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A module dealing

A module dealing

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  • 1. WORK THE PRESENTATION ‘MAGIC’How to tell your without losing your audience at slide 2…
  • 2. IntroductionWhat are the different types of presentations that you have seen?
  • 3. Discussion room What have you found difficult while preparing a presentation What do you find most distracting/deterring in a presentation What are the biggest blocks Which are the most pleasing points in a presentation (besides the ‘thank you’ slide) When have you noticed presentations going well The most noticeable positives in a presentation
  • 4. Care for a laugh?
  • 5. You can crack it if… You plan and work out the content accurately You are able to sequence the slides logically You are able to deliver the presentation with confidence You are able to field all discussions and queries with all necessary back up data
  • 6. WORK THE PRESENTATION ‘MAGIC’Part 1 – Planning your presentation
  • 7. Starting blocks How do you decide what goes into your presentation?  Pay attention to any guiding instructions that have come from your supervisor or the group requesting the presentation  List down the requirements that the presentation must meet  List the reports and data that you would need to source from  Use a personal template only if a specific template has not been provided
  • 8. Composing your slides NEVER copy & paste slides from different sources. Be conservative about what goes into your deck Pick an easy to read font face, and keep the font size consistent for headers and text on all slides Leave room for highlights, such as images or take home messages Do use ‘AHA’ boxes to highlight specific points that are critical to business goals
  • 9. KISS Keep It Straight and Simple  Key points only.  No long sentences and certainly NO paragraphs  Use tables and graphics wherever logical
  • 10. Point to note! Remember that your slides are only there to support, not to replace your talk! You’ll want to tell a story, describe your data or explain circumstances, and only provide key-points through your slides.
  • 11. WORK THE PRESENTATION ‘MAGIC’Part 2 – The criticality of preparing your content
  • 12. Let there be laughter…
  • 13. Preparing your slides (1) Prepare an Agenda or Table of Contents slide.  Ensure that your audience knows exactly what your presentation will cover, so that, if there is a paucity of time, there could be a choice of what may be left out The same slide can be placed as the summary at the end of the presentation  You can add action items to the slide as a closure to your discussion  This makes it easier for a later reminder to those who have endorsed and given a sign-off for the actions Ensure a crisp header for every slide  Your header should be concise and direct – ideally not more than 3 words
  • 14. Preparing your slides (2) Let the picture or graphics tell the story - minimize the use of text.  This is especially important for reviews and governance decks  Nobody has the time to read too much blurb, and everybody has to be given their slot  1 table with all relevant, well marked facts is the equivalent of 5 pages of text Don’t overload your slides with too much text or data.  On the flip side, ensure that you are chunking the data into logical segments Go over the presentation several times, cut and pare until you come down to the bare essentials  You are not done until you have at least come to version 1.3
  • 15. Preparing your slides (3) Numbers are sometimes confusing.  Ensure that all your graphs and charts are well constructed and not crowded  Never more than 2 – 4 different numbers on one slide  Never more than 3 charts on one slide  Do use up arrows, down arrows, and indicative colors to convey positive or negative movement Check and double check any numbers and statistics that you are placing, if possible, get them endorsed by the concerned functions / departments Never put up spread sheets on your slide, place a summary and keep the spread sheet as back up (to be shown if required)
  • 16. Preparing your slides (4) Statistics must be handled with care, and are better represented using charts and graphs  Charts and tables should be clearly labeled  Use percentages or absolute numbers as per instruction, do not mix or alternate the two  Show trends on a separate slide  Always use legends and ensure your numbers are clearly visible by use of font and correct color  Segment your information as much as possible – the 4Q is a good method
  • 17. Preparing your slides (5) Use the same scale for numbers on a slide. Don’t compare thousands to millions or show percentages in one instance and numbers in another When using data representing different locations/segments, stick to a single location in the presentation It is wise to cite your source of your data on the same slide as the statistic, using a smaller size font. It is wise to keep any back up data on excel or spreadsheets ready to hand but hidden
  • 18. Preparing your slides (6) Text should be placed in bullet points only Think statements rather than explanations Clear and easily readable fonts are advised Expansions and explanations are what you should practice and be able to produce extempore
  • 19. Point to note! Remember that your presentation is only as good as the data it carries! If your data is not checked or if it is challenged for accuracy, then you have lost credibility.
