Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
ACVR Residency Training Program Application Form: University ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

ACVR Residency Training Program Application Form: University ...

1,837

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,837
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 1/12 ACVR Residency Training Program Application Form: University of Florida This document is to act as a guide for institutions desiring ACVR accreditation of their residency training program. It should be used in concert with the requirements set out in the ACVR Essentials of Residency Training document and it follows the headings of that document. It is intended to streamline the application process and help define what information the RSEC needs to evaluate the program. All terms used in this application have same definitions as defined in the Essentials. II. Objectives: 1. Advanced training in diagnostic imaging. a. Develop clinical skills in diagnostic radiology. b. Develop clinical skills in special procedures including myelography, fistulography, fluoroscopic evaluation of dynamic processes (swallowing, tracheal evaluation) and routine special procedures (evaluation of the gastrointestinal and urogenital systems). c. Develop clinical skills in selective angiography and interventional radiography. d. Develop clinical skills in small and large animal diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging. e. Receive instructional training in the physics of radiography, alternate imaging modalities (including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine), radiobiology, radiation protection, radiation dosimetry and radiation safety. 2. Training in the research investigative methodology by completing and presenting a prospective diagnostic imaging project that is either clinically relevant or addresses a basic question related to the field of veterinary diagnostic imaging. This training will be intensively weighted to the first several years of the residency program such that the resident will be prepared to take the qualifying examination at the beginning of their third year. 3. Training in scientific writing. The resident is expected to apply for ACVR resident research project funding for their project by the end of their first year/beginning of their second year. 4. Training in critical current literature evaluation through the participation in weekly journal club. 5. Training in didactic teaching by the participation in the training and teaching of veterinary students by presenting 3 formal lectures within the didactic curriculum over the course of the first three years. Participate in the clinical training of veterinary students during their radiology clerkship rotations. 6. Training in the presentation of current relevant research data through abstract submission and presentation at appropriate scientific presentations. This would include the presentation of a current research project at the Annual House Officer’s seminar as well as the submission of an abstract and presentation at the Annual ACVR meeting.
  • 2. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 2/12 presentation at the Annual ACVR meeting. 7. Preparation for certifying and qualifying examinations offered by the American College of Veterinary Radiology. 8. Develop appropriate communication skills with clinicians and referring veterinarians. III. Training period: What is the total length of the training program in months? 48 MONTHS If this is a 4-year program, during what year will the resident be eligible to take the ACVR Preliminary Exam? Yes. The resident will be eligible to sit the preliminary examination at the end of the second year and the beginning of the third year and the certifying examination at the end of their third year. What is the total duration of supervised clinical training in the program? 36 MONTHS What are the responsibilities of the resident in the remaining non-clinical portion of the program? • A completed research project, an oral presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Veterinary Radiology and at least one major manuscript submitted to a referred journal and accepted for publication are required. • The resident will assist in instruction of the veterinary graduate student curriculum. This will include the didactic courses offered to first, second and fourth year veterinary students as well as the clinical rotations for the third and fourth year students. The resident will present a seminar each year as part of the resident seminar series and will prepare a new didactic lecture each year (years 1-3) as part of the radiology curriculum. Pathology rounds and the Veterinary Medical Center House Officer seminars will also be attended by the diagnostic imaging house officers. • The resident is expected to attend and participate in resident seminars and radiology resident rounds. A weekly known case conference will be held with participation of both the resident and radiology faculty. Radiology residents attend and/or direct junior student radiology rounds. Residents are encouraged to participate in other seminars or rounds presented by other sections within the hospital. The resident will participate in the weekly pathology rounds. • During the fourth year, the resident will be allowed to pursue “fellowship” type training in an imaging area of interest for 4 months and will provide clinical coverage for 8 months along with other faculty members. IV. Direction and Supervision: Program Director: Who is the Director of Residency training? Clifford R. Berry, DVM, DACVR
