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May 21, 2013 Agenda packet
 

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    May 21, 2013 Agenda packet May 21, 2013 Agenda packet Document Transcript

    • City Council Agenda Page 1 of 5 May 21, 2013NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETINGAN AGENDA OF A REGULAR MEETING OF THE CITY COUNCILTHE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS9:00 A.M. - Tuesday, May 21, 2013McNease Convention Center, South Meeting Room500 Rio Concho DriveSan Angelo, TX 76903THE MCNEASE CONVENTION CENTER IS ACCESSIBLE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES.ACCESSIBLE ENTRIES AND SPECIALLY MARKED PARKING SPACES ARE AVAILABLE AT BOTHMAIN ENTRANCES AT SURBER DRIVE AND RIO CONCHO DRIVE. IF ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCEIS NEEDED TO OBSERVE OR COMMENT, PLEASE NOTIFY THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK,ROOM 208, CITY HALL, 657-4405, AT LEAST 24 HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING.City Council meetings are broadcast on Channel 17-Government Access at 10:30 A.M. and 7:00 P.M. everyday for two weeks beginning on the Thursday after each meeting.As a courtesy to those in attendance, please place your cell phone on “Silent” or “Vibrate”Thank You!I. OPEN SESSION (9:00 A.M.)A. Call to OrderB. Prayer and Pledge"Honor the Texas flag; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible.”C. Public CommentThe Council takes public comment on all items in the Regular Agenda. Public input on a Regular Agendaitem will be taken at its appropriate discussion. Public input on an item not on the Agenda or ConsentAgenda may be identified and requested for consideration by the Council at this time. The Council mayrequest an item to be placed on a future agenda, or for a Consent Agenda item, to be moved to the RegularAgenda for public comment.II. SPECIAL AGENDA1. Consideration of adopting an Order canvassing the returns and declaring the results of the Electionheld May 11, 2013 and calling for a Runoff Election on June 15, 2013AN ORDER OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, CANVASSING RETURNS OF AGENERAL ELECTION HELD IN SAID CITY ON THE 11TH DAY OF MAY, 2013, FOR THEPURPOSE OF ELECTING MUNICIPAL OFFICERS; AND A SPECIAL ELECTION HELD INSAID CITY ON THE 11TH DAY OF MAY, 2013, FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTINGMUNICIPAL OFFICERS TO FILL VACANCIES FOR UNEXPIRED TERMS; DECLARINGRESULTS OF THE GENERAL ELECTION AND SPECIAL ELECTION; CALLING FOR ARUNOFF ELECTION TO BE HELD ON JUNE 15, 2013, FOR THE PURPOSES OF ELECTINGA MAYOR TO FILL THE MAYOR’S SEAT, AND A COUNCIL MEMBER TO FILL THEVACANCY IN SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICT SEAT ONE AND A COUNCIL MEMBER TOFILL THE VACANCY IN SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICT SEAT FIVE; PROVIDING ASEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE(Presentation by City Clerk Alicia Ramirez)
    • City Council Agenda Page 2 of 5 May 21, 20132. Consideration of adopting a Resolution of the City Council of the City of San Angelo, Texas,ordering that a Runoff Election be held in said city on the 15thday of June, 2013, for the purpose ofelecting municipal officers; and ordering that a Runoff Election be held in said city on the 16thdayof June, 2013, for the purpose of electing municipal officers to fill vacancies for unexpired terms;ordering publication; making provisions for the conduct of the election and other provisions incidentand related to the purpose of this order; providing for severability; and providing for an effectivedate (una Resolución del consejo de la Ciudad de San Angelo, Texas, convocando una segundavotación (elección de desempate) se celebrará en dicha ciudad el 15 de junio, 2013, para la elecciónde oficiales municipales para ocupar unos posiciones vacantes por términos no completado; ;ordenando publicación, haciendo provisiones para la conducta de dichas elecciones y otrasprovisiones relacionadas al motivo de esta ordenanza; previendo por divisibilidad; y previendo unafecha de vigencia)(Presentation by City Clerk Alicia Ramirez)3. Administration of Oaths of Office for Single Member District Representatives 2, 4, and 6, andpresentation of Certificates of Election(Administered by City Clerk Alicia Ramirez and presentation by Mayor New)4. Introduction of Special Guests5. Consideration of appointment of Mayor Pro-Tempore for the 2013 City CouncilNote: A reception will immediately follow the Special Agenda. The Regular Meeting with the newly seated CouncilMembers will begin approximately 30 minutes after the recess for the reception.III. CONSENT AGENDA6. Consideration of approving the May 14, 2013 City Council Regular meeting minutes (submitted byCity Clerk Alicia Ramirez)7. Consideration of rejecting all bids submitted under Request for Bids WU-12-13 for Ferric Chloride foruse in the Water Treatment Plant (submitted by Water Utilities Director Ricky Dickson)8. Consideration of adopting a Resolution authorizing the Mayor to execute Tax Resale Deed (Quitclaim)conveying the following Tax Lot: (submitted by Real Estate Administrator Cindy Preas)a. 404 E 21st Street, (Galilee), Lots 7 & 8, Block 23, Marx & Blum, $5,000, Suit No. B-06-0111-Tb. 402 E 20th Street, (Galilee), Lot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum, $2,340, Suit No. B-07-0182-Tc. 1406 Spaulding Street, (Galilee), Lot 9, Block 32, Fairview $3,500, Suit No. B-08-0004-Td. 1509 Pecan Street, (Perez), NE ¼ of Block 8, Snyder, $750, Suit No. B-4738-B)9. Consideration of adopting a Resolution authorizing the Mayor, on condition stated, to execute a tax-resale (quitclaim) deed conveying all right, title and interest of the City of San Angelo, Trustee and allother taxing units interested in the tax foreclosure judgment to R.W. Hargraves for $15,000 forproperty located at 1636 Pulliam Street: Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition (submitted by RealEstate Administrator Cindy Preas)10. Consideration of adopting Resolution amending authorized representative for Texpool, an InvestmentService for Public Funds (submitted by Assistant CityManager/Chief Financial Officer Michael Dane)11. Consideration of adopting a Resolution authorizing the San Angelo Police Department to applyfor theOffice of the Governor Criminal Justice Division Gang Overtime Grant (submitted by Chief of PoliceTim Vasquez)12. Consideration of approving a recommendation by City of San Angelo Development Corporation(COSADC) to approve the annual COSADC contract with the Chamber of Commerce and authorizingthe COSADC President to execute a contract with the San Angelo Chamber of Commerce for the
    • City Council Agenda Page 3 of 5 May 21, 2013provision of Marketing and Recruitment Services (submitted by Interim Director of EconomicDevelopment Robert Schneeman)13. Consideration of matters related to the City of San Angelo and Texas Department of State HealthServices (DSHS) Animal Friendly Grant: (submitted by Health Director Sandra Villarreal)a. Consideration of adopting a Resolution ratifying and authorizing the City Manager or his designeethe filing of grant submission to the Texas Department of State Health Services for Animal FriendlyGrant Funds for FY14 in the amount of $20,000 with a 0% match requirement to fund the City’s lowcost Spay Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP);b. Consideration of accepting said Animal Friendly Grant funds by the City, if awarded; and;c. Consideration of authorizing the City Manager or his designee to execute all documents related tosaid funds14. Consideration of amending City Council’s prior authorization on February 21, 2013 authorizing thepayroll deduction for police officer duty rifles and related accessories (submitted by Chief of PoliceTim Vasquez)15. Second Hearing and consideration of approving Planning Commission’s recommendation of a ZoneChange from Ranch & Estate (R&E) to Light Manufacturing (ML) in lieu of applicants request forHeavy Manufacturing (MH), and consideration of adopting an Ordinance amending Chapter 12,Exhibit “A” (Zoning Ordinance) of the Code of Ordinances, City of San Angelo (submitted byInterimDirector of Development Services AJ Fawver)Z 13-11: Harold and Margaret MuellerAN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 12, EXHIBIT “A” OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES,CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, WHICH SAID EXHIBIT “A” OF CHAPTER 12 ADOPTSZONING REGULATIONS, USE DISTRICTS AND A ZONING MAP, IN ACCORDANCE WITH ACOMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY CHANGING THE ZONING AND CLASSIFICATION OF THEFOLLOWING PROPERTY, TO WIT: 4017, 4085, 4089, 4091, 4093 and 4125 US Highway 67Frontage, 3902, 3922 and 3970 Tractor Trail, and 3613, 3669 and 3745 Porter Henderson Drive. Thisproperty specifically occupies the Paul Gregory Addition, Block 1, Lots 1-9 (a replat of Tract B inSection 1 and a replat of Tract C in Section 2) in northeast San Angelo, changing the zoningclassification from Ranch & Estate (R&E) to Light Manufacturing (ML) District; PROVIDING FORSEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING A PENALTY16. Second Hearing and consideration of adopting an Ordinance amending Chapter 12, Exhibit “A”(Zoning Ordinance) of the Code of Ordinances, City of San Angelo (submitted by Interim Director ofDevelopment Services AJ Fawver)Z 13-13: David and Pam HiltonAN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 12, EXHIBIT “A” OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES,CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, WHICH SAID EXHIBIT “A” OF CHAPTER 12 ADOPTSZONING REGULATIONS, USE DISTRICTS AND A ZONING MAP, IN ACCORDANCE WITH ACOMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY CHANGING THE ZONING AND CLASSIFICATION OF THEFOLLOWING PROPERTY, TO WIT: 525 Preusser Street, located at the southwest corner of PreusserStreet and North Poe Street. This property specifically occupies the Ellis Addition Block 4, N 115 ofLots 1 & 2 and E 33.5 of Frary Addition, Block 19, Lot 6, in central San Angelo, adding the zoningclassification of Historic Overlay (HO) District; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY ANDPROVIDING A PENALTY17. Second Hearing and consideration of adopting an Ordinance amending Chapter 12, Exhibit “A”(Zoning Ordinance) of the Code of Ordinances, City of San Angelo (submitted by Interim Director ofDevelopment Services AJ Fawver)PD 13-02: Luke Burnett
    • City Council Agenda Page 4 of 5 May 21, 2013AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 12, EXHIBIT “A” OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES,CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, WHICH SAID EXHIBIT “A” OF CHAPTER 12 ADOPTSZONING REGULATIONS, USE DISTRICTS AND A ZONING MAP, IN ACCORDANCE WITH ACOMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY CHANGING THE ZONING AND CLASSIFICATION OF THEFOLLOWING PROPERTY, TO WIT 1245 Grand Canal Road, located approximately500 feet east ofthe intersection of Grand Canal Road and Clarice Court. The propertyspecificallyoccupies a proposedSecond Replat of Sunset Ranch Estates, Section Two, Block Two, Lot 17B in southern San Angelo,changing the zoning classification from Office Warehouse (OW) to Planned Development (PD)District; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING A PENALTYIV. REGULAR AGENDA:D. EXECUTIVE/CLOSED SESSIONExecutive Session under the provision of Government Code, Title 5. Open Government; Ethics, Subtitle A.Open Government, Chapter 551. Open Meetings, Subchapter D. Exceptions to Requirement that Meetingsbe Open, Section 551.072 to deliberate the purchase, exchange, lease, or value of real propertyExecutive Session under the provision of Government Code, Title 5. Open Government; Ethics, SubtitleA. Open Government, Chapter 551. Open Meetings, Subchapter D. Exceptions to Requirement thatMeetings be Open, Section 551.087 to discuss an offer of financial or other incentive to a company orcompanies with whom the City of San Angelo is conducting economic development negotiations andwhich the City of San Angelo seeks to have, locate, stay or expand in San AngeloE. PUBLIC HEARING AND COMMENT18. Presentation of the 1stQuarter 2013 Report from the Chamber of Commerce Economic DevelopmentCouncil and the Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB)(Presentation by Vice President for Economic Development John Dugan and CVB Vice PresidentPamela Miller)19. Consideration of approving an amendment to Vision Plan Component of the San AngeloComprehensive Plan update adopted in 2009, specifically properties located between 43rd Street to thenorth, Coliseum Drive to the east, 40th Street to the south and Grape Creek Road and ChadbourneStreet to the west, in northwestern San Angelo(Presentation by Interim Director of Development Services AJ Fawver)20. Consideration of authorizing the City Manager to execute a contract, in substantiallythe attached form,between Catalyst Urban Development and the City of San Angelo to carry out services regarding aMaster Developer as outlined in PL 01-12(Presentation by Interim Director of Development Services AJ Fawver)21. Discussion regarding Workers’ Compensation data for FY 2011/12 (requested by council on 3/5/13);and review of FY 2012 actuarial report submitted by Jason Martin of Towers, Watson and presented tocouncil on 3/5/13; approval of their recommendation, and authorizing funding for the self-insurancefund consisting of the workers’ compensation fund in the amount of $2,675,000 and the propertycasualty fund in the amount of $1,973,000.00(Presentation by Risk Manager John Seaton)22. Consideration of adopting the 2013 Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Use Plan and anyaction relatedthereto(Presentation by Parks and Recreation Director Carl White)
    • City Council Agenda Page 5 of 5 May 21, 201323. Consideration of approving additional improvements at Civic League Park to support the operation ofthe International Water Lily Collection including a new basin, pavilion and a water misting system andauthorizing City staff to negotiate an agreement for the construction of the improvements with the SanAngelo Council of Garden Clubs(Presentation by Parks and Recreation Director Carl White)24. First public hearing and consideration of introducing an Ordinance amending the 2012-2013 Budgetfor grants, new projects and incomplete projectsAN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO AMENDING THE BUDGET FOR THEFISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2012, AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2013, FORNEW PROJECTS, INCOMPLETE PROJECTS, CAPITAL PROJECTS, AND GRANTS(Presentation by Budget Manager Morgan Chegwidden)F. FOLLOW UP AND ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES25. Consideration of and possible action on matters discussed in Executive/Closed Session, if needed26. Announcements and consideration of Future Agenda Itemsa. Special Meeting: June 25, 201327. Consideration of and possible action on matters related to the July 2, 2013 City Council meeting28. AdjournmentGiven by order of the City Council and posted in accordance with Title 5, Texas Government Code, Chapter551, Thursday, May 16, 2013, at 5:00 P.M./s/________________________Alicia Ramirez, City Clerk
    • City of San AngeloOffice of the City ClerkMemoDate:To: Mayor and CouncilmembersMay 9, 2013From: Alicia Ramirez, City ClerkSubject: Agenda Item for May 21stCouncil MeetingContact: Alicia Ramirez, City Clerk, 657-4405Caption: Regular ItemConsideration of adopting an Order canvassing the returns and declaring theresults of the Election held May 11, 2013 and calling for a Runoff Election on June15, 2013AN ORDER OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, CANVASSING RETURNSOF A GENERAL ELECTION HELD IN SAID CITY ON THE 11TH DAY OF MAY,2013, FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING MUNICIPAL OFFICERS; AND ASPECIAL ELECTION HELD IN SAID CITY ON THE 11TH DAY OF MAY, 2013,FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING MUNICIPAL OFFICERS TO FILLVACANCIES FOR UNEXPIRED TERMS; DECLARING RESULTS OF THEGENERAL ELECTION AND SPECIAL ELECTION; CALLING FOR A RUNOFFELECTION TO BE HELD ON JUNE 15, 2013, FOR THE PURPOSES OFELECTING A MAYOR TO FILL MAYOR’S SEAT, AND A COUNCIL MEMBER TOFILL THE VACANCY IN SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICT SEATS ONE AND FIVE;PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVEDATEConsideration of adopting a Resolution ordering that a Runoff Election be held insaid city on the 15thday of June, 2013, for the purpose of electing municipalofficers; and ordering that a Runoff Election be held in said city on the 16thday ofJune, 2013, for the purpose of electing municipal officers to fill vacancies forunexpired terms; ordering publication; making provisions for the conduct of theelection and other provisions incident and related to the purpose of this order;providing for severability; and providing for an effective dateAdministration of Oaths of Office for Single Member District Representatives 2, 4,and 6, and presentation of Certificates of ElectionIntroduction of Special GuestsConsideration of appointment of Mayor Pro-Tempore for the 2013 City Council________________________________________________________________________________Summary: The Final Canvass Order contains the Precinct by Precinct Report and cumulativetotals for each race. The Ballot Board met on Friday, May 17TH, to count any approved provisionalballots and Federal ballots received from overseas. Election night return reports are attached foryour review and information.Financial Impact: The expense of the election was shared on a prorata basis with the WallIndependent School Districts (ISD) and the San Angelo ISD. The base estimate is between$45,000.00 and $60,000.00. Additional funds may or may not be required in account 101-0300-411.06-16.