  • 20. WORK THE PRESENTATION ‘MAGIC’Part 3 – How do you structure your presentation
  • 21. Slide progressionSlide 1 Main highlights and lowlights Not more than three Specific to the period of review points in each Numbers to be mentioned if They should business any criticalSlide 2 ‘SWOT’ 4 Quadrant covering The points should be key business parameters of bulleted and very brief function ‘Threats’ should be (SWOT – Strengths/Weakness/ covered in detail later in Opportunities/Threats) the presentationSlides 3 - 6 Statistics related to: Numbers related, and Revenue, Profitability, Budget, should be conveyed Manpower & productivity, through charts and Service levels, Audit trails graphs
  • 22. Slides 7 - 10 Specifics and analysis on non You must ensure that all achievement in business related analysis is data driven metrics There should hard fact Lowlights in slide 1 and reasons and not excuses weaknesses of “SWOT” slide No finger pointing, the should be addressed here facts should be the pointerSlides 11 - 12 Actions underway to address low Action plan should have performance areas the following: Problem statement Action plan in accepted format Action proposed for problem areas not covered Target dates Performance target earlier Responsibility DependenciesNote for slides There should be a clear recap of11 - 12 any earlier action plans. Open actions should be added to the newest version along with status
  • 23. Slide 13 Challenges An ‘Exception report’ is Support required related to advised interdepartmental delays that have caused failures on critical deliverablesSlide 14 Forward plan for the period until Supply chain the next review dependencies should be mentioned Any inhibitors (such as staff shortage) must be mentionedSlide 15 Brief updates and status of projects underway (BB/GB/Kaizen) Any special mentions of team achievements
  • 24. Points to note!1. Presentations to a group larger than 5 members necessarily makes it cross functional, the perspective of the presentation should automatically become ‘big-picture’ rather than function biased2. This is not a forum for finger pointing or dramatic exposes3. It is an opportunity to present hard facts and position the status of the business in a factual and realistic manner4. Anything you present must be confirmed by data, preferably from regular and widely circulated dashboards and reports5. Give bad news upfront, there is no point in prevaricating – Man up and own up!!6. Make it a point to run any action plans by your one-downs as well as your one-ups, nobody likes surprises
  • 25. Exercise Please read the following case studies, you will need to glean enough information to tell the story in 5 slides.
  • 26. WORK THE PRESENTATION ‘MAGIC’Part 4 – Delivering your presentation (The proof of thepudding …etc)
  • 27. The practice run A key to seizing the moment is to be prepared This would mean conducting an exhaustive analysis and review of the topic Carefully building slides that clearly and succinctly convey your message Creating back-up slides with supporting data Rehearsing your slides several times and seeking peer feedback prior to presenting
  • 28. The practice run Talk through your presentation to see how much time you use for each slide. Use the automatic slide transition to the amount of time you want to spend discussing each slide, only if you are sure that timing will be strictly followed Are you using the right amount of time per slide? Decide which slides you would necessarily need to spend more Go over the slides which are critical to your team’s performance with greater detail, and ensure that you are conversant with all numbers
  • 29. Internalizing the contents Make a list of key words/numbers for each slide Read through the list before you begin Dont attempt to memorize your text, this is not a play with a static script Your words will probably be different each time you practice Think about the ideas, and your words will follow naturally Practice with a closed audience if that is at all possible
  • 30. Preparation Someone has to check that all the equipment is in order – it may as well be you Do prepare hand-outs of any slides or any additional data/reports that you hope to take to discussion Dress appropriately for your audience Turn off your cell phone, or put it on ‘meeting’ mode and place it in the charge of a trusted deputy if you are expecting any important calls