  • 3. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 3/12 What percentage of this individual’s time is committed to clinical service and teaching of residents? 70% Faculty: Please list the faculty member of the program accepting PRIMARY responsibility for training in each of the following core areas: Roentgen diagnosis: Faculty: Dr. Clifford Berry Percentage clinical service: 70% Diagnostic ultrasound: Faculty: Dr. David Reese Percentage clinical service: 70% Computed Tomography Faculty: Dr. Matthew Winter Percentage clinical service: 50% Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Faculty: Dr. Shannon Holmes Percentage clinical service: 70% Nuclear Medicine: Faculty: Dr. Clifford Berry Percentage clinical service: 70% List the names and percentage clinical commitment of additional imaging faculty in the program, and their area(s) of instructional responsibility. For each imaging faculty in the program please provide a one page CV documenting their expertise in the area(s) of assigned responsibility. For each of the specialty colleges listed below please list at least two Diplomates of these colleges who can be expected to regularly interact with radiology residents: ACVIM Dr. Michael Schaer (DACVIM – Internal Medicine) Dr. Richard C. Hill (DACVIM – Internal Medicine) ACVS Dr. Gary Ellison Dr. Daniel D. Lewis ACVP Dr. A Rick Alleman Dr. John W. Harvey V. Affiliation agreement:
  • 4. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 4/12 If all of the training will not be accomplished on-site, please attach a copy of the affiliations agreement(s). Include the scope of the training and amount of time the resident will be away from the home institution. No affiliation agreements are needed at this time. VI. Facilities: Briefly describe how the program meets the facility requirements. Facilities include small and large animal diagnostic radiology, video fluoroscopy with digital subtraction, computed radiology, real-time B-mode ultrasound with pulsed wave Doppler, power and color Doppler, helical multidetector-row computed tomography and 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Currently, the imaging service is a paperless/filmless department. The diagnostic imaging service is a fully integrated with Kodak DirectView PACS System 10, Kodak DirectView Diagnostic Workstations and an Empiric SystemsTM Radiology Information System. The later is utilized to order exams, store reports and send billing information to the patients medical record. Ultrasound Philips iU22 for small animal radiology, including a microconvex C8-5, linear L15-7, convex C9-4 and linear L12-5. Acuson Sequoia (PW, power and color Doppler) for small animal radiology. Imaging probes include sector and curved array probes as well as a high resolution linear probe. Esaote MyLab 30 for equine surgery. Acuson Aspen (PW, power and color Doppler) for small animal medicine. Logic 7, GE ultrasound for the cardiology service. Computed tomography Toshiba Acquilion® 8 Multi-detector helical CT unit. Small animal radiography Kodak Dryview® 8900 laser printer serving all imaging modalities. Kodak DirectView® CR 950 – computed radiography system. Special procedures Phillips radiographic/fluoroscopic system with overhead tube (1000 mA 125 kVp). Table-tube fluoroscopy unit with 4.5, 6 and 9 inch image intensifier. Infimed PlatinumOne® DSA imaging computer. Medrad Mark-IV® power injector. Routine small animal radiography and special procedures. Radiography room one Quantum Medical Imaging overhead tube, CPI generator (1000 mA ,150 kVp) with Control X floating bucky table and wall bucky. Routine small animal radiography. Radiography room two
  • 5. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 5/12 Sedecal x-ray machine (800mA, 125 KVp) with floating table-top. Routine small animal radiography. Radiography room three Summit x-ray machine (300 mA, 125 kVp). Routine small animal radiography. Large animal radiography Kodak DryView 8900 laser printer serving all of the imaging modalities. Kodak DirectView CR 850 System – computed radiography system. Radiography room one CPI Indico high frequency generator (1000 mA, 150kVp) all purpose machine with a custom slaved cassette holder system. Routine large animal radiography and special procedures. Radiography room two GE general purpose machine (1000 mA, 120 kVp) with wall bucky. Routine large animal radiography. Four portable high frequency machines are available for stall side and intraoperative radiography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Toshiba Vantage 1.5 Tesla, 4 channel, 33 mT/m gradient MRI unit. In addition, there are 3T, 4.7T, and 11T units available for small animal imaging at the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute. Nuclear Medicine MIE Scintron® VI with mobile stand for equine and small animal nuclear medicine. Large field of view gamma camera with dedicated computer system and software (Scintron® dedicated nuclear medicine acquisition and processing software). NOTE: Currently, the nuclear medicine service is being renovated. The above equipment has been identified for purchase. The anticipated installation of this equipment will be complete prior to the start of a diagnostic imaging house officer in July, 2009. It is not anticipated that an affiliated agreement will be required. Radiation Therapy An isolation facility for the routine treatment (I-131) of hyperthyroid cats is available. External beam treatment using a stereotactic radiosurgical device is available at the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute. VII. Clinical resources:
