Committee Of The Whole September 8 2011 Final Version

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Presentation to the Board of County Commissioners to highlight the various administrative issues we will face in the November 2012 election cycle.

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Committee Of The Whole September 8 2011 Final Version

  1. 1. Election 2012Administrative Overview for BOCC Committee of the Whole Brian D. Newby Election Commissioner Johnson County, Kansas www.jocoelection.org http://my.jocopolo.com September 8, 2011
  2. 2. Session Objectives Today’s meeting is intended to: • Provide a general update to issues impacting Johnson County elections. • Highlight specific administrative areas of note for 2012. • Assess readiness. • Be interactive and strategic—if we have great discussion but don’t get past this slide, the meeting likely would be more successful than if we complete the deck but don’t have that engagement.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 2
  3. 3. Johnson County Election Office By The Numbers Staff Members:  Voters:  16 Full‐time  358,000 + Employees, up to  250 part‐time Voting  Precincts: 447 Locations: varies 150 Spring ‐ Voting  285 Presidential Machines:  2,407 Ballot  Advance Voting  Styles:  Locations: 4 Up to  1,461Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 3
  4. 4. Johnson County Potential 800,000 Benefits Potential Drawbacks 744,059 700,000 644,559 600,000 550,904 500,000 451,086 400,000 355,054 463,333 411,191 270,269 300,000 360,000 312,788 200,000 100,000 155,769 173,570 0 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Population Active Voter Registration Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Johnson County Election Office, Mid-America Regional Council Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 4
  5. 5. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 5
  6. 6. Johnson County Elections, 2009 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 25 Spring Primary 26 Spring General 27 Roeland Pk Ward 4 28 Fairway 29 Merriam 30 2010 Spring Primary 31 2010 Spring General Regularly Scheduled Elections Special Elections Primary General Mail Ballot Polls Recall Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 6
  7. 7. Johnson County Elections, 2010 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 29 Merriam 30 Spring Primary 31 Gardner Recall I 32 Gardner Recall II 33 Spring General 34 Primary Partisan 35 2010 General 36 City of De Soto 37 2011 Spring Primary 38 2011 Spring General Regularly Scheduled Elections Special Elections Primary General Mail Ballot Polls Recall Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 7
  8. 8. Johnson County Elections, 2011 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 36 City of De Soto 37 2011 Spring Primary 38 2011 Spring General 39 Spring Hill School District 40 City of Mission 41 Blue Valley School District 42 Gardner School District 43 Roeland Park? Regularly Scheduled Elections Special Elections Primary General Mail Ballot Polls Recall Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 8
  9. 9. Johnson County Elections, 2012 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC41 BV Schools42 Gardner Sch43 Roeland Park?44 Spring Primary 45 Spring General 46 Primary Partisan 47 2012 Presidential 48 Spring General Regularly Scheduled Elections Special Elections Primary General Mail Ballot Polls Recall Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 9
  10. 10. Johnson County, KansasEst. Population 550,000 Registered Voters 358,592Registered Voters 350,000 New Internet Party “Americans Elect” = 0 Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 10
  11. 11. Johnson County Voting Statistics Registered Voters Total Voted Turnout % Year JoCoPop Growth% November Growth% November Growth% November Trend 1960 143,792 77,420 65,033 84% 1964 177,137 23% 84,059 9% 72,483 11% 86% 2% 1968 212,245 20% 100,610 20% 88,314 22% 88% 2% 1972 231,933 9% 120,407 20% 104,136 18% 86% -1% 1976 243,953 5% 140,956 17% 117,040 12% 83% -3% 1980 266,489 9% 155,769 11% 125,637 7% 81% -2% 1984 283,666 6% 169,773 9% 141,715 13% 83% 3% 1988 328,537 16% 185,727 9% 155,267 10% 84% 1% 1992 374,801 14% 222,815 20% 197,265 27% 89% 5% 1996 411,635 10% 246,497 11% 192,202 -3% 78.0% -11% 2000 451,086 10% 312,788 27% 218,486 14% 70% -8% 2004 496,691 10% 348,552 11% 259,599 19% 75% 5% 2008 532,215 7% 364,441 5% 285,001 10% 78.2% 3% 2012 e 551,529 4% 390,000 7% 292,500 3% 75% -3% Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 11
  12. 12. Voting is Local Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 12
  13. 13. Legislative Changes Since 2008• Secure And Fair Elections (SAFE) Act• Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment (MOVE) Act• Full ballot for overseas voters• Changes in Canvass datesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 13
  14. 14. Key Legislative Outcomes:1. There will be no presidential preference primary in 2012. Parties will conduct caucuses.2. Beginning in 2012, every voter must show photo identification each time they vote.3. By-mail advance voters who ask other people to mail or deliver their ballots must designate the delivery persons in writing.4. Beginning in 2013, individuals must provide proof of U.S. citizenship when they register to vote for the first time in Kansas.5. The candidate filing deadline in even-year elections is moved from noon on June 10 to noon on June 1.6. In the redistricting year of 2012, the candidate filing deadline may be June 1, June 10 or, if there is litigation, a date set by a court.7. The voter registration deadline for all elections is moved from the 15th day to the 21st day before the election.8. The county canvass is held either on Monday or the second Thursday following the election, rather than Friday or Monday.9. The deadline to request a single-district recount in a specific county is 5:00 pm the day following the county canvass. Once requested, recounts must be completed in 5 calendar days.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 14
  15. 15. Even More Legislative Outcomes:1. Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Access Voting Abroad (UOCAVA) voters now vote a complete ballot, with all the races and issues that regular ballots contain.2. UOCAVA voters must submit ballot applications annually instead of once every two years.3. In local elections held in the spring of odd-numbered years, a primary is held if more than 3 candidates file for an office, and the two candidates receiving the most votes in the primary move on to the general election.4. Candidates for state offices file their campaign finance reports only with the Secretary of State, not with the county election officer.5. Candidates may not appear in advertisements or public service announcements within 60 days of a primary election, extending until the general election is over.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 15
