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Point of Sale Advertising for Call of Duty: Black Ops II
 

Point of Sale Advertising for Call of Duty: Black Ops II

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Expanding on associated content of marketing plan for Activision's Call of Duty: Black Ops II

Expanding on associated content of marketing plan for Activision's Call of Duty: Black Ops II

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  • Author Note for viewer: Presentation uses a special font in headings. If the font is not supported on your device the font may appear normal on your end. You can view the headings as they were intended by downloading the font, at your own risk from: http://www.azfonts.net/load_font/1196841634_stencil.html __________________________________________________________________More on Point-Of-Sale Advertising Welcome, and thank you for joining us today.Reaching our consumer—or influencing the purchase of the limited edition Call of Duty: Black Ops II in our target consumer—relies on clear understanding of, and effective representation of the company’s goals to the right audience through the right means and positioning strategies (Vollmer, 2008). To maximize the success of accomplishing our goal of generating a 10% increase in sales to the new female gamer between the ages of 16 and 34, our marketing plan consists of a single message, spread with the use of a variety of tactics, employed across a multitude of medias to increase the frequency—or, number of times our target market is met with our message: bring out your inner soldier (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007). During our previous presentation, we briefly discussed the power of positioning strategies. Strategic positioning includes understanding the image of the company as it is perceived by the audience, and many other elements. However, should also consider generating the most frequency in visibility of the product in stores (Grewal & Levy, 2012). Women matching our consumer profile are more often making purchases at places like Wal-Mart, Target, Toys R Us, and Best(Survey, 2012). As that tends to be the case, our positioning of the limited edition Call of Duty for ladies should be concentrated in those locations according to strategic placement techniques (Grewal & Levy, 2012).
  • Point-Of-Sales Systems Among the marketing material we have already connected to this particular campaign, a point-of-purchase display stand has been incorporated to add further visibility throughout store locations. If you are unfamiliar—POS, or point-of-sale advertising is a form of direct marketing, that has been integrated into our strategies for Call of Duty:Black Ops II (Task Detail, 2012). As another means of keeping the game visible to our consumer in-store, POP (point of purchase) displays are fully customizable (generally) cardboard stands that can be set up with our product (Gallery, n.d.). This means the store saves shelf-space while increasing supply and positioning the Limited Edition Call of Duty: Black Ops II in the immediate path of our consumer. The POP display is another channel or method of packaging being used to capture our intended audience through messaging (Piermatteo, 2012). Therefore, with consistent messaging, this tactic of delivery serves many benefits to accomplishing our goals (Grewal & Levy, 2012). A POP display is not only a great method of collecting our target consumer, but works as a reminder to loyal, existing consumers. Overall, it adds appeal to the product in the store environment to enhance the consumers inclination to pursue their planned pursuit of purchase, be influenced to impulse buy, or simply to improve the experience in the store (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007). Some of the other benefits you are going to see this strategy effectively deliver includes: Informing the audience of zombie mode, the Nuketown 2025 bonus map purchase incentive, and females in the game Appealing to the zombie trend popular among our intended age groups Appeals to our specific target audience, without ignoring existing consumers, by reminding them of Nuketown and zombie mode Incorporating an anti-society-instituted impression of women as in-the-kitchen-housewives that calls to the female gaming audience.Additionally, as Activision engages in its mission of becoming the most-well-respected game manufacturer, this piece provides a stance for Activision on the female gaming front (Company Background, n.d.). As a leader, taking the challenge head-on in a positive manner only increases the momentum of Activision’s drive in achieving their goal, and creates a doorway to the future that enhances the relationship between Activision, their products, and the consumers who use them.