  • 6. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 6/12 Indicate the approximate number of patients seen annually by the home institution? 15,000 small animal patients; 3,000 large animal patients (including food animal). What is the annual imaging caseload? 12,568 (2007-08). Indicate the approximate breakdown of the patient population according to species. Small animals (canine, feline) 10,712 Large animals (equine and food animals) 1,647 Exotic animals 209 What is the approximate annual imaging caseload of the program in: Small Animal Radiology: 8,092 Large Animal Radiology: 1,491 Abdominal Ultrasound: 1,729 Computed Tomography: 468 Nuclear Medicine: 95 Magnetic Resonance Imaging: 485 Other (specify): 209 exotics with various modalities VIII. Training content: What percentage of imaging reports are typically available within 48 hours after the examination is conducted in typewritten or electronic form? 100% If your answer is less than 75% please explain how reports are generated and how long it takes for the report to be available for review in typewritten form. Of the preliminary reports generated from the imaging caseload what percentage are initially produced by the resident? Since we are re-establishing the residency program, this number is currently not available. The expectation is that at least 60% of the reports will be dictated by the resident(s) on a daily basis. What percentage of resident reports are reviewed by the imaging faculty prior to finalization of the report? 100%
  • 7. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 7/12 When preliminary resident reports are reviewed and edited by the imaging faculty responsible for training, what percentage of the time are two or more faculty present? 100% Please complete the table below Approximate number of cases in the 30 months clinical experience Small Animal Radiology: 4,800 Large Animal Radiology: 894 Abdominal Ultrasound: 1,030 Computed Tomography: 270 Nuclear Medicine: 54 Magnetic Resonance Imaging: 243 Elective (any of above) Required elective (specify): 1,000 Total 8,291 Please indicate the course number and unit assignment residents are required to take to meet the educational objectives for formal instruction as outlined in the Essentials in the following: Topic Course number Units Radiobiology: The Physics of: Diagnostic Radiology: Nuclear Medicine: Ultrasonography: CT:
  • 8. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 8/12 MRI: If your program does not offer formal courses in any or all of these topics please indicate how these educational objectives for each are met. Use attached sheets if necessary. No formal didactic classes are given. Instead, the residents and radiologists meet weekly to discuss assigned board objective topics on the following schedule. 1. Fall first year – anatomy and pathophysiology. 2. Spring first year – radiobiology, radiation therapy, radiation safety and special procedures. 3. During the fall and spring of the first year, the resident will attend the radiology physics course presented to the Diagnostic Imaging House Officers at the University of Florida College of Medicine. 4. Fall second year - alternative imaging including US, NM, CT, MRI 5. Spring second year – Formal review of current literature as applied to veterinary radiology. This would not replace the weekly journal club. A written examination is given at the end of each topic that will be graded by the faculty and then reviewed with the residents. The resident will be expected to pass the written examination as a part of their review process for continuation in the program. IX. Research Environment: Over the last 5 years, what is the average number of peer reviewed publications, on which the IMAGING faculty listed under Direction and Supervision in IV above, are included as authors? 2/year/faculty What is the number of publications/submissions expected of a resident completing the program? 1 prospective study; 1 case report If this is an established program, what percentage of residents have made formal research presentations at the annual ACVR or equivalent national meeting? The prior program had 100% participation in ACVR abstract submission and presentations (9/9 residents). Is an advanced degree a requirement of the training program? No X. Educational Environment: How many lectures or scientific presentations are expected of each resident during the course of their training? 1 scientific presentation at a national meeting (ACVR); 4 house officer seminars; 2 didactic lectures in the radiology curriculum XI. Evaluation: During the program how often is resident performance evaluated in writing? Annual written evaluations with biannual oral reviews. XII. Teaching File:
