Cloud Computing - A Primer
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Cloud Computing - A Primer

on

  • 3,092 views

My presentation on my Network Theory at James Cook University, 2010.

My presentation on my Network Theory at James Cook University, 2010.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,092
Views on SlideShare
3,090
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
208
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.linkedin.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Cloud Computing - A Primer Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Presentation by Raden Sucalit
    Cloud Computing: A Quick Snapshot
  • 2. 2
    During the course of
    this presentation
    • Motivations of Cloud Computing
    • 3. What really is it?
    • 4. Architecture/Taxonomy
    • 5. Delivery Models/Layers
    • 6. Deployment Models/Types
    • 7. Challenges and Opportunities
    • 8. Summary
    • 9. Image Credits & References
  • 3
    IT infrastructure is reaching a breaking point.
    70¢ per $1
    85% idle
    1.5x
    In distributed computing environments, up to 85% of computing capacity sits idle.
    Explosion of information driving 54% growth in storage shipments every year.
    70% on average is spent on maintaining current IT infrastructures versus adding new capabilities.
    2 billion
    3.3 billion
    An estimated 2 billion people
    will be on the web by 2011
    Worldwide mobile telephone subscriptions reached 3.3 billion in 2007 – one for every two people on the planet
  • 10. 4
    As the world gets smarter, demands on IT will grow
    Intelligent oil field technologies
    Smart retail
    Smart energy grids
    Smart traffic systems
    Smart healthcare
    Smart food systems
    Smart water management
    Smart regions
    Smart weather
    Smart countries
    Smart supply chains
    Smart cities
  • 11. 5
    CLOUD
    “the complicated stuff” that propels the Internet
  • 12. 6
    2006
  • 13. 7
  • 14. 8
    What is Cloud Computing?
    A user experience and a business model
    • Cloud computing is an emerging style of IT delivery in which applications, data, and IT resources are rapidly provisioned (on-demand) and delivered as standardized offerings to users over the web in a flexible pricing pay-for-usage model.
    An infrastructure management and services delivery methodology
    • Cloud computing is a way of managing large numbers of highly virtualized resources such that, from a management perspective, they resemble a single large resource. This can then be used to deliver services with elastic scaling.
    Service Consumers
    DatacenterInfrastructure
    AccessServices
    Monitor & ManageServices & Resources
    IT Cloud
    Component Vendors/Software Publishers
    Service Catalog,
    ComponentLibrary
    CloudAdministrator
    Publish & UpdateComponents,
    Service Templates
  • 15. 9
    Economics of Cloud Computing
    CLOUD COMPUTING
    +
    +
    +
    =
    =
    VIRTUALIZATION
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY
    STANDARDIZATION
    AUTOMATION
    leverages virtualization, standardization and automation to free up operational budget for new investment
    Reduced
    Cost
    +
    +
    +
    =
    =
    AGILITY
    BUSINESS & IT ALIGNMENT
    SERVICE
    FLEXIBILITY
    INDUSTRY STANDARDS
    OPTIMIZED
    BUSINESS
    allowing you to optimize new investments for direct business benefits
  • 16. 10
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Collaboration
    CRM/ERP/HR
    Industry
    Applications
    Java
    Runtime
    Application
    Business
    Processes
    Middleware
    Database
    Development
    Tooling
    Platform
    Web 2.0 Application
    Runtime
    Infrastructure
    Servers
    Networking
    Storage
    Data Center Fabric
  • 17. 11
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Flexibility & Control
    Abstraction
    Application
    Platform
    Infrastructure
  • 18. 12
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    • Most visible layer, normally browser-based
    • 19. Service known as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)
    • 20. All applications that run on the cloud and
    provide a direct service to the user are here
    • Alleviates the burden of software mainte-
    nance for the end-user
    • Simplifies upgrading and testing of
    code for the developers
    • Can make use of below layers or other cloud
    apps to develop other apps
    • Security, Availability and Integration of Legacy
    Apps
    Application
    Platform
    Collaboration
    CRM/ERP/HR
    Industry
    Applications
    Infrastructure
    Business
    Processes
  • 21. 13
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Application
    Platform
    Collaboration
    CRM/ERP/HR
    Industry
    Applications
    Infrastructure
    Business
    Processes
  • 22. 14
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    • Layer for application developers
    • 23. Layer abstracts the underlying physical and logi-
    cal structure from the developer
    • Service is commonly known as PaaS
    • 24. Provides developers with a programming-
    language-level environment with APIs
