Aaae leading hp urban schools

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The is Dr. Johnson's presentation from the AAAE Conference.

The is Dr. Johnson's presentation from the AAAE Conference.

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  • 1. Leading in High-Performing Urban Schools AAAE March 11, 2011 Joseph F. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D. Executive Director, National Center for Urban School Transformation
  • 2. National Center for Urban School Transformation Dedicated to identifying, studying, and promoting the best practices of America’s highest achieving urban schools in a manner that supports urban districts in transforming teaching and learning http://www.ncust.org Learn more at the Annual Symposium on High-Performing Urban Schools in San Diego, CA – May 23-25, 2012
  • 3. NCUST Identifies, Celebrates, and Studies
    • Non-selective, urban schools (serving primarily students from low-income families) that demonstrate high achievement for all students. These schools evidence:
    • High proficiency rates for all groups
    • High graduation rates for all groups
    • High rates of access to challenging programs for all groups
    • No disproportionate enrollments of racial/ethnic groups in special education
    • Low rates of suspension/expulsion for all groups
    • Other indicators of student success/achievement
  • 4. In the past five years, NCUST has identified 48 remarkable elementary, middle, and high schools in 15 different states.
  • 5. 2010 NCUST Award Winners
    • Horace Mann Elementary, Glendale CA
    • International Elementary, Long Beach, CA
    • Lemay Elementary, Los Angeles, CA
    • Nueva Vista Elementary, Los Angeles, CA
    • Whitefoord Elementary, Atlanta, GA
    • Horace Mann Dual Language Academy, Wichita, KS
    • Branch Brook School, Newark, NJ
    • Charles Lunsford School, Rochester, NY
    • Marble Hills High School, Bronx, NY
    • Escontrias Elementary, El Paso, TX
    • Hambrick Middle School, Houston, TX
    • Nathan Adams Elementary, Dallas, TX
    • Stephens Elementary, Houston, TX
  • 6. 2009 NCUST Award Winners
    • Bonham Elementary, Dallas, TX
    • Bursch Elementary, Compton, CA
    • Fallon Park Elementary, Roanoke, VA
    • Franklin Town Charter High, Philadelphia, PA
    • Golden Empire Elementary, Sacramento, CA
    • Highland Elementary, Silver Springs, MD
    • Ira Harbison Elementary, National City, CA
    • Lawndale High School, Los Angeles, CA
    • Kearny School of International Business, San Diego, CA
    • KIPP Adelante Academy, San Diego, CA
    • Montebello Gardens Elementary, Los Angeles, CA
    • World of Inquiry School, Rochester, NY
  • 7. 2008 NCUST Award Winners
    • Louisa Alcott Elementary, Cleveland, OH (2008)
    • Bridesburg Elementary, Philadelphia, PA (2008)
    • William Dandy Middle School, Ft. Lauderdale, FL (2008)
    • Dreamkeeper’s Academy, Norfolk, VA (2008)
    • Franklin Elementary, Bakersfield, CA (2008)
    • Henderson Middle School, Richmond, VA (2008)
    • MacArthur High School, Houston, TX (2008)
    • Signal Hill Elementary, Long Beach, CA (2008)
    • Southside Museums Elementary, Miami, FL (2008)
    • Harriet Tubman Blue Ribbon School, Newark, NJ (2008)
    • Tucker Elementary, Long Beach, CA (2008)
  • 8. Profiles of Two Schools State: District: Grade Span Enrollment: % Low-Income % Latino % Black % White % Asian % Eng. Learners % 8 th Prof. Reading % 8 th Prof. Math NCUST Winner FL Broward 6-8 1,010 73% 7% 87% 3% 1% 3% 60% 79% Neighboring School FL Broward 6-8 891 77% 9% 83% 3% 2% 6% 41% 50%
  • 9. Profiles of Two Schools State: District: Grade Span Enrollment: % Low-Income % Latino % Black % White % Asian % Eng. Learners % 6 th Prof. Reading % 6 th Prof. Math NCUST Winner NY Rochester City PK-6 334 93% 4% 94% 2% 0% 1% 78% 100% Neighboring School NY Rochester City PK-6 381 96% 8% 87% 4% 0% 2% 46% 58%
  • 10. What have we learned about these top-performing urban schools?
  • 11. Characteristic #1: Top-performing urban schools have climates that nurture the commitment and engagement of teachers, parents, and students.
  • 12. The Climate of Top- Performing Urban Schools
    • Students are eager to attend school. They believe they are likely to succeed academically. They perceive that adults in the school care sincerely about their success.
    • Teachers believe they are part of a team that is making a powerful difference in the lives of students. They believe that administrators care sincerely about their success.
    • Parents believe that educators have their children’s best interests at heart. They feel welcome at school and they believe that educators appreciate whatever small or large contributions they make to their child’s education.
  • 13. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate?
    • Leaders make everyone feel valued, respected, and appreciated.
    • Students, parents, teachers, and support staff know they are valued. Leaders collect information that helps them know how to improve relational issues. They identify and resolve issues promptly and professionally. They evidence great integrity and sincerity.
  • 14. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate? 2. Leaders value improvement and growth. People feel like they can take risks and try to improve because they know their efforts will be appreciated and supported. Leaders ensure that professional development is not “an event,” it is a culture that pervades the school. People are constantly learning to improve their craft.
  • 15. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate?
    • 3. Leaders keep conversations constructive.
    • Leaders refuse to be passive when others choose to be negative. Respectfully, but clearly, administrators and teacher leaders speak out when others claim that goals are unattainable. Leaders use research and data to focus on opportunities to improve, not on reasons to blame.
  • 16. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate?
    • 4. Leaders keep attention focused on the impact of everyday efforts on students. Communication frequently, consistently, and in multiple formats conveys the impact of everyday school actions on student lives.
  • 17. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate?
    • 5. Leaders promote ambitious goals that generate enthusiasm and build a sense of mission.
    • Leaders push beyond compliance and encourage everyone to embrace goals that will make a difference in students lives. People commit to goals they see as worth their effort.