  • 9. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 9/12 What is the nature and scope of the teaching file available to residents? A teaching file of interesting cases is maintained in the radiology office and online. This file is organized by organ system and diagnosis, and is also kept on computer as a database in Excel. A student study file is also provided. This file consists of teaching cases with historical information on the front of the envelope and description and diagnoses on the back. In addition, an imaging archive was begun in 2005 with digitized cases that are stored on PACS and catalogued in RIS. How is it maintained/updated? The teaching file is updated on a daily basis during rounds with key word input into the RIS system that is searchable both in the reports and the key word box. XIII. Conferences: On average how many Known Case Conferences are conducted annually? 46-48 XIV. Literature resources: What is the geographic relationship between the nearest medical library and the training program? One building away within the same veterinary school complex. XV. Appendix: (a) Provide the pass rate for first time, second time, etc for both the preliminary and certifying exams for your residents for the past 5 years. For example, for all residents finishing your program 5 years ago (Year 5), check the appropriate box. Complete the table for residents finishing 4 years ago (Year 4), 3 years ago (Year 3), etc. Year 5 Year 4 Year 3 Year 2 Year 1 Passed preliminary exam 1st time YES YES YES YES YES Passed prelim exam 2nd time Passed prelim after 2nd time Passed certifying exam 1st time NO NO YES YES YES Passed certifying exam 2nd time YES (1 section) YES (1 section) Passed certifying exam after 2nd time
  • 10. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 10/12 certifying exam after 2nd time Unsuccessful in all attempts (b) Provide a clinical schedule for your resident(s). This schedule should provide a weekly or monthly outline of the resident’s clinical responsibilities. This may be in the form of a master schedule or duty roster for your entire radiology section if desired. Year 1 Required: 1. Attend all physics lectures given as part of University of Florida, College of Medicine diagnostic imaging house officer training program. 2. Select Faculty Advisor by Sept 1 and a Resident Committee (three faculty members including the faculty advisor (radiologist), radiology resident coordinator and one other departmental faculty member by Sept 30. 3. Review canine anatomy and equine anatomy using cadavers from the freshman canine and equine anatomy courses. 4. Prepare one didactic lecture for freshman diagnostic radiology course. 5. Submit research proposal for resident Competitive Funding (March). 6. Present a seminar for house officer seminar series. 7. Participate in daily film reading and rounds. 8. Participate in radiology, ultrasound, MRI and nuclear medicine service. 9. Attend appropriate rounds and seminars – College of Veterinary Medicine. 10. Share emergency radiology call. 11. Attend all lectures of the veterinary student radiology curriculum (Fall and Spring courses). 12. Participate in weekly Journal Club, Known Case Conference and Board Review preparations. 13. Participate in weekly pathology rounds. 14. Identify and review the appropriate literature for a prospective resident project related to diagnostic imaging. 15. Participate in written mock boards (Anatomy, Pathophysiology, Radiobiology, Physics of Diagnostic Radiology) Encouraged: 1. Attend one in house rotation. (Cardiology) 2. Prepare case report for publication in Vet Radiol & Ultrasound. Year 2 Required: 1. Prepare one didactic lecture for freshman, sophomore or senior diagnostic radiology course.
  • 11. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 11/12 2. Participate in film reading with junior or senior students in radiology rotation. 3. Present a seminar for resident seminar series. 4. Participate in daily film reading. 5. Participate in radiology, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear medicine service. 6. Attend appropriate rounds and seminars at the College of Veterinary Medicine. 7. Complete Research Project. 8. Share emergency radiology call with radiology faculty on a rotating basis. 9. Submit application to sit for written qualifying examination by dead line (typically July of the beginning of the second year). 10. Participate in weekly Journal Club, Known Case Conference and Board Review preparations. 11. Participate in weekly pathology rounds. 12. Completion of Cardiology rotation. 13. Participate in written mock boards (Physics of Alternate Imaging, Current Literature Review, Special Procedures). 14. Study for written examination (1 month given off clinics for preparation) at the end of the second year. Encouraged: 1. Attend one outside rotation (2 weeks in an area of interest at a Veterinary College that is an ACVR accredited resident training facility). 2. Attend radiology interdepartmental conferences at the College of Medicine. Year 3 Required: 1. Prepare one didactic lecture for sophomore diagnostic radiology course or elective course. 2. Participate in film reading with junior or senior students in radiology. 3. Present a seminar for resident seminar series. 4. Participate in daily film reading. 5. Participate in clinical radiology, ultrasound, MRI and nuclear medicine service. 6. Attend appropriate rounds and seminars at the College of Veterinary Medicine. 7. Prepare and submit final draft of research manuscript to Vet Radiol & Ultrasound for publication and Resident paper competition. 8. Participate in written review sessions and in mock oral exam with radiology faculty. 12. Share emergency radiology call with radiology faculty on a rotating basis. 13. Submit application to sit for ACVR oral certifying examination. 14. Take the written certifying ACVR examination in September (Chicago, IL) at the beginning of the third year.
