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Faculty forum November 10, 2010
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Faculty forum November 10, 2010

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Prof. Laurie ZumHofe and Prof. Creed discuss the communication gap between students and professors, and the effect of technology on the gap.

Prof. Laurie ZumHofe and Prof. Creed discuss the communication gap between students and professors, and the effect of technology on the gap.

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  • 1. Faculty Forum November 10, 2010 The Gap Between…
  • 2. Purposes of Our Presentation  To inform you about how students and professors use 21st century communication methods  To provide research about current methodologies involving communication and social media trends  To discuss ways Concordia students and professors view possible communication gaps
  • 3. Introducing
  • 4. Framing Our Presentation  Riley Crane, Presenter at PopTech’s Conference, 2010: Brilliant Accidents, Necessary Failures and Improbable Breakthroughs, Research Fellow in MIT’s Media Lab, researches hidden patterns in collective social media
  • 5. Framing Our Presentation  He compares collective social media behavior to that of trailblazers in America’s settling of the West.
  • 6. Framing Our Presentation  The “crowd” decides what is the most likely path.  www.google.com  The “crowd” inputs what is most important and what is not.  Today, you can connect everybody. Can you solve any problems with that connection?
  • 7. Framing Our Presentation  Our social media communication paradigm is in its adolescence.  Currently, we/others use social media to passively maintain weak ties.  A new class of ties is becoming more important, those with whom we require temporary, spontaneous ties.
  • 8. Question Time  What communication strategies do you use with students?  What communication strategies have you observed students use with you?
  • 9. Research …  Washington Post, 8 October, 2010  “In the Age of Facebook, Twitter, and Apps, Some Candidates Adapt Better Than Others”  “. . . If the politician is where the people are, social media are going to become the new hub of campaign activity.”
  • 10. What does this mean?  “If the professor is where the students are . . .”  Are social media the new hub of educational activity?
  • 11. Research …  A Day Without Media  Research conducted by the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda and students at the Phillip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park  April 21, 2010
  • 12. Research …  200 students asked to give up all media for 24 hours  Some findings:  Media is their personal connection  Even on a crowded campus, they felt alone without media  Connections are their primary source of information  No loyalty at all to traditional media outlets
  • 13. Research …  The Week (newsmagazine) October 18, 2010  92% of American babies have their full name, picture, and mother’s name posted on a website somewhere . . .
  • 14. Research …  NBC Evening News, October 18, 2010  The average 13-year old sends 3339 text messages per month
  • 15. Concordia Research Shows…  Results from professors’ surveys  Extremely small sample  Primary social media connections  Linked In  Facebook  Email  “My profile makes me more approachable . . .”
  • 16. Concordia Research Shows…  Value connections to students  Desire approachability  Wary of lack of privacy in social media sites  Careful of data there  Critical thinking regarding self disclosure to students through face-to- face interaction or through social media
  • 17. Concordia Research Shows…  “College Students’ Perceptions of How Instructors Establish and Enhance Credibility Through Self- Disclosure”  Scott A. Myers, Maria Brann, and Members of Comm 600  Qualitative Research Reports in Communication 10(1), 2009 pp. 9-16
  • 18. Concordia Research Shows…  “. . . primary purpose behind instructor self-disclosure often is to clarify or extend course content, although self-disclosure is also viewed by students as a way to humanize instructors, make instructors appear approachable, and create affect for both the course and the instructor” (10).
  • 19. Concordia Research Shows…  “Credibility . . . is defined as the extent to which an instructor is considered to be believable and consists of three dimensions: character . . . caring . . . And competence” (11).
  • 20. Your Thoughts …  Connections and discussion . . .
  • 21. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What might surprise your professor about you or other students like you?  “Sometimes the quiet people are the ones who are thinking the most. There are some who legitimately don’t care, but others are answering everything in their heads.”
  • 22. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What might surprise your professor about you or other students like you?  “Our social lives drive us.”  “I check my phone more often than my email.”  “When I sit in the back and put my head down and act like I don’t care, it’s probably when I am paying attention the most.”
  • 23. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What might surprise your professor about you or other students like you?  “School isn’t really my number 1 priority sometimes.”  “How easy it is for students to get information and ‘cheat’ the learning system.”  “Some are super sheltered. Some are not.”
  • 24. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “Our generation can be really disrespectful, but some of us are baffled by the level of disrespect.”  “If you don’t know my name, I feel like you don’t care about me, so I don’t care about your class.”  “We are a generation of procrastinators.”
  • 25. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “To know me and not just my work.”  “I may appear not to care or listen but I do.”  “I wish I was a lot more involved in class by my own initiative.”
  • 26. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “Just because I may process material and think in a different manner than what may be expected doesn’t mean that I’m lazy or not learning.”
  • 27. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “Trying to be involved in everything at once is hard. Professors want us to be well rounded – or maybe think we are well rounded – I wish our professors knew how hard we work, in every activity.”
  • 28. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “You taking an interest in me and my life makes me want to take an interest in the subject you teach.”
  • 29. Concordia Student Responses . . .  What is something you wish your professors knew about you?  “I have many leather bound books and my room smells like rich mahogany.”
  • 30. Question Time  What would surprise students about you?  What do you wish students knew about you?  What conclusions can we make?
  • 31. In Conclusion…