Revised 04/09/2010
Institute of Allied
Medical Professions
Academic Catalog
2009-2010
5150 Linton Boulevard
Suite 340
Delr...
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Message from the President 4
Overview
History 5
Main and Branch Campuses 5
Statement of Purpose 5- 6
Sta...
DMS/NMT/RX/MRI/RT/PN
Clinical Externship Policies
Introduction 61-62
Location 62
Site Requirements 62
Externship Attendanc...
A Message From
The President
Welcome to the Institute of
Allied Medical Professions
(IAMP). The decision you have
made to ...
HISTORY
With its roots dating back to 1974,
IAMP has held a long tradition of
excellence! The Radiological Institute
was e...
IAMP places emphasis on the
educational, professional, and personal
growth of each student. On-line
programs, policies and...
• Radiologic Technology
• Radiation Therapy
• Practical Nursing
IAMP will educate and thoroughly train
students for positi...
The Radiologic Technology program is
accredited by the Joint Review
Committee in Radiologic Technology,
2000 W. Danfortth,...
INSURANCE
The school does not provide personal,
medical or liability insurance against
fire, theft, or vandalism of studen...
ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
All applicants must visit the Office of
Admissions to meet with an advisor.
Admissions interviews wi...
requirements may be needed. For
additional information please contact the
American Registry for Diagnostic
Medical Sonogra...
CLASS SIZE
The school will maintain proper ratio
between teachers and students to allow
adequate attention to each individ...
have been met for the NMT and DMS
diploma programs.
The Institute will award the official
Associate of Science Degree when...
materials that could cause potential
injury. In order to reduce the risk of
infection or other harm that could result
from...
uniform, reasonable way of numbering
courses that would be equally useful in
all fields of knowledge. In general it may
be...
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
(Diploma)
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
(Degree)
Nuclear Medicine Technology
(Diploma)
Radio...
Diagnostic Medical
Sonography (DMS)
Diploma
790 Didactic hrs, 280 lab hrs, 1000
Clinical Hours = 2078 total hours
83 Credi...
DMS-D 2001- Principles of
Abdominal Sonography I
7 Credits
120 clock hours (90 didactic, 30 lab)
DMS-D 2002- Principles of...
This course reviews the normal anatomy
and physiology of the human body, and
then expands those concepts in the
context of...
Major topics covered are embryology,
normal first trimester fetal development,
abnormal development, and
complications of ...
This course prepares the student to enter
the clinical training phase of the
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
program. Topics...
an introduction to the principles of
echocardiography, the most effective
non-invasive method for use in cardiac
diagnosis...
*BSC 1085-Anatomy &
Physiology I
3 Credits
45 clock hours
*BSC 1085L – Anatomy &
Physiology I Lab
1 Credit
30 clock hours
...
the application and techniques in
cardiac imaging and cardiac Doppler
studies, cardiac anatomy and
function. The course wi...
The physics of ultrasound will be
studied. Hands-on laboratory instruction
will take place.
Fundamentals of Speech
Student...
terminology, interpretation of
sonographic results, and proper care and
handling of films. Methods of instruction
include ...
Nuclear Medicine curriculum
includes:
NMT 1001- Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Procedures
5 Credits
78.5 clock hours
NMT 1002- ...
quality control programs for assuring the
performance of diagnostic quality
nuclear medicine studies. Throughout
the cours...
Basic Cardiac Life Support for the
Health Care Provider
This course will involve training in risk
factors of heart disease...
3. Students/Graduates will
demonstrate effective
communication.
4. Students/Graduates will
demonstrate professional behavi...
240 clock hours
RTE 2200 & RTE 2200L –
Radiographic Procedures
and Lab III
3 Credits
60 clock hours
*SPC 1016 Fundamentals...
learn the concepts of structural
anatomy as they analyze the complex
functions.
Fundamentals of Speech
Students will learn...
In this course, students learn basic
principles of human behavior.
Challenges, responsibilities,
problems and satisfaction...
externships are set by the externship
sites.
Senior Registry Review
This Course provides a review of basic
knowledge from ...
5) Students/Graduates will appreciate
the importance of professional growth &
development1
The Radiation Therapy Curriculu...
RAD 2004 – Quality Management in
Radiation Therapy – 30 clock hours –
2 credits.
RAD 2005 – Radiation Biology – 30
clock h...
language. Students analyze and learn
prefixes and suffixes, spelling use and
correct pronunciation. Medical
abbreviations ...
safety for the radiation therapist.
Radiation health and safety requirements
of federal and state regulatory agencies,
acc...
aspect as well as the physical and
technical aspects will be discussed. The
role and responsibility of the radiation
thera...
quality improvement issues are
discussed and evaluated and assessment
techniques will be emphasized. Human
resource issues...
1. To provide education experiences
designed to prepare students for entry
level positions in the practical nursing
profes...
PN 420 Communications II
1 credit
15 clock hours
PN 500 Medical Surgical Nursing III
3 credits
45 clock hours
PN 505 Medic...
include the legal aspects of
documentation, basic fundamental
skills including intake and output
monitoring.
Fundamentals ...
the geriatric population, the health
problems they experience and how to
care for the needs of the older patient.
Obstetri...
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  1. 1. Revised 04/09/2010 Institute of Allied Medical Professions Academic Catalog 2009-2010 5150 Linton Boulevard Suite 340 Delray Beach, FL 33484
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the President 4 Overview History 5 Main and Branch Campuses 5 Statement of Purpose 5- 6 Statement of Ownership 6 Non-Discrimination 6 Mission 6 IAMP and You 6 Goals and Objectives 6-7 Licenses, Accreditations and Approvals 7-8 General Information and Policies Policy 8 Equal Opportunity 8 Faculty 8 Insurance 9 Payment of Bills 9 Facility 9 Telephone Policy 9 Smoking / Food Policy 9 Identification Cards 9 Admissions Policy 9 Admissions Procedures 10 Application 10 Admission Requirements 10 Requirements for Admission DMS 10-11 Requirements for Admission NM 11 Requirements for Admission RX and RT 11 Policy for Granting Credit for Previous Education and Training 11 Hours of Operation 11 Parking 11 Class size 12 School Closings 12 Credit Hours 12 Class Schedules 12 Transferability Policy 12 Personal Appearance 12 Credential Awarded 12-13 Housing 13 Student Health and Safety 13-14 Disciplinary Procedures 14 Course Numbering System 14-15 Programs and Curricula Programs 16-43 DMS (Diploma) 17-21 DMS (Degree) 21-25 NMT 26-29 RX 29-33 RT 33-40 PN 40-43 Career and Student Services Distance Education Division 43-47 Policies Career Services 47 Student Services 47-49 Tutoring 49 Individuals with Disabilities 49-50 Student Financial Information Financial Services 50 Financial Assistance 50 How to Apply 50-51 Financial Aid Programs 51-53 Last Day of Attendance 53-54 Determined Date of Withdrawal 54 Return of Title IV Funds 54-55 Refund Policies 55-56 School Regulations and Information Inclement Weather Policy 56 Sexual Harassment 56-57 Definition 57 Quid pro Quo Harassment 57 Hostile Work/Study Environment Harassment 57 Procedure 57-58 Standards and Conduct 58 Alcohol/Drug/Illegal Substance 58 Policy Student Conduct 58-59 Cheating and Plagiarism 59 Consequences of Academic Dishonesty 59 Definition of Plagiarism 59-60 Transcript Report 60 Student Records/Access Policy 60 Definition 60-61 Procedures to Inspect 61 Disclosure of Educational Records 61 Revised 04/10/2010 2
  3. 3. DMS/NMT/RX/MRI/RT/PN Clinical Externship Policies Introduction 61-62 Location 62 Site Requirements 62 Externship Attendance Policy 62-63 Grading 63 Externship Performance Standards 63 Externship Conduct 63-64 Externship Confidentiality 64 Externship Placement Policy 64 Pregnancy Policy-NM 64-65 Pregnancy Policy-DMS 65-66 Pregnancy Policy-RX & RT 66-67 Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress 67 Grading System 67-68 Computation of GPA 68 GPA Requirements 68 Graduation with Honors 68 Changing Grades 68 Maximum Time Frame in Which to Complete Requirements 68 Graduation Requirements 69 Withdrawal and Withdrawal Procedures 69 Incomplete Grades 69 Repeating a Component 69 Non-credit/Remedial Courses 70 Appeal Process SAP 70 Warning and Probation 70-71 Leave of Absence and Re-Enrollment Leave of Absence 71-72 Re-Enrollment 72 Academic Credit 72 Financial Credit 72 Academic, Attendance, Probation and Termination Academic, Attendance, Probation and Termination 72-73 Attendance Policy 73 Make-up Exams 73 Change of Program 74 Change of Schedule 74 Academic Warning 74 Probation 74 Non Continuance 74 Administrative Termination 74 Complaints/Grievance Procedures 74-75 Academic Affairs Committee Academic Affairs Committee General Policy 75-76 Statement of Policy and Procedure 76 Addendum I Academic Calendar 77 Addendum II Faculty & Administration 78-81 Addendum III Tuition & Fees 82 Addendum IV Physical Considerations 83 Addendum V JRCERT Non Compliance 84 Policy Addendum VI Consumer Information 85 Catalog Volume IV Revised 04/10/2010 3
  4. 4. A Message From The President Welcome to the Institute of Allied Medical Professions (IAMP). The decision you have made to continue your education with the hope of preparing yourself for employment and promotion in the health care/business world will prove to be one of the greatest and most rewarding opportunities of your life. The IAMP exists to equip you with the necessary knowledge, skills and the opportunity for personal growth. The school's administration, faculty, and staff will help you in every way possible and are committed to helping you achieve your success. We will prepare you to secure the skills necessary to realize your goals. However, the burden of responsibility is yours. Accept it with enthusiasm; approach it with all of your talents and effort; work at it with perseverance. Take advantage of all the facilities and resources the IAMP has to offer. Make the most of this opportunity, and you will be making the most of yourself. Thomas J. Haggerty Thomas J. Haggerty Revised 04/10/2010 4
  5. 5. HISTORY With its roots dating back to 1974, IAMP has held a long tradition of excellence! The Radiological Institute was established to conduct certificate programs in radiological sciences; the first program being Nuclear Medicine Technology. In September 1977 The Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York granted the IAMP its charter. In 1982 the IAMP amended its charter to change its name to the Institute of Allied Medical Professions (IAMP). This allowed the IAMP to expand its program offerings to meet the growing needs of the Health Care Industry. In1984, the IAMP began its first Diagnostic Medical Sonography program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. In 1995, the program was then moved to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. In the same year, an IAMP Queens Campus was established to conduct programs in Diagnostic Medical Sonography. With the demand for health care professionals on the rise, in 1998, IAMP opened a campus at St. Johns Riverside Hospital in Yonkers, New York. In 2006, to support its growth, this campus was moved to Westchester County Medical Center in Valhalla, New York. In October 2002, the IAMP was granted a provisional license to operate in the State of Florida. This campus was located at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach. An annual license was approved in November 2004. In order to support its expansion, the Campus was then moved to Delray Medical Center in Delray Beach. In January of 2005, the IAMP Atlanta campus, located at St. Joseph’s Hospital opened its doors. Today, the IAMP operates campuses in 3 states: New York at IAMP Queens Campus in Elmhurst, Westchester County Medical Center in Valhalla, and Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan; Georgia at St. Joseph's Hospital in Atlanta; Florida at Delray Medical Center in Delray Beach. MAIN & BRANCH CAMPUSES The IAMP of Atlanta is a branch of the main campus of the IAMP in Delray Beach, Florida. The main campus is located at 5150 Linton Blvd., Suite 340, Delray Beach, Florida 33484. MAIN OFFICE 5150 Linton Blvd. Suite 340 Delray Beach, Florida 33484-6525 561-381-4990 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The IAMP is a career-oriented, co- educational institution that believes the basic purpose of education is to prepare one for the highest degree of self- realization through quality education and training necessary to face the complexities of today's society. The ultimate goal of the IAMP lies in its responsibility, to both the students and the community, to provide educational opportunities through short-term curricula in the IAMP programs. They are designed to prepare a student for immediate employment in a chosen field of study upon graduation, with an emphasis on serving the needs of the community. The IAMP distance education division believes it has a special commitment to support each individual’s goals. The Revised 04/10/2010 5 OVERVIEW
