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For LI802. Presentation to learning group. Human Growth and Development

For LI802. Presentation to learning group. Human Growth and Development

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  • By understanding how each age group develops cognitively, we can better relate our services to our clients.
  • Young children are learning to use the library and will be picture walking through books to find interesting stories. Picture walking is simply looking at each page of the book and predicting what the words say. Books don’t even necessarily have to be read to the child, nor do they need to have words for this age group. Language is the single most important factor in pre-literacy skills.They need the assurance of an adult in order to move through the research process.These children believe the world is focused on them, mainly because they haven’t seen a lot of the world yet.The librarian must find the valuable information for children in this age group to prevent information overload.Scaffold their questions and inquiries by breaking down their research into small steps. One way to do this is to teach the child to skim for important information, one new word at a time.
  • Most patrons are in this age groupPatrons of this age are able to think logically and are able to focus on topic. They have natural curiosity and a drive to learn new information.Most importantly, Adolescents are beginning to understand why trust and mutual helpfulness are important to human relationships. Think of the influence, the difference we can make on their lives simply by being helpful and understanding of their need.Establish a connection with them.Help them see you are a person to trust, who cares about them enough to not only just answer their question, but also come back to them. You value them as a person.
  • More background:The age period from 18-25 has been labeled “emerging adulthood” as individuals have often left the dependency of childhood but have not yet assumed adult responsibilities.• Today’s college students experience more stress and are more depressed than in the past. • Academic circumstances creating the most stress for students were tests and finals, grades and competition, professors and class environment, too many demands, papers and essay exams, career and future success and studying. I share this information with you b/c most inquiries for this age group will refer to school assignments-something that causes them stress.During this time in an adult’s life, they begin to form a specific area of knowledge, refining what they already know to areas of interest. They engage in more reflective and real life thinking that in their early teens. As with Adolescents, it is important to be available throughout the library and follow up with their search inquiryIf you can’t help them with their inquiry, point them in the direction of someone who can. This age needs specific, detailed information. Most inquiries are going to be based on a school assignment. Also help them with bibliographies!
  • *ask “why” questions related to the query*provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information*suggest ways of refining the question*suggest related arguments or topics*anticipate the effects of peer pressure when the teen comes with a group*recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities
  • Accumulated information and verbal skills continues to increase.Ability to reason abstractly begins to declineSpeed of information processing, reaction time, and memory declines in midlife.Use of effective memory strategies can decrease the decline.Having an extensive, highly organized knowledge of a particular domain.Expertise Increases in the middle adulthood years.Use of accumulated experience to solve problems.More creative and flexible in their domain than novices.Pleasant time after work.More time and money to pursue activities and interests.Decreased rate of heart disease and death due to vacations and leisure.Preparation for retirement.*ask “why” questions related to the query*provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information*suggest ways of refining the question*suggest related arguments or topics*recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities*Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives
  • *ask “why” questions related to the query*provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information*suggest ways of refining the question*suggest related arguments or topics*recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities*Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives
  • 5 primary mental abilitiesVerbal Meaning • Spatial Orientation • Inductive Reasoning • Number Ability • Word Fluency–   Avoid cognitive decline by engaging in lifelong program of mental exercise*ask “why” questions related to the query*provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information*suggest ways of refining the question*suggest related arguments or topics*recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities*Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives
  • *ask “why” questions related to the query*provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information*suggest ways of refining the question*suggest related arguments or topics*recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities*Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives

Sneath Humangrowthdevelop Sneath Humangrowthdevelop Presentation Transcript

  • Human Growth and Development
    A Librarian’s Guide to Serving Clients of All Ages
    Presented by Roxie Sneath
    Children
    Age 3 - 7
    Adolescents
    Age 8 - 15
    Adulthood
    Middle: Age 25-50
    Older than 50
    Early Adulthood
    Age 16 -25
  • Children Age 3 - 7
    Background:
    Mainly use the library for entertainment reading
    Adult reassurance
    The world is all about ME!
    Librarian’s Checklist:
    Avoid information overload
    Find the valuable information for this child
    Scaffold
  • Children Age 3 - 7
    Reflect and Connect:
    A four-year-old probably won’t come to your desk to ask for help. The child will probably have a huge mound of books if given the time to browse the shelves. Considering the child’s interests, you must limit check-out to 4 books. How would you do this? (Assume the parent is not present, as if the child came to story hour.)
  • Adolescents Age 8 - 15
    Background:
    Logical and focused, curious and a drive to learn
    Concrete moving towards Abstract thinking
    *******Understanding of Human Relationships*******
    Librarian’s Checklist:
    Be friendly and available throughout the library, without smothering.
    Follow through with them to be sure you helped their inquiry needs.
  • Adolescents Age 8 - 15
    Reflect and Connect:
    Take a minute to reflect on the natural curiosity of an adolescent.
    What drives adolescents to learn new information?
    How can you, as a Librarian, model trust and helpfulness?
  • Early Adulthood Age 16 - 25
    Background:
    Specific Areas of Knowledge
    Reflective
    Real-life connections
    Librarian’s Checklist:
    Be available and follow up
    Get them to expert information
    When Assisting:
  • Early Adulthood Age 16 - 25
    ask “why” questions related to the query
    provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information
    suggest ways of refining the question
    suggest related arguments or topics
    anticipate the effects of peer pressure when the teen comes with a group
    recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities
  • Early Adulthood Age 16 - 25
    Reflect and Connect:
    What questions would you ask to this patron, who comes asks you to help them find information on the geology of Kansas? How would you best serve their needs?
  • Middle Adulthood Age 25- 50
    Background:
    Accumulated information and verbal skills continues to increase.
    Ability to reason abstractly begins to decline
    Speed of processing and reacting begins to decrease
    Expertise increases
    Earlier Middle Adulthood involves family + career; Later Middle Adulthood allows more time for leisure
    Librarian’s Checklist:
    Consider the following when aiding the inquiry:
  • Middle Adulthood Age 25- 50
    ask “why” questions related to the query
    provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information
    suggest ways of refining the question
    suggest related arguments or topics
    recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities
    Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives
  • Middle Adulthood Age 25- 50
    Reflect and Connect:
    How would you best serve a patron who comes in wanting to know how to help their teenage son?
  • Adults Older than 50
    Background:
    Decline in all mental abilities
    Long and short-term memory diminishes
    Cognitive deterioration may be related to disuse
    Librarian’s Checklist:
    Be available throughout the library. Consider their physical needs.
    Consider the following when assisting with their inquiry:
  • Adults Older than 50
    ask “why” questions related to the query
    provide hypothetical examples related to the query to aid in locating information
    suggest ways of refining the question
    suggest related arguments or topics
    recognize the limitations of a patron’s verbal abilities
    Complicate the query by asking questions to help with the search that would take into account a variety of perspectives
  • Adults Older than 50
    Reflect and Connect:
    How would you best serve an elderly patron, who is in your library everyday to read the daily newspaper? You have a personal relationship with him through daily conversation about the weather, his family, his health. However, you notice that he only reads the local news. Would you approach and suggest other news sources? What materials would be appropriate for him to exercise his mind?