public worship,
       spiritual
 formation, and
       mission
Vincent Donovan was a Roman Catholic priest
from the U.S. who served as a Spiritan
missionary in Tanzania for 17 years in ...
“I was to learn that any theology or theory that
makes no reference to previous missionary
experience, which does not take...
Never accept and be content with unanalyzed
assumptions, assumptions about the work, about the
people, about the church or...
“…do not try to call them back to where they
were, and do not try to call them to where you
are, as beautiful as that plac...
public worship,
       spiritual
 formation, and
       mission
Learning is not the
     consequence of teaching.


Learning is the consequence of
                     thinking.
www.brianmclaren.net



       slideshare.net

        brianmclaren
Your backgrounds?



    A bit about my
    background ...
Christian spiritual
               formation:
The development of people
who “be,” think, feel, work,
           relate, an...
transformation
 formation in orthopraxy:
 …teach them to do
all I have commanded you.
          (Matthew 28)
transformationFormation in “orthopathy”

 I have give you an example
  … love one another as I have loved
                ...
Formation in identity:

     to be conformed
to the image of God’s Son
             (Romans 8)
formation in orthodoxy:

   … be transformed
by the renewing of your
         minds.
            (Romans 8)
transformation

transformation:
  …until Christ
  is formed in you.
      (Galatians 4:19)
In one sense, everything
is spiritual formation (or
           malformation):
Listening to Rush Limbaugh, watching
       ...
In a more constructive sense,
   spiritual formation involves
intentional spiritual practices
                (or discipli...
Actions within our power which we do
            to train ourselves to do things
       currently beyond our power, and to...
For example, fasting:
    - Feeling and acknowledging our weakness in
             the face of impulses from our bodies.

...
Public Worship

       Liturgy

        Ritual
Public Worship:

a gathering for liturgy
Public Worship:

  a gathering for liturgy

                Liturgy:

an orderly succession of
                 rituals
Public Worship:

          a gathering for liturgy

                        Liturgy:

an orderly succession of rituals

  ...
Ritualism:

  repeating the prescribed
action without reference to
                   meaning
Liturgy:

the “workout” of the
      people -

rituals and practices
    for formation
public worship as

  (spiritual formation)

     [disciple-making]

{community formation}
there has been a lot of
            talk about

     worship in recent
              years….
traditional

    contemporary

         blended

postmodern (ouch)
such labels can be
          useful …

  and they can be
     problematic.
  Do we need more “market
           segmentati...
let’s consider all of
  these as transitional,
and on a deeper level ...
let’s consider ourselves
to be moving to a “post-
       protestant” era in
              worship …

where forms of worshi...
and where elements of
      worship are not
     denominationally
           proprietary
where liturgy is
      acknowledged as
           universal …

  a dynamic tension of
     form and freedom,

identity and...
and where “evolution”
 is seen as normative,

and where one of the
essential functions of
         worship is …
1. Inconvenience:
  Going to a place I didn’t
                   choose

  At a time I didn’t choose

For a purpose I do c...
2. Awakening
Drawing attention to things
     that can too easily be
                 forgotten.

    Entry rituals, prelu...
3. Association/
                Affiliation
Associating with some people
                       I like

        And others...
4. Hospitality
     Using my presence and our
  space to help “the other” feel
welcome in my presence, and in
the presence...
5. Desire formation
Strengthening certain desires
    through prayer, song, and
                     posture.
 Which desir...
Kinds of prayer:
  invocation (here), thanksgiving
          (thanks), adoration (O!),
      confession (mercy), petition
...
Kinds of posture:
  invocation (here), thanksgiving
          (thanks), adoration (O!),
      confession (mercy), petition...
6. Confession/Absolution
Dealing constructively with the
     gap between behavior and
                    aspiration.


C...
7. Creativity/beauty
Participating in beauty through
 song, ceremony, architecture.


         Consider alternatives:
8. Receptivity
Waiting for what I may receive
  only by waiting receptively.