    • A run-off election will also be necessary on June 15, 2013 in order to determine the winner of thefollowing office(s): Mayor and Council Member for Districts One and Five. The base estimate isbetween $30,000.00 and $40,000.00. Additional funds may be required to fund the runoff election. OnMay 14, 2013, the Council authorized staff to utilize early voting branch locations as utilized in theGeneral/Special Election. Canvassing of the Runoff Election will be held on June 25, 2013.Other Information/Recommendation: Staff recommends adoption of the order canvassing returnsand authorizing the adopting of the Resolution ordering the runoff election.Attachments:• Order: Canvassing of the Elected Officials and Resolution ordering the Runoff Election• Reports: Election Night Report, Canvass and Precinct by Precinct
    • A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO,TEXAS, ORDERING THAT A RUNOFF ELECTION BE HELD IN SAID CITY ONTHE 15THDAY OF JUNE, 2013, FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTINGMUNICIPAL OFFICERS; AND ORDERING THAT A RUNOFF ELECTION BEHELD IN SAID CITY ON THE 16THDAY OF JUNE, 2013, FOR THE PURPOSEOF ELECTING MUNICIPAL OFFICERS TO FILL VACANCIES FORUNEXPIRED TERMS; ORDERING PUBLICATION; MAKING PROVISIONSFOR THE CONDUCT OF THE ELECTION AND OTHER PROVISIONSINCIDENT AND RELATED TO THE PURPOSE OF THIS ORDER; PROVIDINGFOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATEWHEREAS, pursuant to Ordinance No. 2013-02-029 of the City of San Angelo, Texas, adopted onthe 26thday of February, 2013, a General Election and Special Election was duly held on the 11thday ofMay, 2013, the City Council having canvassed the returns of the General Election and having determinedas to no other candidate received a majority of the votes cast for the office for which he was a candidateand that the following candidates received the largest number of votes for the office for which theywere candidates, to wit:MAYORKendall HirschfeldDwain MorrisonWHEREAS, pursuant to Ordinance No. 2013-02-029 of the City of San Angelo, Texas, adopted on the 26thday of February, 2013, a Special Election was duly held on the 11thday of May, 2013, the City Councilhaving canvassed the returns of the general and special election and having determined as to no othercandidate received a majority of the votes cast for the office for which he was a candidate and that thefollowing candidates received the largest number of votes for the office for which they were candidates,to wit:COUNCIL MEMBER FOR DISTRICT ONETrinidad Aguirre, Jr.Rodney FlemingCOUNCIL MEMBER FOR DISTRICT FIVEH.R. “Winkie” Wardlaw, IIIDavid McBrideWHEREAS, the meetings at which this Order is considered are open to the public as required bylaw, and public notice of the time, place, and purpose of said meetings was given as required by Title 5,Chapter 551, Texas Government Code.
    • NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDERED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXASTHAT:Section 1. All of the above premises are found to be true and correct and are incorporated intothe body of this Ordinance as if copied in their entirety.Section 2. The City Council orders a runoff election of officers for the City of San Angelo, Texas,to be held on the Saturday, June, 15, 2013, which is not earlier than the twentieth (20th) day or laterthan the 45thday after the final Order canvassing the returns, #2013-05-???, of the General Electionadopted of May 21, 2013 (EC 2.205), between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 7:00 P.M., for the purpose ofelecting a municipal officer for the seat of Mayor.Section 3. The City Council orders a runoff election of officers for the City of San Angelo, Texas,to be held on the Saturday, June, 2013, 2013, which is not earlier than the twentieth (20th) day or laterthan the 45thday after the final Order canvassing the returns, #2013-05-???, of the Special Electionadopted of May 21, 2013 (EC 2.205), between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 7:00 P.M., for the purpose ofelecting the following municipal officers: one City Councilmember from Single Member District 1, to fillvacancy for the unexpired term of Single Member District 1 and one City Councilmember from SingleMember District 5, to fill vacancy for the unexpired term of Single Member District 5, in compliance withSection 13 of the City Charter.Section 6. Voting at and on said election shall be by use of digital scan ballots, and the officialballots for said election shall conform to the Texas Election Code, as amended, so as to permit theelectors to vote for the candidate of their choice, with the official ballot to contain such otherprovisions, markings and language as required by law.Section 7. Early voting by personal appearance shall be conducted each weekday, June 3, 2013through June 7, 2013, from 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M., and June 10, 2013 through June 11, 2013, from 7:00A.M. – 7:00 P.M. The City of San Angelo will utilize the early voting branch locations, shown on Exhibit“A”, adopted as part of this ordinance, and designated by Tom Green County as outlined in the ElectionCode Section 42.002 entitled “Required Use of County Precincts”.Application for ballot by mail shall be mailed to:City Clerk, City of San Angeloc/o Vona McKerley, Tom Green County Elections AdministratorJudge Edd B. Keyes Building113 W. Beauregard Ave.San Angelo, Texas 76903Applications for ballot by mail must be received no later than the close of business on Friday, June 7,2013.Section 8. Said elections shall be conducted and the results canvassed and announced asprescribed by the General Election and Special Election Laws of the State of Texas, as amended, and onlyduly qualified electors shall be qualified to vote.
    • Section 9. The City Clerk is directed and required to publish notice of said elections as requiredby law.Section 10. The terms and provisions of this Ordinance shall be deemed to be severable in thatif any portion of this Ordinance shall be declared to be invalid, the same shall not affect the validity ofthe other provisions of this Ordinance.Section 11. This Order shall be effective from and after the date of adoption.PASSED, APPROVED and ADOPTED on the 21stday of May, 2013.THE CITY OF SAN ANGELOATTEST: Alvin New, MayorAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkApproved as to Content: Approved as to Form:____________________________ ____________________________Alicia Ramirez, City Clerk Lysia H. Bowling, City Attorney
    • Exhibit “A”POLLING PLACES FOR JUNE 15, 2013 RUNOFF ELECTIONAND RELATED EARLY VOTING DATESEARLY VOTING BRANCH LOCATIONS OPEN FROM JUNE 3, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 7,2013, FROM 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M., AND JUNE 10, 2013 THROUGH JUNE 11, 2013, FROM 7:00A.M. – 7:00 P.M.Main Tom Green County Election Office 113 W. Beauregard, 2nd FloorEV1 River Place Senior Apartments 501 S. IreneEV2 Victory Christian Center 1620 Sunset Dr.EV3 Assembly of God Church 1442 Edmund Blvd.EV4 Plaza del Sol Apartments 4359 Oak Grove BlvdELECTION DAY POLLING LOCATIONS OPEN FROM 7:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M.:1. Precincts 114, 137, and 144 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address144 Belmore Baptist Church 1214 S. Bell St.2. Precincts 106, 107, 124, and 146 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address146 Baptist Memorial Hospital 902 North Main3. Precincts 228 and 230 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address230 Southgate Church of Christ 528 Country Club Rd.4. Precincts 215 and 241 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address241 Texas Department of Transportation 4502 Knickerbocker Rd., Bldg. E5. Precincts 304, 306, and 348 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address304 Lakeview Bible Church 4825 Grape Creek Rd6. Precincts 305, 308, 319, 327, and 351 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address319 Angelo Bible Church 3506 Sherwood Way
    • 7. Precincts 402, 420, 421, and 424 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address421 Plaza Del Sol Apartments 4359 Oak Grove Blvd.8. Precincts 401, 434, 435, and 436 will vote at one of the following locations on Election Day:Precincts Location Address436 MHMR 1501 W. Beauregard Ave.9. Precincts 423 will vote at one of the following location on Election Day:Precincts Location Address423 Knickerbocker Community Center 14608 FM 2335, Knickerbocker, TX.
