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Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
Social media at omr oce
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Social media at omr oce

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  • The 22 percent who didn’t use but believed it was good probably have colleagues who use it.
  • Different surveyNews search – Google news, Social search – Facebook, Blog search – techcruchAt NCI, we had the Standard Search and corporate website pretty well covered, but we had no blogs and little involvement in social networks. Blogs search is based on rank and -- must have a blog to be ranked by blogs – part of community. We needed entry into the blogosphereThe Benchmarks problem became the solution
  • Transition: social media needs
  • In the last 6 months, traffic has been steadily increasing.
  • Lots of Cancer Centers will retweet from the @NCIMedia account because it sounds more official. The @BrookeLayne account allows me to work one on one with the followers, sending notes and info I think they would find useful, that would be weird if “all of NCI” was sending them this info. SW’s will send me questions off the record, which would be weird to send to @NCIMedia
  • Lots of Cancer Centers will retweet from the @NCIMedia account because it sounds more official. The @BrookeLayne account allows me to work one on one with the followers, sending notes and info I think they would find useful, that would be weird if “all of NCI” was sending them this info. SW’s will send me questions off the record, which would be weird to send to @NCIMedia
  • Participation: valuable information and, where possible fun stuff: games, contests, give-aways?Audience: not a competition for fans – quality over quantity
  • Posts that work for twitter may not work for facebook
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Media and Media Relations at NCI<br />Brooke Hardison<br />OCE Retreat<br />December 2, 2010<br />
    • 2. Journalism 2.0<br />70% of journalists use social networks to assist in reporting<br />Newspaper and online journalists more likely to use than magazine reporters<br />56% said social media was important or somewhat important<br />92% believe that social media is enhancing journalism<br />Sources: Middleberg Communications and the Society for New Communications Research (SNCR), "Survey of Media in the Wired World.“ & George Washington University and Cison’s “2009 Social Media & Online Usage Study”<br />
    • 3. Top Information Sources<br />100% of journalists use searches like Google or Yahoo! to get news information (up from 91% in 2008)<br />Search types journalists used:<br />Google Search (100%)<br />Corporate websites (96%)<br />Blog Search (89%)<br />Social Search (65%)<br />Wikipedia (61%)<br />Photo/Video Search (58%)<br />Forums (42%)<br /> Social Media Tools used (sharing):<br />Blogs (64%)<br />Social Networks (60%)<br />Micro-blogging (57%)<br />Sources: TopRank Online Marketing Survey on Journalists Use of Search & George Washington University/Cison “2009 Social Media & Online Usage Study”<br />
    • 4. Once upon a time, there was an outdated website…<br />Since 2001, the NCI media relations team has been publishing articles for reporters about research at NCI<br /><ul><li>Volumes and issues
    • 5. Paired articles
    • 6. Text-only article pages
    • 7. Internally hosted videos (small)
    • 8. Separate pages for multimedia files
    • 9. Keyword-based and date range search options</li></ul>Average hits/month: 800<br />
    • 10. Time for Change<br />The webzine concept was antiquated and needed a fresh look<br />NCI, NIH and HHS as a whole were moving toward incorporating web 2.0 technologies, and we wanted to make sure that the new design could adapt<br />Separately, we were beginning to see an increasing need for more blog-friendly content<br />Journalists were increasingly becoming active on social media sites & we needed to make content available in the blogosphere<br />
    • 11. A new format<br />In 2009, in an effort to modernize the site and serve a broader audience, the Office of Media Relations redesigned the site, inspired by news blogs and social media<br />http://benchmarks.cancer.gov<br /><ul><li>Multiple images per article
    • 12. Embedded videos (now discoverable on Youtube.com)
    • 13. Twitter, YouTube and Flickr integration
    • 14. Easier search (text-based), utilizing categories, a tag cloud, and archive</li></ul>Hits in November 2010: 10,622<br />
    • 15. YouTube Channel<br />Branded YouTube Channel<br />B-roll discoverable through YouTube & Google video search<br />~ 2,300 views per month<br />Posting on YouTube saves on server space & allows for full-length views<br />
    • 16. Corporate + Personal Branded Twitter Accounts<br /><ul><li>Formal notices
    • 17. Only follows HHS accounts
    • 18. More authoritative for retweeting by other organizations
    • 19. Professional w/ personal touch – real person
    • 20. Mostly science writers
    • 21. Allows for 1-on-1 interaction</li></ul>On average, Tweeted press releases get 25-60 hits in the first hour<br />
    • 22. Corporate + Personal Branded Facebook Pages<br /><ul><li>Provides a real person for connections
    • 23. Can post non-official posts that are useful to reporters
    • 24. Lets science writers connect without “friend requests”</li></ul>Facebook is driving traffic to Benchmarks and cancer.gov<br />
    • 25. Keys to Success (gleaned from others)<br />Facebook<br /><ul><li>Integrate with other platforms
    • 26. Create a resource (offer information, serve as a place to connect)
    • 27. Create reasons for fans to participate
    • 28. Target YOUR audience</li></ul>Twitter<br /><ul><li>Be useful
    • 29. Provide links to information (short URLs)
    • 30. Respond to questions
    • 31. Remember that it’s public</li></li></ul><li>What NOT to do(gleaned from other’s mistakes)<br />Focus on fan/follower counts<br />Are your fans engaged?<br />Do you have the right fans?<br />Are you serving YOUR audience?<br />Ignore the specific platform’s etiquette<br />Attribute when appropriate (tag, retweet)<br />Avoid being “spammy” – post in appropriate places<br />Allow page to be overrun with ads & scams<br />Check in regularly, even with the spam filter<br />Overreact and/or respond to everything<br />Sometimes, people just need to rant<br />
    • 32. Overreaction 1: Lockdown<br />DKNY was letterbombed by PETA protesters on Monday. Rather than ignore it, they deleted the posts, locked down their page, and disallowed posts. <br />Now every DKNY post has hundreds of comments related to fur and bunnies (can’t disable comments)<br />And their current news mentions are dominated by this issue<br />
    • 33. Overreaction 2: Defensive<br />Greenpeace staged a protest on Nestlé's page, regarding deforestation and palm oil. People changed their profile image and posted comments on their page.<br />The representative got very defensive, and things spun out of control.<br />This story was in the news for months<br />Nestlé had to create a “zero deforestation” policy in response to the backlash<br />

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