    • No OS to patch, No DB to administer
    • 25. Automatic scaling*, integration to other
    services
    • Billed by CPU cycles, less flexible in terms of
    choice of languages and DB
    Application
    Platform
    Java
    Runtime
    Middleware
    Database
    Infrastructure
    Development
    Tooling
    Web 2.0 Application
    Runtime
  • 26. 15
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Application
    Platform
    Java
    Runtime
    Middleware
    PROJECT CAROLINE
    Database
    Infrastructure
    Development
    Tooling
    Web 2.0 Application
    Runtime
  • 27. 16
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    • Provides basic resources to higher layers
    • 28. Service is called Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
    • 29. Based on virtualization technology
    • 30. Deployment unit is a Virtual Appliance
    • 31. Provides access to “Compute”, “Storage”
    and “Communicate” instances,
    on-demand
    • Pro: Full control of environments
    and infrastructure
    • Con: Provide little or no abstraction
    • 32. Security, Availability and Quality
    Application
    Platform
    Networking
    Data Center Fabric
    Storage
    Infrastructure
    Servers
  • 33. 17
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Application
    Platform
    Networking
    Data Center Fabric
    Storage
    Infrastructure
    Servers
  • 34. Infrastructure vs. Platform
    18
  • 35. 19
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Application / Cloud Application / SaaS / HuaaS
    Firmware / Hardware / HaaS
    Platform / Cloud Platform / PaaS / Cloud Software Envt
    Business Support & Administration
    Infrastructure / IaaS / Cloud Software Infrastructure
    Software Kernel
  • 36. 20
    Proposed Ontology by IBM, UCSB
    Cloud Application (SaaS)
    Cloud Software Environment (PaaS)
    Cloud Software Infrastructure
    Storage
    (DaaS)
    Communications
    (CaaS)
    Computational
    Resources
    (IaaS)
    Software Kernel
    Firmware / Hardware (HaaS)
  • 37. Proposed Ontology by FZI Karlsruhe, HP Laboratories
    Human as a Service
    Software as a Service
    Platform as Service
    Business Support and Administration
    Infrastructure as Service
    Hardware
  • 38. Proposed Ontology by FZI Karlsruhe, HP Laboratories
    Human as a Service
    Software as a Service
    Platform as Service
    Business Support and Administration
    Infrastructure as Service
    Hardware
  • 39. 23
    Cloud Computing Delivery Models / Layers
    Application / Cloud Application / SaaS / HuaaS
    Firmware / Hardware / HaaS
    Platform / Cloud Platform / PaaS / Cloud Software Envt
    Business Support & Administration
    Infrastructure / IaaS / Cloud Software Infrastructure
    Software Kernel
  • 40. 24
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Public
    • Service provider owned and managed.
    • 41. Access by subscription
    • 42. Delivers select set of standardized business process, application and/or infrastructure services on a flexible price per use basis
    • 43. Domain specific, intellectual property, reliability, sensitive data
    Private
    • Privately owned and managed.
    • 44. Access limited to client and its partner network.
    • 45. Drives efficiency, standardization and best practices while retaining greater customization and control
    Cloud Services
    Cloud Computing
    Model
    Hybrid
    • Access to client, partner network, and third party resources
    Customization, efficiency, availability, resiliency, security and privacy
    Standardization, flexibility , capital preservation, and time to deploy
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 46. 25
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Public
    • Service provider owned and managed.
    • 47. Access by subscription
    • 48. Delivers select set of standardized business process, application and/or infrastructure services on a flexible price per use basis
    • 49. Domain specific, intellectual property, reliability, sensitive data
    Standardization, flexibility , capital preservation, and time to deploy
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 50. 26
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Private
    • Privately owned and managed.
    • 51. Access limited to client and its partner network.
    • 52. Drives efficiency, standardization and best practices while retaining greater customization and control
    Customization, efficiency, availability, resiliency, security and privacy
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 53. 27
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Hybrid
    • Access to client, partner network, and third party resources
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 54. 28
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Public
    • Service provider owned and managed.
    • 55. Access by subscription
    • 56. Delivers select set of standardized business process, application and/or infrastructure services on a flexible price per use basis
    • 57. Domain specific, intellectual property, and sensitive data
    Private
    • Privately owned and managed.