  • Placement: Brick and Mortar That relationship begins with the right placement, based on many factors about our target audience as well as significant surveying of the market (Grewal & Levy, 2012). Additionally, using the versatility of a POP display to strategically place the limited edition game in the path of our particular female gaming consumer, we can focus on the brick-and-mortar locations that will serve our purposes (Using Design Elements to Communicate, n.d.). In America, we are strongly tied to Wal-Mart. The company accounts for 25-30% of video game sales by casual gamers (Caoili, 2012). Our goal is to reach a casual gaming audience of females between the ages of 16 and 34; and guess where 88% of them prefer to shop… Our survey indicates—Wal-Mart (Survey 2012). In generating greater frequency and reach opportunities in this group, it is plainly obvious that a strategic placement of multiple POP displays throughout companies like Wal-Mart will serve our purpose. Measurability And I know you are about to ask—”but how do we know if this is working?” These POP displays will not be the only opportunity for this limited edition Call of Duty within a store, and therefore we could not just assume that all purchases of the game from that store were from the display. However, each display is a kit equipped with the exact number of video games—all of which have special inserts. Let’s be honest, everyone will technically “see” our display. Not everyone is going to make a purchase. Those who make the purchase are the ones we want to know about. The material inside the game package will provide the incentive for these consumers to indicate the information we are looking for to add metrics and measurability to this strategy (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007).
  • The Limited Edition POP Display Now I’d like to get into the real meat and potatoes of our plan for the POP display. Coinciding its design with a magazine advertisement we have lined up in the campaign, the POP display can be found in the video game and electronics department of the relative provider (Integrated Marketing Strategies, n.d.). The display will include a stand-up cardboard structure—similar to what you saw in the earlier slide. On the top board, we feature the Black Ops II zombies in the window of the housewife. However, this housewife is hardly susceptible to attack with her machine gun in hand, and her inner soldier about to be released. Along the sides of the board, we see this housewife’s “to-do” list in similar fashion. On it, we see she’s already checked off “pick up dry cleaning” and “Cook dinner” and all that is left is “kill some zombies” (Marketing Inspiration in Product and Package Design, n.d.). The retro-vintage image is detailed with colors that are vibrant, bright, and eye catching, as they depict a familiar scene of historical Call of Duty Series—Nuketown (Colors, n.d.). The picture reminds existing consumers that Call of Duty has always impressed us with the combat zone known as Nuketown—a 50s-style nuke testing facility—and this edition is no different. In fact, a high expectation is relayed from consumers on just how the new Nuketown will impress. Coupled with the incentive to receive a free upgradeable Nuketown map, this display works with many other connected media channels (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007).
  • Building brand equity and consumer relationships In addition to being able to sell more of the Call of Duty product without increasing costs, retailers employing this POS strategy aid in building brand equity—or an association among consumers—for Call of Duty, and image for Activision (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007). This brand building opportunity captures not only one of Call of Duty’s markets, but all of them. By deploying the familiarity of the Nuketown setting and zombies, we play on the emotional level of many existing Call of Duty gamers, as they recall one of the favorite Call of Duty locations throughout the series (Activision, 2012). However, specific to our audience, we demonstrate what women are typically perceived to be while giving them an edge. It delivers the message that as a leading gaming manufacturer, Activision supports the inclusion of women in a supportive and completely respectable manner. This is the type of message a company’s values and equity are built upon (Grewal & Levy, 2012). Coupled with strategic charitable partnerships and incentives for purchase, not only do we increase new-buyer interest, but repeat-buyer likelihood. As the this limited edition becomes available, it will immediately be associated with the hit or miss test that Activision launched to address the female gamer community (Vollmer, 2008). We strengthen the success of this tactic, though, with other continuity plans that manage the consumer relationship include: Introduction of an all female competitive gaming team Purchase rewards program Design of a line of clothing and accessory merchandise for the Call of Duty Girl Providing access to an interactive online community of female gamers through blogs, forums, email lists, and social networking sites (Sirgy & Rahtz, 2007)
  • Sketching the POP DisplayFirst, let’s take a look at our intended display. The display will include a stand-up cardboard structure—similar to what is displayed above. To really make it stand out, our display will be on yellow cardboard (Colors, n.d.). On the top board, we feature the Black Ops II zombies in the window of the housewife (click to slide 4 for image) . However, this housewife is hardly susceptible to attack with her rifle in hand, and her inner soldier about to be let loose. To make this image come to like—almost as if straight from a comic book, we use the cutout effect you see to outline the focal points of the image (Marketing Inspiration in Product and Package Design, n.d.). As you can see, the display has tiered shelves for holding 150 Limited Edition Call of Duty games. We can use this space to include tiers for each gaming console, or specify certain displays for a particular console. On the face of the shelves and the backboard of the shelf, we can see familiar Call of Duty: Black Ops II symbols, similar to those you see used in the presentations we have shown you, maybe the Nuketown hazard sign, or caution tape (Using Design Elements to Communicate, n.d.). Along the sides of the board, we see this housewife’s “to-do” list in similar fashion. On it, we see she’s already checked off “pick up dry cleaning” and “Cook dinner” and all that is left is “kill some zombies.” The goal is to effectively utilize all marking surfaces of the display to ensure visibility from all angle. This includes the backside which can be positioned to be seen or not-seen. However, increasing frequency to improve reach means, positioning this display in-stores is just as crucial as positioning of the game itself on the market. Therefore, it makes absolute sense to utilize the backside. We can reduce cost by re-using the full-size image of the zombie and housewife, or we can use any of the approved images on this particular tactic (Marketing Inspiration in Product and Package Design, n.d.).