  6. 6. IAMP places emphasis on the educational, professional, and personal growth of each student. On-line programs, policies and activities have been designed to implement this philosophy and purpose statement. STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP The IAMP is a privately owned corporation licensed by the state of Florida. NON-DISCRIMINATION The IAMP does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, national origin, physical handicap, religion or sex in its admission policies, activity programs, educational offerings or hiring procedures. MISSION The mission of the Institute of Allied Medical Professions of Florida is to provide its communities with learning opportunities that enables students to attain their educational health career goals and to develop an appreciation for professionalism and life-long learning. The Institute’s mission is supported by the application of its values of integrity, diversity, mutual respect, and genuine caring regarding individuals’ aspiration for self-actualization. IAMP AND YOU Our objective is to provide the opportunity for you to obtain a successful career in the health care world with a secure future. IAMP’s concern for your future is the basis of our unique design of practical education. This includes: • Teaching essential subjects needed for personal advancement and a successful future. • Faculty and administrators knowledgeable in their field and sensitive to the needs and desires of each student. • Effective and efficient equipment, teaching aides and methods, geared to the health care world. • Placement assistance to aid students and alumni in their job seeking endeavors. • Support and academic advisement to assist students in coping with educational, vocational and personal concerns. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES IAMP is committed to assist all students in fulfilling their career objectives. This includes necessary critical support services essential to compete successfully in the career world. IAMP’s aim is to enrich the student’s education through high-level training, which is essential to meet the demands of medical offices, hospitals, medical centers and clinics. The following objectives have been established in order to fully implement our goals. IAMP will provide intensive training in the fields of: • Diagnostic Medical Sonography • Nuclear Medicine Technology Revised 04/10/2010 6
  7. 7. • Radiologic Technology • Radiation Therapy • Practical Nursing IAMP will educate and thoroughly train students for positions as successful employees in the allied health/medical imaging/therapeutic science fields. IAMP will provide training which is sufficiently comprehensive and intensive so that students will be equipped to ascend the career ladder in their respective careers. IAMP will provide instruction in relevant allied health skills which reflect current state of the art techniques and equipment. IAMP will provide an environment conducive to students' personal and academic development which is essential in preparing them as responsible and productive members of society. IAMP will assist in the placement of all graduates in satisfying, productive and growth-oriented jobs. The IAMP trains students to step into the medical center of tomorrow. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES DISTANCE EDUCATION DIVISION Currently, the IAMP offers the following on-line courses: Algebra Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology Lab I Anatomy & Physiology II Anatomy & Physiology Lab II English Composition Medical Terminology General Physics Psychology Introduction to Health Science Speech The IAMP is currently in the process of developing the Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Nuclear Medicine program to be delivered entirely via distance-education. LICENSES, ACCREDITATIONS AND APPROVALS LICENSING The IAMP (License #2843) is licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education. Additional information regarding this institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission at 325 West Gaines Street, Ste. 1414, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400, the toll free telephone number is (888) 224– 6684. ACCREDITATION The IAMP is institutionally accredited by the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES), 7777 Leesburg Pike, Suite 314N, Falls Church, Virginia 22043, (703) 917– 9503, a national accrediting agency recognized by the United States Department of Education under provisions of Chapter 33, Title 38, U.S. Code, and subsequent legislation. The Nuclear Medicine Technology Program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, 2000 W. Danforth Rd., Ste. 130, #230 Edmond, OK 73003, (405) 285-0546. Revised 04/10/2010 7
  8. 8. The Radiologic Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee in Radiologic Technology, 2000 W. Danfortth, Rd, Ste 130, #203 Edmond, OK 73003, (405) 285-0579. The Diagnostic Medical Sonography program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756, (727) 210- 2350. POLICY The IAMP reserves the right at any time to make appropriate changes deemed advisable in the policies, procedures and information contained in this publication including admissions requirements, tuition, fees, and diploma requirements without formal notice. This catalog is not intended as a listing of course offerings but rather as a reference document containing approved curricula, programs, and courses, which may be offered. The IAMP RESERVES the right to postpone the starting date of any program/course for a reasonable period or cancel a program/course if minimum enrollment is not achieved. All fees will be refunded for courses cancelled by the IAMP. Subject matter, course material and/or length of program are subject to change in accordance with the IAMP and its charter. The IAMP reserves the right to limit registration for courses, to discontinue courses for which there is insufficient enrollment, and to change times and/or instructor assignment. If the time of a course is changed the student may be entitled to a full refund. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY The IAMP’s policy of equal opportunity employment, consistent with federal policy, is that no person shall on the grounds of race, creed, religion, handicap, sex, age, color or national origin be excluded from any training, be denied the benefit of, or be subjected to discrimination in any hiring practice or activity. FACULTY Faculty members are highly qualified teachers with experience in their fields. They are carefully selected not only for their teaching ability, but their ability to work closely with their students. All the members of the faculty participate in the guidance program and are available to the student body in the capacity of advisors on all academic matters. The faculty, along with the entire IAMP staff, encourages an open- door policy. Take the initiative to acquaint yourself with your instructors and to seek their help if you have difficulty in your academic courses. The Campus Director, personally and through Program Directors, guides the student through academic problems arising from schedules, grades, subject matter, graduation requirements and attendance. He/she is also concerned with policies regarding student behavior, orientation programs and academic advising. Revised 04/10/2010 8 GENERAL INFORMATION AND POLICIES
  9. 9. INSURANCE The school does not provide personal, medical or liability insurance against fire, theft, or vandalism of students' personal property. Students are covered by professional liability insurance during the clinical components of the programs. PAYMENT OF BILLS All bills are payable as rendered and may be paid from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily. Grades will not be issued or diplomas granted, nor will transcripts or references be furnished until all financial obligations have been satisfied. Tuition accounts must be current in order for students to attend their externship. FACILITY The IAMP is located at 5150 Linton Boulevard on the campus of Delray Medical Center in Delray Beach. This busy and well traveled area consists of four large classrooms and two laboratories, administrative and education offices as well as a student break area. All the equipment used at the IAMP is compatible with industry standards and effectively meets the objectives of the programs. Standard equipment includes a film library of case studies, video monitors, reference books, journals and audiovisual aids, which complement curriculum objectives. TELEPHONE POLICY Students who bring cellular phones and/or pagers to school must keep them in the “off” position during class and laboratory. This includes text messaging. Cellular phones in class may be used only during breaks. Disruption during class or lab will result in disciplinary action. A student may receive a telephone call during school for emergency purposes only. The emergency telephone call must come through the schools telephone number (561) 381-4990 and be directed to the Program Director who will then immediately notify the student of the telephone call. SMOKING/DRINKING/EATING /ETC. POLICY Food and drink are prohibited in the classrooms, lab and certain restricted areas. These items are permitted only in the break areas, lounge areas, or outside of the school building. IAMP is a smoke-free and tobacco-free environment. Smoking is prohibited at any location in the building or within 10 feet of entrance and exit. Gum chewing is prohibited in the classroom. IDENTIFICATION CARDS When applicable, appropriate student ID/access cards are issued to registered students. ADMISSIONS POLICY Within the limits of its ability and resources, it is the policy of the IAMP to accept all applicants for admission whose credentials demonstrate that they have the interest, ability, and potential to successfully complete appropriate requirements for the course of study selected, without regard to race, creed, color, national origin or sex. Revised 04/10/2010 9
  10. 10. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES All applicants must visit the Office of Admissions to meet with an advisor. Admissions interviews will be scheduled to discuss the various options which are available. In order to provide each applicant with the best information possible with which to make a well informed decision to attend the IAMP, the applicant will be fully apprized of program requirements, supportive services, class schedules, and the registration procedures. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR ALL PROGRAMS All applicants submit an application for admission. At a minimum, all applicants must posses a high school diploma or GED. All applicants must conduct a personal interview with one of the school’s admission advisors. This will give the applicant an opportunity to ask questions about the curriculum and program, with which to make a well informed decision to attend the IAMP, the applicant will be fully apprized of program requirements, supportive services, class requirements and the registration procedures. APPLICATION PROCESS FOR ALL DELIVERY METHODS Applicants must complete and submit an application for admissions that includes: 1. Admission interview 2. Personal statement 3. Two letters of reference 4. Transcripts 5. Medical form 6. Application fee of $50 7. Two passport size recent photos 8. An interview with the IAMP’s program director is mandatory. Any student wishing to submit transcripts from a foreign country for consideration of transfer of credits is required to provide a translation of such transcripts performed by a certified academic translator. Applicants applying for our Associate Degree programs are required to demonstrate a passing grade on an entrance exam. Any applicant who is under the age of 18 and applying for admissions to the IAMP must acquire a parent or guardian’s signature on any contractual papers (i.e., Enrollment Agreement). ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Decision as to acceptance of an applicant is determined, but not limited to, interest, educational background, references, and life experience and admission interviews. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY To be considered for admission, applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED. An interview with the program director is mandatory and all applicants must obtain a passing minimum score on the applicant evaluation worksheet. Priority will be given to those with college credits and/or a medical background. In order for a person to become a Registered Diagnostic Medical Sonographer (RDMS), additional Revised 04/10/2010 10