  16. 16. Federal Service Voters Growth in Federal Service Ballots  2000 Ballots Issued 1500 1515 1165 1000 530 500 0 2000 2004 2008 Presidential Elections Literally, each of these voters (who vote using procedures from the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act—UOCAVA) requires the involvement of a staff member to ensure ballots are received and returned. It would be the equivalent of one sales person managing the Fortune 1500 companies. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 16
  17. 17. Census ImpactsThe Chief Election Officer is each county’s point person for thecensus:• Redistricting will move voters from different congressional, senate, and state legislative districts.• This redistricting may not be completed until late spring, leaving a crunch mode to move voters, create new maps, and process candidate filings in early June.• Potential for Spanish ballots comes from the census and we should know the outcome of that within a month: Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 mandates that a state or political subdivision must provide language assistance to voters if more than 5 percent of the voting age citizens are members of a single- language minority group or if more than 10,000 of the voting age citizens are members of a single-language minority group.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 17
  18. 18. Area Closings Will Impact 2012More than 50,000 voters cast ballots by mail in 2008. 40,000ballots were mailed out 20 days before election day, the firstday they could be mailed by law. • In 2012, the downtown Olathe Post Office will be closed, adding more complexity to our mail processing. • Further, the U.S. Postal Service is nearing default on its financial obligations, which will trigger Congressional action. It’s possible service on one or more days will eventually end, making voting by mail, potentially, unviable in the long-term. • Similarly, the election office now has only one newspaper for the many statutorily required publications following the closing of the Johnson County Sun.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 18
  19. 19. Other UncertaintiesThe Election Office is required to serve as an advance votinglocation. • Others used in 2008 may not be available (Metcalf South or Shawnee) or viable (Northeast Offices) in 2012. • It’s too early to negotiate with landlords for alternate sites because there is optimism on their part that space will be filled. Negotiations are resource- intensive. • We’ve had a civic-minded lease with Metcalf South but other locations cost $5,000 per month or more. Leases are for 5 months. • Similarly, polling places must be assigned this fall and polling places are difficult to obtain, making advance voting vital. Without advance voting, we would need 450 polling locations and at least 800 more voting machines. • Like all Johnson County employees, election workers have felt the economy’s impacts. They have not had an increase since 2006, although they will work a 15-hour day in November 2012. (Polls are open an hour longer in presidential elections). By law, election worker pay is set by the BOCC.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 19
  20. 20. Advance Voting—2008 Presidential 50 percent of voters voted in advance. The distribution results in three distinct elections—in person advance, advance by mail, and in-person at the polls. In-Person Advance 86,020 By-Mail Advance 55,585 In-Person Election Day 143,396 Total 285,001* *--provisional votes distributed proportionately to election night totals (In-Person Election Day) (In-Person Advance) (By-Mail Advance) Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 20
  21. 21. Advance Voting Almost half of Johnson County’s in-person advance totals were from non-county owned locations. In-Person Johnson County Election Office 29,695 In-Person Metcalf South 22,883 In-Person Shawnee 18,025 In-Person Johnson County Northeast Office 15,417 Total 86,020 Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 21
  22. 22. Polling Place Layout and Flow Perfect Voter votes and exits machine Voting Provisional machine booth Voting machine Perfect Voter returns deactivated Voter Card to container and receives Election worker EW admits Perfect “I Voted” sticker Voter to voting EW machine and Perfect Voter receives confirms precinctVoter plastic Voter Card split & party Perfect Voter affiliation (inenters here encoded according to Voting receives Voter partisan election) Receipt receipt machine Voter checks in Encoder machine Voting machine Advance voting is similar, except that computers are connected to the statewide voter registration system.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 22
  23. 23. Citizen SatisfactionEven with the same number of full-time staff as in 1996, Electionsranks well in the county’s citizen survey. Satisfaction levels have been similar in the 2005, 2007, and 2009 surveys.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 23
  24. 24. Human Capital Issues Johnson-Wyandotte Election Office Comparison Registered Voters 2011 Voters served per staff Average Salary (2008) National average of voters served per full-time employee is 6,000, according to the National Association of Election Officials Wyandotte  County Johnson County 22,412 $53,824 Johnson  Johnson County County 358k $47,063 Wyandotte County 11,497 Wyandotte County 80k Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 24
  25. 25. Election WorkersJohnson County Election Workers• Minimum of 3 per polling location by law.• Average of 6 per polling place in 2012.• Must, if possible, have one representative from each party.• Must be a registered voter in the county and, if possible, live in the precinct.• Requests are made to each party for workers.• Students (less than 18 but 16 or older) can work as election workers, one per polling location.• 10 percent of our workers are high-school students.• Average age of election workers is 68.• Average tenure of election workers in the 2012 election will be six years.• Workers are generally needed in the outlying areas—Gardner, Edgerton, De Soto, Spring Hill, and Stilwell.• County employees from 19 departments have served as election workers.• Workers train for 3 hours before each election; supervising judges receive a second training just for that function.• Workers provide their own transportation and meals.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 25
  26. 26. Freedom Isn’t Free……But In Johnson County, It Almost Is Of the 284 polling places Johnson County utilized in 2008: Total polling place rent, Aug. and Nov. 50 Paid 2008, estimated: $5,000 234 Free • Johnson County’s Election Office was able to negotiate $2,000 in total rent at Metcalf South for advance voting in August and November 2006. • 2008 rent for two sites was $30,000. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 26
