CREATIVE OUTLETS - ROUND ROCK 2014

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CREATIVE OUTLETS - ROUND ROCK 2014

  1. 1. PLUGGING INTO CREATIVE! OUTLETS DR. BRIAN HOUSAND http://brianhousand.com bit.ly/RRISD2014
  2. 2. brianhousand.com
  3. 3. 2014 ARKANSAS NEBRASKA CALIFORNIA NORTH CAROLINA GEORGIA MONTANA SOUTH CAROLINA TEXAS WASHINGTON CONNECTICUT ALABAMA KANSAS FLORIDA MARYLAND
  4. 4. #gtchat
  5. 5. STAGES IN THE CREATIVE PROCESS THE FUTURE CREATIVITY + TECHNOLOGY
  6. 6. 1. IDENTIFY A TECH TOOL 5. EVALUATE 4. WATCH IT GROW 3. GIVE IT TIME 2. PROVIDE A PURPOSE 5 STEP TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PLAN (Besnoy, Housand, & Clark, 2008)
  7. 7. TYPE III INDEPENDENT OR SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS PRODUCTS AND/OR PERFORMANCES TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES ! TYPE II METHODOLOGICAL TRAINING / HOW-TO ACTIVITIES ! (Renzulli, 1977)
  8. 8. Plugging Into Creative Outlets Brian C. Housand Angela M. Housand ! Gifted Education Communicator Spring 2011 Vol. 42, No. 1
  9. 9. ! !   ! !   We  are  educa)ng  people   out  of  their  crea)vity.   !       Crea)vity  is  as  important   in  educa)on  as  literacy.   Sir Ken Robinson
  10. 10. Rather than running the risk of having our students become ! W A L K I N G ENCYCLOPEDIAS! we need to TEACH them how to ! THINK CREATIVELY. (Sternberg,  2006)
  11. 11. www.p21.org Learning and Innovation Skills Creativity and Innovation! Critical Thinking and Problem Solving! Communication and Collaboration
  12. 12. bit.ly/nets-profiles 1. Creativity and Innovation! 2. Communication and Collaboration! 3. Research and Information Fluency! 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and! Decision Making! 5. Digital Citizenship! 6. Technology Operations and Concepts!
  13. 13. Identify, research, and collect data on an environmental issue using digital resources and propose a solution. PK - 2
  14. 14. Produce a media-rich digital story about a significant local event based on first-person interviews. 3 - 5
  15. 15. Create original animations or videos documenting school, community, or local events. 6 - 8
  16. 16. Design, develop, and test a digital learning game to demonstrate knowledge and skills related to curriculum content. 9 - 12
  17. 17. ?Differentiated Curriculum. Adaptation of content, process, and concepts to meet a higher level of expectation appropriate for advanced learners. Curriculum can be differentiated through acceleration, complexity, depth, challenge, and CREATIVITY (VanTassel-Baska & Wood, 2008).
  18. 18. Don’t tell someone to BE CREATIVE.! Get moving.! Take a break. ! Reduce screen time.! Explore other cultures.! Follow a passion.! Ditch the suggestion box.
  19. 19. (Resnick, 1996) ! NOT Stereos Pianos
  20. 20. GRAHAM WALLAS PREPARATION INCUBATION ILLUMINATION VERIFICATION
  21. 21. If#you#don’t#read#much,# you#really#don’t#know#much.# #YOU ARE DANGEROUS!! DANGER --Jim Trelease TOOLISHNESS! AHEAD
  22. 22. INCUBATION
  23. 23. Games are the most elevated form of investigation.
  24. 24. 20%
  25. 25. Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376. CREATIVITY COMPUTER USE INTERNET USE CELL PHONE USE VIDEO GAME PLAY
  26. 26. Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., & Zhao, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28(2), 370-376. CREATIVITY VIDEO GAME PLAY
  27. 27. (Papert, 1993) Computers serve best when they allow everything to CHANGE
  28. 28. Video games teach children what computers are beginning to teach adults--that some forms of learning are fast-paced, immensely compelling, and rewarding. - Seymour Papert
  29. 29. The fact that they are enormously demanding of one's time and require new ways of thinking remains a small price to pay (and is perhaps even an advantage) to be vaulted into the future. - Seymour Papert
  30. 30. Not surprisingly, by comparison school strikes many young people as slow, boring, and frankly out of touch. - Seymour Papert
  31. 31. REAL GAMES VS. EDUCATIONAL GAMES
  32. 32. “There is nothing that is NOT possible.”
  33. 33. SURVIVAL OR CREATIVE
  34. 34. UNLIMITED You can make it into whatever you want it to be.
  35. 35. FOR aLL INTENTS aND PURPOSES, IT IS A SPACE WHERE YOU ARE GOD
  36. 36. If you are impatient then this may not be the gAme for you
  37. 37. CONSUMERS PRODUCERS
  38. 38. www.truthandtrolls.com