    • CANVASSING REPORT ‐ TOTAL VOTERS ‐ UNOFFICIALCITY OF SAN ANGELO ‐ MAY 11, 2013 ELECTIONCity Councilmember, MayorPrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent TurnoutKendall HirschfeldDwain MorrisonPaul Alexander Totals106BS1 1 69 65 135 1489 9.07% 33 82 19 134107BS2 1 35 30 66 439 15.03% 10 31 24 65114BS4 4 18 13 35 984 3.56% 7 15 13 35124BS5 24 79 49 152 1456 10.44% 22 85 38 145137BS6 18 108 75 201 2504 8.03% 78 72 50 200144BS7 0 49 71 120 1346 8.92% 25 61 32 118144BS8 1 4 4 9 192 4.69% 5 3 1 9146BS9 11 122 148 281 3205 8.77% 95 112 73 280215BS11 11 147 159 317 1645 19.27% 145 61 111 317215BS12 0 54 69 123 770 15.84% 46 32 45 123228BS13 4 108 70 182 1092 16.67% 96 34 52 182228BS14 19 132 45 196 1151 17.03% 83 45 67 195230BS15 9 411 309 729 4598 15.85% 376 153 199 728230BS16 0 30 22 52 169 30.77% 22 14 16 52241BS17 18 595 473 1086 4135 26.26% 485 180 420 1085304BS18 8 265 295 568 3087 18.40% 96 394 77 567305BS19 0 3 5 8 50 16.00% 4 2 2 8306BS20 0 67 55 122 1379 8.85% 44 40 38 122308BS21 0 11 11 22 327 6.73% 6 10 6 22319BS22 13 244 218 475 2659 17.86% 184 120 171 475319BS23 0 8 16 24 157 15.29% 9 8 7 24327BS24 4 170 104 278 2472 11.25% 82 126 70 278401BS25 0 17 10 27 138 19.57% 18 3 6 27402BS26 13 206 161 380 1881 20.15% 151 106 123 380402BS27 0 48 29 77 971 7.93% 31 23 23 77420BS28 0 12 15 27 226 11.95% 13 2 12 27421BS29 2 143 72 217 1155 18.79% 98 51 66 215421BS30 0 137 145 282 1688 16.71% 130 65 86 281424BS31 7 152 146 305 2001 15.24% 104 104 97 305434BS32 0 54 54 108 1087 9.94% 25 61 22 108435BS33 9 65 45 119 1082 11.00% 36 63 20 119436BS34 10 381 303 694 3460 20.06% 360 137 194 691Totals 187 3944 3286 7417 48995 2919 2295 2180 7394City Councilmember, Single Member District 1, Unexpired TermPrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent TurnoutTrinidad Aguirre, Jr.Bill RichardsonRobert Banskter, Sr.Rodney Fleming Totals230BS15 9 411 309 729 4598 15.85% 236 136 28 302 702230BS16 0 30 22 52 169 30.77% 3 7 2 40 52241BS17 18 595 473 1086 4135 26.26% 446 130 36 443 1055420BS28 0 12 15 27 226 11.95% 8 4 0 11 23Totals 27 1048 819 1894 9128 693 277 66 796 1832City Councilmember, Single Member District 2PrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent Turnout Jim Turner Marty SelfJoseph Grimes Totals107BS2 1 35 30 66 439 15.03% 13 37 15 65304BS18 8 265 295 568 3087 18.40% 67 395 92 554308BS21 0 11 11 22 327 6.73% 3 15 2 20327BS24 4 170 104 278 2472 11.25% 40 171 60 271434BS32 0 54 54 108 1087 9.94% 20 57 22 99Totals 13 535 494 1042 7412 143 675 191 1009City Councilmember, Single Member District 4
    • CANVASSING REPORT ‐ TOTAL VOTERS ‐ UNOFFICIALCITY OF SAN ANGELO ‐ MAY 11, 2013 ELECTIONPrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent TurnoutSally Frances AyanaDon Vardeman Totals106BS1 1 69 65 135 1489 9.07% 44 87 131124BS5 24 79 49 152 1456 10.44% 118 33 151144BS7 0 49 71 120 1346 8.92% 46 72 118144BS8 1 4 4 9 192 4.69% 4 5 9306BS20 0 67 55 122 1379 8.85% 27 93 120435BS33 9 65 45 119 1082 11.00% 39 78 117Totals 35 333 289 657 6944 278 368 646City Councilmember, Single Member District 5, Unexpired TermPrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent TurnoutBarbara PrattH.R. "Winkie" WardlawDavid McBrideBarry Gambrell Totals228BS13 4 108 70 182 1092 16.67% 17 79 71 7 174228BS14 19 132 45 196 1151 17.03% 23 85 73 8 189305BS19 0 3 5 8 50 16.00% 1 3 3 1 8402BS26 13 206 161 380 1881 20.15% 54 161 129 26 370402BS27 0 48 29 77 971 7.93% 4 33 34 3 74436BS34 10 381 303 694 3460 20.06% 68 292 293 34 687Totals 46 878 613 1537 8605 167 653 603 79 1502City Councilmember, Single Member District 6PrecinctAbsentee Ballots CastEarly Ballots CastElection  Ballots CastTotal  Ballots CastRegistered VotersPercent TurnoutDon BarnhartCharlotte Farmer Anita Guy Totals215BS11 11 147 159 317 1645 19.27% 72 226 16 314215BS12 0 54 69 123 770 15.84% 30 81 11 122319BS22 13 244 218 475 2659 17.86% 135 310 18 463319BS23 0 8 16 24 157 15.29% 8 10 1 19421BS29 2 143 72 217 1155 18.79% 56 142 16 214421BS30 0 137 145 282 1688 16.71% 91 170 10 271424BS31 7 152 146 305 2001 15.24% 99 178 21 298Totals 33 885 825 1743 10075 491 1117 93 1701LEGENDVoters in precincts 114, 137, and 144 voted at Belmore Baptist Church‐Fellowship Hall, 1214 S. Bell St. Voters in precincts 304, 306, and 348 voted at Lakeview Bible Church, 4825 Grape Creek Rd. Voters in precincts 305, 308, 319, 327, and 351 voted at Ángelo Bible Church, 3506 Sherwood Way.Voters in precincts 402, 420, 421, and 424 voted at Plaza del Sol Apartments, 4359 Oak Grove Blvd. Voters in precincts 401, 434, 435, and 436 voted at MHMR Services, 1501 W. Beauregard Ave.Voters in precincts 106, 107, 124, and 146  voted at Baptist Memorial Hospital, 902 N. Main, ChapelVoters in precincts 228 and 230  voted at Southgate Church of Christ, 528 Country Club Rd. Voters in precincts 215 and 241 voted at Texas Department of Transportation, 4502 Knickerbocker Rd., Bldg. E
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate: May 7, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Ricky Dickson, Water Utilities DirectorSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Ricky Dickson; 657-4209Caption: Consent ItemConsideration of rejecting all bids for RFB WU-12-13 Ferric Chloride.Summary: Bids have been received from 3 suppliers for the purchase of Ferric Chloride. Thelow bidder withdrew their bid due to a computation error. Rejection of all bids andsubsequent re-bidding will allow the competitive bidding process to establish thelowest price and best value for the city.History: Ferric Chloride is the primary coagulant used in the treatment of drinking water atthe City’s Water Treatment Plant. This chemical causes suspended solids toclump together and settle out during the treatment process.Financial Impact: Total estimated annual expenditure of $400,000.00. Budgeted within the WaterTreatment Plant Operating Budget.Related Vision Item(if applicable):naOther Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends that all bids be rejected and that new bids be solicited.Attachments: Bid TabulationPresentation: None.Publication: None.Reviewed byDirector:Ricky Dickson, Water Utilities Director; 657-4209Approved by Legal:
    • QTYGallons1Ferric Chloride (270,000 Gallons/ 1,600 Wet Tons) 270,000 0.64$ 172,800.00$ 1.547$ 417,690.00$ 1.56$ 421,200.00$Total 172,800.00$ 417,690.00$ 421,200.00$Delivery Days (Calendar Days)Payment DiscountRFB Sent to:Nowata, OKSan Felipe, TXDe Soto, TXSyracuse, NYPhilli b NJPennco, Inc.CITY OF SAN ANGELOBID TABRFB: WU-12-13-Ferric Chloride/May 2, 2013. 2:00 PMItemItem Description Price/Gallon Extended Price/GallonKemira PVS TechnologiesPrice/Gallon Extended3 business daysN/A3 days ARO 3 -may require addl timeNet 30 1.5%10, Net 30ExtendedBrenntag SouthwestPenncoEagle LabsGeneral ChemicalGulbrandsen Technologies Inc Phillipsburg, NJDecatur, ALRedmond, WASouthern Water Consultants, Inc. DBA GeneralChemicalUnivar USA Inc.Gulbrandsen Technologies, Inc.C:Documents and SettingsKevin.KruegerLocal SettingsTemporary Internet FilesContent.OutlookZEXODQWZBid Tabulation WU-12-13
    • A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO AUTHORIZING THEMAYOR TO EXECUTE A TAX-RESALE (QUITCLAIM) DEEDCONVEYING ALL RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST OF THE CITY OFSAN ANGELO, AND ALL OTHER TAXING UNITS INTERESTED INTHE TAX FORECLOSURE JUDGMENTWHEREAS, by Sheriff’s Sale, the properties described below were struck-off to the City ofSan Angelo, Trustee, pursuant to delinquent tax foreclosure decrees of the 119thJudicial District,Tom Green County, Texas; andWHEREAS, offers have been made for the purchase of said properties pursuant to Section34.05, Texas Tax Code Ann.(Vernon, 1982); andNOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OFSAN ANGELO that its Mayor, Alvin New, is hereby authorized to execute a Tax-Resale(quitclaim) Deed conveying the following described real properties to the following as specifiedbelow, all of the right, title, and interest of the City of San Angelo, and all other taxing unitsinterested in the tax foreclosure judgment, located in San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas:Conveying to:GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofit corporation;($5,000):Lots 7 and 8, Block 23, Marx & Blum Addition, an addition to the City of San Angelo,Tom Green County, Texas, as described in Volume 4, Page 50, Official Public Recordsof Real Property of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #17-33100-0023-005-00GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofit corporation;($2,340):Lot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas,as described in Volume 119, Page 269, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #17-33100-0022-005-00GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofit corporation;($3,500):Lot 9, Block 32, Fairview Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas, asdescribed in Volume 297, Page 310, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #10-22600-0032-009-00LOUIS A. PEREZ, a married person as his sole and separate property; ($750):Northeast one-fourth of Block 8, Snyder Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom GreenCounty, Texas.Account #24-44100-0000-024-00
    • APPROVED AND ADOPTED ON THE DAY OF , 2013.THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO_______________________________Alvin New, MayorAttest:______________________________Alicia Ramirez, City ClerkApproved As to Content: Approved As to Form:______________________________ ______________________________Cindy M. Preas, Real Estate Administrator Lysia H. Bowling, City Attorney
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District72 West College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: LOUIS A. PEREZ, a married person as his sole and separate property112 W College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Ten and No/100 Dollars ($10.00) and other good and valuable considerationProperty (including any improvements):Northeast one-fourth of Block 8, Snyder Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom GreenCounty, Texas.Account #24-44100-0000-024-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Propertyentered on June 4, 1987, in SuitNo. B-4738-B, by the 119thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated November 16, 1987, and recorded inVolume 57, Page 796, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County, Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded.Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year inwhich the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that was
    • not extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of TexasAfter Recording, Return To:
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:Sheriffs Deed Recorded:25 1/2 YRSAdjudge Value: 4,700.00$ NoAmount of Offer: 750.00$Amounts Due Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee $500.00 $500.00 0.00% $500.00Maintenance Fee $4,800.00 $4,800.00 100.00% 250.00$ 250.00$District Clerk $0.00 $0.00 0.00% $0.00Sheriffs Fee $0.00 $0.00 0.00% $0.00Attorney Fee $0.00 $0.00 0.00% $0.00Municipal Liens $0.00 0.00% $0.00 $0.00Taxes $0.00 0.00% $0.00 $0.00Total 250.00$ $0.00 $5,300.00 100.00% $0.00 $750.00Actual Total Amt Due $250.00Amount Remaining 250.00$Offer will satisfy all costs according to the Judgment.Purchased under Urban RedevelopmentPROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyYears Held in TrustNovember 18, 19871509 Pecan StreetB-4738-TUnimprovedNortheast one-fourth of Block 8, Snyder Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County,Texas.Account #24-44100-0000-024-00November 3, 1987June 4, 1987#24-44100-0000-024-00D. M. West Account # UNKNOWN78 x 138
    • NE 1/4 of Block 8, Snyder Addition1509 Pecan Street 78 x 138Copyright 2011 Esri. All rights reserved. Tue Feb 14 2012 09:08:03 AM.
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Not Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District.72 W. College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofitcorporation1404 S Oakes StreetSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Ten and No/100 Dollars ($10.00) and other good and valuable considerationProperty (including any improvements):Lot 9, Block 32, Fairview Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas, asdescribed in Volume 297, Page 310, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #10-22600-0032-009-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Property entered on August 7, 2009 inSuit No. B-08-0004-T, by the 119thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated November 17, 2011, and recorded inInstrument Number 710993, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County,Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded.Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year in
    • which the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that wasnot extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is not less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of TexasAfter Recording, Return To:City Attorney’s Office
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:Sheriffs Deed Recorded:1 1/2 YRSAdjudge Value: 3,500.00$ NoAmount of Offer: 3,500.00$Amounts Due Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee $500.00 $500.00 0.00% $500.00Maintenance Fee $600.00 $600.00 0.00% $600.00District Clerk $343.00 $343.00 0.00% $343.00Sheriffs Fee $100.00 $100.00 0.00% $100.00Attorney Fee $365.00 $365.00 0.00% $365.00Municipal Liens $0.00 $1,318.07 48.98% $779.75 $779.75Taxes $0.00 $1,373.00 51.02% $812.25 $812.25Total $1,908.00 $2,691.07 $1,908.00 100.00% $1,592.00 $3,500.00Actual Total Amt Due $4,599.07Amount Remaining 1,592.00$Offer will satisfy all costs and a portion of the taxes and liens, according to the Judgment.Purchased under Urban RedevelopmentPROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyYears Held in TrustNovember 17, 20111406 Spaulding StreetB-08-0004-TUnimprovedLot 9, Block 32, Fairview Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas, as described inVolume 297, Page 310, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #10-22600-0032-009-00November 1, 2011August 7, 200910-22600-0032-009-00Mrs. Jean Collier Account # 86450 x 190
    • Lot 9, Block 32, Fairview Addition1406 Spaulding St - 50 x 190Copyright 2011 Esri. All rights reserved. Mon Nov 7 2011 01:16:54 PM.