  • Maintenance of Image Now, when you hear me say “approved” I want to remind you that our display will be appearing in-stores where controlling exactly who is exposed to our image is a little more complicated. Due to the content of the images, our location options rely on other Call of Duty merchandise to drive consumers towards the video game display (Grewal & Levy, 2012). Keeping in mind the audience who will view our stands, I’d like remind everyone of Activision’s mission—to be one of the largest, most profitable and well-respected interactive entertainment software companies of the world. Achieving this mission means being a leader in the industry (Activision, n.d.). It starts with embracing the growing female gamer population, and giving them a place to call home and a brand to be loyal to. By not only giving them the environment, but making them part of an elite group is a challenge being considered by many companies in addition to Activision. By being the first to accomplish this, Activision generates its industry-leading quality that will lead to successful accomplishment of the overall goal for the company. Next, I’d like to remind you of our goal—to surpass projected sales by 10% by capturing the growing female-gaming audience between the ages of 16 and 34 (Armstrong & Kotler, 2006). Why are all of these ideas being brought up here and now? Because they all heavily affect the images of Activision and the Call of Duty: Black Ops II entire game, and they are all going to be immensely effected by this POP display. Our audience is females—it includes mothers, daughters, sisters—girls. Not every mother walking through Wal-Mart wants their daughter or other kids to be exposed to zombies and women with guns. Not all people are in favor of guns or zombies in general. When we place these stands in the way of all consumers, we must consider potential backlash the images on our display may have on the overall image and perception of Activision and Call of Duty: Black Ops II Limited Edition. While strategic placement will aid us in maintaining a reputable image among consumers, we look to this display for its own contribution. Let’s be honest, Activision and its Call of Duty series has a reputation to live up to—hi-quality graphics, decent story lines, and highly interactive game play in a first person shooter. This particular point-of-purchase display does a great job of affirming that expectation among consumers. When coupled with the packaging strategies for the game itself (which you may recall informed consumers of partnerships, bonuses, and other incentives), this display works to convey a message and deliver on the perception of the company.
  • Conclusion Like changing a first impression, changing perceptions can be difficult and costly. However, it can also be easily and unintended to accomplish. Fortunately, Activision and Call of Duty are not thwarted by negative perceptions. Instead, they are looked to for leadership and action—especially among our target audience. For the purposes of being attractive to an audience of females between the ages of 16 and 34, we see a packaging strategy that calls directly to them, while also embracing existing consumers, through consistent media messaging (Developing Marketing Strategy and Mix, n.d.). Conveying our message—bring out the soldier—through the use of images on our point-of-purchase display, we can place our product right in the path of our audience. As Activision works towards accomplishing its mission—to be one of the largest, most profitable and well-respected interactive entertainment software companies of the world; achievementmeans being a leader in the industry (Activision, n.d.). It starts with embracing the growing female gamer population, and giving them a place to call home and a brand to be loyal to. By not only giving them the environment, but making them part of an elite group is a challenge being considered by many companies in addition to Activision. By being the first to accomplish this, Activision generates its industry-leading quality that will lead to successful accomplishment of the overall goal for the company. Next, I’d like to remind you of our goal—to surpass projected sales by 10% by capturing the growing female-gaming audience between the ages of 16 and 34 (Armstrong & Kotler, 2006). We firmly believe that our course of action—placing POP display units in strategic Wal-Mart locations—has the ability as well as the sustainability to be a tool that achieves these goals. Through research to identify the target audience and determine their desire from video games, we have developed a message and multi-faceted approach to delivering that message. By connecting tactics that include branding a lifestyle, being part of a supportive community, and overall consistency; we will not only be visible to our intended market, but we will be the further push that drives Activision closer to accomplishing its vision (Using Design Elements to Communicate, n.d.). In the meantime, I want to thank each of you for hearing our presentation today, and will be happy to answer any additional questions you may have regarding the use of packaging to accomplish our goals.

