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Assessing the Impact of Hate:
Findings from a Large-Scale Hate
Crime Victimisation Survey
Jon Garland
Department of Sociol...
Outline
• Framing the Research
• Aims and Objectives
• Methodology
• Some Tentative Findings
The Leicester Hate Crime Project
Framing the Research
• Moving beyond the five recognised hate crime
victim groups
• Heari...
The Leicester Hate Crime Project
• Received £370k of ESRC funding
• Two-year project based in Leicester
• Very small resea...
The Leicester Hate Crime Project
Aims of the Project
• To establish the nature and impact of victimisation directed
at peo...
The Leicester Hate Crime Project
Methodology
• Large-scale quantitative survey of victims of targeted
violence from all se...
‘It’s just part and parcel of
my everyday life’
• Experiences of hate crime often normalised to the extent
where they beco...
‘They don’t belong here’
• Not uncommon for members of minority groups to express
hate, prejudice and bigotry towards othe...
‘Why doesn’t our pain count
as much as theirs?’
• Some of the most harrowing experiences of hate have been
suffered by vic...
‘There’s nowhere I feel safe’
• Hate acts committed in a variety of different settings
• At home or nearby
• Public transp...
‘How I dress and what I look like
makes all the difference’
• Findings so far suggest that dress and appearance play a key...
‘Not knowing what they look like makes
things so much worse’
• Online abuse commonplace for younger victims
• Experienced ...
Next Steps
• Continue data analysis
• Produce a number of outputs
• Conference 5 September
Email: uolhatecrime@le.ac.uk
Tel: 0116 252 3784 Mobile: 07795 826 061
Website: www.le.ac.uk/leicesterhatecrimeproject
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Assessing the Impact of Hate: Findings from a Large-Scale Hate Crime Victimisation Survey by John Garland

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Assessing the Impact of Hate: Findings from a Large-Scale Hate Crime Victimisation Survey by John Garland - a presentation from the BSA Teaching Group Regional Conference at the University of Surrey on 31 May 2014.

Published in: Education, Spiritual, Technology
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Transcript of "Assessing the Impact of Hate: Findings from a Large-Scale Hate Crime Victimisation Survey by John Garland"

  1. 1. Assessing the Impact of Hate: Findings from a Large-Scale Hate Crime Victimisation Survey Jon Garland Department of Sociology, University of Surrey @Jon_Garland67
  2. 2. Outline • Framing the Research • Aims and Objectives • Methodology • Some Tentative Findings
  3. 3. The Leicester Hate Crime Project Framing the Research • Moving beyond the five recognised hate crime victim groups • Hearing the voices of those at the margins • Understanding victim needs
  4. 4. The Leicester Hate Crime Project • Received £370k of ESRC funding • Two-year project based in Leicester • Very small research team • Involvement of outside agency
  5. 5. The Leicester Hate Crime Project Aims of the Project • To establish the nature and impact of victimisation directed at people because of their identity, perceived vulnerability or ‘difference’ • To identify commonalities, differences and intersections within the experiences of victims of hate crime • To assess hate crime victims’ expectations & experiences of agency responses • To inform the quality of service provision offered to victims of hate crime
  6. 6. The Leicester Hate Crime Project Methodology • Large-scale quantitative survey of victims of targeted violence from all sections of Leicester’s diverse population (online and hard copy) • Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with victims of targeted violence
  7. 7. ‘It’s just part and parcel of my everyday life’ • Experiences of hate crime often normalised to the extent where they become a routine part of people’s lives • ‘Low-level’ harassment not regarded as especially harrowing to some victims • Asylum seekers and refugees
  8. 8. ‘They don’t belong here’ • Not uncommon for members of minority groups to express hate, prejudice and bigotry towards other minority groups • Resentment towards new or emerging communities ‘legitimised’ by some of the more established minority groups • Historical and cultural tensions also evident
  9. 9. ‘Why doesn’t our pain count as much as theirs?’ • Some of the most harrowing experiences of hate have been suffered by victims on the margins of policy and conceptual frameworks • Homeless people • People with mental health issues • The ‘others’
  10. 10. ‘There’s nowhere I feel safe’ • Hate acts committed in a variety of different settings • At home or nearby • Public transport • Public spaces • City centre • At or near places of worship • In cars • On the internet • Via text messages
  11. 11. ‘How I dress and what I look like makes all the difference’ • Findings so far suggest that dress and appearance play a key role in victim selection • 34% of our initial sample of respondents were concerned that their dress or appearance might make them a victim of hate crime • 28% believed that they were targeted specifically because of their dress or appearance
  12. 12. ‘Not knowing what they look like makes things so much worse’ • Online abuse commonplace for younger victims • Experienced through social networking sites, apps and abusive texts • Described by many as being more damaging than physical attacks
  13. 13. Next Steps • Continue data analysis • Produce a number of outputs • Conference 5 September
  14. 14. Email: uolhatecrime@le.ac.uk Tel: 0116 252 3784 Mobile: 07795 826 061 Website: www.le.ac.uk/leicesterhatecrimeproject
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