         Sermons and silence
9. Generosity
Taking greater pleasure in being
       productive (fruitful) than
                   consumptive.
10. Modeling
       Exposing apprentices to
                      masters
   In prayer, teaching, artistry,
          fait...
11. Envisioning
Preaching justice & compassion
  Singing justice & compassion
Praying, signifying, announcing,
     celebr...
12. Catholicity
Celebrating the wideness of
     God’s mercy to others:
            Quoting others
           Affirming ot...
13. Mystery
Exposing the soul to the wonder
      of saturated events - with
           unfathomed layers of
             ...
14. Reciting creeds

                Affiliation
   Submission to tradition
     Abiding in community
                    ...
14. Scripture reading

Living before and in the text
16. Benediction

Being sent into the world ...
         For what purpose?
Getting specific:
Order of Worship:
 Take your liturgy (formal
 and informal) and break it
 down into components and
 eval...
-Arriving, Parking, Entering,
Refreshments, Mingling
-Prelude, Greeting
-Gathering song
-Welcome, invocation
-Creative ele...
-Prayer of response
-Confession, creed
-Eucharist
-Stations, music, singing
-Applause, announcements
-Doxology, benedictio...
What about your church
year?
 What seasons do you have?
 When is there planned latency?
 When is there planned intensity?
...
Are there unintended
“malformations” happening?
 -Revelation sermon
 -“Give us the lost” & “the nations” songs
 -Warfare l...
Six dynamic tensions:
   -Charismatic and
   contemplative
   -Regularity and intensity
   -Familiarity and surprise
   -A...
Question:
How do we induct or initiate
people into our public
worship - so they know the
meaning we want them to
bond to?
Dialogue:
Vincent Donovan was a Roman Catholic priest
from the U.S. who served as a Spiritan
missionary in Tanzania for 17 years in ...
“I was to learn that any theology or theory that
makes no reference to previous missionary
experience, which does not take...
Never accept and be content with unanalyzed
assumptions, assumptions about the work, about the
people, about the church or...
“…do not try to call them back to where they
were, and do not try to call them to where you
are, as beautiful as that plac...
From Michael Polanyi, Personal Knowledge: Toward a
Postcritical Philosophy (1958)


It follows that an art which has falle...
It is pathetic to watch the endless efforts
-- equipped with microscopy and
chemistry, with mathematics and
electronics --...
To learn by example is to submit to
authority. You follow your master
because you trust his manner of doing
things even wh...
These hidden rules can be assimilated
only by a person who surrenders himself
to that extent uncritically to the imitation...
… practical wisdom is more truly
embodied in action than expressed in
rules of action. (pp. 53-54)
What do we do?

     Theology

     Preaching

      Worship

  Common life

      Ministry

       Mission
A Triangle



                 Spirituality        External
                                     Environment
  Context



...
Transformation for Mission and
Transmission:
 From Finding Faith (McLaren, Zondervan, 1999)

    Simplicity
              ...
Brianmclaren.net

Emergentvillage.com
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
Worshipspiritualformationformission
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Worshipspiritualformationformission

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Presented at St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, March 2010.

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  • Worshipspiritualformationformission