  • 31. The opening Jump right in and get to the point, as long as the group is ready Give your rehearsed opening statement; dont improvise at the last moment Use the opening to catch the interest and attention of the audience Stick to your slides and what they contain, do not ad-lib Briefly state the problem or topic you will be discussing and summarize your main theme to place it in context, so that all members of the group are on the same page Use time effectively, and do not go over your allotted time
  • 32. Speaking style Talk at a natural, moderate rate of speech and project your voice Speak clearly and distinctly and always repeat critical information Pause briefly between slides Don’t read the slides aloud. Your audience can read too and faster than you can talk. Be polite, always. There will always be interruptions, but welcome these rather than reject them
  • 33. What your body says… Keep your eyes on the audience, speak directly to anyone who speaks to you Use natural gestures and keep your focus on getting your slide points across Avoid looking at your notes. Only use them as reference points to keep you on track. Talk, don’t read. Smile whenever you can Don’t turn your back to the audience. Don’t hide behind the lectern. Don’t cross your arms, it is a closed posture Don’t keep your hands in your pockets, it denotes nervousness or a lack of confidence
  • 34. Attitude, energy & demeanor Energy is the key, it makes your audience sharper too Show enthusiasm. Nobody wants to listen to a dull presentation. Explain points as you would to a friend you respect Involve your audience. Ask questions, make eye contact, and use humor. Be flexible, and jump to previous slides if a member of the group wants to see it again Don’t get distracted by audience noises or movements. You’ll forget a minor point or two, you will lose your train of thought. Everybody does. An extended discussion on a particular slide may mean you need to skip less important slides in order to get back on track in terms of covering all of your slides. In some cases, you may even forgo covering all of your slides because the discussion on a particular aspect of your presentation is going really well.
  • 35. Question time? Questions are good – so always hope for a few questions at the end of your presentation Don’t make the mistake of not being able to answer a senior manager’s question during your presentation. Executives want to be sure you understand the consequences and implications, and that they can trust your analysis and recommendations  This is where practice helps, especially if you have anticipated potential queries Always go to the slide which would illustrate the answer to your query, and do use your back up data slides if it will help give a convincing answer  This speaks greatly of your preparation If you can’t answer a question, say so. Don’t apologize. Just say “I don’t have that information. I’ll try to find out for you.”
  • 36. Point to note! “Senior people don’t have time to learn about your topic. They just want to know how they can help you.” Remove extraneous information that could take your discussion off track or cloud your main points. The more simple and forthright your presentation is, the easier it will be for your executive audience to understand how they can help you and move things forward.
  • 37. Example: ‘Pure Concept’ or ‘Idea’ slide
  • 38. The Operation Funnel: Operational Excellence results from addressing aspects ofthe business on an end-to-end basisDemand Management“Manage the Pipe”: Workforce Management• Hiring- right skill to match end customer “Manage the Cleaners”: experience .• Forecasting- Accurate and timely forecasting • Appropriately leverage staff to of volumes across various lines of business. Operations Management maximise assets and put right people at the right place at the right time “Fix the Pipe”: VOC • Training- Right content, appropriate training methodology and duration. VOC   Tools/IT Management • Ensure volumes are not dropped/leaked   “Enable the Cleaners”: improve closure rates, improve service quality. VOC  • Improve the efficiency and effectiveness • Provide the right tools Volume 1 and support to drive the of the operations. VOC right outcomes Volume 2 Customer Web IVR Processed Experience Volume “Clear the Pipe”: Volume 3 • Ensure customer expectations are appropriately set and Volume 4 met • Encourage & educate Close the “drip” customers to use channels like web /IVR etc. “Set the Pipes”: Business • Manage the operation end-to-end including  Management decisions on how many channels of service, which services to be offered via non branch deliver channels like phone, email, web, IVR, hours of operations.
