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    Washington island tuesday 2 Washington island tuesday 2 Presentation Transcript

    • a new kind of christianity
    • The Lord’s Prayer • O God, whose love makes us one family … 2. May Your unspeakable Name be revered.
    • 3. Now, here on earth may Your commonwealth come. 4. On earth as in heaven may Your will be done.
    • 5. Give us today our bread for today. 4. Forgive us our wrongs as we forgive.
    • 3. Lead us away from the perilous trial. 2. Liberate us from the evil.
    • 1.For the kingdom is yours and yours alone. 2. The power is yours and yours alone. 3.The glory is yours and yours alone. 4.Now and forever, amen.
    • 5. Now, here on earth may your commonwealth come. 4. Here on earth may your dreams come true. 3. Hallelujah 2. Hallelujah 1. Amen.
    • a new kind of christianity: ten questions that aretransforming the faith
    • What are the questions? 1. The narrative question: What is the shape of the biblical narrative? Storyline, plotline? 2. The authority question: What is the Bible, and what is it for? How does it have authority? 3. The God question: Is God violent? Why does God seem so violent and genocidal in so many bible passages?
    • 4. The Jesus Question: Who is Jesus, and why does he matter? 5. The Gospel Question: What is the gospel - a message of evacuation or transformation? Exclusion or inclusion?
    • 6. The church question: What do we do about the church? 7. The sex question: Can we deal with issues of sexuality without fighting and dividing? 8. The future question: Can we find a more hopeful vision of the future?
    • 9. The pluralism question: How should we relate to people of other faiths? 10. The next step question: How can we pursue this quest in humility, love, and peace?
    • a new kind of christianity
    • 14 Slavery, race, and the Bible
    • The African slave trade spanned 450 years. It involved the kidnapping of 11.5 million Africans. Billions of people today still profit and suffer in the aftermath of it.
    • “Nothing is more susceptible to oblivion than an argument, however ingenious, that has been discredited by events; and such is the case with the body of writing which was produced in the antebellum South in defense of Negro slavery.” Eric McKitrick, Slavery Defended: The Views of the Old South (1963).
    • From 1830 through the 1850’s, slavery was defended in the United States as just, Biblical, and good. Sources: William S. Jenkins, Pro-Slavery Thought in the Old South (1935) Larry E. Tise, Proslavery: A History of the Defense of Slavery in America, 1701-1840 (UGA Press: 1987)
    • Nellie Norton: or, Southern Slavery and the Bible: A Scriptural Refutation of the Principal Arguments Upon Which the Abolitionists Rely: A Vindication of Southern Slavery From the Old and New Testaments, (1864) by Ebenezer Willis Warren, an obscure 44-year old Protestant clergyman from Macon, GA. Last major defense of slavery in the U.S.
    • 5 Arguments In Defense of Slavery
    • 1. The Inferiority Argument 2. The Southern Paradise Argument 3. The Historical Realism Argument 4. The Ad Hominem Argument 5. The Biblical Argument The first 4 arguments are based on the 5th.
    • Leviticus 25: Both thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that are round about you; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land; and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you, to inherit them for a possession; they shall be your bondmen for ever.
    • Nellie Norton: “… the Bible is a pro-slavery Bible, and God is a pro-slavery God,” “… the North must give up the Bible and religion, or adopt our views of slavery.”
    • Meanwhile … in France: A song lyric was written in 1847 by Placide Clappeau, a French wine merchant, mayor of the French town Roquemaure. Adolphe Adam wrote the music. Later the song was translated into English by John S. Dwight – It is said to have been the first music ever broadcast over radio.
    • O holy night, the stars are brightly shining; It is the night of the dear Savior’s birth! Long lay the world in sin and error pining, Till He appeared and the soul felt its worth. A thrill of hope, the weary soul rejoices, For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn. Fall on your knees, O hear the angel voices! O night divine, O night when Christ was born! O night, O holy night, O night divine!
    • Truly He taught us to love one another; His law is love and His Gospel is peace. Chains shall He break for the slave is our brother And in His Name all oppression shall cease. Sweet hymns of joy in grateful chorus raise we, Let all within us praise His holy Name! Christ is the Lord! O praise His name forever! His pow’r and glory evermore proclaim! His pow’r and glory evermore proclaim!