    • 58. Access limited to client and its partner network.
    • 59. Drives efficiency, standardization and best practices while retaining greater customization and control
    Cloud Services
    Cloud Computing
    Model
    Hybrid
    • Access to client, partner network, and third party resources
    Customization, efficiency, availability, resiliency, security and privacy
    Standardization, flexibility , capital preservation, and time to deploy
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 60. 29
    Cloud Computing Deployment Models / Cloud Types
    Flexible Delivery Models
    Hybrid …
    • Access to client, partner network, and third party resources
    ORGANIZATION CULTURE GOVERNANCE
  • 61. 30
    TRADITIONAL SECURITY
    PRIVACY
    INFANCY
    Challenges and Opportunities
    THIRD PARTY CONTROL
    AVAILABILITY
    ENERGY CONSUMPTION
  • 62. 31
    Privacy
    • Challenge is to design cloud services in such a way as to decrease privacy risk, and to ensure legal compliance
    • 63. Government compliance and restrictions limit usage of cloud services as currently designed
    • 64. There have been a number of high-profile privacy breaches
    • 65. Concerns arise when it is not clear to individuals why their personal information is requested or how it will be used or passed on to other parties
  • 32
    Infancy of the Field
    • Most existing cloud-computing offerings are either proprietary or dependent on software that is not amenable to experimentation
    • 66. Lack of research tools fail to answer most fundamental questions in the field
    • 67. EUCALYPTUS, an open-source cloud computing framework that is modular and open to experimental instrumentation has recently been created by UCSB Computer Science Department
  • 33
    Traditional Security
    • Concerns involve computer and network intrusion or attacks
    • 68. VM-level attacks such as the vulnerabilities that appeared in VMWare, Xen, and Microsoft Virtual PC
    • 69. Platform level attacks such as SQL injections or cross-site scripting
    • 70. Phishing cloud provider
    • 71. Cloud providers argue that their security measures and processes are more mature and tested
  • 34
    Availability
    • Concerns on critical applications and data being available
    • 72. One-day outage of Gmail in mid-October, 2008
    • 73. Over 7-hour downtime of Amazon S3 on July 20, 2008
    • 74. 18-hour outage on October 31, 2008
    • 75. Cloud providers argue that their server uptime compares well with the availability of the cloud
    • 76. Concern that third-party cloud would not scale enough
    • 77. There are more single points of failure and attack
    • 78. Assurance of computational integrity
    • 79. Stanford’s Folding@Home project gives the same task to multiple client to reach a consensus on correctness
  • 35
    Third Party Control
    • Legal implications of data and applications being held by third party are complex and are not yet well understood
    • 80. Lack of potential control and transparency when third-party holds the data
    • 81. Implementation independent is one reason why cloud computing cool but also one of its main reason that why it is not
  • 36
    Energy Consumption
    • Data centers are known to be expensive to operate and they consume huge amounts of electric power
    • 82. It is important that they be designed to be energy efficient
    • 83. New techniques have to be investigated for allocation of resources
  • 37
    Summary
    Cloud computing is as much as about the business model as it is about the technology.
    Biggest challenge is the fact that there are no standards yet.
    Cloud fears largely stem from loss of control of sensitive data.
    Cloud Computing isn’t a quick fix. It needs a LOT of thinking.
    It requires a strong foundation of best practice in software development, software architecture and service management.
  • 84. Image Credits
    Images & Text from Slides 3, 4, 8, 24, 28 (Series of Boxes, Cloud)
    What is Cloud Computing? Powerpoint Presentation. IBM Technologies.
    Images from Slide 37 (Series of Boxes)
    The Benefits of Cloud Computing: A new era of responsiveness, effectiveness and efficiency in IT service delivery. IBM. Dynamic Infrastructure. July 2009.
    Sun Report on Cloud Computing Architecture. March, 2009
    ThinkGrid Business IT on Demand White Paper on Cloud Computing
    Images from Slide 3 (Man with Question Mark)
    Greenpeace International. White Paper on Make IT Green: Cloud Computing and its Contribution to Climate Change
    The Benefits of Cloud Computing: A new era of responsiveness, effectiveness and efficiency in IT service delivery. IBM. Dynamic Infrastructure. July 2009.