  39. 39. www.pinkiesquare.com
  40. 40. 49
  41. 41. gamestarmechanic.com
  42. 42. code.org/learn
  43. 43. ILLUMINATION
  44. 44. http://www.flickr.com/groups/visualstory/ five frames
  45. 45. flickr five frames 1st photo: establish characters and location
  46. 46. flickr five frames 2nd photo: create a situation with possibilities of what might happen
  47. 47. flickr five frames 3rd photo: involve the characters in the situation
  48. 48. flickr five frames 4th photo: build to probable outcomes
  49. 49. flickr five frames 5th photo: have a logical but surprising end
  50. 50. ! “Gifted  means  you  have  abilities  to  do  stuff  others  may  not  be  able  to  do,  even  if  they  are  not   easy.    This  tree  is  growing  in  the  shade  under  a  step….that’s  not  easy.”
  51. 51. “As  a  gifted  learner  I  feel  that  I  am  different;     I  am  a  leader;  and  I  am  powerful!”  
  52. 52. “Giftedness  is  you  are  special     and  stand  out  from  others     because  of  your  talent.”
  53. 53. “We  all  have  an  impact  on  the  world.       Although  we’re  small,  someday  we     will  do  something  great.    It  means  to     be  inspiring,  creative,  helpful,  and  smart.       Although  being  gifted  has  its  problems,     Being  gifted  is  very  special.”  
  54. 54. “We  are  all  different.    Everyone  has  different  abilities;  some   people  may  enjoy  learning.    Being  gifted  is  being  yourself.”
  55. 55. “Being  gifted  isn’t   different;     it’s  unique.”
  56. 56. “Giftedness  is   being  different  in   your  own  way  and   to  capture   beautiful  moments   in  life  for   something  cool.     Then  your   differences  will   shine!”
  57. 57. “Giftedness   means  you  can   be  talented  in   some  things  but   not  at  others;   you  swing  back   and  forth  at  the   things  you  are   good  at  and  the   things  you  are   not.”
  58. 58. “Being  gifted  is  like   flying  in  the  sky;     free  to  learn.”
  59. 59. “Cracked  mud  is  like  a  puzzle;     like  the  parts  of  the  brain.       When  put  together,  makes  a   gifted  person.”
  60. 60. “Being  gifted   means  being   creative  in   your  own   special  way.”
  61. 61. GarageBand djay DM1
  62. 62. iMovie Trailers
  63. 63. diy.org
  64. 64. Googleable
  65. 65. “We don’t have the option of turning away from the future. No one gets to vote on whether technology is going to change our lives.” ! Bill Gates   The Road Ahead
  66. 66. Summer 2013 T he admonition that we should be preparing our students for the 21st century is everywhere. There are numerous books, blogs, and content resources promoting and espousing the virtues of 21st cen- tury learning. If one examines the titles and descriptions of presentations at any gifted or general education conference, reference to 21st century learning is prevalent. Most of us in gifted education have regularly advocated for teaching trace their origins back at least 30 years. In 1983, the Na- tional Science Board Commission on Precollege Education in Mathematics, Science and Technology published a report entitled, Educating Americans for the 21st Century: A Plan of Action for Improving Mathematics, Science, and Technol- ogy Education for All American Elementary and Secondary Students So that their Achievement is the Best in the World by 1995. This publication outlined many of the same initia- Quality Classroom Practice for High-Abillity Students Teaching for High Potential THPThe 21st Century is SO Yesterday Brian C. Housand, Ph.D. East Carolina University www.brianhousand.com Brian Housand is an Assistant Professor at East Carolina University in the department of Elementary Education. “The world is moving at a tremendous rate. No one knows where. We must prepare our children, not for the world of the past, not for our world, but for their world, the world of the future.” — John Dewey
  67. 67. ENGAGING CURIOSITY
  68. 68. ENGINEERING SERENDIPITY
  69. 69. futurecasting.org
  70. 70. UNDERSTANDING DESIGN
  71. 71. CONSTRUCTING SYNTHESIS
  72. 72. Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and SYNTHESIZE new things. - Steve Jobs, 1995
  73. 73. GT = GOOD TEACHING
  74. 74. GOOD TEACHING “It doesn’t matter what you cover; it matters how much you develop THE CAPACITY TO DISCOVER
  75. 75. brianhousand.com t y v m

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