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District72 West College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofitcorporation1404 S Oakes StreetSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Ten and No/100 Dollars ($10.00) and other good and valuable considerationProperty (including any improvements):Lots 7 and 8, Block 23, Marx & Blum Addition, an addition to the City of San Angelo, TomGreen County, Texas, as described in Volume 4, Page 50, Official Public Records of RealProperty of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #17-33100-0023-005-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Property entered on October 15, 2008 inSuit No. B-06-0111-T, by the 119thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated June 30, 2011, and recorded in InstrumentNumber 705021, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County, Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded.Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year in
    • which the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that wasnot extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of TexasAfter Recording, Return To:
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:Sheriffs Deed Recorded:2 YRSAdjudge Value: 7,000.00$ NoAmount of Offer: 5,000.00$Amounts Due Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee $500.00 $500.00 0.00% $500.00Maintenance Fee $800.00 $800.00 0.00% $800.00District Clerk $469.00 $469.00 0.00% $469.00Sheriffs Fee $100.00 $100.00 0.00% $100.00Attorney Fee $371.00 $371.00 0.00% $371.00Municipal Liens $0.00 $2,641.11 29.63% $817.76 $817.76Taxes $0.00 $6,272.86 70.37% $1,942.24 $1,942.24Total $2,240.00 $8,913.97 $2,240.00 100.00% $2,760.00 $5,000.00Actual Total Amt Due $11,153.97Amount Remaining 2,760.00$Offer will satisfy all costs and a large portion of the taxes and liens, according to the Judgment.Purchased under Urban RedevelopmentPROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyYears Held in TrustJune 30, 2011404 E 21st StreetB-06-0111-TUnimprovedLots 7 and 8, Block 23, Marx & Blum Addition, an addition to the City of San Angelo, Tom GreenCounty, Texas, as described in Volume 4, Page 50, Official Public Records of Real Property ofTom Green County, Texas. Account #17-33100-0023-005-00June 7, 2011October 15, 2008#17-33100-0023-005-00Zacarias C. Garza Account # 1255 & Francisco Z. & Lourde Alvarado Account #996100 x 140
    • 100 ftCity of San Angelo GIS DivisionCopyright 1988-2011For Illustrative Purposes Only.
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District72 West College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: GALILEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a Texas nonprofitcorporation1404 S Oakes StreetSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Ten and No/100 Dollars ($10.00) and other good and valuable considerationProperty (including any improvements):Lot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas, asdescribed in Volume 119, Page 269, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #17-33100-0022-005-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Property entered on August 7, 2009 inSuit No. B-07-0182-T, by the 119thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated November 20, 2009, and recorded inInstrument Number 678736, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County,Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded.Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year in
    • which the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that wasnot extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of TexasAfter Recording, Return To:
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:Sheriffs Deed Recorded:3 1/2 YRSAdjudge Value: 3,500.00$ NoAmount of Offer: 2,340.00$Amounts Due Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee $500.00 $500.00 0.00% $500.00Maintenance Fee $700.00 $700.00 0.00% $700.00District Clerk $338.00 $338.00 0.00% $338.00Sheriffs Fee $100.00 $100.00 0.00% $100.00Attorney Fee $365.00 $365.00 0.00% $365.00Municipal Liens $0.00 $1,754.06 64.71% $218.07 $218.07Taxes $0.00 $956.64 35.29% $118.93 $118.93Total $2,003.00 $2,710.70 $2,003.00 100.00% $337.00 $2,340.00Actual Total Amt Due $4,713.70Amount Remaining 337.00$Offer will satisfy all costs and a small portion of the taxes and liens, according to the Judgment.Purchased under Urban RedevelopmentPROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyYears Held in TrustNovember 23, 2009402 E 20th StreetB-07-0182-TUnimprovedLot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum Addition, City of San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas, asdescribed in Volume 119, Page 269, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account #17-33100-0022-005-00November 3, 2009August 7, 200917-33100-0022-005-00Mrs. E. Baker Account # 529550 x 140
    • 402 E 20th Street Lot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum 50 x 140Address PointsCity Address PointsPending City AddressesRetired City AddressesApril 18, 20130 0.045 0.090.0225 mi0 0.07 0.140.035 km1:2,699
    • Adopted: 5/30/03Revised: 6/21/10City of San AngeloMemoDate: April 18, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Cindy M. Preas, Real Estate Administrator (657-4407)Subject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Diana Farris, Property Specialist (657-4407)Caption: Consent ItemConsideration of adopting a Resolution of the City of San Angelo authorizing themayor to execute a tax-resale (quitclaim) deed conveying all right, title and interestof the City of San Angelo, and all other taxing units interested in the taxforeclosure judgment:a. 404 E 21stStreet, (Galilee), Lots 7 & 8, Block 23, Marx & Blum, $5,000, SuitNo. B-06-0111-Tb. 402 E 20thStreet, (Galilee), Lot 8, Block 22, Marx & Blum, $2,340, Suit No. B-07-0182-Tc. 1406 Spaulding Street, (Galilee), Lot 9, Block 32, Fairview $3,500, Suit No. B-08-0004-Td. 1509 Pecan Street, (Perez), NE ¼ of Block 8, Snyder, $750, Suit No. B-4738-BSummary: The subject properties were auctioned at Sheriff’s Sale. No offers were receivedcausing subject properties to be stuck-off to the City, as Trustee for itself and theother taxing entities.History: The attached Property Analysis reflects amounts of delinquent taxes, accruedpenalties, interest, attorney fees and costs for delinquent years of, together withadditional penalties and interest at the rates prescribed by Chapter 33, Tex.PropetyFinancial Impact: Upon approval: (1) The City will retain a $500 Administration fee; (2) The balancewill be distributed according to the judgment on the Sheriff’s Return; and (3)Property will be reinstated back onto tax roll.Related Vision Item(if applicable):Financial Vision – Examine liquidation of unused or underperforming city-ownedpropertiesNeighborhood Vision – Attract reinvestmentOther Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends approval.Attachments: Property Analysis, Resolution, Tax-Resale Deed and Property Location MapPresentation: N/APublication: N/A
    • Reviewed byDirector:Lysia H. Bowling, City AttorneyApproved by Legal:
    • A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO AUTHORIZING THEMAYOR, ON CONDITION PRECEDENT, TO EXECUTE A TAX-RESALE (QUITCLAIM) DEED CONVEYING ALL RIGHT, TITLE ANDINTEREST OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TRUSTEE, AND ALLOTHER TAXING UNITS INTERESTED IN THE TAX FORECLOSUREJUDGMENT TO R.W. HARGRAVES FOR $15,000.WHEREAS, by Sheriff’s Sale to be conducted on June 4, 2013, the property described belowmay be struck-off to the City of San Angelo, Trustee, pursuant to a delinquent tax foreclosuredecree of the 340thJudicial District, Tom Green County, Texas; andWHEREAS, the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000) has been offered by R.W.Hargraves, for the purchase of said property pursuant to Section 34.05, Texas Tax Code; andNOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OFSAN ANGELO that its Mayor, Alvin New, is hereby authorized to execute a Tax-Resale(quitclaim) Deed conveying to R.W. Hargraves, all of the right, title, and interest of the City ofSan Angelo, and all other taxing units interested in the tax foreclosure judgment, said deedbecoming effective only upon the event that the following described real property located in SanAngelo, Tom Green County, Texas is struck-off to City of San Angelo, Trustee:Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Accounts No.03-13800-0008-010-00 & 03-13800-0008-011-00APPROVED AND ADOPTED ON THE DAY OF , 2013.THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO_______________________________Alvin New, MayorAttest:______________________________Alicia Ramirez, City ClerkApproved As to Content: Approved As to Form:______________________________ ______________________________Cindy M. Preas, Real Estate Administrator Lysia H. Bowling, City Attorney
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:N/AAdjudge Value: 18,509.00$ NOAmount of Offer: 15,000.00$Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee 500.00$ 500.00$ 0.00% 500.00$Maintenance Fee -$ -$ 0.00% -$District Clerk 690.00$ 690.00$ 0.00% 690.00$Sheriffs Fee 100.00$ 100.00$ 0.00% 100.00$Attorney Fee 512.00$ 512.00$ 0.00% 512.00$Municipal Liens 365.93$ 365.93$ 0.00% 365.93$Taxes 13,016.38$ 100.00% 12,832.07$ 12,832.07$Total 1,802.00$ 13,016.38$ 2,167.93$ 100.00% 12,832.07$ 15,000.00$Actual Total Amt Due 14,818.38$Amount Remaining 12,832.07$PROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyJune 4, 2013100 x 190Offer will satisfy the court cost and a large portion of the taxes.Amounts DueApril 14, 2010Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.C-09-0067T1636 Pulliam StreetGenco Holdings, LP, Ronnie Lyles, II & State National Bank of Groom Acct. #4470#03-13800-0008-010-00 #03-13800-0008-011-00ImprovedYears Held in TrustUrban Redevlopment Sale?:
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate: May 8, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Cindy M. Preas, Real Estate Administrator (657-4407)Subject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Diana Farris, Property Specialist (657-4407)Caption: Consent ItemConsideration of adopting a Resolution authorizing the Mayor, on condition stated,to execute a tax-resale (quitclaim) deed conveying all right, title and interest of theCity of San Angelo, Trustee and all other taxing units interested in the taxforeclosure judgment to R.W. Hargraves for $15,000:1636 Pulliam Street: Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell AdditionSummary: The subject property is a former gas station with four underground storage tanks.It was offered at tax sales in 2010 and 2011, but there were no bidders because ofthe storage tanks, so it was withdrawn from sale so the city would not holdpotentially contaminated property. It is scheduled for tax sale again on June 4,2013. We anticipate that there will be no bidders, especially since the amount oftaxes due has increased significantly since 2010. Fortunately, Mr. R.W.Hargraves has offered to purchase the property. This re-sale, prior to the actualsale, becomes effective only if the property is struck-off to the city, and avoidsindefinite ownership of the property by the city.History: The attached Property Analysis reflects amounts of delinquent taxes, penalties,interest, attorney fees and costs for delinquent years of, together with additionalpenalties & interest at the rates prescribed by Chapter 33 of the Texas Tax Code.Financial Impact: Upon approval: (1) The City will retain a $500 Administration fee; (2) The balancewill be distributed according to the judgment on the Sheriff’s Return; and (3)Property will be reinstated back onto tax roll.Related Vision Item(if applicable):Financial Vision – Examine liquidation of unused or underperforming city-ownedpropertiesNeighborhood Vision – Attract reinvestmentOther Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends approval.Attachments: Property Analysis, Resolution, Tax-Resale Deed and Property Location MapPresentation: N/APublication: N/AReviewed byDirector:Lysia H. Bowling, City AttorneyApproved by Legal:
    • A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO AUTHORIZING THEMAYOR, ON CONDITION PRECEDENT, TO EXECUTE A TAX-RESALE (QUITCLAIM) DEED CONVEYING ALL RIGHT, TITLE ANDINTEREST OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TRUSTEE, AND ALLOTHER TAXING UNITS INTERESTED IN THE TAX FORECLOSUREJUDGMENT TO R.W. HARGRAVES FOR $15,000.WHEREAS, by Sheriff’s Sale to be conducted on June 4, 2013, the property described belowmay be struck-off to the City of San Angelo, Trustee, pursuant to a delinquent tax foreclosuredecree of the 340thJudicial District, Tom Green County, Texas; andWHEREAS, the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000) has been offered by R.W.Hargraves, for the purchase of said property pursuant to Section 34.05, Texas Tax Code; andNOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OFSAN ANGELO that its Mayor, Alvin New, is hereby authorized to execute a Tax-Resale(quitclaim) Deed conveying to R.W. Hargraves, all of the right, title, and interest of the City ofSan Angelo, and all other taxing units interested in the tax foreclosure judgment, said deedbecoming effective only upon the event that the following described real property located in SanAngelo, Tom Green County, Texas is struck-off to City of San Angelo, Trustee:Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Accounts No.03-13800-0008-010-00 & 03-13800-0008-011-00APPROVED AND ADOPTED ON THE DAY OF , 2013.THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO_______________________________Alvin New, MayorAttest:______________________________Alicia Ramirez, City ClerkApproved As to Content: Approved As to Form:______________________________ ______________________________Cindy M. Preas, Real Estate Administrator Lysia H. Bowling, City Attorney
    • Legal Description:Improved/UnimprovedTax Suit Number:Location:Parcel Size/Dimensions:City of San Angelo vs.Tax ID Number:Judgment Date:Date of Sheriffs Sale:N/AAdjudge Value: 18,509.00$ NOAmount of Offer: 15,000.00$Priority % of Pro Rata AmountsFees Judgment Allocations Remainder Allocations DistributedAdministration Fee 500.00$ 500.00$ 0.00% 500.00$Maintenance Fee -$ -$ 0.00% -$District Clerk 690.00$ 690.00$ 0.00% 690.00$Sheriffs Fee 100.00$ 100.00$ 0.00% 100.00$Attorney Fee 512.00$ 512.00$ 0.00% 512.00$Municipal Liens 365.93$ 365.93$ 0.00% 365.93$Taxes 13,016.38$ 100.00% 12,832.07$ 12,832.07$Total 1,802.00$ 13,016.38$ 2,167.93$ 100.00% 12,832.07$ 15,000.00$Actual Total Amt Due 14,818.38$Amount Remaining 12,832.07$PROPERTY ANALYSISFor Tax Resale PropertyJune 4, 2013100 x 190Offer will satisfy the court cost and a large portion of the taxes.Amounts DueApril 14, 2010Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.C-09-0067T1636 Pulliam StreetGenco Holdings, LP, Ronnie Lyles, II & State National Bank of Groom Acct. #4470#03-13800-0008-010-00 #03-13800-0008-011-00ImprovedYears Held in TrustUrban Redevlopment Sale?:
    • 1636 Pulliam Street Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition 100 x 190Address PointsCity Address PointsPending City AddressesRetired City AddressesMay 9, 20130 0.045 0.090.0225 mi0 0.07 0.140.035 km1:2,699
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District72 West College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: R.W. Hargraves1001 N. BellSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Fifteen Thousand and No/100 Dollars ($15,000.00) and other good and valuableconsiderationProperty (including any improvements):Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account 03-13800-0008-010-00 & 03-13800-0008-011-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Property entered on April 14, 2010 inSuit No. C09-0067T, by the 340thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated June 4, 2013, and recorded in InstrumentNo._______________, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County, Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded. This deed shall become effective immediately upon the sale of the property to City of San Angelo,Trustee at sheriff’s foreclosure auction, but not otherwise. The parties agree that Grantor has not managed oroperated the property, and its ownership of the property in the chain of title is strictly incident to the taxforeclosure of the property. Grantee acknowledges that Grantor has provided him notice of undergroundstorage tanks in compliance with Chapter 334, Texas Administrative Code.
    • Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year inwhich the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that wasnot extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of Texas
    • 1636 Pulliam Street Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition 100 x 190Address PointsCity Address PointsPending City AddressesRetired City AddressesMay 9, 20130 0.045 0.090.0225 mi0 0.07 0.140.035 km1:2,699
    • NOTICE OF CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS: If you are a natural person, you may remove orstrike any or all of the following information from this instrument before it is filed for record inthe public records: your social security number or your driver’s license number.Tax-Resale Deed(Property Sold for Less than Adjudged Value)Date: __________________________Grantor: The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, for itself and as Trusteefor itself, Tom Green County, and San Angelo Independent School District72 West College AvenueSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Grantee: R.W. Hargraves1001 N. BellSan Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas 76903Consideration: Fifteen Thousand and No/100 Dollars ($15,000.00) and other good and valuableconsiderationProperty (including any improvements):Lots 11 & 12, Block 8, Bell Addition, City of San Angelo, as described in plat recorded inVolume 26, Page 277, Deed Records of Tom Green County, Texas.Account 03-13800-0008-010-00 & 03-13800-0008-011-00Judgment: Judgment for the foreclosure of a tax lien against the Property entered on April 14, 2010 inSuit No. C09-0067T, by the 340thDistrict Court of Tom Green County, Texas.Sheriff’s Deed: Grantor acquired full legal title to the Property — both for its own benefit and as Trustee forall other taxing authorities entitled to receive proceeds from the sale of the Propertyunder theterms of the Judgment — by Sheriff’s Deed dated June 4, 2013, and recorded in InstrumentNo._______________, Official Public Records of Real Property, Tom Green County, Texas.For the Consideration, Grantor — acting by and through its Mayor, who has been duly authorized toexecute this instrument on Grantor’s behalf by resolution and order of Grantor’s City Council recorded in theCity Council’s official minutes — hereby quitclaims to Grantee all of Grantors right, title, and interest in andto the Property, to have and to hold it to Grantee and Grantees heirs, successors, and assigns forever. NeitherGrantor, nor any other taxing unit interested in the Judgment, nor any other person or entity claiming underthem, will have, claim, or demand any right or title to the Property or any part of it. Grantor gives this Tax-Resale Deed without any express or implied warranty whatsoever; and all warranties that might arise bycommon law and the warranties in § 5.023 of the Texas PropertyCode (or its successor) are herebyspecificallyexcluded. This deed shall become effective immediately upon the sale of the property to City of San Angelo,Trustee at sheriff’s foreclosure auction, but not otherwise. The parties agree that Grantor has not managed oroperated the property, and its ownership of the property in the chain of title is strictly incident to the taxforeclosure of the property. Grantee acknowledges that Grantor has provided him notice of undergroundstorage tanks in compliance with Chapter 334, Texas Administrative Code.
    • Grantees rights under this deed are subject to the provisions of Chapter 34 of the Texas Tax Code,including, without limitation, any right of redemption remaining in the former owner of the Property; the termsof any recorded restrictive covenants running with the land that were recorded before January 1 of the year inwhich the tax lien on the property arose; any recorded lien that arose under such restrictive covenants that wasnot extinguished in the judgment foreclosing the tax lien; and each valid easement of record as of the date ofthe sale that was recorded before January 1 of the year the tax lien arose.Grantor is selling the Property to Grantee for an amount that is less than the lesser of (1) the marketvalue specified in the Judgment, or (2) the total amount of the Judgment.Grantee assumes full payment of any ad valorem taxes for the Property for the current year and allfuture years.When the context requires, singular nouns and pronouns include the plural.GRANTOR:The City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rulemunicipal corporation, for itself and as Trustee forany taxing authorities named in the JudgmentATTEST: By: ____________________________Alvin New, Mayor andduly-authorized agentAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkSTATE OF TEXAS §§COUNTY OF TOM GREEN §This instrument was acknowledged before me on _____________________, 2013, by Alvin New,Mayor and duly-authorized agent of the City of San Angelo, a Texas home-rule municipal corporation, onbehalf of such corporation and as Trustee for any taxing authorities named in the Judgment identified in theabove instrument.__________________________________Notary Public, State of Texas
    • A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE SAN ANGELOPOLICE DEPARTMENT TO APPLY FOR THEOFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR CRIMINAL JUSTICEDIVISION GANG OVERTIME GRANTWHEREAS, The City Council of the City of San Angelo finds it in the bestinterest of the citizens of San Angelo, TX that the Gang Program be operatedfor 2013 fiscal year; andWHEREAS, The City Council of the City of San Angelo agrees to provide nomatching funds for the said project as required by the Office of the GovernorCriminal Justice Division Gang Overtime grant application; andWHEREAS, The City Council of the City of San Angelo agrees that in theevent of loss or misuse of the Criminal Justice Division funds, The CityCouncil of the City of San Angelo assures that the funds will be returned tothe Criminal Justice Division in full.WHEREAS, The City Council of the City of San Angelo designates the CityManager as the grantee’s authorized official. The authorized official is giventhe power to apply for, accept, reject, alter or terminate the grant on behalf ofthe applicant agency.NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that The City Council of the City ofSan Angelo approves submission of the grant application for the GangProgram to the Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division.PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED this day of , 2013.Grant Number: 2737201CITY OF SAN ANGELOBY: ____________________________Alvin New, MayorATTEST:BY: ________________________Alicia Ramirez, City Clerk
    • APPROVED AS TO CONTENT: APPROVED AS TO FORM:_________________________ _________________________Tim Vasquez, Police Chief Dan Saluri, Asst. City Attorney
    • Adopted: 5/30/03Revised: 1/16/08City of San AngeloMemoDate: 5/9/13To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Tim Vasquez, Chief of PoliceSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Chief Tim Vasquez, 657-4336Caption: Consent Agenda ItemConsideration of adopting a Resolution authorizing the San Angelo Police Departmentto apply for the Office of the Governor Criminal Justice Division Gang Overtime GrantSummary: The State of Texas announced that funds are available under from the Office forthe Governor Criminal Justice Division. The City of San Angelo Police Departmentis asking for authorization to apply for funds from this program for the GangProgram. This grant will fund overtime for officers to enforce gang violence in SanAngelo.History: The San Angelo Police Department has not applied for this grant in the past.Financial Impact: There is no requirement for matching funds. The San Angelo PoliceDepartment will apply for $21,800 from the grant and if awarded these funds willincrease the Police Department budget.Other Information/Recommendation: Staff recommends approval of the stated caption.Attachments: ResolutionPresentation: noneReviewed by Service Area Director: Chief Tim Vasquez, Police Department, 5/9/13
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate: 04/18/13To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Dale Hahn, Finance DepartmentSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, Council MeetingContact: Dale Hahn, Finance Department, 657-4251Caption: Consent ItemConsideration of adopting Resolution amending authorized representative forTexpool, an Investment Service for Public FundsSummary: Authorize Dale Hahn to be representative for Texpool.History: Doug Cooper, the former representative is no longer employed with the City. Dale Hahnhas assumed his position and will serve as the contact member to represent the City.Financial Impact: Texpool, an Investment Service for Public Funds, is utilized as an account for theCity’s reserve cash and interest bearing investment account which is a substantial portion of the City’scurrent assets.Related Vision Item (if applicable): NoneOther Information/Recommendation: NoneAttachments: ResolutionPresentation: No special equipment is required.Publication: NoneReviewed by Service Area Director: Michael Dane, Finance Department, 01/29/13
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate: May 15, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Robert Schneeman, Interim Director of Economic DevelopmentSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Robert Schneeman, 657-4210Caption: Consent AgendaConsideration of approving a recommendation by COSADC to approve the annualCOSADC contract with The Chamber of Commerce and authorizing the COSADCPresident to execute a contract with the San Angelo Chamber of Commerce for theprovision of Marketing and Recruitment ServicesSummary: On December 19, 2012, the City of San Angelo Development Corporation(COSADC) approved the above cited contract for renewal for fiscal year 2013.The only change from the 2012 contract is the addition of up to $25,000 inreimbursable one time expenses for the Business Retention and ExpansionProgram and promotion of the Business Resource Center and web pagedevelopment.History: This contract for 2013 was approved by the COSADC Board on December 19, 2012.The Board reviewed all the partner contracts extensively during the 2010 and 2011fiscal years. As a result, the contracts were adjusted to include more specificrequirements relating to procedures, expenditure of funds, services to be provided,and reporting requirements. The COSADC Board requested that specificperformance measures be added to the 2012 contracts, and these have beenreviewed and approved by the contracting parties. The performance measures havenot changed for the 2013 contracts. All parties acknowledge and understand that anynew initiatives undertaken must be presented to and approved by the COSADC Boardand City Council prior making expenditures for new initiatives.Financial Impact: $225, 000 plus up to $25,000 additional to be reimbursed for BusinessRetention & Expansion Program and Business Resource CenterPromotion and Web Site DevelopmentRelated Vision Item(if applicable):N/AOther Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends approval of the above contract in the stated amounts andauthorization for COSADC Board President to execute a final contract on behalf of theCOSADC.Attachments: COSADC – Chamber AgreementPresentation: Robert SchneemanPublication:Reviewed by Robert Schneeman
    • Director:Approved by Legal: Yes
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate:To: Mayor and Council membersFrom: Sandra J. Villarreal, Health Services DirectorSubject: Agenda Item for April 16, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Sandra J. Villarreal, Health Services Director, 657-4493Caption: ConsentConsideration of matters related to the City of San Angelo and Texas Departmentof State Health Services (DSHS) Animal Friendly Grant any action thereto:A. Consideration of ratifying and authorizing the City Manager or hisdesignee the filing of grant submission to the Texas Department of StateHealth Services for Animal Friendly Grant Funds for FY14 in the amountof $20,000 with a 0% match requirement to fund the City’s low cost SpayNeuter Assistance Program (SNAP);B. Consideration of accepting said Animal Friendly Grant funds by the City, ifawarded; and;C. Consideration of authorizing the City Manager or his designee to executeall documents related to said funds.Summary: The City of San Angelo Animal Shelter has the opportunity to apply for funds fromthe Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) for Animal Friendly GrantFunds. In an effort to reduce pet overpopulation, Animal Friendly Program funds willbe made available for community based programs which sterilize dogs and cats ownedby the general public at no or minimal cost.Due to pet overpopulation in Texas, over half a million animals are euthanized annuallyat cost of over $20 million dollars. These figures do not include animals that areabandoned and die from starvation, disease, or trauma. Stray animals represent publichealth threats through a variety of diseases such as rabies, toxoplasmosis, plague, andparasitic infections. Failure to sterilize pets is unquestionably a major cause of petoverpopulation. The cost of the sterilization is considered prohibitive to many petowners. As a response to these problems, the 75thTexas Legislature designated thatfunds derived from the sale of Animal Friendly license plates are to be used forsterilization programs.In 2012, the City’s Animal Shelter euthanized 7685 abandoned or unwanted animals. Itis our belief if more people would become responsible pet owners and have their petsspayed or neutered, the number of animals that enter the shelter and ultimatelysuccumb to humane euthanasia, would decrease.History: The City of San Angelo Low Income Spay / Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP)began in the mid 2000’s with the sale of the old Animal Shelter building andgrounds located on Baze Street in fiscal year 2003. The city received half of theproceeds with the other half going to the Humane Society.The SNAP program was designed to assist low income individuals with the costof spay and neuter surgeries for their pets within the city limits.