  27. 27. Polling Places by the Numbers Johnson County Polling Places and Registered Voters Presidential Elections 1996 - 2008 350 400,000 360,000 348,552 300 350,000 312,788 300,000 250 246,497 1,267 Registered Voters 1,219  Voters per 250,000 Polling Places 1,208 Voters per Polling Place 200 1,086  Voters per Polling Place Voters per Polling Place 200,000 Polling Place 150 150,000 100 100,000 50 50,000 227 259 286 284 0 0 1996 2000 2004 2008Brian D. Newby, November 29, 2007 27
  28. 28. Voting TechnologyJohnson County has used voting machines formore than 40 years, since 1966.• Voters authorized the county to purchase voting machines.• For most under the age of 65, voting on machine, rather than paper, has been the method of voting the entire time they have voted in Johnson County. 2001• Johnson County moved to touch-screen voting First Version, generation machines in 2001 and implemented them in 2002. machine Diebold TS• These machines were bought from Global Election Systems, a company acquired by Diebold shortly after Johnson County’s 2001 equipment purchase.• Essentially, these machines are using 1990s touch-screen technology (four- wire resistive): Smartphones and tablet computers like iPhones and iPads weren’t invented yet when these machines were designed. These new devices use much more advanced touch-screen technology. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 28
  29. 29. History of Voting TechnologyJohnson County is utilizing its second generation of DRETouch-Screen Machines.• Older TS machines were replaced by TSX machines.• 300 TS machines were retained as encoders (one per polling place, prepares ballot on voter card) until 2008.• TSx machines utilized as encoders beginning in 2008.• Diebold renamed election division “Premier” in 2007 and sold Premier to Election Systems and Software (ES&S) in 2009.• Department of Justice sued Election Systems and Software in 2010, resulting in divestiture of intellectual property of Premier’s recently certified software to Dominion Voting Systems.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 29
  30. 30. History of Voting Technology What this means to Johnson County: • TSx machines are no longer being manufactured. • Johnson County does not pay the $100,000 annual maintenance contract on the TSx machines. • Johnson County is in a unique position where it could be supported by ES&S or Dominion. However, because much of what we do is autonomous, without vendor involvement, this position is less impactful than it could be. If we move to the new certified software on these machines, however, we must do that with Dominion. • In 2012, machines will be 9 years old, with estimated life of 7 to 10 years. (TS machine parts began failing within 5 years).Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 30
  31. 31. Touch-Screen Voting Timeline 2001 • TS Units put into  service • Express Polls •Johnson County  delivered, but not yet  Purchases 860 TS Units  certified for use and 300 Express Polls  (electronic poll  books/encoders) 2002 TS Unit 2004 •California Decertifies voting machines without Voter  Verifiable Paper Audit Trail •Johnson County trades up, replacing its 860 machines  for new and used TSX machines (from California),  bringing the fleet to 1,305 Express PollBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 31
  32. 32. Touch-Screen Voting Timeline 2005 • Johnson County  orders 576 additional  TSx machines with •Express Polls certified dollars from the Help •Boxes opened; order not  America Vote Act.  complete•Statewide voter  registration/election  management system is  2006 TSx Unit successfully implemented 2007 •Express Polls not accepted because the technology is outdated. •300 TS machines returned to Diebold •576 TSx machines ordered in 2006 delivered and accepted (there was no  warehouse space for the new machines until the TS machines were sent back)Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 32
  33. 33. Touch-Screen Voting Timeline 2008 •125 machines are purchased from Diebold/Premier.  TSx machines used as encoders. 2011 •400 purchased from ES&S, putting fleet at 2406. •Election office does not have the capability to store or power additional machines. •Table retrofit is underway to allow space for these new units in our warehouse 2017 •Spring election would be the absolute drop‐dead date for the lifespan of this system to  be exhausted.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 33
  34. 34. Voting TechnologyDuring the next election cycle, the Election Office will postvideos on YouTube to demonstrate the method of calibratingand testing voting machines. This sign also appears at ourpolling locations. Please Note  Touch screens on voting machines are sensitive.  You must retouch a wrong selection to cancel it before making another selection.  Carefully review your choices on the summary page prior to casting your ballot. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 34
  35. 35. Audit Trail Johnson County’s voting machines have an audit trail consistent with the Help America Vote Act, as well as Kansas Secretary of State and voluntary voting guidelines.• Do they have a paper trail? Yes. Ballots cast can be and have been printed for recounts. Ballots are stored, with voter privacy, on the machine’s hard drive and on a removable drive.• Do they have a paper trail with a printer on the side? No. This is often referred to as a Voter Verifiable Paper Audit Trail (VVPAT). This capability was invented after Johnson County’s machines were built. The lack of VVPAT was why the machines were de-certified in California. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach would prefer all systems have a formal paper trail (VVPAT or paper ballots). Upgrading to VVPAT capability with Johnson County’s current system is not an option. The machines could be upgraded with new software, from Dominion, at a cost estimate of approximately $1.8 million.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 35
  36. 36. Machine SecurityThe Johnson County Election Office is staffed by 16 sworn electionprofessionals who adhere to The Election Center’s Code of Ethics,which was adopted by our office in 1997. • The Election Office full-time staff manages all aspects of elections for residents of Johnson County. • The staff is responsible for programming, verifying, tabulating, and controlling every election. • We utilize seasoned election workers to conduct all of our pre-election testing. • The vendor has never programmed our elections and does not have remote access to our election software. • We control our own elections—no outside entity is involved in programming or election-day support.Our office building, located at 2101 E. Kansas City Road in Olathe, hascontrolled access and is secured through an alarm system with a numberedlock and password-protected entrance keypad. • Within the building there are numerous rooms with different levels of controlled access. • The election computer room and the ballot storage vault are monitored by security cameras 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. • Combination lock passwords are changed after each election cycle.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 36