  • 39. Example: ‘Concept’ or ‘Idea’ slide withtransaction specifics
  • 40. Star Certification 3 Phase program involving TLs, Managers and Sr. ManagementMeasurements and Tracking Sr. Metrics Improvement Mgmt PHASE III Participants’ presentation to Panel of Sr. Management. Mgrs Weekly PHASE II Implementation 8 Weeks implementation-Manager signoff Tracking Participants to commit on improving 2 metrics. Post -Test TLs PHASE I 40 hours (5 Days) Instructor Led Program Pre- Test
  • 41. Example: ‘Reporting’ or ‘Fact’ slide(making effective use of table & colors to denote differentlevels of performance)
  • 42. Performance Summary – Training Process Target Yields Target Effectiveness (CSAT – 30 days) Vijayawada 80% 91% 85% 87% Bangalore 80% Ongoing 85% 86% Hubli 80% 78% 85% 86% Yield Trend Indore 80% 78% 85% NA Kochi 80% 76% 85% 89% Attrition split Kolkata 80% 42% 85% 86% Bhubaneshwar 80% 90% 85% 80% Siliguri 80% 71% 85% 87% Trichy 80% 81% 85% 89% Vodafone 80% 72% 85% 86%Kolkata : ( 48% VOL and 39% INVOL certification failures)Yield for 1 KOL batch with 18 HC @17% : 47% abandon and 40% Certification failures & 1 BEN Batch dissolved ( 13 VOL attritions)Siliguri : 56% VOL and 44% INVOL ( Tollgate & Certification failures)Kerala: 1 Part timer batch dissolved with 10 attritions – 6 abandon and 4 tollgate failuresHubli: 2 batches one with 92% and another with 62%(8 attr – 5 abandons and 3 tollgate failures)Indore: 3 batches with 6 attritions : 63% VOL and 38% INVOL ( Certification failures)
  • 43. Example: Very comprehensive ‘4Q’ slide
  • 44. EQ Scores Tr e n d s Analysis FATAL count May fatals April fatals March fatals Security Check 7 6 0 EQ score from March to May Accurate Information 4 1 0 92.0 90.6 Tagging 9 7 8 92.0 90.0 88.4 Full and Completeness 86.7 86.7 of Information 43 23 0 88.0 85.0 86.0 85.0 86.0 82.9 Professional Behavior 3 0 0 84.0 Total count of FATALs 66 37 8 82.0 80.0 78.0 Action Plan Mar-11 Apr-11 May-11 Pre POP PGC S. TIME ISSUE IMPROVEMENT PLAN RESP NO LINES.N ISSUE ROOT CAUSE Quality / O no tagging data is Training No Ongoin 100% calls are not tagged due to 1 published and action / 1 No Tagging Tagging g taken as per ZTP Operatio delay tagging happening after 10pm n 1. Rushing through the calls. 1. Refreshers planned for 2. Right TAT not provided to reduction of the same. customers. Quality / Complete 2. one on one discussion. 2 3. Miss of total information pertaining Training Ongoin Complete 3. Trainers will provide information 2. / g to enquiry info TAT information in briefing Operatio 4. Charges not getting information for and debriefing. n VAS services. 4. TNI sharing on specific to outliers Lack of attentiveness on calls and 3 44 Security check Security Refresher planned for Training/ Ongoin process knowledge 3 Check outliers Quality g
  • 45. Example: Ineffective ‘Data’ slide(very cluttered and over informative)