    1. 1. public worship, spiritual formation, and mission
    2. 2. Vincent Donovan was a Roman Catholic priest from the U.S. who served as a Spiritan missionary in Tanzania for 17 years in the 1960s and 1970s, evangelizing the Masai. Christianity Rediscovered, his memoir of ministry in Masailand is, I think, one of the most important mission-related books of the twentieth century, a treasure that too few have discovered.
    3. 3. “I was to learn that any theology or theory that makes no reference to previous missionary experience, which does not take that experience into account, is a dead and useless thing…praxis must be prior to theology…. In my work [theology would have to proceed] from practice to theory. If a theology did emerge from my work, it would have to be a theology growing out of the life and experience of the pagan peoples of the savannas of East Africa”
    4. 4. Never accept and be content with unanalyzed assumptions, assumptions about the work, about the people, about the church or Christianity. Never be afraid to ask questions about the work we have inherited or the work we are doing. There is no question that should not be asked or that is outlawed. The day we are completely satisfied with what we have been doing; the day we have found the perfect, unchangeable system of work, the perfect answer, never in need of being corrected again, on that day we will know that we are wrong, that we have made the greatest mistake of all. (Christianity Rediscovered, 146)
    5. 5. “…do not try to call them back to where they were, and do not try to call them to where you are, as beautiful as that place might seem to you. You must have the courage to go with them to a place that neither you nor they have ever been before.’ Good missionary advice, and a beautiful description of the unpredictable process of evangelization, a process leading to that new place where none of us has ever been before.”
    6. 6. public worship, spiritual formation, and mission
    7. 7. Learning is not the consequence of teaching. Learning is the consequence of thinking.
    8. 8. www.brianmclaren.net slideshare.net brianmclaren
    9. 9. Your backgrounds? A bit about my background ...
    10. 10. Christian spiritual formation: The development of people who “be,” think, feel, work, relate, and play … in the way of Jesus.
    11. 11. transformation formation in orthopraxy: …teach them to do all I have commanded you. (Matthew 28)
    12. 12. transformationFormation in “orthopathy” I have give you an example … love one another as I have loved you. (John 13-15)
    13. 13. Formation in identity: to be conformed to the image of God’s Son (Romans 8)
    14. 14. formation in orthodoxy: … be transformed by the renewing of your minds. (Romans 8)
    15. 15. transformation transformation: …until Christ is formed in you. (Galatians 4:19)
    16. 16. In one sense, everything is spiritual formation (or malformation): Listening to Rush Limbaugh, watching Fox News or South Park or The Cosmetic Surgery Channel, using pornography or drugs, choosing one neighborhood over another, engaging in office gossip, making charitable donations, etc.
    17. 17. In a more constructive sense, spiritual formation involves intentional spiritual practices (or disciplines):
    18. 18. Actions within our power which we do to train ourselves to do things currently beyond our power, and to become people we are currently incapable of being. - Running a marathon - Playing the violin - Building a bridge
    19. 19. For example, fasting: - Feeling and acknowledging our weakness in the face of impulses from our bodies. - Practicing impulse control. - Asserting to ourselves the importance of things other than impulse gratification. - Accepting weakness and “poverty” in faith that greater strength and satisfaction can come to us. - What benefits could come from this practice?
    20. 20. Public Worship Liturgy Ritual
    21. 21. Public Worship: a gathering for liturgy
    22. 22. Public Worship: a gathering for liturgy Liturgy: an orderly succession of rituals
    23. 23. Public Worship: a gathering for liturgy Liturgy: an orderly succession of rituals Ritual: a bodily action for bonding to meaning
    24. 24. Ritualism: repeating the prescribed action without reference to meaning
    25. 25. Liturgy: the “workout” of the people - rituals and practices for formation
    26. 26. public worship as (spiritual formation) [disciple-making] {community formation}
    27. 27. there has been a lot of talk about worship in recent years….
    28. 28. traditional contemporary blended postmodern (ouch)
    29. 29. such labels can be useful … and they can be problematic. Do we need more “market segmentation?”
    30. 30. let’s consider all of these as transitional, and on a deeper level ...
    31. 31. let’s consider ourselves to be moving to a “post- protestant” era in worship … where forms of worship are not biblically mandated
    32. 32. and where elements of worship are not denominationally proprietary
    33. 33. where liturgy is acknowledged as universal … a dynamic tension of form and freedom, identity and innovation,
    34. 34. and where “evolution” is seen as normative, and where one of the essential functions of worship is …
    35. 35. 1. Inconvenience: Going to a place I didn’t choose At a time I didn’t choose For a purpose I do choose.
    36. 36. 2. Awakening Drawing attention to things that can too easily be forgotten. Entry rituals, preludes, songs, sacred space, artwork, invocation
    37. 37. 3. Association/ Affiliation Associating with some people I like And others I don’t like For a purpose I believe in.
    38. 38. 4. Hospitality Using my presence and our space to help “the other” feel welcome in my presence, and in the presence of our community.
    39. 39. 5. Desire formation Strengthening certain desires through prayer, song, and posture. Which desires? What range? Weekly, Seasonal, Annual, Lifespan
    40. 40. Kinds of prayer: invocation (here), thanksgiving (thanks), adoration (O!), confession (mercy), petition (help), intercession (please), aspiration (when?), refusal (no!), abandonment (why?), meditation (behold), surrender (yes), contemplation (-)
    41. 41. Kinds of posture: invocation (here), thanksgiving (thanks), adoration (O!), confession (mercy), petition (help), intercession (please), aspiration (when?), refusal (no!), abandonment (why?), meditation (behold), surrender (yes), contemplation (-)