  37. 37. Machine Security (cont.)The election software computer is freestanding. It is not networked withinthe office or connected to the Internet. 1. Physically, the vendor’s election software and each individual election database are secured on a computer that is accessible by few members of our office staff only. 2. This computer is installed in a secure room with controlled access. One staff member has a key to enter the room, but the room requires a code as well from another staff member. Thus, 2 persons are in the room, at a minimum, at any time. 3. A video camera also records all activity in this room. 4. The computer requires a password, which only one employee knows. The specific election requires a different password, again known by only one employee. 5. Individual election database files are backed up at designated milestones and secured in the tabulation room and in off-site storage. 6. All voting machine keys, voter cards, and storage media are secured in a controlled access room. Staff maintains a detailed inventory control of these supplies. 7. Keys and combinations are assigned so that any election-centric procedure requires at least two persons. 8. On Election Night, our election results are hand-carried by election judges to election headquarters. 9. We do not use modems to transmit results.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 37
  38. 38. 7:30 11:30 Polling Place (285) Results 11:00 PC Card Server Results 8:00 Drop- Off Site (20) UploadPC Card PC Card PC Card (2,200) 8:40 Election Office PC CardPC Card PC CardBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 38
  39. 39. Election SetupThe Johnson County Election Office may use only voting systems, equipment andsoftware certified through the Kansas Secretary of State’s Office.A voting system must pass three levels of tests before it can be used in Kansas - FederalQualification Tests, State Certification Tests, and local Acceptance Tests. Our policy hasbeen to receive software updates directly from the Independent Testing Authority thatcertified the software. 1. Before each election our office conducts a Systems Diagnostic Test on each voting machine to ensure that it is operating properly. 2. Logic and Accuracy (L&A) Tests are performed on each election data card. In addition, an L&A is done to test the integration of the voting machine data cards with the paper ballot system. 3. This L&A assures the accuracy of the entire process for every election – merging of paper ballot and machine votes to expected hand-calculated outcomes, including a review of all reports. 4. Throughout the entire testing process there is an internal separation of duties and dual sign-off accountability on all processes—maintaining an extensive audit trail, including all proofing documentation. 5. Tabulation effectiveness is demonstrated through a public test, with notice published by law and verified again post-election. 6. Each voting machine is secured with a unique padlock and key combination. 7. Data cards for the voting machines are secured at the Election Office until the afternoon before the election, when they are picked up in a numbered, sealed pouch by the Supervising Judge of each polling place. 8. On Election Day, poll workers confirm the seal numbers on PC card pouches and voting machines, then verify protective counters before inserting PC cards into voting machines to activate the election. This validation is signed by all sworn election workers.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 39
  40. 40. Election Day Each polling place in our county is staffed by sworn election workers, who have attended a mandatory training session during each election cycle. 1. The Supervising Judge is responsible for balancing the number of voters processed to votes collected periodically throughout the day. On election day, the Supervising Judge maintains control of all machine keys. 2. There are numerous checks and balances in place, including separation of duties as each voter moves through the polling place. 3. A beginning “zero proof” printout from each voting machine validates that there are no votes stored on the results cartridges. This printout is signed by all sworn election workers. 4. An individual voter receipt is issued to each voter at check-in. A voter must present a voter receipt in order to be issued a voting machine activation card. 5. An activation card is not issued until a voting machine is available for use. 6. Each voter is escorted to a voting machine by a Machine Attendant. The Machine Attendant used the voter receipt to validate that the correct ballot is displayed for the voter. 7. The voter receipt is deposited in an envelope at the voting machine, providing a paper audit trail for the number of votes collected in each voting machine. The voter receipt is comparable to a paper ballot stub. 8. The voter cards are collected at the exit door by an election worker. 9. An end-of-day tally includes balancing voters processed to votes collected, and validating that the numbers of voter cards issued to the polling place are being returned to the Election Office. 10. A closing printout from each voting machine confirms the total number of votes collected in each machine. This printout is again signed by all sworn election workers. 11. The election results data cards, again secured in a numbered, sealed pouch, are hand-carried by election judges to the Election Office, where the votes are tabulated.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 40
  41. 41. Further Security Concerns Despite the focus on security, more investment could be made: 1. We have outsourced a security audit and received a proposal that we are reviewing internally and with facilities, which has, itself, conducted a security audit. 2. Likely, proposals will be brought to the BOCC for additional spending on cameras and fencing. 3. Aside from election security, a risk exists from the hacking industry—not of voting machines but of other county systems that could impact voter confidence: 1. For instance, a hacker who could reach the elections website—stored at the county—could cause voters to wonder if others systems were impacted. 2. Four election office websites have been hacked since July 2011. 3. Election and website systems are unrelated and unassociated, and the ITS group understands the concern, but this is a security issue outside of the control of the Election Office. 4. Any issue “outside of the control of the Election Office,” could still cause voters to wonder how much control our office actually has over voting security. 5. While we have great control over election security, mitigating effects of any unrelated outside force is something of which we are continually mindful.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 41