    • How did the proslavers use the Bible? How did the abolitionists use the Bible? Which method do we want to follow?
    • Reading the Bible • Proof-Texting or EvolvingValues? • Letter or Spirit? • Law or Love? • Master or Servant of Humanity? • Equal to Christ ... or Manger of Christ?
    • The Bible as Constitution • What purposes do constitutions (or social contracts) fulfill? • How is the Bible like a constitution? • What problems arise with this approach?
    • Bible as Conversation • The Bible as a cultural library • Library as preserver of minority opinions and ongoing arguments • Artifacts from stories within stories
    • LEGAL CONSTITUTION COMMUNITY LIBRARY Uniformity Diversity Preserve order Preserve diversity agreement argument enforcement encouragement
    • LEGAL CONSTITUTION COMMUNITY LIBRARY Rules to live by, Conformity Stories to live by, Creativity One publication date Many publication dates Analyze, interpret, argue Enter, inhabit, practice amendments? new acquisitions
    • Inspiration • what would an inspired constitution look like? • what would an inspired community library look like? • how would we engage with the Bible as an inspired library?
    • Dear Dr. Laura: Thank you for doing so much to educate people regarding God's Law. I have learned a great deal from your show, and try to share that knowledge with as many people as I can.When someone tries to defend the homosexual lifestyle, for example, I simply remind them that Leviticus 18:22 clearly states it to be an abomination... End of debate. I do need some advice from you, however, regarding some other elements of God's Laws and how to follow them.
    • 1. Leviticus 25:44 states that I may possess slaves, both male and female, provided they are purchased from neighboring nations.A friend of mine claims that this applies to Mexicans, but not Canadians. Can you clarify? Why can't I own Canadians? 2. I would like to sell my daughter into slavery, as sanctioned in Exodus 21:7. In this day and age, what do you think would be a fair price for her? 3. I know that I am allowed no contact with a woman while she is in her period of menstrual uncleanliness - Lev.15: 19-24.The problem is how do I tell? I have tried asking, but most women take offense.
    • 4.When I burn a bull on the altar as a sacrifice, I know it creates a pleasing odor for the Lord - Lev.1:9.The problem is, my neighbors.They claim the odor is not pleasing to them. Should I smite them? 5. I have a neighbor who insists on working on the Sabbath.Exodus 35:2 clearly states he should be put to death. Am I morally obligated to kill him myself, or should I ask the police to do it? 6.A friend of mine feels that even though eating shellfish is an abomination - Lev. 11:10, it is a lesser abomination than homosexuality. I don't agree. Can you settle this? Are there 'degrees' of abomination?
    • 7. Lev. 21:20 states that I may not approach the altar of God if I have a defect in my sight. I have to admit that I wear reading glasses. Does my vision have to be 20/20, or is there some wiggle- room here? 8. Most of my male friends get their hair trimmed, including the hair around their temples, even though this is expressly forbidden by Lev. 19:27. How should they die? 9. I know from Lev. 11:6-8 that touching the skin of a dead pig makes me unclean, but may I still play football if I wear gloves?
    • 10. My uncle has a farm. He violates Lev.19:19 by planting two different crops in the same field, as does his wife by wearing garments made of two different kinds of thread (cotton/polyester blend). He also tends to curse and blaspheme a lot. Is it really necessary that we go to all the trouble of getting the whole town together to stone them? Lev.24:10-16. Couldn't we just burn them to death at a private family affair, like we do with people who sleep with their in-laws? (Lev. 20:14) I know you have studied these things extensively and thus enjoy considerable expertise in such matters, so I am confident you can help. Thank you again for reminding us that God's word is eternal and unchanging. Your adoring fan. James M. Kauffman, Ed.D. Professor Emeritus Dept. of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education University ofVirginia
    • Constitution? Library?