  • 12. University of Florida Residency Application 2008 Page 12/12 15. Submit abstract for annual ACVR meeting. Attend and present abstract at the annual ACVR meeting. 16. Participate in weekly Journal Club, Known Case Conference and Board Review preparations. 17. Participate in weekly pathology rounds. Encouraged: 1. Attend one outside rotation (2 weeks in an area of interest at a Veterinary College that is an ACVR accredited resident training facility). 2. Attend radiology interdepartmental conferences at the College of Medicine. Year 4 1. Participate in clinical radiology, ultrasound, MRI and nuclear medicine service (60% clinical commitment). 2. Participate in daily film reading. 3. Give prior three didactic lectures for the freshman or sophomore diagnostic radiology course or the senior elective course(s). 5. Share emergency radiology call with radiology faculty on a rotating basis. 6. Sit for ACVR certifying oral examination in September at the beginning of the fourth year. 7. Focus on an area of interest in diagnostic imaging for development into a research focus in an academic career. Division of Residents Time The 48-month program will be divided as follows: (Each week is equivalent to five working days) Activity Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Clinic 42 wks 42 wks 42 wks 30 wks Out/In Rotation (See Attached Program Requirements) 4 wks 4 wks 4 wks 10 wks Research 4 wks 4 wks 4 wks 10 wks Vacation 2 wks 2 wks 2 wks 2 wks
  • 13. Clifford Rudd Berry, DVM, DACVR Small Animal Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32608 Education Aug. 1976 - May 1980 DePauw University B.A. in Zoology Greencastle, IN 46135 (cum laude) Aug. 1980 - June 1984 College of Veterinary Medicine D.V.M. University of Florida (with honors) Gainesville, FL 32610 Graduate Training July 1987-June 1990 Department of Radiological Sciences Radiology residency School of Veterinary Medicine University of California Davis, CA 95616 Academic Honors 1990 American College of Veterinary Radiology, 1990 Resident- Authored Paper Award. 1997 Merck Excellence in Teaching Award, North Carolina State University; Co-authored with Dr. Nancy Love, Mr. Joe Trumpy, Ms. Brenda Bunch and Ms. Susan-Jane Curtis. 1999 Class of 2000, Outstanding Teaching Award, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine Professional Experience August 1990 - June 1991 Assistant Professor in Veterinary Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. June 1991 - June 1996 Assistant Professor in Veterinary Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. June 1996 - December 1996 Associate Professor in Veterinary Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. March 1997 - August 1997 Associate Professor in Veterinary Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.
  • 14. July 1998 – June, 1999 Associate Professor in Veterinary Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. August, 1999 – July, 2008 Veterinary Radiologist, Central Florida Veterinary Radiology, P.A., Orlando, FL. July, 2008 – present Clinical tract, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, FL. Recent Publication List: 1. 2000 Berry CR, Hawkins E, Hurley K and Monce K. Frequency of pulmonary mineralization and hypoxemia in 21 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. J Vet Intern Med 2000 Mar-Apr 14(2):151-6 2. 2003 Douglass JP, Berry CR, Thrall DE, Malarkey DE, Spaulding KA. Radiographic features of aortic bulb/valve mineralization in 20 dogs. Vet Radiol Ultrasound. Jan-Feb;44(1):20-7. 3. 2003 Hawkins EC, Basseches J, Berry CR, Stebbins ME, Ferris KK. Demographic, clinical, and radiographic features of bronchiectasis in dogs: 316 cases (1988-2000). J Am Vet Med Assoc. Dec 1;223(11):1628-35. 4. 2004 Daniel GB, DeNovo RC, Sharp DS, Tobias K, Berry CR. Portal streamlining as a cause of non-uniform hepatic distribution of sodium pertechnetate Tc-99m during per-rectal portal scintigraphy in the dog. Vet Radiol Ultrasound. Jan-Feb;45(1):78-84. 5. 2005 Tyson AR, Graham JP, Bermingham E, Randall S, Berry CR. Dynamic computed tomography of the normal feline hypophysis cerebri (Glandula pituitaria). Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 46(1):33-8. 6. 2005 Morandi F, Cole RC, Tobias KM, Berry CR, Avenell J, Daniel GB. Use of 99mTcO4- trans-splenic portal scintigraphy for diagnosis of portosystemic shunts in 28 dogs. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 46(2):153-61. 7. 2005 Prather AB, Berry CR, Thrall DE. Use of radiography in combination with computed tomography for the assessment of non-cardiac thoracic disease in the dog and cat. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 46(2):114-21. 8. 2005 Lazar TP, Berry CR, deHaan JJ, Peck JN, Correa M. Long-term radiographic comparison of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy versus extracapsular stabilizataion for cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the dog. Veterinary Surgery, 34(2):133-41. 9. 2006 Mattern KL, Berry CR, Peck JN, De Haan JJ. Radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluation of the patellar ligament following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 47(2):185-91.
  • 15. 10. 2006 Hanson SP, Peck JN, Berry CR, Graham J, Stevens G. Radiographic evaluation of the Zurich cementless total hip acetabular component. Vet Surg, 35(6):550-8. 11. 2006 Brumitt JW, Essman SC, Kornegay JN, Graham JP, Weber WJ, Berry CR. Radiographic features of Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 47(6):574-80. 12. 2007 Tidwell SA, Graham JP, Peck JN, Berry CR. Incidence of pulmonary embolism after non-cemented total hip arthroplasty in eleven dogs: computed tomographic pulmonary angiography and pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy. Vet Surg, 36(1):37-42. 13. 2007 Schultz RM, Tucker RL, Gavin PR, Bagley R, Saveraid TC, Berry CR. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired trigeminal nerve disorders in six dogs. Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 48(2):101-4.