    • The SNAP Fund account was completely depleted at the end of FY12.Financial Impact: The City of San Angelo is not obligated to match dollars received through theAnimal Friendly Account Grant.Related Vision Item(if applicable):Community Appearance VisionFinancial VisionOther Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends . . . approvalAttachments: Resolution and Copy of Animal Friendly Grant ApplicationPresentation: NoPublication:Reviewed byDirector:Rick Weise, x-1072Approved by Legal: Date of Approval (attach Legal Approval Form)
    • A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELORATIFYING THE APPLICATION AND CONTRACT FOR, AND ACCEPTING, IFAWARDED, A FISCAL YEAR 2014 TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTHSERVICES ANIMAL FRIENDLY GRANT IN THE AMOUNT OF $20,000.00 WITHA ZERO (0%) MATCHING CONTRIBUTION REQUIREMENT TO FUND THECITY’S LOW COST SPAY NEUTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (SNAP); ANDAUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER OR HIS DESIGNEE TO EXECUTE ANYNECESSARY AND RELATED DOCUMENTS.WHEREAS, on April 8, 2013, the City of San Angelo applied for Animal Friendly Grant Funds fromthe Texas Department of State Health Services in the amount of $20,000.00, to be used to fund the San AngeloAnimal Shelter’s Low Cost Spay Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP) during Fiscal Year 2014; and,WHEREAS, said Animal Friendly Grant Application does not require the City to contribute aMatching Contribution; and,WHEREAS, said funds must be used to sterilize dogs and cats owned by the general public at no orminimal cost.NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SANANGELO, TEXAS THAT:The application for Texas Department of State Health Services Animal Friendly Grant Funds in theamount of $20,000.00 to finance the San Angelo Animal Shelter’s Low Cost Spay Neuter Assistance Programis hereby ratified and the Animal Friendly Grant Funds in the amount of $20,000.00, if awarded, are herebyaccepted. The City Manager or his designee is hereby authorized to execute any necessary and relateddocuments for implementing and carrying out such Animal Friendly Grant Funds project.PASSED and APPROVED THIS DAY OF , 2013.CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXASATTEST: _________________________________Alvin W. New, MayorAlicia Ramirez, City ClerkAPPROVED AS TO CONTENT APPROVED AS TO FORM_________________________________Sandra Villarreal, Health Services Manager Lysia H. Bowling, City Attorney
    • .City of San AngeloMemoDate:To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Tim Vasquez, Chief of PoliceSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council Meeting *Contact: Jeff Fant, Ass’t Chief, Police, 659-8011Caption: ConsentConsideration of amending City Council’s prior authorization on February 21, 2013authorizing the payroll deduction for police officer duty rifles and relatedaccessoriesSummary: The SAPD is requesting authorization from Council to provide up front purchasingof patrol rifle and accessories for sworn officers employed by the City. Eachofficer will subsequently reimburse the City through equal payroll deductions untileach purchase has been totally reimbursed.History: The SAPD brought this concept before council during the February 21, 2013meeting. The concept was approved, however the both original interest by officersand the price of the rifles and accessories increased above and beyondexpectations.The purpose of allowing officers to purchase his/her own rifle is to allow eachofficer to configure the rifle according personal preferences and to provide anopportunity for a high level of marksmanship that is demanded by precision rifles.Whereas issue weapons must maintain a level of standardization that is notconducive to the level of accuracy, proficiency, and perfection required of officers.These rifles are specifically designed and/or adapted for law enforcementresponse and are manufactured according to military specifications. Each rifle islegal to own and possess without restriction. The rifles selected by theDepartment were limited to specific designs and manufacturers to standardize thefunctionality and maintenance without interfering with individual preferences.Accessories were limited to specific items that will enhance the operation andusability of the rifle for law enforcement use and include such items as sight optics(scopes), manual sights, slings, and extra magazines.At the conclusion of the selection and ordering process, 160 sworn officers electedto purchase a rifle through this program. This also includes sworn officers fromMunicipal Court and the Fire Marshall’s office. The total cost of all rifles andaccessories is approximately $244,365.48. This final number may change slightlyas variations for left hand rifles are reviewed by the vendor.Financial Impact: There is no overall or long-term financial impact to the City since the totalpurchase will be reimbursed through periodic payroll deductions made by eachpurchasing officer.Related Vision Item(if applicable):N/A
    • Other Information/Recommendation:Staff recommends . . . Council approval for the initial purchase and subsequentpayroll reimbursement for patrol rifles and accessories.Attachments: February 21, 2013 agenda memoFebruary 21, 2013 City Council minutesRifle and Accessory quotesPresentation: N/APublication: N/AReviewed byDirector:Tim Vasquez, Chief of PoliceApproved by Legal: N/A
    • MemoDate:To:From:Subject:Contact:Caption:Summary:History:City of San AngeloMayor and CouncilmembersTim Vasquez, Chief of PoliceAgenda Item for February 18, 2013 Council MeetingJeff Fant, Asst Chief, 659-8011 ext 2104Regular AgendaConsideration of .. . authorizing the police department to purchase patrol rifles andaccessories for individual officers who shall reimburse the City through payrolldeduction.Police officers are often understaffed and out gunned. This, coupled with themore recent increase in mass casualty shooting incidents, clearly indicated thatour police officers need to be better prepared with superior weaponry at all times.Individual preferences and set-up improve the proficiency and precision necessaryin critical stress incidents making it more advantageous for officers to own theirrifle. However the initial cost of such a purchase can be difficult. Therefore, theSAPO wishes to make this process easier by allowing the officer to purchase theproposed rifles and accessories through a payroll deduction program.In 2005/2006, COSA and the SAPO conducted a similar rifle purchase programthrough payroll deduction. A large number of officers participated, however, asignificant number of officers have been hired since that time and the SAPObelieves that this program would be beneficial, not only to the officers but also forthe department and the citizens of San Angelo. When polled, approximately 75officers indicated their desire to purchase a patrol rifle through payroll deduction.The proposed rifle and accessories meet the standards established by the SAPOfirearms instructor/armorer and are substantially the same as any existing riflescurrently in use by the SAPO. Each rifle meets military specifications as to qualityand construction and are legal to possess without Federal licensure (they are notfully automatic). The rifles chosen are not designed for recreational use and to beto facilitate the officers in performing the necessary functions of their job. Security,proficiency and use are all governed by SAPO policy to ensure control standardsare met.Recent events along with proposed legislation have made the purchase of a patrolrifle almost impossible for individuals other than through a lawenforcement/department purchase. Quotes are only being accepted by gundealers through law enforcement agencies and each transaction must becoordinated through the manufacturer. This delays the receipt of a quote. Theestimated cost of each transaction will be $1,100 to $1,200. Exact cost cant bedetermined until final quotes and contractual agreements are made. The total upfront transaction would be less than $100,000, however the out of pocket cost tothe city would be reimbursed through payroll deduction within a specified timeperiod, causing no change to the annual budget.The SAPO is requesting Council approval to complete these transactions once theproper procedures are met, including quotes and binding agreements between theCity and individual officers.
    • Financial Impact: There is no overall financial impact to the City. The initial gross purchase wouldbe made from existing funds. Individuals officers would, under contractagreement, make semi-monthly payroll deductions for the rifle until the purchase ispaid off, at which time, the City would be totally reimbursed for any initial payout.Each individual officer transaction is estimated to be $1 ,200 or less and the entireinitial purchase will be less than $100,000.Related Vision Item NIA(if applicable):Other Information! Staff recommends . . . that City Council approve the initial purchase andRecommendation: subsequent officer payroll deduction payment for the purchase of approximately75 patrol rifles.Attachments: Agenda request and memorandums for 2005/2006 patrol rifle purchase program.Presentation:Publication:Reviewed byDirector:Payroll deduction authorization.Spec sheet from potential vendor.NoneTim Vasquez, Chief of Police, January 30, 2013.Approved by Legal: Date of Approval (attach Legal Approval Form)
    • MinutesFebruary 21, 2013PUBLIC HEARING AND COMMENTPage 281Vol. 104POSTPONEMENT OF THE DEMONSTRATION AND CONSIDERATION OF THE NEPTUNE N SIGHTIQ SOFTWARE WHICH WOULD ALLOW CITIZENS THE ABILITY TO ACCESS THEIR UTILITYDATA COLLECTED FROM THE CITYS AUTOMATIC METER READING SYSTEMMayor New announced the item will be postponed to a future meeting. City Council concurred.POSTPONEMENT OF THE UPDATE AND PRESENTATION ON THE UPPER COLORADO RIVERAUTHORITY STORM WATER MASTER PLANMayor New announced the item will be postponed to a future meeting. City Council concurred.PRESENTATION OF THE 4TH QUARTER REPORT FOR THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCEECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU (CVB)Vice President for Economic Development John Dugan and CVB Vice President Pamela Miller presentedbackground information.General discussion was held on economic growth due to the influx of oil industry prospects, impact to localbusinesses, and hotel room occupancy.AUTHORIZATION OF THE PAYROLL DEDUCTION FOR POLICE OFFICER DUTY RIFLESAssistant Police Chief Jeff Fant presented background information.Motion, to approve the payroll deduction, as presented, was made by Councilmember Hirschfeld and secondedby Councilmember Silvas. Motion carried unanimously.APPROVAL OF A LICENSE AGREEMENT WITH THE PEOPLE/PLANT CONNECTION FOR THEDEVELOPMENT AND OPERATION OF A COMMUNITY GARDEN AT RIO VISTA PARKParks and Recreation Director Carl White and Susan M. Stanfield, President ofthe People/plant Connectionpresented background information. A copy a/the presentation is part a/the permanent supplemental record.Motion, to approve the agreement, as presented was made by Councilmember Silvas and seconded byCouncilmember Hirschfeld. Motion carried unanimously.DISCUSSION OF THE 2013-2018 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN PREPARATION, PROCEDURES,SUBMISSIONS, AND PUBLIC FORUMSBudget Manager Morgan Trainer presented background information. A copy a/the presentation is part a/thepermanent supplemental record.Assistant City Manager/ChiefFinancial Officer Michael Dane suggested identifYing projects and ofwhich willthen be translated into an action plan. City Manager Daniel Valenzuela stated Council will have theopportunity to identifY these projects during the Strategic Planning Workshop scheduled for February 26,2013.FIRST PUBLIC HEARING AND RECONSIDERATION OF INTRODUCING AN ORDINANCEORDERING THE GENERAL ELECTION AND SPECIAL ELECTION FOR MAY 11, 2013: (Page 321,#2013-02-028)AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS, ORDERINGTHAT A GENERAL ELECTION BE HELD IN SAID CITY ON THE 11TH DAY OF MAY, 2013, FOR THEPURPOSE OF ELECTING MUNICIPAL OFFICERS; AND ORDERING THAT A SPECIAL ELECTION
    • 1042 Cleveland Road. Colona, IL 61241. Phone: 309.792.5780 • Fax: 309.792.5781Toll Free Order Line: 866-980-ROCK (7625) • Email: info@rockriverarms.com • www.rockrlverarms.comJeffFant San Angelo Police DepartmentQUOTE FOR RIFLES:MODEL LE1020 CARA4 .223 15.56SUB STAR SAFETY SELECTORSUB CHROME MOLY BARREL ( NOT SURE WHY??)SUB RRA 2-STAGE TRIGGERPRICE PER UNIT $905.00 $25.00 S/HMODEL # LE1080 TACTICAL CARBINESUB STAR SAFETY SELECTORSUB CHROME MOLY BARRELSUB RRA 2-STAGE TRIGGERPRICE PER UNIT $ 1080.00 $25.00 SIHAR116N30 RRA MAG $18.00 I AR3788 EOTECH $499.00E-MAIL: JEFF.FANT@SANANGELOPOLICE.ORGThank you.Randy HansenRRA I LE SALES DEPT.866-980-7625 EXT 120309-792-5780 EXT 120309-792-5781 FAXRANDYH@ROCKRIVERARMS.COMMarch 21, 2013