  • 18. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate? 6. Leaders build hope. Leaders give students, parents, teachers, and support staff reasons to believe that their efforts are worthwhile. College and careers are constant topics of focus. Policies are designed/implemented to nurture, sustain, and rekindle hope.
  • 19. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate? 7. Leaders celebrate progress frequently. Frequently, leaders celebrate improvements (both formally and informally). They find elements of success worth celebrating in results others see as failure. They are skillful at acknowledging everyone who contributed to successes.
  • 20. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain A Great Climate? 8. Leaders build leaders. Leaders create platforms for the leadership of many others who want to influence school improvement. Leaders distribute leadership opportunities in ways that build the capacity of individuals to contribute to the school’s success.
  • 21. Characteristic #2: Top-performing urban schools have challenging, meaningful, focused curricula
  • 22. The Curriculum in Top- Performing Urban Schools
    • Instructional objectives are focused toward high levels of mastery. Students are expected to be able to apply, discuss, debate, analyze, and explain the concepts and skills they are asked to learn. Learning is deep and meaningful.
    • Teachers are more focused upon generating mastery than they are focused upon complying with a pacing chart or a teacher’s manual. Often they cover fewer objectives; however, students are much more likely to master the objectives taught.
    • Students receive a rich, balanced curriculum. Art, music, physical education, and other “non-tested” subjects make learning more interesting and enjoyable.
  • 23. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Strong Curricula? 1. Leaders help educators focus on key academic content. Leaders encourage teachers to teach a few concepts to mastery rather than “cover” everything. Leaders encourage educators to increase rigor and depth. They engage teachers in using assessment data to identify critical content.
  • 24. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Strong Curricula? 2. Leaders structure opportunities for teachers to learn content to greater levels of depth. Leaders create opportunities for teachers to work with each other to learn more about critical content. These opportunities are not structured to promote blame or shame. Instead, these opportunities provide a collegial way to build upon strengths and deepen levels of content understanding.
  • 25. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Strong Curricula? 3. Leaders engage teachers in designing and implementing assessments that provide concrete, common understandings of the levels of mastery students should attain. Common assessments drive attention to deeper levels of understanding. By engaging in assessment design, teachers gain perspective on the levels of understanding students must acquire.
  • 26. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Strong Curricula?
    • 4. Leaders measure and communicate progress toward goals regularly.
    • Goals become real as baseline measures and regular measurements of progress are collected, posted, discussed, disaggregated, acted upon, and celebrated promptly and regularly. Leaders make data accessible and actionable.
  • 27. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Strong Curricula?
    • 5. Educators help parents and students know which key learning objectives students need to master.
    • Parents and students feel empowered when educators regularly share information about the key learning objectives to be taught and strategies they can use to enhance learning.
  • 28. Characteristic #3: In top-performing urban schools, instruction is focused upon generating student mastery
  • 29. Instruction in Top-Performing Urban Schools
    • In most urban schools, one can find at least one classroom where excellent teaching occurs regularly. In the highest performing schools, excellent, effective instruction occurs in almost all classrooms.
  • 30. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Instructional Effectiveness ? 1. Leaders pay close attention to instructional quality. Leaders visit classrooms frequently to gauge student learning. They constantly seek evidence that students are learning what their teachers are teaching. Regularly, leaders share this evidence in ways that build the capacity of teachers from day to day, creating a culture of professional growth.
  • 31. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Instructional Effectiveness ?
    • 2. Leaders help educators support each other in learning how to teach students more effectively and efficiently.
    • Leaders provide time and support in a manner that helps educators learn that one of their primary roles is to support the ongoing learning of their colleagues.
  • 32. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Instructional Effectiveness ? 3. Leaders help everyone remember that learning should be interesting and exciting. Leaders help educators teach in ways that students like to learn. They encourage teachers to build upon students interests, backgrounds, cultures, and prior knowledge. They help educators consider how they can make learning enjoyable.
  • 33. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Instructional Effectiveness ? 4. Improvement is rewarded. Lack of improvement is not. Lack of effort is not tolerated. Leaders communicate their passion to transform relationships, teaching, and learning through their actions. They reward improvement efforts and they make clear that a lack of effort is unacceptable.
  • 34. How Do Top Schools Build and Sustain Instructional Effectiveness ? 5. Teachers and principals share a common understanding of effective instruction. Teachers and leaders regularly make time to see and discuss effective instruction. Teachers regularly identify elements of effective instruction in their own teaching and in the teaching of others. Regular, detailed conversation nurtures a common vision of effective instruction.
  • 35. Equity and Excellence Are Attainable!
    • You can help make any school a high-performing school for all students.
    • It is not easy! Often, changes take two to four years before they bear substantial results. Nonetheless, mortals prove that it can be done.
    • The well being of our society depends upon our ability to create many more high-performing schools. Our students deserve nothing less.