  42. 42. These individuals have become celebrated election hactivists, having hacked a District of Columbia Internet election trial (by invitation). They have obtained a TSx machine and sponsored a hacking election on the machine at a national conference.Example of a high-profile hactivist, 2006
  43. 43. Next Generation Voting Certification to the 2012 Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (under development) requires the use of paper: • Machines with Voter Verifiable Paper Audit Trail • Paper ballots • Devices which print paper $13 million is considered the high side for the most expensive solution—Machines with Voter Verifiable Paper Audit Trail. Johnson County will need to consider a total cost solution (capital and operating costs) when developing and evaluating its Request for Proposal.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 43
  44. 44. History of Voting TechnologyNew systems must: • Be federally certified by the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) • Comply with the EAC’s 2008 Voluntary Voting Systems Guidelines • Be certified in the state of Kansas Currently, no system meets this criteria. Internet voting likewise does not meet this criteria. Internet voting has security risks but is the centerpiece of the MOVE Act. If Internet voting becomes successful with military voters, the industry likely will be pulled to this technology. Another backdrop to these issues is the role of the EAC, empowered by the Help America Vote Act. Many--including the National Association of Secretaries of State, the current Kansas Secretary of State, and the Johnson County Election Commissioner—believe the EAC has outlived its role and should be abolished or blended into other agencies. This would place more emphasis on Kansas certification and may allow for more innovation and, definitely, reduced costs. A bill to abolish the EAC was introduced in the House of Representatives but did not gain the votes needed to advance to the Senate.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 44
  45. 45. Elections as Public Policy The equipment issues facing Johnson County are not solely Retrofit Fleet of 1,881 TSx Machines election issues. They are public policy issues that require the same consideration by the Board of County Commissioners as other service levels with other agencies. Considerations of any equipment decisions • How will service levels be changed now? • Will any change limit our service level options in the future? Put Machines on Ice, Go Paper • What is the possibility of stranded investment? • What is the possibility of federal or state funding? • Will action now limit or prevent cost recovery from federal or state sources?Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 45
  46. 46. So Why Not Go Back to Paper? This question is often asked by voters. “Back to Paper” has an impractical romantic quality. Perception Reality • Less susceptible to fraud. • The potential for fraud is what drove the use of voting machines. Voter intent questions come to the forefront, leaving more elections decided by courts and governing bodies. • Elections are cheaper. • Few ballot printing vendors, use of natural resources, and transportation costs of heavy items, along with human resources, make this significantly more operationally expensive. • We can hand-count the votes. • In a small recount, hand-counting is accurate, but in large elections with several races, hand- counting is not accurate, and it is very time- intensive. • People can wait a few days for results. • We live in a 10 o’clock news society. Voter and candidate expectations are that most or all results will be available by the nightly news.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 46
  47. 47. So Why Not Go Back to Paper?• Johnson County prints ballots in each ballot style to prepare for power outages, provisional voters, advance voting by mail, and persons who request paper. Ballot orders are placed months before an election with our ballot printer in Washington state— few vendors, and none locally, exist that can meet our printing needs.• A large number of unused ballots, because of the myriad of styles printed, are destroyed, leading to a waste of money but perhaps a chance to repurpose dollars towards ballot-on- demand printing and back-up power capabilities at the Election Office, reducing the chance for a large number of provisional ballots if power were lost during a mandatory advance voting period.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 47
  48. 48. Paper Use Since 2004 Printed Used Blank Ballots Disposed Cost*2004 692,485 247,071 435,414 $174,1662006 387,965 46,555 341,410 $136,5642008 426,860 90,481 336,379 $134,5522010 316,570 72,026 244,544 $ 97,818 Notes: *--assumes $0.40 printing costs per ballot, numbers are rounded • Each year represents August and November elections only. Ballots are printed for each election. • 2004’s presidential election was a 2-page ballot. • While the current election ballot delivery model requires the printing of more ballots than necessary, these dollars represent a strategic opportunity to perhaps repurpose dollars towards another model, such as ballot on demand printing or vote centers. • These costs represent printing only—other costs include storage and laborBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 48
  49. 49. Vote Center Defined• Colorado was the first to implement Vote Centers, in 2003. • A Vote Center is very much like an Advance Voting site – the voter can live anywhere within the county and vote at any voting center. • Difference is that it can be done on Election Day, too, rather than just Early Voting period. • A single Vote Center does not have the same operational efficiency of an Advance Voting site, simply because the Vote Center is generally a Super Polling Place on Election Day only, although Advance Voting sites could be used as Vote Centers. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 49
  50. 50. Vote Center Considerations Drivers Restrainers• Polling locations are easier to locate. • Fewer locations available that meet the requirements (large parking, available• Any registered voter within the space, etc.). county can vote at any center without having to return to their own • Significant (unbudgeted) staff neighborhood polling place. resources needed to negotiate leases. • Sites must be networked together.• Fewer provisional ballots because voters can vote anywhere in the • All paper ballots would have to be sent county. to each site (as many as 1,500 types in Johnson County) for provisional and• Fewer additional voting machines paper voters or printed on demand. needed as the community grows. • Physical security of locations.• Fewer election workers needed, approximately 25 percent less. • Greater chance of voter receiving the incorrect ballot.• Fewer locations need to be obtained. • Voter complaints that the local site has• Sites could be open through the closed, making it harder for them to weekend before, blending advance vote. voting with Vote Centers. • Rent cost could be prohibitive.
