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25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout
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25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout

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25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout

25 Brand Lessons From Jack Trout

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  • 1. 25<br />BrandLessons<br />From Jack Trout<br />
  • 2. He is president of Trout & Partners Ltd. an international marketing consultancy based in Connecticut. <br />Jack Trout is the acclaimed author of many marketing classics published in many languages: Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind, Marketing Warfare, The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing, Differentiate or Die, Big Brands. Big Trouble, A Genie’s Wisdom, and his latest, Trout on Strategy. He is president of Trout & Partners Ltd. an international marketing consultancy based in Connecticut. He has consulted for such companies as Hewlett-Packard, Southwest Airlines, Merck, Procter & Gamble, Papa John’s Pizza and many others. He has consulted with the State Department on how to better sell America and in 2006 helped the Democrats regain leadership of the U.S. Congress.<br />
  • 3. Recognized as one of the world’s foremost marketing strategists<br />Trout is the originator of Positioning and other important concepts in marketing strategy. He has over 40 years of experience in advertising and marketing, and became a boardroom advisor to some of the world’s largest corporations and his worldwide consulting work gives him first-hand experience in a wide range of marketing scenarios. Trout has gained an international reputation as a consultant, writer, speaker, and proponent of leading-edge marketing strategies.<br />Here are his 25 brand lessons that I collect :<br />
  • 4. Lesson 1 : Ownership <br />He told marketers that once you take ownership of an idea you have to stick with it. For example, Papa John’s is now the third most popular pizza chain, thanks to a smart positioning statement it has maintained: "Better ingredients. Better pizza." And this has led to better results -- sales have grown at twice the industry average rate in the past two years.<br />
  • 5. Lesson 2 : Leadership psychology <br />Believe it or not, Trout has found that one of the most underused competitive advantages is leadership. He said that it is the most direct way to establish the credentials of your brand. Even if you don’t have it, you can claim it. <br />
  • 6. Lesson 3 : Timing <br />A successful brand has to be first to market with a good idea, not just any idea.<br />
  • 7. Lesson 4 : Heritage<br />Demonstrating tradition is a great way to establish a brand’s point of difference. When there’s a trusted line from a brand in the past, customers feel comfortable with its future. For instance, dozens of under-the-radar companies today communicate tradition through photos of their heritage and telling a story.<br />
  • 8. Lesson 5 : Expertise<br />One of the most powerful advantages is to show how a brand is an expert in its category. GE faces tough competition from smaller companies that have positioned themselves as specialists. Generalists, such as Kraft, have become weak against specialists, like Smuckers.<br />
  • 9. Lesson 6 : Differentiation<br />First, your message has to make sense within the context of the category.  Second, the differentiating idea must be clear. Find the difference and set up a benefit for your customer. Next, identify the credentials. In order to build a logical argument for your brand, you have to demonstrate proof. Last, communicate the difference. Truth will not win without communicating it.<br />
  • 10. Lesson 7: Reality<br />"When you approach a category with a strategy, you have to deal with reality: what you can do and what your competitors will let you do," Trout said. When MCI and Sprint arrived, AT&T began to lose its differentiation because it ignored the competition. The company sat around and waited. AT&T handed market share to its competitors.<br />
  • 11. Lesson 8 : Internet<br />Trout pointed out that the interactive industry is an enormous factor in differentiation primarily because it is a new tool. It delivers information in a brand new way about the points of difference. Trout warned the audience: Just don’t overdo it. Each medium has its own strengths and weaknesses.<br />
  • 12. Lesson 9 : Memory’s Limitations<br />Ask someone to name all the brands he or she remembers in a given product category. Rarely will anyone name more than seven. And that’s for a high-interest category. For low-interest products, the average consumer can usually name no more than one or two brands. In 1964, there were seven soft drinks advertised on network television. Today there are 22.<br />
  • 13. Lesson 10 : Simplicity<br />To cope with complexity, people have learned to reduce everything to its utmost simplicity. This “ranking” of people, objects and brands is not only a convenient method of organizing things, but also an absolute necessity if a person is to keep from being overwhelmed by the complexities of life.You see ranking concepts at work among movies, restaurants, business and military organizations. <br />
  • 14. Lesson 11 : Mind<br />Like a memory bank, the mind has a slot or “position” for each bit of information it has chosen to retain. In operation, the mind is a lot like a computer. But, there is one important difference. A computer has to accept what is put into it. The mind does not. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.In general, the mind accepts only that new information which matches its prior knowledge or experience. It filters out everything else. <br />