    • Quote QTE0063195Date 2/14/2013Bill To:San Angelo Police DepartmentAttn: Accounts Payable401 E Beauregard AveSan Angelo TX 76903GT Distributors - AustinP.O. Box 16080Piiae:Austin TX 78761(512) 451-8298Ship To:San Angelo Police Department401 E BeauregardRef PO#Attn:San Angelo TX 769031Pu[chase Order No. ICustomer 10 JSalesperson 10 IShipplng,Method IPayment Terms IRegShiD DatelMaster No.AR PAYROLL DEDUG 1000673 I JD luPS INET 15 101010000 I 973,792Quantity Item Number Description UOM Unit Pliice Ext. P~ice1 BFM-BCWA3F16M4TXI Bushmaster Texas M4 Patrolmens Carbine .22 EA $898.79 $898.79#903031 BFM-BCWVMF16M40F Bushmaster Optics Ready Carbine .223 #9039#903911 SIG-RM400-16B-EC Sig Sauer M400 Carbine 5.56 NATO EnhancecMOE Grip, Hand Guards, Stock1 SIG-R556-16B-PS-RD Sig Sauer SIG556 Patrol Rifle 5.56mm 16" BblQuad Rail Forend1 BH-70GS17BK Blackhawk Swift Sling Universal1 YHM-9680 Yankee Hill Flip Up Rear Sight1 YHM-5040 Yankee Hill 5040 Q.D.S.Sight SystemFront and Rear Flip Up Sight1 AP-12841 Aimpoint Patrol Rifle Sight1 EOT-XPS2-0 Eotech Transverse Model 1 CR123 Battery 6511 BFM-8448670-20R Bushmaster 20rd AR Mags #93304Aluminum Bulk #933041 MAGPUL-MAG560-BLK Magpul PMAG 20 AR/M4 Gen M3, 5.56x45 Ma1 BFM-93306 Bushmaster 30rd AR Mags Aluminum1 MAGPUL-MAG571 -BLK Magpul PMAG 30 AR/M4 GEN M2 MOE, 5.56x1 NOTES Notes:Quotation reflects Buyboard Contract 363-10Contract period 04/01/11-03/31/14.Fax BuyBoard POs to 1-800-211 -5454 only.All returns must be authorized by GT Distributors. Interest charges on pastdue invoices at the maximum rate allowed by law.Your salesman is Joshua Lemke. Thank you.Jeff Fant 325-659-8011jeff.fant@sanangelopolice.orgEA $783.69 $783.69EA $966.00 $966.00EA $1,095.00 $1,095.00EA $22.50 $22.50EA $66.88 $66.88EA $176.00 $176.00EA $400.00 $400.00EA $471.25 $471 .25EA $16.19000 $16.19EA $11.34 $11 .34EA $16.19 $16.19EA $12.15 $12.15EA $0.00 $0.00I:Subtotal $4935.98Mise $0.00Tax $407.24Freiaht $0.00Total $5,343.22
    • High Standard Manufacturing Co., IncA Texas CompanyFirst Choice in Small ArmsWeapons - Parts - Ammo - Accessories - GunsmithingA2 Carbine (TX6551) 5.56Package 1 with firearmPackage 2 with firearmOffer Qt~Firearm 100Package 1 100Package 2 100Other Options of InterestCarry handle with sightFront flip-up sight sight2 stage triggerCarbine quad rail$667.00$799.00~1,155.00Price$667.00$799.00$1 ,155.00$96.00$72.00$65.00$107.00Description and included accessories:US Mil Spec were applicable16" barrel - 4140 material1/9 twistA2 Front sight6 position collapsible stockA2 flash hider(4) 30 Rd MagsSemi AutoRear Flip-up sightRear Sight (double aperture)Black Hawk Single Point SlingAmbidextrous Single Point Sling AdapterRear Sight (double aperture)Black Hawk Single Point SlingAmbidextrous Single Point Sling AdapterEo Tech 512 (with 2 double A Batteries)Total Price$66,700.00$79,900.00$115,500.00..:,.,..... " . , 5 1 5 1 Mit c h e I I d a Ie, Sui t e B7 1 3 - 4 6-2 - 4 2 0 0 0 r t 0
    • High Standard Manufacturing Co., IncA Texas CompanyEstimated time of delivery 1 - 3 months upon time of order.• Freight is complimentary for all Texas locations and is under weight restrictions.• Weapons include a life time warranty for manufacturing and material defects• US manufactured componentsQuote is developed for San Angelo Police Department for a department purchase.Date March 28, 2013.If additional accessories are included pricing will change. For a complete list of weapons andaccessories please visit our website or refer to the attached pricing sheet.ThanksStan ChapmanHigh Standard ManufacturingHouston, TXwww.highstandard.com202-374-0827.. ~. ",., . , 515 1 Mit c hell d a Ie, 5 u it e B713 - 462-4200 or to
    • SAN ANGELO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE2013 1st QUARTER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT REPORT TO:CITY COUNCILCITY OF SAN ANGELO DEVELOPMENT CORPORATIONTOM GREEN COUNTY COMMISSIONERSECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCILI. MEMORANDUMII. PROSPECTSIII. GENERAL ACTIVITES/MARKETINGIV. MARCH 31, 2013 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
    • M E M O R A N D U MDATE: May 2013TO: San Angelo COSADC Board and City CouncilFROM: John DuganRE: Synopsis Recent/Current ActivityJanuary –March 2013Worked with 12 companieso 8 Companies energy related 8 visited San Angelo and are possible new businesses for SA3 should be making a decision by the end of the second quarter of2013Working with the City to complete rezoning of the existing business parkThe Chamber has taken the lead in mobilizing the Cline Shale Consortiumo Addressing the issues impacting the community due to the increase in energyproduction in the area Workforce Housing Education Economic Developmento Working on a regional basiso Meeting with representatives of communities that have already been affected byoil/gas productiono Sponsored visits to communities in the region already seeing the effects ofgrowth Talked to community leaders Looked at housing/temporary and permanent Visited drilling areas and spoke with principals about job creation, needs,and future expectationso Participated with Devon Energy to host a Safety conference for many of theirsubcontracting companies with follow up information to those companies aboutSan Angelo
    • Familiarizing staff with the variety of business within the field of energy to assist inplanning and to accommodate the needs of business considering San Angelo and thosealready hereWorking through the consortium to discuss with UTSA Institute for EconomicDevelopment the commission of a study to indentify and project the affects of the ClineShale on the regionWorking with local companieso Continue to develop strategies to identify opportunities in the current economicclimateo to assist in workforce issueso to identify resources for oil related businesses to insure local tradeIdentifying Real Estate and keeping files on resources to disseminate to interestedbusinessesRepresented San Angelo with TMCN in Austin to meet with our state legislators todiscuss the priorities for this session and the needs of West TexasWorked with TMCN to share cost in an ad in Texas Wide Open for BusinessSponsored and Represented San Angelo through High Ground of Texas at the World AgExpo in Tulare, CAHosted the Economic Development Awards Luncheon and recognized six localbusinesses for growth and contribution to our economy
    • GENERAL ACTIVTIESJANUARY – MARCH 2013Assistance:Information was sent to a potential investor looking to invest in commercial property in this area.Demographic data was provided to a prospective business seeking to locate downtown.Meetings and events:John attended the special COSADC meeting to discuss the approaching joint meeting with City Counciland the requirements for filling the Executive Director vacancy.The Cline Shale Consortium met February 4th to discuss planning for the future. Representatives frommultiple counties attended and a plethora of information was shared.Phil and John met with a representative from the State of Chihuahua about an economic developmentconference.The Economic Development Council had a record turnout at the February meeting held at the BRC.Partners discussed future issues related to the energy industry and shared upcoming events.Staff attended a BRC partner meeting to discuss the training room reservation system.Staff attended both a joint meeting with COSADC and City Council and the regularly scheduled COSADCmeetings.Hope assisted with preparations for the Port-to-Plains Southern Workgroup Conference.The Economic Development Council met in March to discuss a potential study on the Cline Shale and theeffects on our area.John attended and spoke at the Planning Commission Meeting in support of the rezoning of the SanAngelo Business Park.John attended Texas Midwest Community Network’s “Texas Midwest Day at the Capitol” on Feb. 5,2013. Community leaders from throughout the region attended to address The primary issues like waterand transportation with law makers. The day in Austin included a photo session with lawmakers on thesteps of the Capitol, a briefing on issues important to the region, visits with lawmakers and staffs and alegislative reception for which TMCN.BREP Efforts:A BREP visit was conducted with Devon Energy. We continue to help them in locating additional realestate.John assisted two local (non-energy related) businesses in search of a new location.
    • A new business in San Angelo inquired about funding assistance for signage on their building. Hoperesearched options for the small business.The Economic Development Awards committee met to review nominations. Six were selected andpresented at the April Chamber Luncheon.The Chamber, along with BRC partners, hosted a grand opening event on March 20th to showcase theBusiness Resource Center. The Chamber catered the event.Prospects:Eight new energy related prospects contacted the Chamber during the quarter. Information wasdistributed as appropriate.Follow up continued on Project ET, Project SW visited San Angelo, and additional information wassupplied to Project CJ and meetings were set for their upcoming visit.Project CJ and Project RR took a tour of the business park in January.John set up a meeting with a prospective oil related business and a local land owner.John held a joint meeting with Downtown San Angelo, Inc. and a regional company consideringrelocation into San Angelo.John met with City staff and an energy-related company considering location at the San Angelo BusinessPark.John met with regional representatives of a local business looking to expand, and sent communityinformation to a large manufacturing company looking at relocation.Staffs met with two different real estate developers this quarter about commercial and residentialdevelopment, and have provided information via phone to a handful of others.Miscellaneous:Hope collected 1st quarter 2013 cost of living data this week.Hope served as a facilitator at the Junior Leadership Forum, hosted by the Leadership San Angelo AlumniAssociation.There were approximately 70 in attendance at the annual Cornerstone Investors Report Luncheon heldin February at the LeGrand Alumni Center. Hope coordinated the luncheon, mailed out invitations, andfollowed up with pledges. Several new pledges, with an interest in economic development, werereceived at the luncheon.Fourth quarter reports were submitted to the City Clerk’s office and were presented to City Council inFebruary.Phil, John and members of the Executive Committee participated in a Cline Shale Educational Field Tripin March organized by the Chamber. The trip included observation of a sand offloading operation, a tour
    • of Big Lake and meetings with Big Lake Economic Development Director and Chamber Administrator, anup-close explanation of a fracking operation and drilling rig thanks to Lee Pfluger, and tours of energyworker housing in Sterling City and Big Lake.MARKETINGJANUARY – MARCH 2013A short summary of San Angelo was prepared for a job fair in Plainview. Cathy Ballard with the ConchoValley Workforce Development Board, attended the job fair after the Cargill meat processing plantannounced it was closing. The marketing piece was also distributed at the Devon energy safety meeting.Community information, housing information, and pocket knives were handed out to prospectivecompanies at the Devon Energy safety meeting. The pocket knives were popular and we were able tomeeting and make contact with numerous people. John followed up with interested companies oncethe meeting was concluded.John interviewed with Images magazine for their publication titled Texas Wide Open for Business. SanAngelo will be part of the publication later this year. Texas Wide Open for Business is the marketingcampaign for strategic economic development outreach at the state level through TexasOneSM, the majorsource of economic development marketing funds for the State of Texas. Dollars raised by TexasOneSMare used to fund special events, outreach programs, and other exciting and highly visible marketing andcommunications programs. These programs are directed at a targeted audience of corporate decisionmakers and site selectors.San Angelo participated with Texas Midwest Community Network for an advertisement for Texas WideOpen for Business Magazine. The magazine is sponsored by the Governor’s office with global distributionin both print & electronic media.The 2013 Community Profile was published this quarter.
    • L ocation2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEThe City of San Angelo covers 58.61 square miles, and Tom Green County covers 1,540.05 square miles. We are located atLatitude 31.22 N and Longitude 100.30 W in West Central Texas between the Texas hill country to the southeast and therolling plains to the northwest. San Angelo is located between U.S. Interstate Highways I-10 and I-20. I-10 is 64 miles southof San Angelo, and depending on the route taken, it is approximately 70-90 miles to I-20. Other major highways connecting toSan Angelo include U.S. Highways 67, 87, and 277. The mileages to major cities are:Abilene 91Amarillo 298Austin 207Corpus Christi 363Dallas/ Fort Worth 259El Paso 418Houston 367Midland/Odessa 132San Antonio 218Wichita Falls 234Atlanta 501Chicago 1,180Denver 721Jacksonville 1,144Los Angeles 1,208New Orleans 723New York 1,860Phoenix 818Ciudad Acuna, Mexico 155Mexico City, Mexico 1,078Texas Out of State
    • T axes2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEINDIVIDUAL TAXESThe State of Texas mandates a $15,000 homestead exemp-tion for school taxes for all Texas homes. The tax rate for SanAngelo is $2.566 per $100.00 of assessed value. Tax ratios areestablished in September of each year. Texas has no personalincome tax.Property Taxes Sales TaxCity Tax 0.7810 State 6.25%County Tax 0.5250 County 0.50%School District Tax 1.2600 City 1.50%Total 2.5660 Total 8.25%BUSINESS TAXESThe State of Texas does not have a business income tax, butdoes impose a business franchise tax. In the 2007 Texaslegislative session, state business franchise taxes were loweredand broadened to include partnerships (general, limited, andlimited liability), corporations, limited liability corporations,business trusts, professional associations, joint ventures andmost other legal entities.The tax rate is 1%, with the exception of qualified retail andwholesale businesses that have a 1/2% tax, or an EZ rate of0.575% (0.00575) for qualifying entities. The tax rate appliesto an adjusted margin which equals the least of threecalculations – total revenue minus cost of goods sold, totalrevenue minus compensation, or total revenue times 70%.For further information, contact the Comptroller of PublicAccounts toll free at (800) 252-1381 or www.cpa.state.tx.us.
