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Communication / Culture Connection<br />
Culture is defined “as a learned meaning system that consists of patterns of traditions, beliefs, values, norms, meanings ...
A symbolic process whereby reality is produced, maintained, repaired, and transformed (Martin & Nakayama, 2010, p. 94)<br ...
James Burke said (1985, p.11), “All communities in all places at all times manifest their own view of reality in what they...
The dialectical approach is a “conversational” approach originally developed by Mikhail Bahktin.<br />According to Bahktin...
James Burke said (1985, p.11), “All communities in all places at all times manifest their own view of reality in what they...
To understand the culture -  communication connection, we need to understand the “realities” of each culture; that is what...
Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck developed a spectrum of cultural values.<br />Values are the most deeply felt beliefs shared by t...
What is human nature?<br />What is the relationship between humans & nature?<br />What is the relationship between humans?...
Kluckhohn & StrodtbeckValue Orientations<br />
Hofstede continued the work of Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck.  Hofstede added 4 more value orientations:<br />Power Distances<b...
A cultural variability dimension that concerns the extent to which people accept an unequal distribution of power.<br />Po...
A cultural variability dimension that concerns the degree of feminine—valuing fluid gender roles, quality of life, service...
A cultural variability dimension that concerns the extent to which uncertainty, ambiguity and deviant ideas and behaviors ...
A cultural variability dimension that reflects a cultural-group orientation toward virtue or truth. The long-term orientat...
What we value determines how we communicate. It determines our social scripts or our communication rituals.<br />Communica...
Burke, J. (1985). The day the universe changed. Boston: Little, Brown.<br />Martin, J.N. & Nakayama, T.K. (2010). Intercul...
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Communication culture connection

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  • To understand Burke’s comment, you need to understand dialectics.
  • Transcript of "Communication culture connection"

    1. 1. Communication / Culture Connection<br />
    2. 2. Culture is defined “as a learned meaning system that consists of patterns of traditions, beliefs, values, norms, meanings and symbols. . .shared to varying degrees by interacting members of the community” <br />(Ting-Toomey & Chung, 2005, p. 28)<br />Culture (Re)Defined<br />
    3. 3. A symbolic process whereby reality is produced, maintained, repaired, and transformed (Martin & Nakayama, 2010, p. 94)<br />Communication Defined<br />
    4. 4. James Burke said (1985, p.11), “All communities in all places at all times manifest their own view of reality in what they do. The entire culture reflects the contemporary model of reality.”<br />Culture / Communication Connection<br />
    5. 5. The dialectical approach is a “conversational” approach originally developed by Mikhail Bahktin.<br />According to Bahktin, reality develops through a continuing and dynamic dialogue between parties.<br />Reality & Dialectics<br />
    6. 6. James Burke said (1985, p.11), “All communities in all places at all times manifest their own view of reality in what they do. The entire culture reflects the contemporary model of reality.”<br />Culture / Communication Connection<br />
    7. 7. To understand the culture - communication connection, we need to understand the “realities” of each culture; that is what does each culture value?<br />Understanding “The Connection”<br />
    8. 8. Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck developed a spectrum of cultural values.<br />Values are the most deeply felt beliefs shared by the cultural group; they reflect a shared perception of what ought to be and not what is (Martin & Nakayama, 2010, p. 95)<br />Kluckhohn & StrodtbeckValue Orientations<br />
    9. 9. What is human nature?<br />What is the relationship between humans & nature?<br />What is the relationship between humans?<br />What is the preferred personality?<br />What is the orientation toward time?<br />Kluckhohn & StrodtbeckValue Orientations<br />
    10. 10. Kluckhohn & StrodtbeckValue Orientations<br />
    11. 11. Hofstede continued the work of Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck. Hofstede added 4 more value orientations:<br />Power Distances<br />Femininity v. Masculinity<br />Ways of dealing with Uncertainty<br />Controlling aggression & expressing emotions<br />Long-term v. short-term life orientations<br />Hofstede Value Orientations<br />
    12. 12. A cultural variability dimension that concerns the extent to which people accept an unequal distribution of power.<br />Power Distance<br />
    13. 13. A cultural variability dimension that concerns the degree of feminine—valuing fluid gender roles, quality of life, service, relationships, and interdependence—and the degree of being masculine—emphasizing distinctive gender roles, ambition, materialism and independence.<br />Femininity v. Masculinity<br />
    14. 14. A cultural variability dimension that concerns the extent to which uncertainty, ambiguity and deviant ideas and behaviors are avoided.<br />Uncertainty Avoidance<br />
    15. 15. A cultural variability dimension that reflects a cultural-group orientation toward virtue or truth. The long-term orientation emphasizes virtue, whereas the short-term orientation emphasizes truth.<br />Long-term v. Short-term<br />
    16. 16.
    17. 17. What we value determines how we communicate. It determines our social scripts or our communication rituals.<br />Communication rituals are a set form of systematic interactions that take place on a regular basis.<br />Connecting the Values<br />
    18. 18. Burke, J. (1985). The day the universe changed. Boston: Little, Brown.<br />Martin, J.N. & Nakayama, T.K. (2010). Intercultural Communication in Contexts, 10 ed. New York: McGraw Hill.<br />Ting-Toomey, S. & Chung, L.C. (2005). Understanding Intercultural Communication. New York: Oxford University Press.<br />References<br />
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