    All company logos from their respected websites
    Google Docs, Google Maps API, Open Social, OpenID, Office Live, Salesforce.com, Akamai, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, NetSuite, Sun, Zoho, Amazon, Digg.com, University of Iowa, Youtube, AppNexus, Bluelock, Emulab, ENKI, EU Reservoir Project, Flexiscale, GoGrid, Google, HP, Joyent, Nirvanix, OpenFlow, RackSpace, Skytap, Terremark, The Globous Alliance, UCSB, 10gen
    38
  • 85. 39
    References
    [1] U. D. o. H. Security, Smart Objects: IBM Global Technology Outlook 2005, US Department of Homeland Security, 2005.
    [2] R. Clarke. "Computing Clouds on the Horizon? Benefits and Risks from the User's Perspective," May 1, 2010; http://www.rogerclarke.com/II/CCBR.html.
    [3] T. Nolle. "Understanding cloud computing architecture models," http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid194_gci1349265_mem1,00.html.
    [4] G. International, Make IT Green: Cloud Computing and its Contribution to Climate Change, Greenpeace International, Amsterdam, 2010.
    [5] H. Mcleod. "The Cloud's Best-Kept Secret," http://gapingvoid.com/2008/08/01/the-clouds-best-kept-secret/.
    [6] M. Crandell. "Defogging Cloud Computing: A Taxonomy," April 20, 2010; http://gigaom.com/2008/06/16/defogging-cloud-computing-a-taxonomy/.
    [7] G. Fowler, and B. Worthen. "The Internet Industry is on a Cloud -- Whatever That May Mean," http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123802623665542725.html#printMode.
    [8] S. Bobrowski. "Cloud Computing Defined," http://thecloudview.com/cloud-computing-defined/.
    [9] R. Buyya, C. S. Yeo, S. Venugopal et al., “Cloud computing and emerging IT platforms: Vision, hype, and reality for delivering computing as the 5th utility,” Future Gener. Comput. Syst., vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 599-616, 2009.
    [10] M. Armbrust, A. Fox, R. Griffith et al., “A view of cloud computing,” Commun. ACM, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 50-58.
  • 86. 40
    References
    [11] J. Geelan, “Twenty-One Experts Define Cloud Computing,” 2009.
    [12] J. Strickland. "How Cloud Computing Works " May 1, 2010; http://communication.howstuffworks.com/cloud-computing1.htm.
    [13] Appistry.com, “Cloud Taxonom: Applications, Platform, Infrastructure,” December 18, 2008, 2008.
    [14] E. c. Tutorials. "Cloud Computing Architecture," http://www.exforsys.com/tutorials/cloud-computing/cloud-computing-architecture.html.
    [15] A. Greggo, "Cloud computing in the Enterprise: An Overview," 2009.
    [16] R. Raja, and V. Verma, "Cloud Computing - An Overview," 2009.
    [17] M. Mould. "Public vs. private clouds," http://searchvirtualdatacentre.techtarget.co.uk/tip/0,289483,sid203_gci1511608,00.html.
    [18] S. Charrington, "The Cloud "Pyramid": Applications, Platform, Infrastructure," 2008.
    [19] A. Lenk, M. Klems, J. Nimis et al., “What's inside the Cloud? An architectural map of the Cloud landscape,” in Proceedings of the 2009 ICSE Workshop on Software Engineering Challenges of Cloud Computing, 2009.
    [20] J. W. Rittinghouse, and J. F. Ransome, Cloud computing : implementation, management, and security, Boca Raton: CRC Press.
    [21] J. D. Hurwitz, Cloud computing for dummies, 1st ed., Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub., Inc., 2009.
    [22] A. T. Velte, T. J. Velte, and R. C. Elsenpeter, Cloud computing : a practical approach, New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • 87. 41
    References
    [23] T. O'Reilly. "Web 2.0 and Cloud Computing," May 5, 2010; http://radar.oreilly.com/2008/10/web-20-and-cloud-computing.html.
    [24] S. O'Grady. "Cloud Types: Fabric vs Instance," http://redmonk.com/sogrady/2008/11/14/cloud-types/.
    [25] M. Pokharel, and J. S. Park, “Cloud computing: future solution for e-governance,” in Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, Bogota, Colombia, 2009.
    [26] M. Miller, Cloud computing : Web-based applications that change the way you work and collaborate online, Indianapolis, Ind.: Que, 2008.
  • 88. 42