Point of Sale Advertising for Call of Duty: Black Ops II Point of Sale Advertising for Call of Duty: Black Ops II Presentation Transcript

  • More on Point-of-Sale Advertising Sabrina Mergenthaler Colorado Technical University
  • Point-of-Sale Systems•What is a Point-of-Sales promotion? •What are the benefits of using a POP display? •How are we connecting target audience and existing audience to increase the overall production of the POP display while saving resources and matching product/company goals?
  • Placement: Brick and MortarPlacement of POP Display Measurability -In the path of our consumer -significance of purchase information -Wal-Mart video game sales 25-30% -package insert incentives -Meets 88% of target audience
  • The Limited Edition POP Display• Detailing the POP display -Colors-Themes-Messages•Building brand equity and consumerrelationships•The Limited Edition Call of Duty: BlackOps II POP display system•Maintaining Image of Product andCompany
  • Building brand equity and consumer relationships •Capturing all audiences • Message delivery•Sets Activision apart a leader in industry and supporter of women • Responds to female gamer demands •Partnerships •Purchase Incentive • Consumer Relationship Management •Supportive Merchandise •Rewards Programs •Community
  • Sketching the POP Display •Yellow POP Stand with eye catching and familiar CoD Symbols • Housewife and zombie image • Cut-out effect • Tiered holding units • 150 units per display • Can hold row for each gaming console or the same • CoD Imaging on display lips •Display side walls with to-do list “kill zombies” is not yet checked off • Game rating symbols
  • Maintenance of Image•What are approved images • Location of Displays • Uncontrolled exposure • Conveyance of Company and Product Image and Perceptions through packaging strategies such as external promotional stickers and inserted incentives•Hi-quality graphics • Story lines • Highly interactive First- person shooter game
  • Conclusion Activision’s Mission Embrace Female Gamers Consistent messaging Integrated media strategies Marketing Goals Integrated Media Q & A Session
  • ReferencesActivision. (n.d.). Activision. Retrieved from http://www.Activision.comAlsem, K., & Wittink, D. (2013). Strategic Marketing: An Applied Approach. Pearson Custom Publishing.Armstrong, G., & Kotler, P. (2006). Principles of Marketing ( (11th edition) ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Color Symbolism and Emotional Effects of Color. (n.d.). M.U.S.E., Colorado Technical University. Retrieved from http://coursebuildercontent.careeredonline.com/Assets/30000/25544.pdfGallery. (n.d.). Point Display & Design. Retrieved from http://www.pointdisplay.com/services.htmlKunin, M. (2012). Why Girls Should Create Video Games. Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/madeleine-m-kunin/why-girls-should- create-v_b_1501601.html
  • ReferencesPiermatteo, L. (2012). Live Chat . Integrated Marketing Strategy Capstone. Colorado Technical University.Sirgy, M. & Rahtz, D. (2007). Strategic Marketing Communications: A Systems Approach to IMC. Mason, OH: Thompson.Using Design Elements to Communicate. (n.d.). M.U.S.E, Colorado Technical University. Retrieved from http://coursebuildercontent.careeredonline.com/Assets/30000/25928.pdfVollmer, C. (2008). Always on : Advertising, Marketing and Media in an Era of Consumer Control. New York, New York: McGraw-Hill.