    • Stories in conversation ... David, Goliath, and the Temple Two Arks Pharoah, Hagar, Solomon Joshua, Jesus, and the Canaanites
    • a new kind of christianity: ten questions that aretransforming the faith
    • Question 3 God and violence
    • Derek Flood graphically displays Paul’s edited quotation of Psalm 18:41-49 and Deuteronomy 32:43 in Romans 15:8-10. Notice what Paul picks to retain and what he chooses to reject: For I tell you that Christ has become a servant of the Jews on behalf of God's truth, to confirm the promises made to the patriarchs so that the Gentiles may glorify God for his mercy, as it is written: “I destroyed my foes. They cried for help, but there was no one to save them—to the LORD, but he did not answer…. He is the God who avenges me, who puts the Gentiles under me…. Therefore I will praise you among the Gentiles; I will sing hymns to your name.” (Ps. 18:41–49).
    • Again, it says, “Rejoice, O Gentiles, with his people, for he will avenge the blood of his servants; he will take vengeance on his enemies and make atonement for his land and people.” (Deut. 32:43)
    • Flood concludes: “Paul is making a very different point from the original intent of these Psalms. In fact, he is making the opposite point—we should not cry out for God’s wrath and judgment [on the other], because we are all sinners in need of mercy.” He concludes, “This is not a case of careless out-of- context proof-texting; it is an artful and deliberate reshaping of these verses … from their original cry for divine violence into a confession of universal culpability that highlights our need for mercy.”
    • Question 3 God and violence FLAT DESCENDING ASCENDING TENT
    • a new kind of christianity: ten questions that aretransforming the faith
    • What are the questions? 1. The narrative question: What is the shape of the biblical narrative? Storyline, plotline? 2. The authority question: What is the Bible, and what is it for? How does it have authority? 3. The God question: Is God violent? Why does God seem so violent and genocidal in so many bible passages?
    • 4. The Jesus Question: Who is Jesus, and why does he matter?
    • Hell Salvation History/ The world Fall HeavenEden
    • Anthropologist Literary Scholar Cultural Historian Rene Girard See also: Michael Hardin James Alison Tony Bartlett1
    • 1. Imitation Humans are imitative (mimetic) creatures.
    • “Acquisitive mimesis” - What you want, I want.What I want, you want. We become mirrors or doubles of one another’s competitive desires.Will we - supposed friends - become enemies? Because of proximity, a dangerous friend is more frightening than an enemy.
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry
    • The reduction of canine teeth to their current dimensions occurred a long time before the appearance of homo sapiens, suggesting that stones had replaced dentition in most of their uses, including intra-species combat.... If instead of throwing branches at one another as they sometimes do, chimpanzees were to learn to throw stones at one another, their social life would be radically shaken. Either the species would disappear, or like humanity it would have to impose its own prohibitions. (TH 86-87)
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety
    • Rivalry creates the constant danger of “all against all” outbreaks of violence, which in turn creates constant anxiety ... “The more you get along together, the less you get along together.” How will this anxiety be relieved?
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating
    • TheVictimage Mechanism The opposition of everyone against everyone is replaced by the opposition of all against one.Where previously there had been a chaotic ensemble of particular conflicts, there is now the simplicity of a single conflict: the entire community on one side, and on the other, the victim. The community finds itself unified once more at the expense of a victim....The sacrifice is simply another act of violence, one that is added to a succession of others, but it is the final act of violence, the last word. (TH 24)
    • The aggressive transference [focusing a group’s general social anxiety upon one individual] is followed by the reconciliatory transference [which] sacralizes the victim... Because the popular imagination tends to polarize its hopes and enthusiasms, and of course its fears and anxieties, around a chosen individual, the power of the individual in question seems to multiply infinitely, for good or ill. Such an individual does not represent the collectivity in an abstract manner, but rather represents the state of turmoil, restlessness, or calm of the collectivity at any given moment of representation. (TH 37) The peace created through scapegoating is counted as sacred, supernatural, divine ...
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization
    • Through prohibitions and taboos, societies seek to avoid the conflict and competition of acquisitive mimesis. Through rituals, societies seek to diffuse the social tensions that arise from that conflict and competition - especially through ritualized sacrificial scapegoating.
    • Religion is nothing other than this immense effort to keep the peace.The sacred is violence, but if religious man worships violence it is only insofar as the worship of violence is supposed to bring peace; religion is entirely concerned with peace, but the means it has of bringing it about are never free of sacrificial violence. (TH 33)
    • People do not wish to know that the whole of human culture is based on the mythic process of conjuring away man’s violence by endlessly projecting it upon new victims.All cultures and all religions are built on that foundation, which they then conceal, just as the tomb is built around the dead body that it conceals....The tomb-religion amounts to nothing more or less than the becoming invisible of the foundations, of religion and culture, of their only reason for existence.
