By: Heath Bridges
 Rubber’s elastic propertycomes from its chemicalmakeup. Rubber is apolymer, a chain ofrepeating units calledmonomers (Fr...
 The monomer in rubber iscalled isoprene and hastwo carbon-carbon doublebonds (1).
 The fluid which comes from latex trees contains largenumbers of isoprene molecules and as the latex dries, theisoprene m...
 The process continues until long strands of many isoprenemolecules are linked like a chain (Freudenrich 1). Thesestrands...
 As the drying process continues electrostatic bonds formbetween the polyisoprene strands (1). The electrostaticattractio...
 Temperature affects the electrostatic interactions between thepolyisoprene strands in latex rubber (1). Hot temperatures...
 Freudenrich, Ph.D., Craig. "How Rubber Works" 14 October 2008.HowStuffWorks.com.<http://science.howstuffworks.com/rubber...
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Heath bridges chemistry of rubber powerpoint

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Heath bridges chemistry of rubber powerpoint

  1. 1. By: Heath Bridges
  2. 2.  Rubber’s elastic propertycomes from its chemicalmakeup. Rubber is apolymer, a chain ofrepeating units calledmonomers (Freudenrich1).
  3. 3.  The monomer in rubber iscalled isoprene and hastwo carbon-carbon doublebonds (1).
  4. 4.  The fluid which comes from latex trees contains largenumbers of isoprene molecules and as the latex dries, theisoprene molecules crowd together (1). The isoprenemolecules then attack carbon-carbon double bonds ofneighboring molecules causing the double bonds to break(1). The electrons then rearrange to form a bond between thetwo isoprene molecules (1).
  5. 5.  The process continues until long strands of many isoprenemolecules are linked like a chain (Freudenrich 1). Thesestrands are called polyisoprene polymer with eachpolyisoprene molecule containing thousands of isoprenemonomers (1).
  6. 6.  As the drying process continues electrostatic bonds formbetween the polyisoprene strands (1). The electrostaticattraction between strands holds the rubber fibers togetherand gives them their “stretchy” property (1).
  7. 7.  Temperature affects the electrostatic interactions between thepolyisoprene strands in latex rubber (1). Hot temperaturesreduce the interactions and cause the rubber to have a stickiertexture (1). Colder temperatures increase the interactions andcause the rubber to become brittle (1).
  8. 8.  Freudenrich, Ph.D., Craig. "How Rubber Works" 14 October 2008.HowStuffWorks.com.<http://science.howstuffworks.com/rubber.htm> 11April 2013.http://www.howstuffworks.com/rubber.htm Schaefer, Ronald J. "Dynamic properties of rubber." Rubber World May1994: 20+.General OneFile. Web. 11 Apr. 2013.DocumentURL<http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA15410472&v=2.1&u=tel_k_dlhs&it=r&p=GPS&sw=w>http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-15410472.html The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012,ColumbiaUniversity Press. All rights reserved.Read more: rubber: Chemistry andProperties | Infoplease.com<http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/science/rubber-chemistry-properties.html#ixzz2QFfYlrn8>
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