  11. 11. requirements may be needed. For additional information please contact the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) at www.ardms.org or 1-800-541-9754. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROGRAM At a minimum, applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED. Additionally, applicants must be registered as a Radiologic Technologist through the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), or possess a Bachelors Degree or a minimum of sixty semester credits including courses in Human Anatomy & Physiology, Physics, General Chemistry, Algebra, Medical Terminology, Oral and Written Communications and Computer Applications. Priority will be given to those with a medical background. An interview with the IAMP’s program director is mandatory. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY AND RADIATION THERAPY PROGRAMS At a minimum, applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED. Priority will be given to those with college credits and/or a medical background. An interview with the program director is mandatory. POLICY FOR GRANTING CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS EDUCATION AND TRAINING Credit for advanced placement or appropriate experiential learning will be given consideration when such education or experience is determined to be comparable to the courses offered at the IAMP. The IAMP considers the transfer of credits from other institutions accredited by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education (USDE) or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) The institute will evaluate and grant credit for previous education that has been earned no earlier than three years prior to enrolling at the Institute as college philosophies, objectives and programs may vary and change from year to year. The Institute reserves the right to test applicants or request that they successfully pass an examination administered by an Institute of Allied Medical Professions faculty member. HOURS OF OPERATION The IAMP hours are 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Administrative Office hours are as follows: Office of Admissions 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Business Office 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Resource Centers 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Career Placement 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. PARKING Student parking is permitted at the southeast corner of the parking lot. Revised 04/10/2010 11
  12. 12. CLASS SIZE The school will maintain proper ratio between teachers and students to allow adequate attention to each individual in both theory and laboratory. The student- teacher ratio will generally not exceed 30:1 in theory class and 20:1 laboratory classes. Laboratory class size will vary by program. SCHOOL CLOSINGS The administrative offices are closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday Presidents Day Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Columbus Day Thanksgiving Day Day After Thanksgiving Christmas Day CREDIT HOURS The units of measure used are credit hours. A credit hour is equivalent to a minimum of each of the following: CLASS SCHEDULES Most classes are scheduled from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday for the day programs and 6:00 – 10:30 PM for the evening POLICY FOR TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS Transferability of credits is at the discretion of the receiving institution whether to accept any credits in transfer. Therefore, the Institute does not provide assurance as to the transferability of credits earned. PERSONAL APPEARANCE Personal appearance is one of the first features upon which an employer evaluates a candidate for employment. Therefore, the IAMP maintains a strict dress code for its students. All students are expected to be neat, clean, and dressed in medical scrubs consistent with the type of dress that would be required for the medical/business office, in the color designated by the IAMP. The student’s footwear should consist of clean white sneakers or medical clogs. A student’s appearance must reflect their awareness of the demands to maintain astute professional, medical and hygienic standards in an externship setting. While assigned to an externship site, the student must adhere to that facility’s dress code in addition to the program’s policy. If such rules are not followed, the school will take disciplinary action. CREDENTIAL AWARDED The school will award the official diploma for each program or course of study when the student has successfully completed the requirements for graduation and all financial obligations Revised 04/10/2010 12 HOURS CREDITS 15 hours of lecture 1 semester credit 30 hours of laboratory 1 semester credit 45 hours of externship/clinical 1 semester credit
  13. 13. have been met for the NMT and DMS diploma programs. The Institute will award the official Associate of Science Degree when the student has successfully completed the requirements for graduation and all financial obligations have been met for the DMS, RT or RX degree programs. HOUSING The IAMP does not have dormitory or housing facilities. Students in need of housing should contact the admissions office for recommendations on housing. STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY The staff at the IAMP is very conscious of the need for safety procedures. It is the policy of the school to have classrooms and laboratories comply with the requirements of various State and local building codes, the Board of Health, and the Fire Marshal. Accidents often occur as a result of carelessness, fatigue, and/or use of the wrong procedures or faulty equipment. The laboratory and other places on the campus are, therefore, designed to promote safety. Students must follow all procedures in order to prevent accidents and avoid injury. In the case of an emergency brought to the attention of a school staff member during school hours, action will be taken to obtain medical emergency services, if required. All accidents, injuries or emergencies must be reported immediately to the nearest instructor or staff member. Students must not take it upon themselves to summon fire, rescue, and medical or law enforcement personnel. Instructors and staff members, upon receiving a verbal report, will act promptly and follow a specific accident procedure. Students must not attempt to repair any damaged, broken or malfunctioning equipment. Instructors or nearest staff member, upon notification, will follow a specified procedure. The school administration should also be notified immediately of any illnesses, accidents, or hospitalization of any students that may affect their ability to attend classes or otherwise participate in the programs. Student contact at the school from outside parties in the form of telephone calls, messages, and letters of a personal nature are discouraged except in cases of emergency, such as hospitalization, death in family, etc. All personal business, including telephone calls and messages, should be directed to the students’ residences. Fire drills will be conducted periodically in order to familiarize students with emergency evacuation procedures. The full cooperation of the students is expected an appreciated. If a fire or fire hazard is discovered, an instructor or staff member must be notified immediately. All exits are marked, and students are expected to leave the building in a prompt and orderly fashion using these exits. Classes will resume following the all-clear signal. Other emergency evacuation drills may be conducted. Students are expected to follow direction as provided by a designated official. During the course of training in health- related fields, students may also be exposed to individuals with infectious disease, including substances and Revised 04/10/2010 13
  14. 14. materials that could cause potential injury. In order to reduce the risk of infection or other harm that could result from exposure, student must observe all rules and regulations regarding their training and procedures. In case of an accident which could result in the transmission of an infectious disease, students must report immediately to their instructors and to a health care facility for appropriate testing. In addition, students may come in contact with other students, faculty, and/or patients with compromised immune systems. Any student, therefore, having knowledge of, or possessing a communicable disease must notify their instructor and will not be allowed into the classroom or clinical setting until a physician’s clearance has been obtained. Examples of communicable diseases include, but are not limited to: measles (rubella), chicken pox, streptococcal infections, pneumonia, tuberculosis and hepatitis. Students should contact their personal physician with any questions regarding their health and communicable diseases. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES Any student in violation of any of the disciplinary rules or student conduct regulations located on pages 57-59 of this catalog and are subject to any or all of the following penalties: 1. Warning 2. Probation 3. Suspension 4. Expulsion Disciplinary rules and student conduct regulations are incorporated in this catalog. In all instances where it is practical and there is no immediate need for imposition of the penalty, no penalty shall be imposed unless the following procedures have been followed: If, in the judgment of the administration of the school, continued attendance by the individual charged with misconduct will endanger the safety and well being of the individual and/or members of the school, the following procedures shall be set aside. 1. The student has received written notice of the charges against him/her. 2. A hearing is held before the Academic Affairs Committee consisting of faculty and administrative personnel chosen by the school. 3. At the hearing the student may present a written statement or state his/her case orally. The student is entitled to the aid and assistance of a faculty member or administrative person of their choosing. The determination of the disciplinary panel shall be final. Any penalty imposed (after a hearing) shall be noted on all appropriate student records. • Any disciplinary procedure taken without following the procedures outlined above shall, at the written request of the student, be reviewed in accordance with those procedures. • Any student refusing to obey any instruction given as to conduct and/or behavior may be instructed to leave the premises forth with. Failure to do so shall be grounds for immediate disciplinary action. COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM Because of the differences in the organization and content of the various disciplines and professions, there is no Revised 04/10/2010 14
  15. 15. uniform, reasonable way of numbering courses that would be equally useful in all fields of knowledge. In general it may be assumed that advances in division level (1000, 2000, and 3000) correlate with more difficult and challenging academic work. Sometimes, however, disciplines organize their course numbering partly in terms of criteria other than degree of difficulty. It should be noted, too, that some students find introductory courses to be more demanding than advanced, specialized courses. In such courses, a more comprehensive approach and the first exposure to new ways of thinking may be harder for some individuals than covering a smaller, more familiar, area in much greater detail. Revised 04/10/2010 15
  16. 16. Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Diploma) Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Degree) Nuclear Medicine Technology (Diploma) Radiological Technology (Degree) Radiation Therapy (Degree) Practical Nursing (Diploma) Revised 04/10/2010 16 PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA
  17. 17. Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) Diploma 790 Didactic hrs, 280 lab hrs, 1000 Clinical Hours = 2078 total hours 83 Credit Hours Day Program: 18 months Evening Program: 22 months Credential Awarded: Diploma Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This 22-month evening program is designed to provide the essentials of sonographic techniques. Our curriculum leads the entry-level student through primary sonographic education. Basic subjects explored include physical principles, abdominal, small parts, and obstetrical and gynecological sonography. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing the scope of the curriculum by providing additional learning opportunities in both vascular and echocardiography specialties. The curriculum also devotes significant time to developing "hands-on" laboratory skills. For the first 16 months of the evening program, students attend classes and receive laboratory instruction. Day classes are scheduled from 9:00am - 2:00pm Monday through Thursday. Evening classes are scheduled from 6:00pm – 10:30pm Monday through Thursday. The remaining 6 months is devoted to a full-time clinical practicum. Students complete one thousand hours of clinical training, normally Monday through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm. Testing takes place at regular intervals throughout the program to evaluate levels of student achievement and progress. Each didactic course builds on each other; therefore, the class prior to the current course is required to continue throughout the program. Goals of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program 1. To provide education experiences designed to prepare students for entering a career as medical sonographers. 2. Graduate students who successfully pass the ARDMS exam 3. To provide the medical community with individuals qualified to perform sonographic procedures. 4. To instill in students a lifelong desire to achieve professional and academic excellence. Diagnostic Medical Sonography Curriculum Includes: DMS-D 1001- Principles of Allied Medical Professions 6 Credits 90 clock hours (90 didactic, 0 lab) DMS-D 1002- Principles of Sonographic Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory 6 Credits 105 clock hours (75 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 1003- Introduction to Sonographic Anatomy 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) Revised 04/10/2010 17