    • Since [many people] do not see that human community is dominated by violence, people do not understand that the very one of them who is untainted by any violence and has no form of complicity with violence is bound to become the victim. ... people fail to understand that they are indebted to violence for the degree of peace they enjoy. (210-211)
    • ... the primitive deity is essentially monstrous.” (35) [God becomes an object of fear that is more frightening than the threat of a competitive neighbor.] Religious systems form a whole in this sense, such that the infraction of any particular rule, no matter how absurd it may seem objectively, constitutes a challenge to the entire community.... In societies that do not have penal systems capable of halting the spread of mimetic rivalry and its escalation into a vicious cycle of violence, the religious system performs this very real function. (TH 41)
    • [T]he common origin of all institutions ... is the reproduction of generative* violence. (79) *Intentional, controlled, sanctioned violence whose intent is to prevent unintentional, uncontrolled, unsanctioned violence
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization 6.The Hebrew Scriptures - law/priesthood and/vs prophets
    • From the first lines of Genesis, we have the theme of the warring brothers or twins: Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Joseph and his eleven brothers, etc. ... It is always by violence, by the expulsion of one of the brothers, that the crisis is resolved, and differentiation returns once again. ... In the sacrifice of Isaac the necessity of sacrifice threatens the most precious being, only to be satisfied, at the last moment, with a substituted victim, the ram sent by God.
    • What the prophets come down to saying is basically this: legal prescriptions are of little consequence as long as you keep from fighting one another, so long as you do not become enemy twins.This is the new inspiration ...Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself (Lev 19, 18). [154-155) So the three great pillars of primitive religion - myth, sacrifice and prohibitions - are subverted by the thought of the Prophets, and this general activity of subversion is invariably governed by the bringing to light of the mechanisms that found religion: the unanimous violence against the scapegoat. (TH 155)
    • In the prophetic books, this conception [of God] tends to be increasingly divested of violence characteristic of primitive deities.... in the Old Testament we never arrive at a conception of the deity that is entirely foreign to violence. (157) ...The sacrifices are criticized, but they continue; the law is simplified and declared to be identical to love of one’s neighbor, but it continues.And even though he is presented in a less and less violent form, and becomes more and more benevolent,Yahweh is still the god to whom vengeance belongs.The notion of divine retribution is still alive. (TH 158)
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization 6.The Hebrew Scriptures 7. Jesus and the gospels
    • The Old Testament [was] a first step outside the sacrificial system, and the first gradual withering of sacrificial resources.At the very moment when this adventure approaches its resolution, Jesus arrives on the scene - Jesus as he appears in the gospels. From now on, it becomes impossible to put the clock back.There is an end to cyclical history, for the very reason that its mechanisms are beginning to be uncovered. (206)
    • Behaving in a truly divine manner, on an earth still in the clutches of violence, means not dominating humans, not overwhelming them with supernatural power; it means not terrifying and astonishing them in turn, through the sufferings and blessings on can confer; it means not creating difference between doubles and not taking part in their disputes.‘God is no respecter of persons.’ He makes no distinction between ‘Greeks and Jews, men and women, etc.’ This can look like complete indifference and can lead to the conclusion that the all-powerful does not exist, so long as his transcendence keeps him infinitely far from us and our violent undertakings. But the same characteristics are revealed as a heroic and perfect love once this transcendence becomes incarnate in a human being and walks among men, to teach them about the true God and to draw them closer to Him. (234)
    • [The text of the Gospels] speaks incessantly of everything we have said ourselves; it has no other function than to unearth victims of collective violence and to reveal their innocence. [TH 138]
    • Satan = Destructive Imitation,Violence It is no abstract metaphysical reduction, no descent into vulgar polemics or lapse into superstition that makes Satan the true adversary of Jesus. Satan is absolutely identified with the circular mechanisms of violence, with man’s imprisonment in cultural and philosophical systems that maintain his [way of life] with violence.That is why he promises Jesus domination provided that Jesus will worship him... Satan is the name for the mimetic process seen as a whole. (162)
    • Mary = Nonviolence In innumerable episodes of mythical birth, the god copulates with a mortal woman in order to give birth to a hero. Stories of this kind always involve more than a hint of violence.... the birth of the gods is always a kind of rape...The orgasm that appeases the god is a metaphor for collective violence. ... No relationship of violence exists between those who take part in the virgin birth: the Angel, theVirgin and the Almighty....The complete absence of any sexual element has nothing to do with repression ...All the themes and terms associated with the virgin birth convey to us a perfect submission to the non-violent will of the God of the Gospels. (220-221)