  • 16. Matthew D. Winter Curriculum Vitae Address Home Address University of Florida 587 SE 32 Terrace College of Veterinary Medicine Keystone Heights, FL 32610 Section of Radiology Phone: 352-473-3983 1600 SW. 16th Street Gainesville, FL 32610 Phone: 352-392-2226 Fax: 352-392-6125 email: winterm@vetmed.ufl.edu Education 2006 Diplomate, ACVR 2004 Residency, Radiology Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine North Grafton, MA 1998 D.V.M. Cornell University Ithaca, New York 1994 B.A Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD Clinical Experience 2007-Present Assistant Professor, Radiology, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Gainesville, FL 2004-2007 Assistant Professor, Radiology Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine Ames, IA 2001-2004 Radiology Resident Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine N. Grafton, MA 1999-2001 Associate Veterinarian, Edgefield Veterinary Hospital and Atkinson Equine Practice Hampstead, NH Matthew D. Winter 1 10/10/2008
  • 17. 2000-2001 Veterinary Emergency Clinic of Southern New Hampshire Manchester, NH 1998-1999 Associate Veterinarian, Eastview Veterinary Clinic (Dairy, Equine), Penn Yan, NY Funded Research Projects Co-PI: “Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Relative Gastrointestinal Layer Thickness in Cats without Evidence of GI Disease” Londono L (PI), Winter MD (Co-PI), Merck-Merial Veterinary Scholars Program, 2008, ($4250) Co-PI: “Ultrasonographic, radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation of bone Ingrowth after tibial tuberosity advancement surgery: a comparison of autologous cancellous bone, demineralized bone matrix, BioScaffold and recombinant human BMP-2” University of Florida CVM 2008 Spring Consolidated Research Development Award Grant Competition M. Risselada (PI), A. Pozzi (Co-PI), M.D. Winter (Co-PI), D.L. Lewis (Co-PI), ($7000) Co-PI: “Intrathecal Enzyme Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis I” NIH/NINDS 1RO1 NS054242-10, Subcontract to ISU (N. Matthew Ellinwood PI) from UCLA Harbor Medical School, Patricia Dickson PI. The focus of this grant is the use of recombinant enzyme to treat an inherited neurodegenerative enzymopathy. The subcontract focuses on the canine model and involves treatment and imaging studies. (Total Subcontract $622,172) PI: "Three dimensional helical computed tomographic hepatic angiography” Hills Overly Grant, April, 2002-January, 2003 ($4,000 direct costs). Publications Winter MD, Riedesel D, Miles KG. Effects of enalapril on determination of glomerular filtration rate using nuclear scintigraphy in cats. Manuscript in preparation Winter MD, Riedesel D, Miles KG. Effects of three sedation protocols on determination of glomerular filtration rate using nuclear scintigraphy in cats. Manuscript in preparation Kligman KC, Kim S, Bacon N, Winter MD, Krellner H, Levy JK. What’s your diagnosis? Synovial cysts in a cat. Accepted by JAVMA, August 2008 Matthew D. Winter 2 10/10/2008
  • 18. Matthew D. Winter 10/10/2008 3 Frederick J, Winter MD, Paravertebral abscessation with vertebral body osteomyelitis in a calf. Accepted by the Veterinary Record, August 14, 2008 Romans CJ, Reimer SB, Winter MD. What is your diagnosis? Parosteal osteosarcoma in a Dog. Submitted to JAVMA January 2007 Wong D, Winter MD, Haynes J, Sponseller B, Schliening J. Dandy Walker malformation in a quarter horse colt. J Vet Intern Med. 2007 Sep-Oct; 21(5):1130-4 Winter MD, Locke JE, Penninck.DG. Prostatic lymphoma in a young Dog. Vet Radiol Ultrasound Nov-December; 47(6): 597-601 MacGregor JM, Winter MD, Keating J, Tidwell AT, Brown DJ. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in a 4-month-old West Highland White terrier. Vet Radiol Ultrasound Jul-Aug 2006;47(4):345-350 Sponseller BA, Caston SS, Winter MD, Galow N. What is your diagnosis? Juvenile Ossifying Fibroma. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Dec 1;229(11):1727-8. Winter MD, Kinney LA, Kleine LJ. "Three dimensional helical computed tomographic hepatic angiography” Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2005 Nov-Dec;46(6):494-499 MacGregor JM, Rozanski EA, McCarthy J, Sharkey L, Winter MD, Brown DJ, Rush JE, Cholesterol-based pericardial effusion and aortic thromboembolism in a 9 year- old mixed breed dog with hypothyroidism.. J Vet Intern Med 2004 May-Jun; 18(3):354-8.
