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Grief presentation in psychology class

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  • 1. Brian A. Wong ’13 B.A. Psychology Counseling minor Areas of interest: Bereavement and Autism Adult Development (PSY 312) K. Hinton – Tues. Dec. 4, ‘12http://Marshall.Academia.edu/BrianWong
  • 2. Kathleen E. BurchedeanU.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” 1974-1998First female Sergeant Major to lead Army Strings Ensemble
  • 3. Personal ExperienceGrand Canyon; August ‘02Died of melanoma at age 54 (10/1950 – 12/2004)
  • 4. Practical Experience Sociology of Death and Dying (SOC 452) Spring ‘10 Death and Grief Counseling (COUN 456) Fall ‘11Huntington, WV – Fall 2010 for Clinical Placement in Counseling (COUN 370)Washington, DC
  • 5. What is grief?“Normal and natural reaction toloss of any kind” and “theconflicting feelings caused by theend of or change in a familiarpattern of behavior”James, J.W. & Friedman, R. (2009). The grief recoveryhandbook: the action program for moving beyond death,divorce, and other losses. New York, NY: HarperCollins
  • 6. Anticipatory GriefUsually in cases of terminal illness“grief over those losses that havealready occurred as a result of theillness and those that are occurring”Pomeroy, E.C. & Garcia, R.B. (2009). The grief assessmentand intervention workbook: a strengths perspective. Belmont,CA: Brooks/Cole
  • 7. Disenfranchised GriefGrief from a loss that is not socially accepted as aloss to be grieved. “Although the individual grieves,others do not acknowledge that he or she has a rightto grieve.”Doka, K.J. (2008). Disenfranchised Grief in Historical and Cultural Perspective. In M.S.Stroebe, R.O. Hansson, H. Schut, and W. Stroebe. Handbook of bereavement research andpractice: advances in theory and intervention. (p. 224). Washington, DC: AmericanPsychological Association.Example:Alzheimer’s DiseaseBoss, P. (2010). The trauma and complicated grief of ambiguous loss. Pastoral Psychology59(2), 137-145. DOI: 10.1007/s11089-009-0264-0.
  • 8. Tasks of Mourning 1. Accept reality of the loss 2. Process the pain of grief 3. Adjust to a world without the deceased 4. Find an enduring connection with the deceased in the midst of embarking on a new lifeWorden, J.W. (2009). Grief counseling and grief therapy: a handbook for themental health practitioner. (Fourth edition). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.
  • 9. Mediators of Mourning Who the person who died was (parent, sibling, etc.) Nature of the attachment (secure? Strong?) How the person Died (expected, unexpected, violent?) Previous losses Personality, coping style Social Support SystemWorden, J.W. (2009).
  • 10. Stages of…… Denial and Isolation Anger Bargaining Depression Acceptance
  • 11. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D. 1926-2004 Psychiatrist Near-death studies Stage theory of dying
  • 12. Background of theory 1969 On Death and Dying 200 patients interviewed Patients told by doctor of a terminal illnessKübler-Ross, E. (1969). On death and dying. New York,NY: Macmillan Publishing(available at Drinko)
  • 13. Yale Bereavement Study Examined the relative magnitudes and patterns of change over time post loss of 5 grief indicators for consistency with the stage theory of grief. Longitudinal cohort January 2000 – January 2003 233 grievers; ≥ 65 years of age Assessed disbelief, yearning, anger, depression, and acceptance of the death from 1 to 24 months post lossMaciejewski, P.K., Zhang B., Block, S.D, & Prigerson, H.G. (2007). Anempirical examination of the stage theory of grief. Journal of theAmerican Medical Association 297(7), 716-722
  • 14. Yale Bereavement Study resultsDisbelief not dominant initial feelingAcceptance most frequently endorsed itemPersonally:If participants were in denial that their loved ones weredeceased, they would not have been in that study
  • 15. Misunderstanding The stages “have been very misunderstood…They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss”Kübler-Ross, E. & Kessler, D (2005). On grief and grieving: finding themeaning of grief through the five stages of loss. (p. 8) New York: Simon &Schuster. Retrieved from Google Books
  • 16. Personal observationsFrom speaking with grievers, those who have lost a lovedone at least ten years prior and are still coming to termswith their grief, have all told me that were told about“stages of grief” and believed it
  • 17. DamageWhen viewed as a stage, the griever is at a standstill.Implying that the emotion and feeling is a stage willmake the griever wait and they will still feel the same,waiting for time.“There are no stages of grief. But people will always try tofit themselves into a defined category if one is offered tothem. Sadly, this is particularly true if the offer comesfrom a powerful authority such as a therapist,clergyperson, or doctor”James, J.W. & Friedman, R. (2009).
  • 18. Joseph R. Novello, MDAdult, Child/Adolescent, Forensic Psychiatrist(and my neighbor)3301 New Mexico Ave. NW, Suite 305Washington, DC 20016Tel (202) 362-0115www.NovelloMD.comStudied under Kübler-Ross“As I recall, Elisabeth viewed her work as a starting point. She was pleased that shehad shed light on what was the darkness of death but, humble as I recall her,trusted that others would follow her and expand our knowledge and sensitivity.”
  • 19. Dignity Memorial Compassion Helpline Counseling resource available 24/7, 365 Staffed by licensed professionals specially trained in grief counseling. All hold doctorate or master degrees Maintains a network of therapists and support groups for face-to-face counseling (at your expense) if desired. 1-800-480-1234
  • 20. Grief Recovery Institute www.GriefRecoveryMethod.com 1-800-334-7606 Provides resources and workshops to grieving people in major cities Training to anyone who wants to become one of their Grief Recovery Specialists Helpful articles on grief “Broken Hearts” blog on Psychology Today
  • 21. `
  • 22. 6 Dangerous Myths of GriefAug. 24, 2011http://www.youtube.com/GriefRecoveryMethodhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK7vLMFWTs8