    • The Death of Jesus = End of Sacrificial Religion The Gospels only speak of sacrifices in order to reject them and deny them any validity. Jesus counters the ritualism of the Pharisees with an anti-sacrificial quotation from Hosea:“Go and learn what this means,‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice’” (Matthew 9:13). There is nothing in the Gospels to suggest that the death of Jesus is a sacrifice, whatever definition (expiation, substitution, etc.) we may give for sacrifice.At no point in the Gospels is the death of Jesus dfined as a sacrifice.... Certainly the Passion is presented to us in the Gospels as an act that brings salvation to humanity. But it is in no way presented as a sacrifice. (181)
    • Jesus = Nonviolent Word of God If love and violence are incompatible, the definition of the Logos must take this into account.The difference between the Greek Logos and the Johannine Logos must be an obvious one, which gets concealed only in the tortuous complications of a type of thought that never succeeds in ridding itself of its own violence. (270)
    • The gospel interpretation of the Old Testament can be summed up in this approach ... the replacement of the God that inflicts violence with the God that only suffers violence, the Logos that is expelled....When the consequences of this substitution finally come to fulfillment, there will be incalculable results. (275)
    • The sacrifical interpretation of the Passion must be criticized and exposed as a most enormous and paradoxical misunderstanding - and at the same time as something necessary - and as the most revealing indication of mankind’s radical incapacity to understand its own violence, even when that violence is conveyed in the most explicit fashion. (181)
    • To say that Jesus dies, not as a sacrifice, but in order that there may be no more sacrifices, is to recognize in him the Word of God,‘I wish for mercy and not sacrifices’.... Where violence remains master, Jesus must die. Rather than become the slave of violence, as our own word necessarily does, the Word of God says no to violence. (210-211)
    • A non-violent deity can only signal his existence to mankind by having himself driven out by violence - by demonstrating that he is not able to establish himself in the Kingdom ofViolence. But this very demonstration is bound to remain ambiguous for a very long time, and it is not capable of achieving a decisive result, since it looks like total impotence to those who live under the regime of violence. That is why at first it can only have some effect under a guise, deceptive through the admixture of some sacrificial elements, through the surreptitious re-insertion of some violence into the conception of the divine. (219-220)
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization 6.The Hebrew Scriptures 7. Jesus and the gospels 8.The violent reversion of “historical/sacrificial Christianity”
    • What turns Christianity in on itself, so that it presents a hostile face to all that is not Christian, is inextricably bound up with the sacrificial reading. (225)
    • Historical Christianity covers the texts with a veil of sacrifice. Or, to change the metaphor, it immolates them in the (albeit splendid) tomb of Western culture. (249) But the process requires an almost limitless patience: many centuries must elapse before the subversive and shattering truth contained in the Gospels can be understood world-wide. (252)
    • ... there has never been any thought in the West but Greek* thought, even when the labels were Christian. Christianity has no special existence in the domain of thought. Continuity with the Greek Logos has never been interrupted... everything is Greek and nothing is Christian. (273) *i.e. imperial, with centralized, sanctioned, institutional violence
    • Sacrificial Christianity still believes in divine thunderbolts, while its progressive double completely stifles the apocalyptic dimension and so deprives itself of the most valuable card that it has in its hands, under the flimsy pretext that the first priority is to reassure people. (442- 443)
    • - Beware resurrecting what you are trying to lay to rest: If we believed that we were justified in condemning sacrificial Christianity we would be repeating the very error to which sacrificial Christianity itself succumbed.We would be taking our stand on the Gospels and the non- sacrificial perspective they introduce, yet beginning all over again the abominable history of anti-semitism, directed this time at Christianity.We would be starting up the victimage mechanism once again, while relying on a text that, if it were really understood, would put that mechanism out of use once and for all. (245)
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization 6.The Hebrew Scriptures 7. Jesus and the gospels 8.The violent reversion of “historical/sacrificial Christianity” 9. Our apocalyptic moment
    • The Christian religion doesn’t understand its own gospel: [The Gospel] discredits and deconstructs all the gods of violence, since it reveals the true God, who has not the slightest violence in him. Since the time of the Gospels, mankind as a whole has always failed to comprehend this mystery, and it does so still. (429)