  • 19. SHANNON PEARSON HOLMES, BSc, MSc, DVM University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Department of Small Animal Clinical Studies P.O. Box Gainesville, FL 32610- holmess@vetmed.ufl.edu ACADEMIC BACKGROUND Candidate for Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Radiology 2008 Residency Training in Radiology Washington State University, 2007 Pullman, WA Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Ontario Veterinary College, 2003 University of Guelph Masters of Science Ontario Veterinary College, 1999 University of Guelph Bachelor of Science (with Honors) University of Guelph 1996 Biomedical Sciences Specialization ____________________________________ EMPLOYMENT HISTORY University of Florida – College of Veterinary Medicine, Dept. of Small Animal Clinical Sciences Clinical Assistant Professor f Radiology 2007 – 2008 Michigan Veterinary Specialists 2003 – 2004 Small Animal Medical and Surgical Internship South Tamworth Animal Hospital, New South Wales, Australia June 2002 Externship in Small Animal Medicine Tamworth Veterinary Hospital, New South Wales, Australia May 2002 Externship in Large Animal Medicine The J.P. Robarts Research Institute London 1999 – 2002 Research Assistant (Summer) in the Imaging Research Laboratories (MRI & CT projects) University of Guelph – Ontario Veterinary College, MRI Facility Research and Clinical Coordinator 1996 – 1999 ____________________________________
  • 20. RESEARCH RECORD PROJECTS & CONTRIBUTIONS: (1) Primary Investigator - Use of MRI in the pre-operative evaluations of the canine stifle. (2) Radiology Residency Research Project – MR portography, MRI evaluation of cerebral structural changes associated with hepatic encephalopathy & Quantitative hepatic MR for distinction of normal liver parenchyma and microvascular dysplasia. (3) Washington Horse Racing Commission funded project – An evaluation of a new surgical treatment for desmitis of the proximal suspensory ligament. (4) Multiple Sclerosis Society Funded Project – In vivo 4.0-T magnetic resonance investigation of spinal cord inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage in chronic-progressive experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. (5) US Navy funded project – High resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MR microscopy) of acute spinal cord injury and perivascular cuffing in EAE rats. (6) Masters Thesis – Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Assessment of Hepatic Responses to Drug Exposure in rats. GRANTS American Kennel Club – Canine Health Foundation ($9,900) for MR Portography in Dogs study Mendelson Intramural Grant – WSU-Veterinary Clinical Studies ($9,900) for MR Portography in Dogs Intramural Grant - WSU-Veterinary Clinical Studies ($12,000) for MR Evaluation of the Canine Stifle PUBLICATIONS: (1) Suspected corpus cavernosum, ischiocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscle injury in a dog. Hicks, DG, Bagley, RS, Gavin, PR, Holmes, SP, and Tibary, A. Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound 2007 (48):239-42. (2) Recent advances in ultrasound technology. O’Brien, RT and Holmes, SP. Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice. 2007 (22):93-103. (2) Fungal sinusitis and osteomyelitis in an Alpaca. Byers, S, and Holmes, SP. Canadian Veterinary Journal 2007 (48):939-41 (3) Thoracolumbar spinal column trauma in 3 Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) - Evaluation by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) case series. Stauber, E, and Holmes, SP. Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery 2007 (21): 196-200. BOOK CHAPTERS: (1) Veterinary Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Blackwell Publishing, Ames, IA - 2009); Edited by Gavin, PR & Bagley, RS – Chapters: Brain (Bagley, RS, & Holmes, SP), Spine (Bagley, RS, & Holmes, SP), Abdomen (Gavin, PR, & Holmes, SP), Musculoskeletal (Gavin, PR, & Holmes, SP). (2) Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Medicine: Ultrasound (Blackwell Publishing, Ames, IA); Edited by Fischetti, AJ – Chapter: Harmonics, Compounding, and Contrast Ultrasonography: Physical Principles and Clinical Techniques. O’Brien, RT & Holmes, SP.