  18. 18. DMS-D 2001- Principles of Abdominal Sonography I 7 Credits 120 clock hours (90 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2002- Principles of Abdominal Sonography II including Small Parts 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2003- Sonographic Gynecological Diagnostics 4 credits 85 clock hours (45 didactic, 40 lab) DMS-D 2004- Sonographic Obstetrical Diagnostics I 3 Credits 50 clock hours (50 didactic, 0 lab) DMS-D 2005- Sonographic Obstetrical Diagnostics II 3 Credits 50 clock hours DMS-D 2006- Principles of Vascular Technology I 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2007- Principles of Vascular Technology II 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2008- Principles of Echocardiography with Laboratory 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2009- Principles of Echocardiography with Laboratory 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-D 2010- Introduction to the Clinical Practicum 2 Credits 30 clock hours DMS-D 3000- Clinical Practicum 1000 Clinical Hrs = 22 Credits 1000 clock hours BCLS 101- Basic Cardiac Life Support For the Health Care Provider 5 Lab. Hrs Principles of Allied Medical Professions This course provides an overview of diagnostic ultrasound. Topics covered include medical terminology, introduction to ultrasound laboratory, patient care, and medical law & ethics. Principles of Sonographic Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory This course includes physics, instrumentation, scan plane orientation and physical principles of ultrasound. Major topics covered are sound production, continuous wave, pulsed sound, attenuation, echo production, transducers, beams and focusing, automatic scanning imaging instruments, Doppler, artifacts, and quality assurance. Students are provided with hands-on laboratory instruction in equipment operation including Doppler and color- flow instrumentation, the ultrasonic presentation of soft tissue and imaging artifacts. Basic scanning is also included as well as instruction on patient safety. Introduction to Sonographic Anatomy Revised 04/10/2010 18
  19. 19. This course reviews the normal anatomy and physiology of the human body, and then expands those concepts in the context of the sonographic appearance, including cross-sectional anatomy, and physiology, of abdominal, vascular, and obstetrical and gynecological structures. Among the main goals of the course is to provide structured information and guidelines for adequate quality scanning procedures. Principles of Abdominal Sonography I with lab This abdominal unit introduces the student to the basic anatomy and physiology, normal and abnormal sonographic appearances, scanning techniques and disease processes of the various organs/structures within the abdomen, including cardiovascular, liver, gallbladder, biliary tree, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, and adrenal glands. Students develop competency in assessing and interpreting the ultrasonic presentation of normal versus abnormal images through the use of slides and radiological film case studies. The laboratory component of this course provides a series of hands-on practical exercises in organ scanning protocols to facilitate the skills needed to provide optimal diagnostic images. Principles of Abdominal Sonography II including Small Parts with lab This abdominal unit introduces the student to the basic anatomy and physiology, normal and abnormal sonographic appearances, scanning techniques and disease processes of the thyroid, parathyroid, breast, scrotum, lymph nodes, and other superficial structures. Students develop competency in assessing and interpreting the ultrasonic presentation of normal versus abnormal images through the use of slides and case studies. The laboratory component of this course provides a series of hands-on practical exercises in organ scanning protocols to facilitate the skills needed to provide optimum diagnostic images. Anatomy, physiology, ultrasound scanning techniques and pathology will be covered. Laboratory training will incorporate basic small parts scanning methods with the use of tissue phantoms to maximize scanning techniques. Sonographic Gynecological Diagnostics This course introduces the student to the basic anatomy and physiology, normal and abnormal sonographic appearances, scanning techniques and disease processes of the female reproductive system. Major topics include pelvic anatomy, physiology of female reproductive organs, the menstrual cycle, and uterine and ovarian pathology. Transabdominal, transvaginal, transperineal and sonohysterography sonographic techniques will be discussed. The sonographic appearance of normal versus abnormal tissue presentation will be reviewed using film and slide case study reviews. GYN scanning protocols will be introduced in the laboratory setting with particular attention focused on patient preparation for different scanning methods Sonographic Obstetrical Diagnostics I This course provides the student with an in depth knowledge and understanding of pelvic anatomy and pathology, embryology and fetal development. Revised 04/10/2010 19
  20. 20. Major topics covered are embryology, normal first trimester fetal development, abnormal development, and complications of pregnancy. Students learn the current methodology for assessing fetal growth parameters and the structures supporting fetal viability. The identification of risk factors and abnormal fetal development is covered through a series of slide and film presentations. Sonographic Obstetrical Diagnostics II This course introduces students to a basic understanding of fetal growth and development and those structures supporting fetal life during the second and third trimester. Special focus is placed on the use of sonography to accurately assess fetal well-being. Major topics covered are normal second and third trimester fetal development, abnormal development and complications, multi-gestational pregnancies, potential fetal anomalies, possible maternal complications, and life support structures. Principles of Vascular Technology I with lab This course introduces the principles of Doppler imaging and physics, vascular anatomy and pathology, hemodynamics, common duplex examinations, and alternative vascular testing methods. Major topics covered include the history of Doppler, introduction to the Doppler equation, continuous and Pulsed Wave Doppler, color flow imaging, color power imaging, spectral Doppler, vascular anatomy of the central and cerebral arterial system, peripheral arterial system and microscopic anatomy, central and peripheral venous system, characteristics and functions of blood and hemodynamics. Principles of Vascular Technology II with Lab This course covers the use of Doppler imaging techniques in venous disease and testing, arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease, various diagnostic modalities, bypass graft surveillance, fistula and pseudoaneurysm, plethysmography, and abdominal vascular exams. Hands-on instruction is provided in performing lower extremity venous and carotid examinations. Principles of Echocardiography with Laboratory This course introduces the principles of echocardiography and its application and techniques in cardiac imaging and cardiac Doppler studies of cardiac anatomy and function. Major topics covered include anatomy and physiology of the heart, principles of Doppler, and normal cardiac imaging. This course also covers pathology and pathophysiology of the heart, and Doppler and echocardiography application in cardiac diagnosis and management. Cardiac pathology covered includes left ventricular dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, cardiac masses, diseases of the aorta, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and pericardial disease. Introduction to the Clinical Practicum Revised 04/10/2010 20
  21. 21. This course prepares the student to enter the clinical training phase of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Topics covered include advanced patient care and handling techniques, training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim, activation of the emergency medical services system and management of the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component, adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuers team, patient's Bill of Rights, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA) and other patient confidentiality laws. Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Health Care Provider This course will involve training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim. Activating the emergency medical services system and managing the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component. Adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuer team will be covered. Externship The Externship provides the student with practical experience in the performance of sonographic examinations, proper patient/staff interactions and relations, communication skills, proper handling and use of diagnostic equipment, tomographic anatomy, and medical terminology, interpretation of sonographic results, and proper care and handling of films. Methods of instruction include mentoring by clinical staff, performance of assorted sonographic protocols, completion of case studies, and evaluations by clinical supervisors. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for externships are set by the externship sites. Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) Associate in Science 735 Didactic Hours, 210 Lab hours 1530 Clinical Hours 2475 Total Hours 90 Credits 90 Weeks of Instruction Credential Awarded: Associate in Science Degree Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential /Distance Delivery (* Denotes the courses available to be delivered via Distance Delivery) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Associate in Science Degree in General Sonography is an educationally broad based post secondary full time program. This twenty-four month program is designed to provide the essentials of entry level sonographic medical imaging. The curriculum leads the student through primary sonographic education in the specialties of Abdominal/Small Parts and Obstetrics & Gynecology. The course also provides Revised 04/10/2010 21
  22. 22. an introduction to the principles of echocardiography, the most effective non-invasive method for use in cardiac diagnosis. It also provides the application and techniques in cardiac imaging and cardiac Doppler studies, cardiac anatomy and function. The program requires general education courses in General Physics, Anatomy & Physiology, Algebra, Psychology, English and Speech. The core curriculum also devotes significant time to developing "hands-on" laboratory skills in basic nursing care and sonographic imaging techniques. Students receive consistent sequential didactic and scheduled laboratory instruction throughout the program. Classes are scheduled from 9:00am - 2:00pm Monday through Friday. Students complete one thousand five hundred thirty (1530) hours of clinical training within an approved clinical education center. Typical clinical hours are Monday through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm. Assessments takes place at regular intervals throughout the program evaluating the student’s progress towards specific levels of competency. Students must complete each course with a 2.0 or higher to remain in the program. Goals of the AS degree in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program 1. To provide transfer of general education credits to a four-year institution for baccalaureate degree completion. 2. Graduate students who successfully pass the ARDMS exam. 3. To provide the medical community with individuals qualified to perform sonographic procedures. 4. To instill in students a lifelong desire to achieve professional and academic excellence. 5. To provide education experiences designed to prepare students for entering a career as medical sonographers. Diagnostic Medical Sonography Curriculum Includes: *SPC 1016- Fundamentals of Speech 3 Credits 45 clock hours *MAC 1105 – College Algebra 3 Credits 45 clock hours *ENC 1101 – English Composition 3 Credits 45 clock hours *PSY 1012 – Introduction to Psychology 3 Credits 45 clock hours *PHY 2053 – General Physics 4 Credits 60 clock hours *HSC-1000 Introduction to Health Science 3 Credits 45 clock hours *MEA 1239 – Medical Terminology 2 Credits 30 clock hours Revised 04/10/2010 22