    • The ancient and violent violence-management system is breaking down ... In contemporary society ... no more taboos forbid one person to take what is reserved for another and no more initiation rites prepare individuals in common, for the necessary trials of life. (291)
    • Our weapons have achieved divine status - A truly wonderful sense of the appropriate has guided the inventory of the most terrifying weapons to choose names that evoke ultimate violence in the most effective way: names taken from the direst divinities of Greek mythology, like Titan, Poseidon, and Saturn, the god who devoured his own children.We who sacrifice fabulous resources to fatten the most inhuman form of violence so that it will continue to protect us... how can we have the extraordinary hypocrisy to pretend that we do not understand those people who ... made it their practice to throw a single child, or two at the most, into the furnace of a certain Moloch in order to ensure the safety of the others? (256)
    • Either we are moving to ineluctably toward nonviolence, or we are about to disappear completely....The genuinely new element is that violence can no longer be relied upon to resolve the crisis.Violence no longer guarantees a firm base. For violence to be capable of carrying out its cyclical development and bringing back peace, there must be an ecological field that can absorb the damage done in the process....The environment can no longer absorb the violence humans can unleash. (258) As for the terrors of the Apocalypse, no one could do better in that respect nowadays than the daily newspaper. (260)
    • 1. Imitation 2. Rivalry 3.Violence and Anxiety 4. Scapegoating 5. Religion, Prohibitions, Ritualization 6.The Hebrew Scriptures 7. Jesus and the gospels 8.The violent reversion of “historical/sacrificial Christianity” 9. Our apocalyptic moment 10.The challenges before us
    • - A new kind of Christianity must be resurrected from the old: ... this sacrificial concept of divinity must ‘die,’ and with it the whole apparatus of historical Christianity, for the Gospels to be able to rise again in our midst, not looking like a corpse that we have exhumed, but revealed as the newest, finest, liveliest and truest thing that we have ever set eyes upon. (235-236)
    • - We must rediscover Jesus as the nonviolent Word of God - Reflecting on John 1 There is no privileged stance from which absolute truth can be discovered...That is why the Word that states itself to be absolutely true never speaks except from the position of a victim in the process of being expelled.... [F]or two thousand years this Word has been misunderstood, despite the enormous amount of publicity it has received. (435)
    • - We must make a break with all violent images of God: [T]he complete break between the sacrificial god and the non-sacrificial God - the Father who has been made known to us only through Christ - in no way excludes a continuity between the sacrificial religions and this universal renunciation of violence to which all humanity is called....There is an absolute separation between the only true deity and all the deities of violence, who have been radically demystified by the Gospels alone. But this should not prevent us from recognizing in the religions of violence, which are always in search of peace, anyway, the methods that initially helped humanity to leave the animal state behind and then to elevate itself to unprecedented possibilities, though they are combined with the most extreme dangers. (410)
    • - We must rediscover the primacy of love: The New Testament contains what amounts to a genuine epistemology of love, the principle of which is clearly formulated in the first Epistle of John: He who loves his brother abides in the light, and in it there is no cause for stumbling. But he who hates his brother is in the darkness and walks in darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes. (1 John 3:10-11) ... Only Christ’s perfect love can achieve without violence the perfect revelation toward which we have been progressing.... (277)
    • - We must not slip into another cycle of fruitless scapegoating: I do not think that we should mince our words.We must refuse all the scapegoats that Freud and Freudianism have offered to us: the father, the law, etc.We must refuse the scapegoats that Marx offers: the bourgouisie, the capitalists, etc.We must refuse the scapegoats that Nietzsche offers: slave morality, the resentment of others and so on.All of modernism in its classic stage ... merely offers us scapegoats. (287)
    • - We must practice the opposite of scapegoating - the sacred protection (rather than sacrifice) of victims: ... there can be no victim who is not Christ, and no one can come to the aid of a victim without coming to the aid of Christ. (429)
    • - We must rediscover the Bible: Pascal writes somewhere that it is permissible to correct the Bible, but only by invoking the Bible’s help.That is exactly what we are doing when we re-read Genesis and the whole of the Old Testament, and the whole of culture, in the light of these few lines from the Prologue of John.The immense labor that went into the inspired text of the Bible (which is also the onward march of humanity toward the discovery of its own truth) can all be summed up in this repetition of the first sentence of Genesis and the ‘slight’ rectification it carries out. (276) We were able to detect a series of stages in the Bible that invariably pointed toward the attenuation and later elimination of the practice of sacrifice. (443)
    • Two Christologies: 1. Define God. 2. Apply Definition to Jesus.