  • 21. PRESENTATIONS: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (San Antonio, TX – 2008): New Twist: Radiology in the Vomiting Patient – Small Animal Internal Medicine Specialist Presentation. American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (San Antonio, TX – 2008): Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Vascular Disease – Veterinary Ultrasound Society Presentation American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Annual Scientific Meeting (San Antonio, TX – 2008): Correlation of MR imaging meningeal enhancement or CSF FLAIR suppression in dogs. FA Wininger, SP Holmes, RS Bagley, AV Chen, DG Hicks and JN Brya – Poster presentation. American College of Veterinary Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting (Chicago, IL – 2007): Quantitative MR investigation of microvascular dysplasia (MVD) following Feridex® contrast enhancement of the liver – Scientific presentation. American College of Veterinary Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting (Chicago, IL – 2007): Coronal radiation hyperintensity in magnetic resonance (MR) images of cases wih presumed hepatic encephalopathy (HE) – Scientific presentation. American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum (Louisville, KY – 2006): Intracranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dogs with presumed hepatic encephalopathy performed in conjunction with MR portography – Poster presentation. Veterinary Orthopedic Society Conference (Keystone, CO – 2006): Stifle MRI: Is it really all about the cranial cruciate ligament – Scientific presentation. American College of Veterinary Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting (Chicago, IL – 2005): Clinical Experiences in MR Portography in Dogs – Scientific presentation. VMS 582 Seminars in Clinical Medicine (WSU, Pullman, WA) 2007 What exists beyond 1 Tesla – Part II: Functional MRI (fMRI)) 2006 What exists beyond 1 Tesla – Part I: MR Microscopy (MRM) 2006 Stifle MRI: Is it really all about the cranial cruciate ligament 2005 Clinical Experiences in MR Portography in Dogs 2004 Advanced Ultrasound Techniques Annual Conference for Veterinarians & Veterinary Technicians (WSU, Pullman, WA) 2005 What’s new in radiology: Advanced imaging techniques – Seminar. 2006 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the CNS – Seminar. 9th Annual Scientific Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ISMRM) (Glasgow, Scotland – 2001): Delineation of an acquisition window within the respiratory cycle of laboratory animals – Poster presentation. High Resolution Imaging in Small Animals with PET, MR and Other Modalities (Amsterdam, Netherlands – 2001): Delineation of an acquisition window within the respiratory cycle of laboratory animals – Invited poster presentation. 7th Annual Scientific Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ISMRM) (Vancouver, Canada – 1999): Quantitive T2 analysis of the liver following acute exposure to 3 hepatotoxic drugs: Acetaminophen, Amiodarone and Cocaine – Poster presentation. Radiological Society of North American (RSNA) Annual Scientific Meeting (Chicago, IL – 1998): Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Equine Cervical Myelopathy – Poster presentation.
  • 22. David J. Reese 2635 SW. 35th PL. #1006 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 219-4640 Objective: To continue diagnostic imaging research and maintain a high standard of didactic training and clinical imaging. Education Background: The Ohio State University 2006 – 2008 Columbus, OH • Resident – Diagnostic Imaging University of Florida 2005 – 2006 Gainesville, FL Resident – Diagnostic Imaging Friendship Hospital for Animals 2003 – 2004 Washington, DC Small Animal Emergency, Internal Medicine, and Surgical Internship University of Florida 1999 – 2003 Gainesville, FL College of Veterinary Medicine Magna Cum Laude University of Florida 1996 – 1999 Gainesville, FL B.S. in Animal Science - Biology Graduated with Honors Employment: University of Georgia Athens, GA 7/14/04 – 6/28/05 Temporary Clinical Instructor, Emergency and Critical Care Cobb Veterinary Emergency & Referral Atlanta, GA 7/14/04 – 6/28/05 Emergency relief clinician NAVC Emergency & Critical Care Wetlab Orlando, FL 1/01 and 1/02 Assisted attending clinicians in instructing emergency procedures Dr. Charles Courtney (University of Florida) Gainesville, FL
  • 23. 6/2/00 – 5/1/01 Database entry, using Microsoft Access, for the College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Responsibilities: Exotic Imaging Rounds – The Ohio State University (2007) Clinical Instructor, Emergency and Critical Care – University of Georgia Daytime Emergency/Triage and clinical instruction Professional Interests: Exotic animal diagnostic imaging, ultrasound guided tissue sampling, tomographic imaging Awards, Certifcations, and Recognitions: PennHip Certification, Western States Veterinary Conference (Jan 06) American College of Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound Award (May 03) Kaytee Avian & Special Species Excellence Award (May 03) Merck Veterinary Manual Award (May 03) Society of Phi Zeta member (Spring 02) Papers and Talks Presented: Drost WT, Reese DJ, Hornof WF. Digital Radiography Artifacts. Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 2008; 49:S48-S56. Reese DJ, Kinsella JM, Zdziarski JM, Zeng QI-Yun, Greiner EC. Parasites in 30 Captive Tokay Geckos (Gekko gecko). J Herpe Med Surg. 2004. 14:21-25. Presented at University of Florida, CVM Phi Zeta Research Day 6/10/02 Professional Meetings: North American Veterinary Conference – 2001, 2002, 2003 American College of Veterinary Radiology annual meeting – 2007 Nuclear Medicine Short Course, University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN – 2006

×