    42. 42. 6. Confession/Absolution Dealing constructively with the gap between behavior and aspiration. Constructive versus destructive confession
    43. 43. 7. Creativity/beauty Participating in beauty through song, ceremony, architecture. Consider alternatives:
    44. 44. 8. Receptivity Waiting for what I may receive only by waiting receptively. Sermons and silence
    45. 45. 9. Generosity Taking greater pleasure in being productive (fruitful) than consumptive.
    46. 46. 10. Modeling Exposing apprentices to masters In prayer, teaching, artistry, faithfulness, service, hospitality, etc. Contemplative and charismatic models …
    47. 47. 11. Envisioning Preaching justice & compassion Singing justice & compassion Praying, signifying, announcing, celebrating, organizing for justice & compassion
    48. 48. 12. Catholicity Celebrating the wideness of God’s mercy to others: Quoting others Affirming others Praying for others Inviting others
    49. 49. 13. Mystery Exposing the soul to the wonder of saturated events - with unfathomed layers of meaning ... Such as Eucharist, Resurrection, Pentecost, Eschaton
    50. 50. 14. Reciting creeds Affiliation Submission to tradition Abiding in community More?
    51. 51. 14. Scripture reading Living before and in the text
    52. 52. 16. Benediction Being sent into the world ... For what purpose?
    53. 53. Getting specific: Order of Worship: Take your liturgy (formal and informal) and break it down into components and evaluate them for spiritual formation potential.
    54. 54. -Arriving, Parking, Entering, Refreshments, Mingling -Prelude, Greeting -Gathering song -Welcome, invocation -Creative element -Sermon
    55. 55. -Prayer of response -Confession, creed -Eucharist -Stations, music, singing -Applause, announcements -Doxology, benediction -Orientation, mingling, sign- ups, goodbyes, departure
    56. 56. What about your church year? What seasons do you have? When is there planned latency? When is there planned intensity? Feasting? Fasting? Inward, Upward, Outward focus? Planning? Evaluating?
    57. 57. Are there unintended “malformations” happening? -Revelation sermon -“Give us the lost” & “the nations” songs -Warfare language, cliches -Emotional manipulation/hype -Emotional strangulation -Racial/Cultural/age exclusion -Body acknowledgement -Intellectual or political messages
    58. 58. Six dynamic tensions: -Charismatic and contemplative -Regularity and intensity -Familiarity and surprise -Ancient and Future -Planned and spontaneous -Word and image
    59. 59. Question: How do we induct or initiate people into our public worship - so they know the meaning we want them to bond to?
    60. 60. Dialogue:
    61. 61. Vincent Donovan was a Roman Catholic priest from the U.S. who served as a Spiritan missionary in Tanzania for 17 years in the 1960s and 1970s, evangelizing the Masai. Christianity Rediscovered, his memoir of ministry in Masailand is, I think, one of the most important mission-related books of the twentieth century, a treasure that too few have discovered.
    62. 62. “I was to learn that any theology or theory that makes no reference to previous missionary experience, which does not take that experience into account, is a dead and useless thing…praxis must be prior to theology…. In my work [theology would have to proceed] from practice to theory. If a theology did emerge from my work, it would have to be a theology growing out of the life and experience of the pagan peoples of the savannas of East Africa”
    63. 63. Never accept and be content with unanalyzed assumptions, assumptions about the work, about the people, about the church or Christianity. Never be afraid to ask questions about the work we have inherited or the work we are doing. There is no question that should not be asked or that is outlawed. The day we are completely satisfied with what we have been doing; the day we have found the perfect, unchangeable system of work, the perfect answer, never in need of being corrected again, on that day we will know that we are wrong, that we have made the greatest mistake of all. (Christianity Rediscovered, 146)
    64. 64. “…do not try to call them back to where they were, and do not try to call them to where you are, as beautiful as that place might seem to you. You must have the courage to go with them to a place that neither you nor they have ever been before.’ Good missionary advice, and a beautiful description of the unpredictable process of evangelization, a process leading to that new place where none of us has ever been before.”
    65. 65. From Michael Polanyi, Personal Knowledge: Toward a Postcritical Philosophy (1958) It follows that an art which has fallen into disuse for the period of a generation is altogether lost. There are hundreds of examples of this to which the process of mechanization is continuously adding new ones. These losses are usually irretrievable.
    66. 66. It is pathetic to watch the endless efforts -- equipped with microscopy and chemistry, with mathematics and electronics -- to reproduce a single violin of the kind the half-literate Stradivarius turned out as a matter of routine more than 200 years ago.
    67. 67. To learn by example is to submit to authority. You follow your master because you trust his manner of doing things even when you cannot analyze and account in detail for its effectiveness. By watching the master and emulating his efforts in the presence of his example, the apprentice unconsciously picks up the rules of the art, including those which are not explicitly known to the master himself.
    68. 68. These hidden rules can be assimilated only by a person who surrenders himself to that extent uncritically to the imitation of the master. A society which wants to preserve a fund of personal knowledge must submit to tradition.
    69. 69. … practical wisdom is more truly embodied in action than expressed in rules of action. (pp. 53-54)
    70. 70. What do we do? Theology Preaching Worship Common life Ministry Mission
    71. 71. A Triangle Spirituality External Environment Context Community Mission Experiences of life … joys, sorrows, sufferings, pleasures
    72. 72. Transformation for Mission and Transmission: From Finding Faith (McLaren, Zondervan, 1999) Simplicity Complexity Perplexity Humility
    73. 73. Brianmclaren.net Emergentvillage.com
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