  51. 51. Advance Voting Benefits In-person advance voting creates a better voting experience that could be leveraged in the Vote Center concept:• Voter convenience—allows voters to vote on their terms.• Election workers are more seasoned—working daily instead of two or three times a year.• Voting machine utilization reduces the county’s overall capital investment. November 2008 Machine Utilization Percentage Each advance voting site reduced the need for 40 polling places and 200 voting machines. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 51
  52. 52. 2008 Physical Capital Issues Overhangs to the dock doors were never replaced; equipment becomes wet when loaded in the rain. Employees park in the grass and mud, arriving and leaving in the dark. This is the secure ballot drop box that was inadequate in 2008. One of many areas in need of repair in the parking lot. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 52
  53. 53. Further Building Issues• Likely, the Election Office facility will be completely out of space by 2014. • The office must be open, by law, for advance voting. • One way or another, more equipment will be needed by 2016, even if the additional equipment obtained are laptops to check-in voters and extend the life of the voting machines. • There is no room to store and fulfill the additional paper ballots expected because of new precincts and parties. • Warehouse restrooms are not ADA-compliant. • The facility is extremely vulnerable in the event of power failure, which could delay election results or result in thousands of provisional ballots. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 53
  54. 54. Election Laws/Regulations Elections fall under federal and state oversight: • National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) governs list maintenance activities • Help America Vote Act (HAVA) governs election administration • State statutes detail election requirements • Secretary of State Standards clarify and enhance state requirements Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 54
  55. 55. Voter Registration RequirementsCurrent Requirements to register to vote: United States Citizen Resident of the State of Kansas and the County listed on the registration 18 years of age or older by the date of the next election Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 55
  56. 56. Election Office Responsibilities The Election Office is responsible for conducting a program that makes a reasonable effort to remove names of registrants who have:  Died  Moved to another County or State  Inactive voters removed for failure to vote in two consecutive federal general elections  Requested to be removed  Are no longer eligible to vote 56
  57. 57. Election Office Responsibilities 1) Mail two notices non-forwardable first class mail 2) Transfer of voters to “inactive” status - Maintain for two full federal election cycles (4 years) - Or through the second general election for federal office following the date the voter was transferred to inactive. When we conduct a full voter mailing we get thousands of mail pieces to verify. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 57
  58. 58. Voter Registration Process Complete = Registered Incomplete information = Rejected Incomplete  Information=  Suspense Registrant is sent a letter requesting the additional information that is  necessary to complete their registration.  If the registrant  If the registrant does  provides that  not provide that  information=  information Registered.   Not Registered.
  59. 59. Mass Mailing Process OFFICE OF THE KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE NCOA / MASS MAILING / CROSSCHECK  RESULTS1. Receive evidence of a  2. Receive evidence of a  3. Receive response from post move within the county. move out of the county.  office saying “undeliverable” or “no  forwarding address”. Send forwardable confirmation  Send forwardable  mailing to address on file and Update the registrant’s  confirmation mailing to  make voter record “Inactive”. record with the new  new address and make address. voter record “Inactive”. Do  not update the  registrant’s record yet. Response from voter.Send forwardable  No response – Must fail to confirmation mailing to new  vote and have no contact address. until after second  consecutive federal  Voter responds with  Voter responds with  Voter confirms  general election, then  no change to record.  move in county,  move out of  cancel voter registration. Remove “Inactive”  update address and  county, cancel  designation. remove “Inactive”  voter’s  designation. registration. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 59
  60. 60. Poll Books and Voter History •When a voter signs in the  Signature Roster on Election Day,  voting history is updated.   •The poll books are scanned in the  days following the election to  update that the voter voted.  •If the voter is inactive this will  restore the registration and the  voter will become an active voter. •If the inactive voter does not  vote, then the voter is removed  from the voter file after the proper  time has elapsed.  Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 60
  61. 61. Registration Systems• Johnson County co-developed and purchased a voter registration and election management system in 1997.• This system was selected as the same system to be used for the statewide voter registration system, required by the Help America Vote Act.• Before implementation, in early 2005, the vendor of this system and the Secretary of State’s office terminated these plans, leading to a new selection process and a new vendor, ES&S. ES&S is contracted with the Secretary of State’s office.• Johnson County pays approximately $40,000 annually for user security tokens to the Secretary of State’s office. The system’s primary missive is to securely process and maintain Kansas voter registration records.• The system was envisioned as an election management system (ballot design, reporting, and scheduling of workers and supplies) but it hasn’t yet fulfilled this vision, leaving Johnson County to operate two systems (including the now-unsupported legacy 1997 system).• Replacement of this legacy system would cost approximately $100,000 likely will be necessary unless the state system capabilities are enhanced. While there are plans to enhance the system, there are limitations that have delayed this expectation.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 61
  62. 62. Voter Investment Issues• Johnson County has arguably the most engaged voters in the nation. These voters have high expectations and their utilization of the Election Office supports those expectations be met.• In 2008, the BOCC approved nearly $230,000 of an approximate $320,000 request for outreach. The Election Office recognized this was the highest amount ever allocated for any outreach project (not just elections) by the BOCC.• Outreach efforts contributed to a reduction in provisional ballots in 2008. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 62
