and know how to identify and solve them where appropriate, • describe the possibilities for interactions both desired and undesirable between radiopharmaceuticals and other medications, • Access and evaluate sources of reference information on all aspects of radiopharmaceuticals. • describe the general principles of PET imaging, and the organisation of a PET radiopharmacy and list the products most commonly used therein together with their clinical indications

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