  23. 23. *BSC 1085-Anatomy & Physiology I 3 Credits 45 clock hours *BSC 1085L – Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 Credit 30 clock hours *BSC 1086 - Anatomy & Physiology II -3 Credits 45 clock hours *BSC 1086L – Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 Credit 30 clock hours DMS-A 1002 – Principles of Sonographic Physics and Instrumentation 5 Credits 90 clock hours (60 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-A 1003 – Sonographic Anatomy with Lab 3 Credits 60 clock hours (30 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-A 2001- Principles of Abdominal Sonography I with lab 4 Credits 75 clock hours (45 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-A 2003- Principles of OB/GYN Sonography I with lab 4 Credits 75 clock hours (45 didactic, 30 lab) DMS-A 2002- Principles of Abdominal Sonography II 2 Credits 30 clock hours DMS-A 2004- Principles of OB/GYN Sonography II 3 Credits 45 clock hours DMS-A 2005 – Introduction to Cardiac and Vascular Sonography with Lab 3 credits 60 clock hours (30 didactic, 30 lab hours) DMS-A 2014 – Seminar in Sonographic Interpretation and Professional Development 3 Credits 45 clock hours BCLS 101- Basic Cardiac Life Support For the Health Care Provider 8 Lab. Hrs DMS-A 2010, DMS-A 2011, DMS-A 2012, DMS-A 2013 – Clinical Externships I - IV 34 Credits 1530 clock hours Introduction to Health Science This course will examine the healthcare professionals and how they interact with patients. Professional organizations, OSHA standards, asepsis, and isolation techniques will be covered. The students will learn to perform vital signs and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training will be provided. Introduction to Cardiac and Vascular Sonography with Lab This course provides an introduction to the principles of echocardiography, the most effective non-invasive method for use in cardiac diagnosis. It also provides Revised 04/10/2010 23
  24. 24. the application and techniques in cardiac imaging and cardiac Doppler studies, cardiac anatomy and function. The course will introduce the principles of Doppler imaging, Doppler physics, vascular anatomy and pathology, hemodynamics, common duplex examinations and alternative vascular testing methods. Instruction is given in how to compare clinical presentation to exam results and write a concise impression. The course also focuses on pathology and dysfunction and the disease process. Medical Terminology This course provides instruction in how to decipher useful medical terminology into everyday language. Students analyze and learn prefixes and suffixes, spelling use and correct pronunciation. Medical abbreviations and symbols are included. Anatomy and Physiology I and II Anatomy and Physiology Lab I and II Students will learn about the structure and function of the human body. The concepts of cells, tissues, organs and systems are presented to form the framework for a comprehensive study of anatomic structures and basic functions of each body system. In addition the concepts of biochemistry will be discussed. The students will also learn the concepts of structural anatomy as they analyze the complex functions. College Algebra Students in this course will explore college algebra through a detailed examination of practical applications. Students will calculate algebraic problems with linear equations, exponents, polynomials, factors, and rational expressions. Student will solve problems using graphs, slopes, inequalities, linear equations, roots, radicals and quadratic equations. English Composition Students will learn grammar, punctuation and usage skills that are useful in everyday language. The goals of effective writing will be covered as well as essay preparation. Students will take several mastery and editing tests as part of the course. Students will review readings for writing to aid in essay preparation and completion. General Physics This course is designed to cover a broad range of physics topics. As these topics are applied to various problem situations, the student will develop critical thinking skills and through the use of group activities which the student will enhance cooperative attitudes. Topics include computer technologies, math calculations, mechanics, measurement, heat, fluid, and gas laws, as well as, atomic and nuclear physics, electromagnetic, light and sound. Principles of Sonographic Physics and Instrumentation This course includes physics and instrumentation which provides the foundation for the understanding of ultrasound physics and instrumentation. Revised 04/10/2010 24
  25. 25. The physics of ultrasound will be studied. Hands-on laboratory instruction will take place. Fundamentals of Speech Students will learn the foundations of communications including public presentations and interviewing skills Introduction to Sonographic Anatomy This course reviews the normal anatomy and physiology of the human body and then expands those concepts in the context of the sonographic appearance, including cross-sectional anatomy and physiology of abdominal, vascular and obstetrical and gynecological structures. Among the main goals of the course is to provide structured information and guidelines for adequate quality scanning procedures. Principles of Abdominal Sonography with Lab This course is an in-depth study of the organs contained within the human abdominal cavity in both normal and abnormal states. Part II further explores small parts, breast, prostate, musculoskeletal, and interventional sonography. AGNOSC Principles of OB/GYN Sonography with Lab This is a comprehensive approach to in- depth studies of organs contained within the human female pelvic cavity in both normal and abnormal conditions. The primary focus of Course I will be on normal states. The primary focus of Course II will be on abnormal states. Seminar in Sonographic Interpretation and Professional Development This course utilizes case presentations and peer review to assess the student’s ability to interpret sonographic criterion and findings, as they correlate with other diagnostic studies and clinical signs and symptoms to derive at clinical impressions. Additionally the student will prepare for the real world via assistance in professional development such as resume writing and interviewing techniques. Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Health Care Provider This course will involve training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim. Activating the emergency medical services system and managing the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component. Adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuer team will be covered. Externship The Externship provides the student with practical experience in the performance of sonographic examinations, proper patient/staff interactions and relations, communication skills, proper handling and use of diagnostic equipment, tomographic anatomy, and medical Revised 04/10/2010 25
  26. 26. terminology, interpretation of sonographic results, and proper care and handling of films. Methods of instruction include mentoring by clinical staff, performance of assorted sonographic protocols, completion of case studies, and evaluations by clinical supervisors. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for externships are set by the externship sites. Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) 2 Semesters of Approximately 26 Weeks Each-53 Credits 872 Didactic Hours + 1060 Clinical Hours = 1932 Total Clock Hours 52 Weeks of Instruction Credential Awarded: Diploma Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is designed to provide the essentials of Nuclear Medicine techniques. Our curriculum offers detailed experience in nuclear medicine techniques while exposing the student to newer imaging modalities such as SPECT scanning as well as full range of In-Vitro Nuclear Medicine procedures. Instruction is tutorial, didactic and practical. As an imaging modality, nuclear medicine is based on unstable atoms that emit radiation for diagnosis and treatment of disease. These atoms or radio-nuclides are compounded like drugs to form radiopharmaceuticals. When radiopharmaceuticals are injected, inhaled or taken orally, the radioactivity can be detected and monitored from outside the body. The concentration of radioactivity in tissues or organs is the basis for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Nuclear Medicine technologists are employed by hospitals, physicians, out patient clinics, and medical and imaging. This twelve month program emphasizes the application of nuclear medicine and covers a wide range of subjects. The student will be tested at intervals throughout the program to check his/her level of achievement and progress. Students attend class for the first 6 months of the program. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday. During the first 6 months students will also complete four hundred and eighty (480) hours of clinical lab (24 weeks at 20 hours per week). The remaining six months will be devoted to full-time clinical training. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for externships are set by the externship sites. The student will complete one thousand, sixty (1,060) hours of clinical Externship (40 hours per week). Goals of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program 1. Prepare graduates for entry level positions in the Nuclear Medicine profession 2. Graduate students who successfully pass the ARRT exam 3. Graduate students who will model professional development and growth 4. Graduates satisfied with their clinical preparation 5. Employers satisfied with the clinical preparation of IAMP graduate. Revised 04/10/2010 26
  27. 27. Nuclear Medicine curriculum includes: NMT 1001- Clinical Nuclear Medicine Procedures 5 Credits 78.5 clock hours NMT 1002- Physics of Nuclear Medicine 3 Credits 55 clock hours NMT 1003- Radiopharmacy and Radiochemestry 5 Credits 75 clock hours NMT 1004- Radiation Biology and Health 2 Credits 35 clock hours NMT 1005- Nuclear Medicine Laboratory 1 Credit 48 clock hours NMT 1006- Patient Care 2 Credits 32.5 clock hours BCLS 101- Basic Cardiac Life Support For the Health Care Provider 8 Lab. Hrs NMT 2001 Clinical Practicum Lab I 6 credits 270clock hours NMT 2002 Clinical Practicum Lab II 6 Credits 270 Clock Hours NMT 2003 Clinical Practicum I 11.5 Credits 530 Clock Hours NMT 2004 Clinical Practicum II 11.5 Credits 530 Clock Hours Clinical Nuclear Medicine Procedures This course is designed to provide the student with a review of anatomy, physiology, pathology and radiopharmaceuticals as they relate to clinical nuclear medicine imaging and non-imaging procedures. The practical knowledge necessary to perform current Nuclear Medicine studies are presented. The student is taught the clinical indications for a test or scan, the physiological basis for performing it and how to calculate and analyze data. Examples of normal and abnormal results are given. (Prerequisite: None) Physics of Nuclear Medicine The Physics of Nuclear Medicine focuses primarily on basic principles of atomic and nuclear physics which lead ultimately to an understanding of the many radiation detection systems used in a clinical nuclear medicine department. An initial review will include mathematical relationships and atomic- nuclear structure transitions into a discussion of nuclear reactions, radioactivity, modes of radioactive decay and the interaction of radiation with matter. General principles of counting systems are then addressed with an emphasis on nuclear counting statistics, pulse height spectroscopy and problems in radiation detection. Finally, the rectilinear scanner, Anger gamma camera and gamma well counter are examined in detail with a final focus on Revised 04/10/2010 27
