Wine Prehistory

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  • It is presumed that wine was made from grapes rather than from other fruit vines, by concentrations of grape pips found on various sites
  • About 7000 years ago. Prehistoric people of this region gathered berries from wild vines in the forest and at some stage they began cultivating these vines within their villages to provide a convenient source of food. IN GEORGIA
  • About 7000 years ago. Prehistoric people of this region gathered berries from wild vines in the forest and at some stage they began cultivating these vines within their villages to provide a convenient source of food.Neolithic which is 6000 to 5000 BCIt comes from the 7th century BC, and shows a reclining man drinking wine from a traditional drinking horn
  • Moved to EGYPT
  • In between the period of 4000 and 1000 BC, it is said that extensive cultivation and wine production were performed in Egyp.Wine became a part of recorded history, playing an important role in ancient ceremonial lifeOne hieroglyphic stamped on a stopper belonging to a jar of the PharoahKhasekhemwy of Dynasty 2 shows that one way was to grow grape vines was to erect two wood pillars with the upper ends forked, and a wooden pole lay over the top where the vines hung with bunches of grapes dangling. This type of support also forms a picture which is used in the words meaning ‘garden,’ ‘wine,’ and ‘vine’. A second way is to train the grape vines to grow on trellis’s supported on sloping rafters that rested on columns. Occasionally the columns were carved and painted. A third way was to make vine arbors consisting of branches with the ends placed in the ground to form an arch. And lastly, some vines were grown and pruned to make low bushes and needed no support
  • EGYPT to GREECE
  • Shows what happens when you drink too much wine. The earliest evidence of winemaking in Greece is a stone foot press at Vathipetro, a Minoan villa on Crete, dated to 1600 BC. Most Greek people drank wine every day, because the water was often unsafe to drink, they thought it was safer to drink wine.
  • GREECE to ITALY and NORTH AFRICA
  • 1000 BC, significant wine production had spread to Italy, Sicily and North AfricaThe Romans liked to mix honey with this drink to make an aperitif called Mulsum. They often added herbs and spices, but were known to mix wine with salt water. Even chalk was sometimes mixed with wine to reduce acidity
  • ITALY to SPAIN and PORTUGAL, SOUTHERN FRANCE and parts of RUSSIA
  • To their understanding, vines grew best in the same climate and area that would support olive and fig trees, therefore most of the early vineyard planting was in the warm, Mediterranean coastal areasDom Perignon was believed to be the inventor of champagne
  • The greenish-yellow glass amphora has handles formed in the shape of dolphins. One of several bottles discovered, it is the only one with the contents still preserved.near the town of Speyer, Germany, it was inside one of two Roman stone sarcophaguses that were dug up. The bottle dates from approximately 325 A.D. and was found in 1867.1685History Museum of the Pfalz in GermanyAbout two-thirds of the contents are a thicker, hazy mixture. This is most probably olive oil, which the Romans commonly used to "float" atop wine to preserve it from oxidation
  • the Church took over control of vineyards throughout EuropeOnly in the Church, where wine was needed to celebrate the sacrament, was an effort made to maintain vineyardsSome monasteries, in particular the great Benedictine and Cistercian abbeys in Burgundy, France and along the Rhine River of Germany, began producing surplus wine for their own enjoyment and that of the nobility. As Europe regained its appreciation for the fruit of the vine, winemaking began a slow recovery
  • The century also saw the expansion of wine growing into the New World as areas were settled and cultivated. Firstly in North America and latterly in Australia there was a limited, but essential start to potentially important areas. 1700 to 1800 ACThe industry was brought into a state of panic by the appearance of the Phylloxera beetle in 1864 which destroyed the vineyards of Europe taking over 30 years before it was brought under control.
  • Took 30 years to recover
  • Wine Prehistory

    1. 1. Wine Prehistory<br />WSC5.05 Introduction to Wine Business<br />Brooke Nielsen<br />
    2. 2. <ul><li>First Discovery of Wine</li></li></ul><li>X<br />
    3. 3. The cultivation of the vine began in Georgia at the time of the Neolithic period. 6000 to 5000 BC. <br />9,000-year-old archaeological remains<br />
    4. 4. X<br />X<br />
    5. 5. First cultivation in Egypt was in 3000BC.<br />
    6. 6. X<br />X<br />X<br />
    7. 7. Greece 1600 BC<br />
    8. 8. X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />
    9. 9. Italy 1000 BC<br />Mixed wine with honey to make an aperitif called Mulsum<br />
    10. 10. X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />
    11. 11. France 100 BC<br />First planting and production of Champagne<br />
    12. 12. Estimated 1685 years old<br />
    13. 13. The Dark Ages 600 – 1400 AD<br />Stop in development of winemaking regions<br />
    14. 14. X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />X<br />
    15. 15. 18th Century<br />Phylloxera beetle destroyed vineyards all over Europe in 1864<br />
    16. 16. 21st Century<br />Technology<br />Knowledge<br />Skills<br />Resources<br />
    17. 17. References:<br />(http://hellastrading.com/the_history.html) History of Greek Wine. Retrieved August 13, 2010, from http://hellastrading.com<br />Cannavan, T. Georgia, Cradle of Wine. (2006). Retrieved August 15, 2010, from http://www.wine-pages.com/features/georgia.htm<br />(http://news.satimagingcorp.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/07/colosseum_in_rome_italy_-_april_2007.jpg) Retrieved August 15, 2010, from http://news.satimagingcorp.com<br />(http://www.hermes-press.com/vercingetorix.jpg). The Truth About the Dark Ages. Retrieved August 15, 2010, from http://www.hermes-press.com/DAtruth.htm<br />(http://www.tastefrenchwine.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Phylloxera-of-French-vines.png) Retrieved August 15, 2010, from http://www.tastefrenchwine.com<br />(http://www.hawkhurstwines.co.nz/images/winechee.jpg) Retrieved August 15, 2010, from http://www.hawkhurstwines.co.nz<br />

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