    • Two Christologies: 1. Define God. 2. Apply Definition to Jesus. 1. Define God. 2. Encounter Jesus. 3. Re-define God in light of Jesus.
    • Jesus as the non-violent word of God. God with and for the poor. God who cares for creation.
    • a new kind of christianity: ten questions that aretransforming the faith
    • 4. The Jesus Question: Who is Jesus, and why does he matter? 5. The Gospel Question: What is the gospel - a message of evacuation or transformation? Exclusion or inclusion? - Reign, kingdom, economy, ecosystem, dance, friendship, network of God.
    • 6. The church question: What do we do about the church? - The church as school of love, training and deploying of love-peace-justice activists.
    • 7. The sex question: Can we deal with issues of sexuality without fighting and dividing? - Deeper issue: sexuality to embodiment to humanity to creation 8. The future question: Can we find a more hopeful vision of the future? - Evacuation plan to incarnation plan, a Participatory Eschatology
    • 9. The pluralism question: How should we relate to people of other faiths? - Seeking a strong and benevolent Christian identity 10. The next step question: How can we pursue this quest in humility, love, and peace? - Winning a hearing, not winning an argument.
    • we need a theology of institutions & movements
    • Institutions: Organizations which conserve the gains made by past social movements to support convivial communities.
    • Social Movements Organizations which call current institutions to make progress towards new gains to support convivial communities.
    • QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Ivan Illich (Austrian former priest, philosopher, social critic, 1926-2002)
    • Neither revolution nor reformation can ultimately change a society, rather you must tell a new powerful tale, one so persuasive that it sweeps away the old myths and becomes the preferred story …
    • … one so inclusive that it gathers all the bits of our past and our present into a coherent whole, one that even shines some light into the future so that we can take the next step…. If you want to change a society, then you have to tell an alternative story. - attributed to Ivan Illich (Austrian former priest, philosopher, social critic, 1926-2002)
    • Something is on the way out and something else is painfully being born. It is as if something were crumbling, decaying, and exhausting itself, while something else, still indistinct, were arising from the rubble.... We are in a phase when one age is succeeding another, when everything is possible. Vaclav Havel,“The New Measure of Man”
    • Fr. Vincent Donovan: Do not leave others where they are. Do not bring them to where you are, as beautiful as that place might be. Instead, go with them to a new place neither you nor they have ever been before.
    • Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel (the good, joyful, healing story) to all creation. - Jesus
    • The Lord’s Prayer • O God, whose love makes us one family … 2. May Your unspeakable Name be revered.
    • 3. Now, here on earth may Your commonwealth come. 4. On earth as in heaven may Your will be done.
    • 5. Give us today our bread for today. 4. Forgive us our wrongs as we forgive.
    • 3. Lead us away from the perilous trial. 2. Liberate us from the evil.
    • 1.For the kingdom is yours and yours alone. 2. The power is yours and yours alone. 3.The glory is yours and yours alone. 4.Now and forever, amen.
    • 5. Now, here on earth may your commonwealth come. 4. Here on earth may your dreams come true. 3. Hallelujah 2. Hallelujah 1. Amen.
    • something is trying to be born: envisioning a new kind of Christian faith Text