  28. 28. quality control programs for assuring the performance of diagnostic quality nuclear medicine studies. Throughout the course, mathematical problems pertinent to various topics are presented and solved in class as the topics are covered. Mathematical problem-solving is then reinforced by graded homework assignments. For certain topics, the assigned reading course text will be supplemented with hand-outs. (Prerequisite: NMT 1001) Radiopharmacy and Radiochemistry The Radiopharmacy and Radiochemistry course initially reviews basic chemistry principles which lead to an understanding of radiopharmaceuticals chemistry. Radiopharmacy is next introduced with presentations on radiopharmaceuticals design, mechanisms of radiopharmaceuticals localization and radionuclide production. The compounding and chemistry of the principal radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in relation to their respective organ systems. Radionuclide generators, the safe preparation radiopharmaceuticals, quality control and radiation dosimetry are finally presented to provide the tools with which to assure good quality of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine. (Prerequisite: NMT 1002) Radiation Biology and Health The radiation biology and health course is designed to give the nuclear medicine technologist the necessary knowledge to work in his/her profession with the proper understanding of ionizing radiation. The course covers the biological effects of radiation and the perspective of the risks associated with exposures. The instruments and techniques used to measure radioactivity and radiation levels are presented. The student is acquainted with sources of background radiation, radiation quantities and units, the main factors in internal dose calculations, radioactive waste management and the pertinent codes and regulations. (Prerequisite: NMT 1003) Nuclear Medicine Laboratory The nuclear medicine laboratory course is designed to give the student "hands- in" experience with the various instrumentation used in the practice of nuclear medicine. Operation, basic quality control and routine maintenance of scanners, gamma cameras, well counters and spectrometers are taught through demonstrations and supervised practice sessions. Laboratory sessions are coordinated with the subject material being presented in the classroom. (Prerequisite: BCLS 101) Patient Care This course focuses on the student’s ability to provide basic patient care. Emphasis is on communication skills, medical ethics, patient assessment, body mechanics, asepsis and care of the patient with special nursing problems. The student is taught to recognize emergency patient conditions and to initiate life saving first-aid measures prior to the arrival of a physician. (Prerequisite: NMT None) Revised 04/10/2010 28
  29. 29. Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Health Care Provider This course will involve training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim. Activating the emergency medical services system and managing the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component. Adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuer team will be covered. (Prerequisite: NMT None) Clinical Practicum This is a 1060 hour practicum under the direction of a hospital clinic supervisor. The student will develop the skills to function competently as an entry-level technologist with high ethical and professional standards. Students will be involved in all aspects of nuclear medicine, including Anatomy and Physiology, radiopharmacy, Instrumentation, Radiation Protection, Patient Care and Communication, Quality Assurance, Laboratory Procedures and Safety, and pathophysiology to procedures performed in clinical practicum. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for externships are set by the externship sites. (Prerequisite: NMT 1001 & NMT 1002) Radiologic Technology Associate of Science 990 Didactic Hours + 1560 Clinical Hours = 2595 Total Hours 96 Credits 90 Weeks of Instruction Credential Awarded: Associate in Science Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential/Distance Delivery (* Denotes the courses available to be delivered via Distance Delivery) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program is approximately twenty-four months in length. The program is designed to provide a well-planned didactic and clinical education experience to enable students to become competent, entry- level professionals upon graduation. The curriculum has been developed in accordance with the guidelines established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT). The program meets all the requirements for programmatic accreditation by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). For the first semester of the program, students attend classes and receive laboratory instruction. In the second semester students begin clinical externships. Students attend clinical on scheduled days of the week and class on the other days. Goals for the Radiologic Technology Program: 1. Students/Graduates who graduate will be clinically competent. 2. Students/Graduates will demonstrate effective critical thinking skills in the practice of radiography. Revised 04/10/2010 29
  30. 30. 3. Students/Graduates will demonstrate effective communication. 4. Students/Graduates will demonstrate professional behaviors. Radiologic Technology Curriculum Includes: *HSC 1000 - Introduction to Health Science 3 Credits 45 clock hours *MEA 1239 – Medical Terminology 2 Credits 30 clock hours *BSC 1085 - Anatomy & Physiology 3 Credits 45 clock hours *BSC 1085 L – Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 Credit 30 clock hours *MAC 1105 – College Algebra 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 1200 & RTE 1200L Radiographic Procedures & Lab I 4 Credits 75 clock hours *BSC 1086 - Anatomy & Physiology II 3 Credits 45 clock hours *BSC 1086L – Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 Credit 30 clock hours RTE 1000 – Introduction to Radiation Safety 1 Credit 15 clock hours *ENC 1101-English Composition 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 1025 - Principles of Image Production I 2 Credits 30 clock hours BCLS 101- Basic Cardiac Life Support For the Health Care Provider 8 Lab. Hrs RTE 1270 - Clinical I 5 Credits 240 clock hours RTE 1201 & RTE 1201L -Radiographic Procedures & Lab II 4 Credits 75 clock hours RTE 1026 - Principles of Image Production II 2 Credits 30 clock hours RTE 1030 - Radiographic Physics 4 Credits 60 clock hours *PSY 1012 - Introduction to Psychology 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 1280 - Clinical II 5 Credits Revised 04/10/2010 30
  31. 31. 240 clock hours RTE 2200 & RTE 2200L – Radiographic Procedures and Lab III 3 Credits 60 clock hours *SPC 1016 Fundamentals of Speech 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 2005 – Clinical III 8 Credits 360 clock hours RTE 2201 & RTE 2201L – Radiographic Procedures and Lab IV 5 Credits 60 clock hours *CTS 1050 – Introduction to Computers 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 2010 – Clinical IV 8 Credits 360 clock hours RTE 2025 Cross Sectional Anatomy/Advanced Modalities 3 Credits 45 clock hours RTE 2015 – Radiographic Biology and Protection 2 Credits 30 clock hours RTE 2220 & RTE 2220L – Radiographic Procedures and Lab V 3 Credits 60 clock hours RTE 2020 – Clinical V 8 Credits 360 clock hours RTE 2500 – Senior Registry Review 3 Credits 45 Clock Hours Introduction to Health Science This course will examine the healthcare professionals and how they interact with patients. Professional organizations, OSHA standards, asepsis, and isolation techniques will be covered. The students will learn to perform vital signs and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training will be provided. Medical Terminology This course provides instruction in how to decipher useful medical terminology into everyday language. Students analyze and learn prefixes and suffixes, spelling use and correct pronunciation. Medical abbreviations and symbols are included. Anatomy and Physiology I and II/and Lab Students will learn about the structure and function of the human body. The concepts of cells, tissues, organs and systems are presented to form the framework for a comprehensive study of anatomic structures and basic functions of each body system. In addition the concepts of biochemistry will be discussed. The students will also Revised 04/10/2010 31
  32. 32. learn the concepts of structural anatomy as they analyze the complex functions. Fundamentals of Speech Students will learn the foundations of communications including public presentations and interviewing skills College Algebra Students in this course will explore college algebra through a detailed examination of practical applications. Students will calculate algebraic problems with linear equations, exponents, polynomials, factors, and rational expressions. Student will solve problems using graphs, slopes, inequalities, linear equations, roots, radicals and quadratic equations. Radiographic Procedures This component will provide instruction in proper positioning methods in the laboratory setting. It will prepare the student to perform these methods competently in a clinical setting. Students will master practical experience in positioning patients, while exercising independent judgment, creativity and problem solving in the clinical laboratory. Students work in teams, role-playing as patient and technologist. Introduction to Radiation Safety Content is designed to present principles of radiation protection, including the responsibility of the radiographer for patient, personnel and the general public. Students will be provided with overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation to the body systems. Fundamental principles of molecular and cellular responses to radiation will be learned, including acute and chronic effects of radiation. Principles of Imaging & Radiation Equipment I and II The components will explain factors that govern and influence the production of radiographic images on film. Topics include: cassettes, screens, radiographic film, and film processing. The production and properties of x-rays and the radiographic equipment and accessories used to produce diagnostic medical images will be discussed. Image quality and the technical factors that affect it will also be addressed. Grids and grid applications will be presented as well as the calculations of technique problems. Physics in Radiologic Science This component will provide the student radiographer with a basic knowledge of radiation physics. Fundamentals of x-ray equipment will be discussed. Information of x- ray production, beam characteristics and units of measurements will be provided. Students will also learn about molecules, electrostatics, electrodynamics and electromagnetism. Introduction to Psychology Revised 04/10/2010 32
  33. 33. In this course, students learn basic principles of human behavior. Challenges, responsibilities, problems and satisfactions of being a health care provider are discussed. Theories of human behavior and personality development are included. English Composition Students will learn grammar, punctuation and usage skills that are useful in everyday language. The goals of effective writing will be covered as well as essay preparation. Students will take several mastery and editing tests as part of the course. Students will review readings for writing to aid in essay preparation and completion. Introduction to Computers Students will learn the basic operation of Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Student will learn proper techniques for business letter writing and resume writing. Cross Sectional Anatomy/Advanced Modalities Students will learn sectional anatomy to develop a realistic understanding of 3-dimensional sense of anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Advanced modalities including angiography, mylelography, arthrography and hysterosalpingograms will be presented. Students will also acquire basic knowledge of ultrasound, MRI, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, mammography and PET scanning Radiation Biology and Protection This course is designed to provide students with overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation to the body systems. Fundamental principles of molecular and cellular responses to radiation will be learned, including acute and chronic effects of radiation. Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Health Care Provider This course will involve training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim. Activating the emergency medical services system and managing the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component. Adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuer team will be covered. Clinical Content and clinical practice experiences are designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of Radiologic procedures. The externship will provide the student with practical experience in positioning the patient and obtaining radiographs as requested. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for Revised 04/10/2010 33