  • 15. Lesson 12 : Opposite<br />If you have a truly new product, it’s often better to tell the prospect what the product is not, rather than what it is. (To parallel his examples in today’s world: fat-free or sugar-free, anyone?) Words like “offtrack” betting, “leadfree” gasoline and “tubeless” tire are all examples of how new concepts can best be positioned against the old. Names that do not contain an element of positioning usually die out. <br />
  • 16. Lesson 13 : Marketing<br />It is important to separate in the readers' mind before beginning. As they state "Marketing is building a brand in the mind of the prospect. If you can build a powerful brand you will have a powerful marketing program. If you can't, then all the advertising, fancy packaging, sales promotion and public relations in the world won't help you achieve your objective."<br />
  • 17. Lesson 14 : Competition<br />Every program starts with competition and what is happening in the marketplace. In this phase we must look at research, study trends and develop a sense of the market. Who is doing what to whom? Who owns what idea? We determine what strategy is available to pursue.<br />
  • 18. Lesson 15 : Positioning<br />Here we determine what differentiating idea can be used to separate a company or product from its competitors. What kind of benefit can be offered to a customer and prospect? How can this concept best be verbalized? We must verbalize it.<br />
  • 19. Lesson 16 : Credentials<br />You cannot just make a claim about being different. You must be able to prove that you are unique or different or find a way to support your point of difference. Without these credentials, you will only have an empty claim and not a real point of difference. We evaluate your credentials.<br />
  • 20. Lesson 18 : Communication<br />You must build a communications program behind your idea. A useful analogy is to view your differentiating idea as a nail that you are going to drive into the mind. The program to do this would be the hammer to drive this nail into the minds of your customer and prospects. Every aspect of your communication should contain this differentiating idea. <br />
  • 21. Lesson 19 : Specialization<br />Most companies don't want to be tied to a single specialty. They want to be as many things to as many consumers as possible. What they fail to understand is that, once they start to extend into areas outside of their true areas of expertise, they leave space for new specialists to creep into their markets and take their place.<br />
  • 22. Lesson 20 : Information<br />Problem with too much information is people use it to push their own agendas. Like that Bible, you want to read that, it’s a good, what do you want? I’ll find you something. And that’s the problem, you have to be careful with generating a lot of, too much information because people will use it sometimes just to further their own agendas. What they want to do. So it’s very tricky stuff.<br />
  • 23. Lesson 21 : Research<br />If you’re out there trying to find out what people are going to do and then doing a whole bunch of stuff, you could be wrong, because people are not telling you the truth. People might tell you what they think you might want to hear. So you’ve got to be very careful with research that is aimed at trying to find out what people think or want, very careful about that.<br />
  • 24. Lesson 22 : Innovation<br />Innovation is a new idea or way to do things. It is very critical for survival in the 21st century as it can be what makes your company or product different from your competitors. And in this very competitive world, if you don't have a point of difference, you better have a low price. Some people think line extensions are innovations. All they do is confuse things<br />
  • 25. Lesson 23 : Segmentation<br />I think what you find out is that the leading products tend to cover most of the market because they own the biggest attribute. And after you get by that, you’re going to have to find a niche or a segment of the market that perhaps you can appeal to, it’s not as big as the overall market, but at least it’s a piece. You have to have a product that lines up against that piece.<br />
  • 26. Lesson 24 : Growth Strategy<br />Financial statements are pushing companies to grow and be everything for everybody. Companies,<br />in their insatiable desire to grow, lose focus and move away from a simple idea.They should plot their growth strategies carefully and not take the brand where it does not make sense,” warns Trout. “You cannot be everything to everybody unless you are a Wal-Mart.”<br />
  • 27. Lesson 25 : Inspiration<br />People ask me what I read; I’ll tell that I read Business Week, Forbes, Fortune, and the Wall Street Journal, and the Economist. I said those five magazines tell me what’s going on. I’m much more concerned about, I call those the score cards. You know, you’ve got to have a sense of who’s winning and who’s losing and why. So that’s where your lessons are.<br />
  • 28. “You have to be willing to attack yourself, making your own technology obsolete with new products. It's hard for some companies to do that, and if you don't, someone will. That's what happened to them.”<br />Thank You Very Much<br />Sompong Yusoontorn<br />

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