  63. 63. Key Metrics 2/3 of Johnson County  Voters Would Have a  Different Polling Place in  2008 Than in 2004 Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 63
  64. 64. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional Ballots “Lost Voter” Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 64
  65. 65. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional Ballots “Lost Voter” 4,267 Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 65
  66. 66. Key Metrics 2004 2008 286 These would be Polling 284 Places expected to 11,301 Provisional increase as Ballots “Lostturnout Voter” 4,267 Provisionals increased. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 66
  67. 67. Key Metrics 2004 2008 74.5% Turnout 37.8% Advance Percentage Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 67
  68. 68. Key Metrics 2004 2008 74.5% Turnout 78.3% 37.8% Advance Percentage Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 68
  69. 69. Key Metrics 2004 2008 74.5% Turnout 78.3% 37.8% Advance 49.3% Percentage Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 69
  70. 70. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional Ballots “Lost Voter” Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 70
  71. 71. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional 8,198 Ballots “Lost Voter” Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 71
  72. 72. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional 8,198 Ballots “Lost Voter” 4,267 Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 72
  73. 73. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional 8,198 Ballots “Lost Voter” 4,267 Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 73
  74. 74. Key Metrics 2004 2008 Polling 286 284 Places 11,301 Provisional 8,198 Ballots “Lost Voter” 4,267 668 Provisionals Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 74
  75. 75. Communications ComponentsThe Election Office had an exhaustive campaign involving the followingcomponents, with an initial push focused on the August election. Engage Local Business Develop Baseline Materials Partnerships Utilize Public Relations Leverage County Resources Opportunities Leverage City/Civic Resources Utilize Strategic Media Placement • Approved dollars by the BOCC for $229,725 came to 64 cents per voter. • There is no similar effort budgeted for 2012. Without a campaign, provisional ballots are likely to move back towards 2004 levels. 75Brian D. Newby, November 29, 2007
  76. 76. Message Johnson County voters were consistently be reminded that: • Advance voting is more convenient than ever and can be done in person or by mail. • Polling places change for each election. • Voters should check their location before heading to the polls. • There will be lines at the polling places throughout the day, especially first thing in the morning. THIS IS STILL THE PRIMARY MESSAGE. Outreach efforts in this document are focused on these specific messages. Other messages and targets (such as encouraging young adults to register) are important but beyond the scope of this particular campaign.Brian D. Newby, November 29, 2007 76
  77. 77. 2008 Outreach Approach JoCoPoLo and “Express Lane” Public Awareness Campaign and Outreach Program to promote Election Day polling locations and Early Voting Options.Brian D. Newby September 8, 2011 64
  78. 78. Jo-Co Po-Lo www.jocopolo.com Johnson County Election Office
  79. 79. Jo-Co Po-Lo www.jocopolo.com Johnson County Election Office
  80. 80. Jo-Co Po-Lo www.jocopolo.com Johnson County Election Office
  81. 81. Website/Phone CallsOctober phone call volumewas similar in 2008 and 2004,but phone calls on electionday in 2008 were 3,600 lessthan in 2004, suggesting animpact from advance votingand outreach efforts. The two websites had more than one million unique visits, Oct. 3-Nov. 6Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 70
  82. 82. Components of Outreach JoCoPoLo van, Democracy Posse, and “JP” Voter types in VOTEKS and address to short code Response Received within 60 Seconds Democracy Posse Johnson County Election Office 4 4
  83. 83. CanvassBoard of County Canvassers conduct the canvass based on BOCC policy.• Election Commissioner is the facilitator of the process.• Provisional ballots are determined by the Special Elections Board, appointed by the Election Commissioner but not staff members. These persons represent a similar composition to a polling place election board or advance voting board.• Elections staff research and categorize provisional ballots for the canvass meeting.• Board of Canvassers in some counties actually adjudicate each provisional ballot—and could in Johnson County, but it would require an extensive time commitment by the BOCC members over a period of several days beginning the Wednesday after the election.• In November 2012, Board of Canvassers, or their alternates, should prepare to be available the full week after the election.Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 85
  84. 84. Provisional Timeline Ballots received after 7 p.m. are considered  late and not  Provisional  provisional.  They are  ballots can be  stored separately for  mailed.  review if necessary. 20 Days before Election Day 19 Days before Election Day Tuesday, Election Day Tuesday, 11 p.m. Research of  Election night provisional ballot  voted ballots as  bags are checked in to confirm  they are received  all have been accounted for and  in the mail begins  locked in secure room.  Ballot  by staff. bags remain sealed overnight.Brian D. Newby, April 28, 2011 86
  85. 85. Provisional Timeline Provisional envelopes begin to  be sorted by general categories  Ballot bags are opened and  for research.  Research follows  emptied.  Ballots in each bag  a checklist to determine if the  are counted and reconciled  voter is eligible to vote and if  against the green sign‐in  the voter has already cast a  sheet. ballot. Wednesday,  8 a.m. Wednesday,  9 a.m. Wednesday, 11 a.m. Provisional envelopes are moved to the “E” Room.   Counts by EP Code, if necessary to know the number of  provisional ballots in close races, are recorded. Brian D. Newby, April 28, 2011 87
  86. 86. Provisional Timeline Researching of  envelopes  Research  continues. continues on  envelopes. Thursday, 8 a.m. Thursday, 2 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. Canvass summary sheets are drafted.  Sheets summarize categories  that by law ballots are recommended to be counted and  recommended not to be counted.  Envelopes simply containing ballots  that were cast on paper, but not provisional, are reviewed and held to  be tabulated during the canvass recess the following Monday.Brian D. Newby, April 28, 2011 88