  • 46. Pre Process Training Yield Process Batch Type Input Vol attr Invol attr BGC Fail Output MTD % MTD% w/o BGC AGL Non Impact 65 5 0 0 60 92.3% 92.3% Top3 Attrition Reasons - Bangalore BskyB - BB Non Impact 41 5 2 0 34 82.9% 82.9% PP Failure : 4.1% (15 / 367) BskyB - CS Non Impact 22 2 1 0 19 86.4% 86.4% Abandoned : 3.8% (14 / 367) BskyB - TS Non Impact 20 1 0 0 19 95.0% 95.0% Foxtel Non Impact 29 5 0 0 24 82.8% 82.8% Personal Issues : 2.2% (8 / 367) TTBB Non Impact 130 13 16 0 101 77.7% 77.7% TTBB-Bentley Non Impact 60 10 0 0 50 83.3% 83.3% Top3 Attrition Reasons - Mumbai Blr MTD 367 41 19 0 307 83.7% 83.7% Health Issues : 3.7% (16 / 427) Process Batch Type Input Vol attr Invol attr BGC Fail Output MTD % MTD% w/o BGC Personal Issues : 3.7% (16 / 427)British Telecom Non Impact 5 0 0 0 5 100.0% 100.0% PP Failure : 3.5% (15 / 427) LBG Go-Coll Impact 67 22 10 0 35 52.2% 52.2% LBG Go-ER Non Impact 11 0 0 0 11 100.0% 100.0% Blr Vol Attr Invol Attrn LBG Go- Ins Impact 11 3 2 1 6 54.5% 60.0% Apr 6.5% 15.4% I-Bank UK Non Impact 23 2 1 0 20 87.0% 87.0% May 10.7% 15.3% O2 Impact 23 3 3 0 17 73.9% 73.9% BSkyB CR Non Impact 8 0 0 0 8 100.0% 100.0% Jun 11.7% 14.1% BskyB - CS Non Impact 18 1 0 0 17 94.4% 94.4% Jul 7.5% 7.2% BSkyB RTM Non Impact 12 1 0 0 11 91.7% 91.7% Aug 10.4% 1.3% BskyB - TS Non Impact 25 0 0 0 25 100.0% 100.0% Sep 11.2% 5.2% TTBB Non Impact 82 9 5 0 68 82.9% 82.9% TTOT Non Impact 29 2 0 0 27 93.1% 93.1% Mum Vol Attr Invol Attrn TTVF Non Impact 30 5 3 0 22 73.3% 73.3% Apr 6.0% 4.3% Unirush Non Impact 11 2 2 1 7 63.6% 70.0% May 4.3% 11.8%Vodafone Email Impact 62 8 1 0 53 85.5% 85.5% Jun 7.8% 5.8% Vodafone WC Impact 10 1 0 0 9 90.0% 90.0% Jul 12.3% 6.0% Mum MTD 427 59 27 2 341 79.9% 80.2% Aug 15.1% 5.9% PP MTD 794 100 46 2 648 81.6% 81.8% Sep 13.3% 6.8%T&M BLR - (MTD): 81.8% (247 / 302), YTD: 79.7% (1188 / 1490)T&M MUM - (MTD): 86.2% (262 / 304), YTD: 86.2% (1198 / 1389)BFSI BLR - (MTD): 92.3% (60 / 65), YTD: 88.0% (278 / 316)BFSI MUM – (MTD): 64.2% (79 / 123), YTD: 73.2% (303 / 414)
  • 47. Forecasted, Offered and Answered 0.14 120% 0.12 100% Call volume in (Mns) 0.10 Variance in % 80% 0.08 60% 0.06 40% 0.04 0.02 20% 0.00 0% Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar-10 Apr-10 Forecasted 0.12 0.13 0.12 0.12 0.12 0.11 Off ered 0.12 0.12 0.13 0.12 0.12 0.10 Answ ered 0.12 0.12 0.13 0.12 0.12 0.10 Off ered VS Forecasted 97% 97% 109% 101% 101% 86% Answ ered VS Forecasted 96% 95% 106% 98% 99% 85% Answ ered VS Of fered 99% 98% 97% 98% 99% 99% PGC Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar-10 Apr-10 Vodafone SL 89.5% 90.59% 92.19% 90.58% 88.9% 90.36% Firstsource SL 89.5% 90.95% 92.19% 90.58% 90.4% 90.36% Postpaid SLs consistently well above targets
  • 48. Training Effectiveness - Dec NO OF CIRCLES PROCESS BATC Nos AVG BATCH On call CSAT INTERNAL TAGGING % ACHT ATT FCR HES SCORE scores AUDIT PEP & PEP-60% PEP-90% PEP-75% PEP-100% PEP-120 Target for PEP and POP POP POP-60% POP-92% POP-85% POP-100% POP-180 85% CHENNAI PEP 2 25 83% 68% 88% 69% 89% 179 163 97% PEP 8 148 87% 69% 88% 77% 91% 171 133 99% ROTN POP 1 15 89% 76% 92% 80% 94% 185 162 94% KL PEP 2 31 86% 76% 82% 76% 102% 146 134 99% Data Data yet to Data yet PEP 5 90 84% 72% 86% 70% 132% yet to rec to rec rec AP Data yet to Data rec Data yet POP 1 19 84% 66% 87% 75% 120% yet to to rec rec KOL PEP 2 31 91% 76% 95% 80% 98% 143 166 94% ROB PEP 3 36 90% 74% 94% 79% 97% 145 167 92% KAR PEP 2 37 75% 64% 82% 635 120% 150 150 100%