  34. 34. externships are set by the externship sites. Senior Registry Review This Course provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examination for radiographers. Topics include: principles of radiographic exposure, radiographic procedures, anatomy, physiology, pathology, terminology, radiographic equipment, radiation protection, and patient care techniques. RADIATION THERAPY PROGRAM A.S. Degree Hours= 2655 Total Hours 98 weeks 1035 Didactic Hrs., 60 Lab Hrs., 1560 Clinical Externship Hrs., 105 Credits Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential/Distance Delivery (* Denotes the courses available to be delivered via Distance Delivery) PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Radiation Therapy Program is 24 months in length. It is designed to provide a well-planned didactic and clinical education experience to enable students to become competent, entry- level radiation therapists upon graduation. The curriculum has been developed in accordance with the guidelines established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT). The clinical competency requirements have been developed in accordance with ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) guidelines. This program meets all the requirements for programmatic accreditation by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). During the first semester of the program, students attend classes and receive laboratory instruction. Beginning with the second semester of the program, students will start their clinical externship assignments. During their first year of training, clinical externships will be assigned two days per week. During the second year of training, clinical externships will be assigned three days per week. Mission: The mission of the school of Radiation Therapy is to graduate health care professionals who are competent Radiation Therapists through the provision of quality academic and clinical experiences. The program aspires to the highest standards of student and employer satisfaction regarding academic and clinical preparation. Goals of the Radiation Therapy Program: 1) The program will graduate entry- level technologists 2) Students will be clinically competent 3) Students and Graduates will exhibit effective communication in the academic and clinical setting. 4) The student /graduate will have the ability to exhibit critical thinking, and problem solving in the profession of Radiation Therapy Revised 04/10/2010 34
  35. 35. 5) Students/Graduates will appreciate the importance of professional growth & development1 The Radiation Therapy Curriculum includes: *HSC 1000 – Introduction to Health Science, 45 clock hours, 3 credits *MEA 1239 – Medical Terminology, 30 clock hours, 2 credits *BSC 1085 – Anatomy & Physiology I, 45 clock hours, 3 credits *BSC 1085L – Anatomy & Physiology I Lab, 30 clock hours, 1 credit. *BSC 1086 – Anatomy & Physiology II, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. *BSC 1086 L – Anatomy & Physiology II Lab, 30 clock hours, 1 credit. *MAC 1105, College Algebra, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. *ENC 1101 – English Composition, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. *PSY 1012 – Introduction to Psychology, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. *SPC 1016 – Fundamentals of Speech, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. *CTS 1050 – Introduction to Computers, 45 clock hours, 3 credits. RAD 1000 – Orientation to Radiation Therapy – 30 clock hours, 2 credits. RAD 1001 – Introduction to Clinical Radiation Therapy – 45 clock hours, 3 credits. RAD 1002: Law & Ethics in Radiation Therapy – 30 clock hours – 2 credits. RAD 1003 – Radiation Therapy Patient Care – 60 clock hours – 4 credits. RAD 1004 – Radiation Therapy Physics I – 60 clock hours – 4 credits. RAD 1005 - Radiation Therapy Physics II - 60 clock hours – 4 credits. RAD 1008 – Radiation Protection – 30 clock hours, 2 credits. RAD 1009 Medical Imaging and Processing – 15 clock hours – 1 credit. RAD 1010 – Principles & Practice of Radiation Therapy I – 45 clock hours – 3 credits. RAD 2010 – Principles & Practice of Radiation Therapy II – 45 clock hours – 3 credits. RAD 2000 – Treatment Planning & Dose Calculation I – 45 clock hours – 3 credits RAD 2001 – Treatment Planning & Dose Calculation II – 45 clock hours – 3 credits RAD 2002 – Operational Issues in Radiation Therapy – 15 clock hours – 1 credit. RAD 2003 – Pathology of Radiation Therapy – 45 clock hours – 3 credits. Revised 04/10/2010 35
  36. 36. RAD 2004 – Quality Management in Radiation Therapy – 30 clock hours – 2 credits. RAD 2005 – Radiation Biology – 30 clock hours – 2 credits. RAD 2006 – Sectional Anatomy – 15 clock hours – 1 credit. BCLS 101- Basic Cardiac Life Support For the Health Care Provider 8 Lab. Hrs RAD 1006, 1007, 2007, 2008, 2009, Clinical Externship I, II, III, IV and V. 1560 Externship hours, 34 credits. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: HSC 1000: Introduction to Health Science, 45 hours, 3 credits. This course will examine the healthcare professionals and how they interact with patients. Professional organizations, OSHA standards, asepsis and isolation techniques will be covered. The students will learn to perform vital signs and CPR training will be provided. SPC 1016: Fundamentals of Speech, 45 hours, 3 credits. Students will learn the foundations of communication including public presentations and interviewing skills. Emphasis will be placed on motivational speaking. MAC 1105: College Algebra, 45 hours, 3 credits. Students in this course will explore college algebra through a detailed examination of practical applications. Students will calculate algebraic problems with linear equations, exponential functions, polynomials, factors and rational expressions. Students will solve problems using graphs, slopes, inequalities, linear equations, roots, radicals and quadratic equations. PSY 1012: Introduction to Psychology, 45 hours, 3 credits. This course offers students the basic principles of human behavior. Students will discuss challenges, responsibilities, problems and satisfaction of being a health care provider and relate this to the theories of human behavior and personality development. ENC 1101: English Composition, 45 hours, 3 credits. Students will be taught the proper use of grammar, punctuation and usage skills that are used in everyday language. The goals of effective writing will be covered as well as essay preparation. Students will take several mastery and editing tests as part of the course. Students will review readings for writing, to aid in essay preparation and completion. CTS 1050: Introduction to Computers, 45 hours, 3 credits In this course students will learn the basic operation of Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point. Students will learn proper techniques for business letter-writing and resume-writing. MEA1239: Medical Terminology 30 Didactic hours 2, credits This course will provide students with instruction in how to decipher useful medical terminology into everyday Revised 04/10/2010 36
  37. 37. language. Students analyze and learn prefixes and suffixes, spelling use and correct pronunciation. Medical abbreviations and symbols are included. BSC 1085, 1085L, 1086, 1086L, Anatomy & Physiology I and II plus lab: 90 didactic hours, 60 laboratory hours, 8 credits This course will offer students the opportunity to learn about the structure and function of the human body. The concepts of cells, tissues, organs and systems are presented to form the framework for a comprehensive study of anatomic structures and basic functions of each body system. In addition, the concepts of biochemistry will be discussed. Also provided will be the concepts of structural anatomy as students analyze the complex functions of each system. RAD 1000: Orientation to Radiation Therapy 30 didactic hours, 2 Credits Orientation to Radiation Therapy: This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the foundations in radiation therapy and the therapist’s role in the health care delivery system. The principles, practices and policies of the IAMP educational program, health care organizations, principles of radiation and health safety and professional responsibilities of the radiation therapist will be covered in this course. RAD 1001: Introduction to Clinical Radiation Therapy, 45 hours, 3 credits. This course will introduce the students to the clinical setting. Personnel and responsibilities will be discussed with regard to each person involved with patients and their care. Equipment utilized and safe operation of equipment will be discussed. The proper and ethical behaviors of students and personnel in the clinical setting will be demonstrated via role play and discussion groups. This course will prepare students for the clinical externship that begins during the second semester of the program. RAD 1002: Law and Ethics in Radiation Therapy 30 didactic hours, 2 Credits This course provides sequential development, application, analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theories in radiation therapy. Concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. Problem-solving will be utilized along with critical thinking skills in discussion of the source of law, causes of action and litigation processes related to the professional practice of radiation therapy. The ethical stands and standards of law will be compared and examined. RAD 1003: Radiation Therapy Patient Care, 60 didactic hours, 4 credits The student will be provided with concepts in assessment and evaluation of the patient for delivery of radiation therapy. Psychological and physical needs and factors affecting treatment outcome will be presented and examined. Routine and emergency care procedures will be presented. RAD 1008: Radiation Protection in Radiation Therapy, 30 didactic hours, 2 credits This course will present the basic principles of radiation protection and Revised 04/10/2010 37
  38. 38. safety for the radiation therapist. Radiation health and safety requirements of federal and state regulatory agencies, accreditation agencies and health care organizations are included. The specific responsibilities of the radiation therapist are discussed, examined, performed and evaluated. RAD 2003: Pathology of Radiation Therapy, 45 didactic hours, 3 credits This course provides the student with an introduction into the general pathology of cancer. It introduces the basic disease concepts, theories of disease etiology and the pathologic disorders of each system most frequently encountered in clinical practice. Also provided to the student is an in-depth study of new and abnormal development of cells in the cancer process. The student is introduced into the processes involved in the development and classification of both benign and malignant tumors and site-specific information on malignant tumors. RAD 1004: Radiation Physics I 60 Didactic hours, 4 credits This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts of general physics. It then develops into an understanding of radiations used in the clinical setting. Fundamental physical units, measurements, principles, atomic structure and types of radiation are emphasized. Also presented are the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment, x-ray production and its interactions with matter. RAD 1005: Radiation Physics II 60 Didactic hours, 4 credits This course is a continuation of RAD 1004 and is designed to review and expand concepts and theories in the radiation physics I course. Detailed analysis of the structure of matter, properties of radiation, nuclear transformations, x-ray production and interactions of ionizing radiations are emphasized. The student is also presented with treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, measurement and quality of ionizing radiation produced, absorbed dose measurement, dose distribution and scatter analysis. RAD 2005: Radiation Biology 30 Didactic hours, 2 credits The student will be presented with basic concepts and principles of radiation biology. The interactions of radiation with cells, tissues and the body as a whole and resultant biophysical events will be presented. Discussion of the theories and principles of tolerance dose, time-dose relationships, fractionation schemes and the relationship to the clinical practice of radiation therapy will be discussed, examined and evaluated. RAD 1009: Medical Imaging and Processing, 15 hours, 1 credit The student is introduced to a knowledge base in factors that govern and influence the production and recording of radiographic images for patient simulation, treatment planning and treatment verification in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology imaging equipment and related devices will be emphasized. RAD 1010: Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy I, 45 hours, 3 credits In this course the student is provided with an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy. The medical, biological and pathological Revised 04/10/2010 38