  87. 87. Provisional Timeline Research continues on envelopes.  Envelopes recommended to be processed and those  recommended not to be processed are stored separately and  tagged appropriately. Canvass summary sheets are completed and totals are  proofed. Saturday,  8 a.m. Sunday, 8 a.m. Monday, 9 a.m. Research  Board of County Canvassers convene.  The Board recesses  continues on  while those envelopes recommended to be processed are  envelopes. taken to the E Room and are worked by the Special Board.   Results are tabulated for final results and certification by  the Board of County Canvassers.Brian D. Newby, April 28, 2011 89
  88. 88. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 90
  89. 89. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2010 2012 2014 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2010 of Total 2012 of Total 2014 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 1,101 45.6% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 224 9.3% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 932 38.6% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 2,416 Percentage 1.3 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 91
  90. 90. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 92
  91. 91. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 93
  92. 92. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 94
  93. 93. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 95
  94. 94. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total 2006 of Total 2008 of Total Counted Counted Counted Name, Address 360 4.7% 1,740 45.6% 2,117 40.1% Change, Correct Polling Place Name, Address 4,267 55.1% 432 11.3% 668 12.7% Change, Incorrect Polling Place Mailed Advance 585 7.6% 539 14.2% 1,836 34.8% Ballot, Voted at the Polls Total Counted 7,738 3,810 5,280 Percentage 3.0 2.0 1.9 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 96
  95. 95. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Not Counted” 2004 2006 2008 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2004 of Total Not 2006 of Total Not 2008 of Total Not Counted Counted Counted Not Registered 1,806 55.5% 560 60.3% 1,307 44.8% First Time Voter, No 1,031 31.7% 72 7.8% 316 10.9% Acceptable ID Incomplete 204 6.7% 119 12.8% 945 32.4% Provisional Envelope Signature Match 62 8.4% 18 1.9% 102 3.5% Total Not Counted 3,253 928 2,918 Percentage 1.3 0.5 1.0 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 97
  96. 96. Provisional Ballot Metrics “Not Counted” 2010 2012 2014 Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage Nov. Percentage 2010 of Total Not 2012 of Total Not 2014 of Total Not Counted Counted Counted Not Registered 445 30.1% First Time Voter, No 18 1.2% Acceptable ID Incomplete 661 45.0% Provisional Envelope Signature Match 160 10.8% Total Not Counted 1,478 Percentage 0.8 of Total VotesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 98
  97. 97. Websites http://www.jocoelection.org http://my.jocopolo.com http://advance.jocoelection.org https://voter.jocoelection.org http://lwv.jocoelection.orgBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 99
  98. 98. Websites Facebook: Johnson County Election Office Twitter: Jocoelection Podcast: Election Updates on iTunesBrian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 100
  99. 99. Appendix AElection Office, Relevant Statutes
  100. 100. Relevant Legislative Authority 19-3419a. Salaries and car allowance of election commissioners. The election commissioners in any county shall receive a salary in an amount to be fixed by resolution of the board of county commissioners of the county. On and after January 1, 1977, the compensation so fixed shall be in an amount not less than ten thousand dollars ($10,000) per annum. Such salary shall be an annual salary payable in equal monthly installments. The election commissioner shall receive a car allowance in an amount to be fixed by resolution of the board of county commissioners. 19-3420. Assistant election commissioners; appointment, salary; expenses. The election commissioner shall appoint one assistant, known as assistant election commissioner, who shall receive an annual salary to be fixed by the election commissioner and shall be paid in the same manner as other county officers and employees, and in addition the election commissioner shall certify to the board of county commissioners the amount necessary for clerk hire and expense, which amount shall be allowed by the board of county commissioners of said county. The board of county commissioners shall also authorize the statutory mileage allowance provided for in K.S.A. 75-3203 for the assistants of the election commissioner, to provide and maintain means of travel within their county. In counties having a population of more than two hundred thousand (200,000) the election commissioner shall appoint two (2) assistants, known as assistant election commissioners who shall be paid as provided for in this act. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 102
  101. 101. Relevant Legislative Authority 19-3424. Powers, authority and duties; ward and precinct boundaries; notices of elections; printing ballots; election contests; budget. The election commissioner, as a part of his or her official duties shall have and exercise the following powers and authority: (a) Such commissioner shall establish and fix the boundaries of wards and precincts within the county and in all cities the greater part of the population of which is located in said county. Such commissioner shall accept and file nomination and declaration papers of candidates and declarations of party affiliation. (b) Such commissioner shall give notice by publication in the official county paper, at least fifteen (15) days before the holding of any election, except as otherwise provided by law, of the time of holding such election, and the officers at that time to be chosen, and any other matters to be voted upon. (c) Such commissioner shall publish notice giving the proper party designation if required by law, the title of each office, the names and addresses of all persons seeking national and state offices and as certified to such county election officer by the secretary of state, as provided by law, and of all persons from whom nomination papers or declarations have been filed with such election officer as provided by law, giving the name and address of each, the title to such office, the day of the election, the hours during which the polls will be open and the location of the voting place in each precinct or area, and mail to all persons whose nomination or declaration papers are on file with such election officer, a copy of the first issue containing such publication notice. Brian D. Newby, September 8, 2011 103

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