  39. 39. aspect as well as the physical and technical aspects will be discussed. The role and responsibility of the radiation therapist, the treatment prescription, the documentation of treatment parameters and delivery will also be discussed. RAD 2010: Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy II, 45 hours, 3 credits This course is a continuation of RAD 1010. The course is designed to examine and evaluate the management of neoplastic disease while promoting critical thinking skills and the basis of ethical clinical decision-making. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented for each organ and system. This will be discussed and evaluated in relationship to histology, anatomical site and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist’s role in the management of neoplastic disease will also be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the character of the profession. RAD 2004: Quality Management in Radiation Therapy, 30 hours, 2 credits. This course is designed to focus on the evolution of quality management programs and continuing quality improvement in radiation oncology. Students will examine the need for quality assurance checks, quality assurance of the clinical aspects and chart checks, film checks, the various types of evaluations and tests performed on simulators, megavoltage therapy equipment and therapy planning units, the role of radiation therapists in quality management programs. Legal and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate quality management guidelines as well as the role of computers and information systems are discussed as they serve within the radiation oncology department. As part of this course, students will be required to document competency in performing daily treatment machine checks as part of their clinical competency requirements. RAD 2000: Treatment Planning I, 45 hours, 3 credits The content of this course is designed to establish factors that influence and govern clinical treatment planning of patient treatment. Encompassed are isodose distributions, patient contouring, radiobiologic considerations. RAD 2001: Treatment Planning II, 45 hours, 3 credits This is a continuation of RAD 2000. Students will be required to make dosimetric calculations, utilizing compensating filters, blocking considerations and other treatment accessories. Clinical application of treatment beams will be taken into consideration and optimal treatment planning will be emphasized along with particle beams. Stereotactic and emerging technologies will also be presented. Coincidental with this course, students will be provided with a clinical rotation in the radiation dosimetry department to work with radiation physicists to observe and participate in the computerized treatment planning process. RAD 2002: Operational Issues in Radiation Therapy, 15 hours, 1 credit. This course focuses on various radiation therapy operational issues. Continued Revised 04/10/2010 39
  40. 40. quality improvement issues are discussed and evaluated and assessment techniques will be emphasized. Human resource issues and regulations impacting the radiation therapist will be examined. Accreditation agencies and the radiation therapist’s role in the accreditation process will be discussed. Billing and reimbursement issues pertinent to the radiation therapy department will be presented. RAD 2006: Sectional Anatomy, 15 hours, 1 credit. This course will provide the student the opportunity to study normal sectional anatomy utilizing diagrams and radiologic images. Guest speakers will be invited to demonstrate the different imaging modalities utilized for diagnosis. Basic Cardiac Life Support for the Health Care Provider This course will involve training in risk factors of heart disease, recognition of a heart attack and choking victim. Activating the emergency medical services system and managing the unconscious victim with rescue breathing using airway adjuncts/ventilation devices along with the automated external defibrillator educational component. Adult, child and infant cardio pulmonary resuscitation and obstructed airway instruction for the one-rescuer and two-rescuer team will be covered. RAD 1006, 1007, 2007, 2008, 2009, Clinical Externship I, II, III, IV and V: 1560 hours, 34 credits These courses are held in a clinical setting, giving the student the opportunity to participate in hands-on learning. Students are rotated through various clinical affiliates, either private clinics or hospital departments, and are expected to document clinical competency that is consistent with their sequential development and level of knowledge. Students will apply, analyze, integrate, synthesize and evaluate concepts and theories in radiation therapy. Through structured sequential assignments in these clinical facilities, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. Externships are full time commitments. Actual times for externships are set by the externship sites. Practical Nursing 675 Didactic Hours + 675 Clinical Hours = 1350 Total Hours = 59 Credit Hours=64 Weeks of Instruction Credential Awarded: Diploma Type of Instructional Delivery: Residential PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This thirteen-month diploma program is designed to prepare graduates the knowledge base, technical skills and clinical competency required to pass the state examination. These objectives will be accomplished through class instruction to achieve the academic and clinical foundation to function as a practical nurse. Testing takes place at regular intervals throughout the program to evaluate levels of student achievement and progress. Goals of the Practical Nursing Program Revised 04/10/2010 40
  41. 41. 1. To provide education experiences designed to prepare students for entry level positions in the practical nursing profession. 2. Graduate students who are satisfied with their academic and clinical preparation. 3. To provide employers with practical nurses who are competent in the affective, cognitive and psychomotor domain. 4. To instill in students a lifelong desire to achieve professional and academic excellence. Practical Nursing Curriculum Includes: PN 100 Anatomy and Physiology 4 Credits 60 clock hours PN 105 Dosages and Drug Calculations 2 Credits 30 clock hours PN 110 Growth and Development 2 Credit 30 clock hours PN 115 Fundamentals of Nursing I 5 Credit 75 clock hours PN 200 Communications I 2 Credit 30 clock hours PN 205 Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical I 1 Credit 45 clock hours PN 210 Fundamentals of Theory II 3 Credits 45 clock hours PN 215 Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical II 2 Credits 90 clock hours PN 220 Basic Pharmacology 4 Credits 60 clock hours PN 300 Medical Surgical Nursing I 4 Credits 60 clock hours PN 305 Medical Surgical Clinical I 3 Credits 135 clock hours PN 310 Nutrition and Nursing 2 Credits 30 clock hours PN 400 Medical Surgical Nursing II 4 credits 60 clock hours PN 405 Medical Surgical Clinical II 3 Credits 135 clock hours PN 410 Mental Health 2 Credits 35 clock hours Revised 04/10/2010 41
  42. 42. PN 420 Communications II 1 credit 15 clock hours PN 500 Medical Surgical Nursing III 3 credits 45 clock hours PN 505 Medical Surgical Clinical III 3 credits 135 clock hours PN 510 Geriatric Theory 2 Credits 40 clock hours PN 515 Geriatric Clinical 1 credit 45 clock hours PN 600 Obstetrical Nursing 2 credits 30 clock hours PN 605 Obstetrical Clinical 1 credit 45 clock hours PN 610 Pediatric Nursing 2 credits 30 clock hours PN 615 Pediatric Clinical 1 credit 45 clock hours Anatomy and Physiology Content is designed to provide foundation and knowledge of the body Structure and function. Emphasis is placed upon normal structure and function so that the abnormal conditions will be better understood Dosages and Drug Calculations Content is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge and skill in basic mathematics relevant to health care. The course includes numbers, fractions, decimals and whole numbers. The metric, apothecary and household conversion systems will be presented. Growth and Development Content is a study of human development from infancy through older adulthood. This course will provide the nursing student with the basic knowledge of human development from conception to death. Fundamentals of Nursing Theory I Content is designed to introduce the student to basic nursing skills necessary to maintain physiological and psychosocial integrity. It serves as a foundation for the more advanced skills as the student progresses through the practical nursing program. Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical I Content is designed to assist the student in gaining better comprehension of the basic nursing skills in a clinical setting. Communications I Content is designed to introduce the theories and demonstrate exercises in verbal and non-verbal communication with focus on interpersonal relationships. Fundamentals of Nursing Theory II Content is designed to provide the basic fundamentals in nursing skills necessary to maintain physiologic and psychosocial integrity. Topics will Revised 04/10/2010 42
  43. 43. include the legal aspects of documentation, basic fundamental skills including intake and output monitoring. Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical II The student will learn to set priorities and how to deal with the many different types of physiologic and psychosocial relating to the medical care of patients. Student will incorporate critical fundamental skills. Medical Surgical Nursing I Content includes an overview of the cause of illness and the nursing measures used in caring for the special needs of the medical-surgical patient. Medical Surgical Clinical I Content is designed to assist the student in gaining better comprehension of the basic nursing procedures, including OSHA guidelines for blood borne pathogens, effective hand washing technique, and surgical asepsis. Basic Pharmacology Content provides an overview of the legal implications of drug administration and to demonstrate what the nurses responsibilities are in administrating medication. Medical Surgical Nursing II Content includes discussion of the variety of clinical experiences of the illness of the adult medical surgical patient. Medical Surgical Clinical II The student will learn to set priorities and how to deal with the many different types of care relating to the medical surgical patient. Student will incorporate critical thinking skills. Nutrition and Nursing Content will provide the principles of basic nutrition, diet, and how the role of these principles effect treatment of medical problems Mental Health Content includes the basic concepts of mental health as it relates to growth and development. Theories surrounding abnormal behaviors, stress and anxiety and the care of patients with mental illnesses will be covered. Communications II Students will learn grammar, punctuation and usage skills that are useful in everyday language. Students will review readings for writing to aid in essay preparation and completion. Medical Surgical Nursing III The course continues meeting the objectives learned during Medical- Surgical Nursing III. Additionally, this course introduces the student to other departments such as the emergency department and ICU. Medical Surgical Clinical III Content includes factors that prepare the student for the transition from student to graduate Practical Nurse. Geriatric Theory The course will introduce the student to various aspects of the aging process. Topics include attitude towards the elderly, death and dying, as well as sensory disorders. Geriatric Clinical The course introduces an interactive relationship between the student and Revised 04/10/2010 43
  44. 44. the geriatric population, the health problems they experience and how to care for the needs of the older patient. Obstetrical Nursing The course assists students in gaining knowledge in topics such as delivery, ante partum, post-partum, and newborns. Obstetrical Clinical Content is designed to assist students with understanding the obstetrical patient. The course incorporates the theory principles enabling the student to implement them to the clinical experience and apply the nursing principle in the delivery care within the scope of practice. Pediatric Nursing The student will utilize their knowledge of growth and development. Emphasis will be placed in the practice of safe Implementation of medication, disorders in children, communicable diseases and hematologic disorders. Pediatric Clinical This course is designed to enable the student to gain a clear understanding of the pediatric patient, from birth to 18 years of age. An understanding of the immunization process and disease processes will be introduced. THE DIVISION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION The IAMP strives to provide students with the ability to adapt their skills and knowledge to meet the demands of a dynamic, team-based environment. The online Distance Education Division focuses heavily on concept formation and skill development through collaborative learning. Our online courses offer flexibility and can be accessed from anywhere anytime. The IAMP is currently offering the following courses on-line: Algebra Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy and Physiology Lab Introduction to Computers English Composition Health Science General Physics Medical Terminology Psychology Speech Radiation Biology and Protection Patient Care Law and Ehtics of Radiation Therapy The IAMP is currently in the process of developing the Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Nuclear Medicine program to be delivered entirely via distance-education. In order to meet the unique needs of Distance Education learners, our online programs integrate: • Instructor led courses • Interactive software to complement and enhance course content • anytime/anywhere learning • online discussions • real time interaction, support and feedback Revised 04/10/2010 44 CAREER AND STUDENT SERVICES

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