    • P opulation Trends2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE2000 U.S. Census PopulationCity of San Angelo 88,474 Tom Green County 104,0102000 Tom Green County PopulationBreakdown and 2010 EstimateBy Ethnicity and AgeEthnicity 2010 Pop. Est. PercentageWhite 63,799 58%Hispanic 39,315 36%African American 4,445 4%Asian 1,118 1%Other 1,547 1%2010 U.S. Census PopulationCity of San Angelo 93,200Tom Green County 110,224County 2000 Pop. 2010 Pop.Coke 3,864 3,320Concho 3,966 4,087Crockett 4,099 3,719Irion 1,771 1,599Kimble 4,468 4,607Mason 3,738 4,012McCulloch 8,205 8,283Menard 2,360 2,242Reagan 3,326 3,367Runnels 11,495 10,501Schleicher 2,935 3,461Sterling 1,393 1,143Sutton 4,077 4,128Tom Green 104,010 110,224Totals 159,707 164,693San Angelo Trade Area PopulationsSource: U.S. Census BureauSource: U.S. Census BureauAge Population PercentageUnder 19 26,038 28%20-44 32,837 35%45-64 21,481 23%65+ 12,847 14%
    • W orkforce Trends2000 $2,522,803,0002001 $2,618,083,0002002 $2,652,258,0002003 $2,775,361,0002004 $2,884,138,0002005 $3,044,912,0002006 $3,195,283,0002007 $3,495,366,0002008 $3,674,704,0002009 $3,952,000,0002010 $4,028,971,000Total Personal IncomeSan Angelo MSAYear IncomeSource: Bureau of Economic Analysis2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 201253,407 54,005 53,421 53,140 53,344 52,728 52,725 54,136 54,908 45,521 57,1934.80% 5.10% 4.70% 4.30% 4.20% 3.70% 4.00% 6.20% 6.52% 6.40% 5.28%Civilian Labor Force Estimates & Unemployment RatesAnnual Average - San Angelo MSASource: Labor Market Information, Texas Workfoce CommissionMedian Household IncomeAverage 2006-2010 - Tom Green County$41,3982000 $23,8002001 $24,8002002 $25,0002003 $26,0002004 $27,0002005 $28,5002006 $29,6002007 $32,2912008 $33,6662009 $33,2292010 $35,888Per Capita Personal IncomeSan Angelo MSAYear IncomeSource: Bureau of Economic Analysis2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE
    • T ransportationHighwaysSan Angelo is served by three U.S. Highways: 67, 87, and 277.Located between Interstate Highways 10 and 20, San Angelois 1 hour and 1 ½ respectively from each. Current highwayimprovement projects are underway to connect the InterstateHighways with 4-lane access. U.S Highway 277 is San An-gelos closest connection to Mexico - a distance of 155 miles tothe border crossing at Del Rio and Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila.The highway traffic in west central Texas is light, and thefour lane divided highways and two lane highways with fullshoulders provide easy and safe travel.RailroadSan Angelo is the main rail yard for Texas-Pacifico Trans-portation, Ltd. This railroad connects the Mexico rail systemthrough the border crossing at Ojinaga, Chihuahua and Presi-dio, Texas and the main U.S. rail corridors in Fort Worth. Thebusiness office is located in San Angelo, TX. For moreinformation, contact Elizabeth Grindstaff at (325) 942-8164or e.grindstaff@txpf.us.Motor FreightMotor freight companies located in San Angelo include ABFFreight, Beaver Express, Central Freight Systems, Con-WayFreight, and FedEx Freight.Overnight DeliverySan Angelo is served by Federal Express, Airborne Express,UPS, and the U.S. Postal Service in providing overnight orexpedited package delivery.Bus ServiceSan Angelo is served by Kerrville Bus Lines with directschedules to all major cities in Texas and the nation. ConchoCoaches provides twice daily van service to the Midland-Odessa Airport.Air ServiceSan Angelo Regional Airport - Mathis Field is served byAmerican Eagle Airlines. They offer 4-5 flights per day to theDallas-Fort Worth International Airport. San Angelo Re-gional Airport - Mathis Field is currently undergoing a $2.4million renovation estimated to be completed in 2013. Seeartist rendering below.Taxi ServiceLocal taxi service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a weekthrough Checker Cab Co., Yellow Cab Co., and Red Ball Taxi.Automobile RentalsRental services include Affordable Rent & Leasing, Avis Renta Car, Budget Rent a Car, Enterprise Rent a Car, Hertz Rent aCar, and National Car Rental.Concho Valley Transit DistrictIn 2006, the City of San Angelo and the Concho Valley Coun-cil of Governments consolidated the urban and the rural pub-lic transportation system. The transit office is located at 510N. Chadbourne. For more information, call (325) 947-8729.A new multi-modal terminal opened in 2012.2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE
    • H ourly Wage Rates2013 COMMUNITY PROFILECabinetmakers & BenchCarpenters51-7011 30 $10.17 $13.22 $11.00Network andComputer Systems Administrators15-1142 120 $20.82 $34.78 $29.55Computer Support Specialists 15-1121 160 $15.56 $24.79 $19.97Executive Secretaries &Adminstrative Assistants43-6011 230 $14.82 $24.48 $20.72Financial Managers 11-3031 80 $32.18 $55.46 $44.77First Line Supervisors/Managersof Mechanics, Installers, Repairers49-1011 170 $15.51 $30.87 $26.43General & Operations Managers 11-1021 650 $21.20 $57.08 $35.78Industrial Production Managers 11-3051 30 $24.14 $43.25 $33.23Laborers/Freight/Stock/Material/Movers/Hand53-7062 650 $8.14 $10.87 $8.88Plumbers, Pipefitters, &Steamfitters47-2152 100 $12.11 $18.76 $16.34Production & Operating Workers 51-1011 120 $14.71 $27.12 $20.58Production MachinistsAssemblers and Fabricators51-2099 N/A $9.36 $13.24 $12.03Welders, Cutters, Solderers, &Brazers51-4121 110 $9.66 $15.77 $13.21CodeEmployeesSampled Entry WageExperiencedWage Median WageOccupational TitleSource: Texas Workforce Solutions, Last Revised: June-2012. The above wages represent a small sample of the list available through the TexasWorkforce Solutions. To obtain a complete listing go to: www.texasindustryprofiles.com/apps/win. Select San Angelo MSA from “Areas” taband then click on “Occupations” tab for categories of employment.
    • L argest EmployersGoodfellow Air Force Base 5,165 Col. Mark Damiano Military Training CenterShannon Health System 2,627 Bryan Horner Hospitals and ClinicsSan Angelo ISD 2,041 Dr. Carol Ann Bonds Public School SystemAngelo State University 1,680 Dr. Brian May UniversitySan Angelo State Supported Living Center 920 Charles Njemanze State SchoolSan Angelo Community Medical Center 860 Eric Becker HospitalCity of San Angelo 855 Daniel Valenzuela Municipal GovernmentTom Green County 727 Mike Brown County GovernmentSITEL, Inc. 572 Grant Tilley TeleservicingEthicon (Johnson & Johnson) 510 Ray Gonzalez Sutures/NeedlesLone Star Beef Processors 480 John Cross Beef ProcessingVerizon, Inc. 459 Joe Sanchez Telephone ServicesBlueCross BlueShield of Texas 400 Diana Davies Medical Claims ProcessingHirschfeld Industries 380 Dennis Hirschfeld Structural Steel MaterialsPerformant DCS/HCS/VFI 375 Pat Powell Government ContractorReece Albert 330 Jack Albert Highway ConstructionBaptist Retirement Center 301 Patrick Crump Retirement CommunityStripes Convenience Stores 298 Sam Susser Convenience StoresSan Angelo Packing 269 Jarrod Stokes Beef ProcessingFirm Name Size Executive ProductSource: San Angelo Chamber of Commerce, November 20122013 COMMUNITY PROFILE
    • E conomic Trends2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE$90$60$30$068’0287’0391’0497’05135’0696’07142’08107’091129591’10 ’11 ’12Total Building PermitsMILLIONS $$150$120Source: City Permit Office—January 2013500251’02270’03233 229’04269’05369’06356’07373’08214’09173 172’10 ’11 ’12Single Family Housing PermitsNUMBER OF PERMITS400350300250200150100Source: City Permit Office—January 2013$022 20 29662 26 3410314 217711 41,593San Angelo’s Trade AreaRETAIL SALES IN MILLIONS$1,500$1,200$900$600$300CokeConchoIrionCrockettKimbleMasonMcCullochMenardReaganRunnelsSchleicherSource: Susan Combs, Texas Comptroller of Public Acconts, 2011 Retail Sales FiguresSterlingSuttonTomGreen$01,131 1,153493’021,185497’031,258507’041,391539’051,489 1,513596’06644 676’071,3311,4471,599’08638 649 671’09 ’10 ’11Gross Retail Sales - San Angelo MSAAMOUNT IN MILLIONS$1,500$1,000$500AMOUNT SUBJECT TO SALES TAXSource: Susan Combs, Texas Comptroller of Public Acconts, 2011 Retail Sales FiguresGROSS RETAIL SALES
    • B usiness Location IncentivesTAX ABATEMENTS - The City of San Angelo and TomGreen County may provide personal property and real estatetax abatements for periods of 5 to 7 years. Abatement levelsrange from 20% to 75% and are determined by the number ofnew jobs created and/or the amount of new investment in thecommunity. All companies receiving the abatements must meetthe minimum job creation level of 5 new jobs and no less than$250,000 in new valuation in either real estate and/or personalproperty.Businesses eligible for the tax abatements include manufactur-ing, warehousing/distribution centers, home/regional adminis-trative offices, data processing centers, and telecommunicationsservices. Tax abatements are not automatic; applications mustbe made to both the City Council and County CommissionersCourt. For more information about the program, contact theSan Angelo Development Corporation at (325) 653-7197.FREEPORT TAX EXEMPTIONS - All three taxing districtswithin San Angelo (City, County, and the San Angelo Indepen-dent School District) may provide 100% tax exemptions for in-ventory and work-in-process that will be shipped outside of thestate of Texas and kept on site for less than 175 days. San Angelois one of the few cities in Texas where all three taxing districtsprovide this incentive. Applications must be made annually. Formore information, contact the Tom Green County AppraisalDistrict at (325) 658-5575. TOM GREEN COUNTY/SAN ANGELO ENTERPRISEZONE - The Zone was created by the Texas Department ofEconomic Development in 1996, and renewed in September of2003. Unlike the local tax abatement program, all businessesare eligible for designation as a “project”. However, there are alimited number of projects selected state-wide, so job creationand job quality are important considerations for each project.Companies that are approved as designated projects withinthe zone are eligible for sales tax refunds of up to $2,000 pernew employee over the 5-year period. The total amount of taxrefunds is capped at $1,250,000 per company over the 5 years.The company receiving the benefits of the program must agreeto hire 25% of their new employees from within the zone.Additional information on the enterprise Zone may beobtained by contacting the San Angelo DevelopmentCorporation at (325) 653-7197.SALES TAX FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - SanAngelo voters have approved a ½ cent increase in the sales taxfor community and economic development projects. The SanAngelo Development Corporation has established priorities formanufacturing, warehousing/distribution, telecommunicationsservices, data processing, and home/regional offices. Loans andgrants are available for buildings, land, equipment, training,site infrastructure, moving expenses, lease subsidies, and otherexpansion costs. Minimum job and investment thresholds arerequired to qualify. Job retention may also be considered. Theproject must meet state mandated NAICS codes and “a defini-tion of primary employees.” Payroll guidelines are also consid-ered.Depending upon the wages and types of jobs created, theDevelopment Corporation may provide assistance from $1,000to $5,000/new job. High skill - high wage jobs may carry ahigher incentive level. New and existing companies are eligible.For more information, contact the San Angelo DevelopmentCorporation at (325) 653-7197.INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT DESIGNATION - A company thatwishes to locate outside of the city limits of San Angelo and stillavail themselves of city services may apply to the City for des-ignation as an industrial district, with the expectation that theywill be annexed at some future date. These agreements typicallylast for 7 years, but may be extended. During this period of timethey are outside of the city limits, the company does not pay citypersonal property tax (inventory and equipment), but they dopay a negotiated percentage of real estate tax they would nor-mally pay. Past agreements were 10% in year one, 20% in yeartwo, etc. The costs of services that the company wishes to obtainfrom the City are negotiated. An industrial district in San Ange-lo is located in the Northeast part of the city. For more informa-tion, contact the City Manager’s office at (325) 657-4241.OTHER ASSISTANCE - San Angelo’s public and privatesectors work together to help create an atmosphere for new jobcreation. The Chamber of Commerce can provide coordina-tion of services such as incentives, training, financing arrange-ments, find available land and buildings, and refer businessowners to helpful services provided by Angelo State University,Small Business Development Center and The Business Fac-tory. For a one stop look at all business assistance services, visitwww.cvbiz.org. The Business Resource Center, located at 69 N.Chadbourne, is the one stop shop for existing and prospectivebusinesses. Partners in the BRC include: City of San AngeloDevelopment Corporation, Chamber of Commerce EconomicDevelopment Division, ASU Small Business DevelopmentCenter, The Business Factory, Concho Valley WorkforceDevelopment Board, Howard College Business Training, andDowntown San Angelo, Inc. For more information, contactthe San Angelo Chamber of Commerce at (877) 655-4136 orecodev@sanangelo.org.2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE
    • U tilities2013 COMMUNITY PROFILENATURAL GAS: Natural gas service is provided by AtmosEnergy in San Angelo. Residential, Commercial and Industrialservice is available by calling the Atmos Energy CustomerCall Center at 1-888-286-6700. For current rates or questions,contact Shelley Burnett at (325) 481-3716 orwww.atmosenergy.com.ELECTRICITY: Electrical wires service is provided by AEP-Texas. San Angelo is currently served with 13 transmissionlines – 69,000 volts (4) 139,000 volts (6), 345,000 volts (3).Under deregulation, San Angelo residents and businesses mayselect their own retail electric provider. Depending uponlocation, electric service may be provided by Concho ValleyElectric Cooperative, the area’s electric cooperative(www.cvec.coop). For detailed information on serviceproviders and rates (excluding electric cooperatives), go towww.powertochoose.org.TELECOMMUNICATIONS: Verizon is the region’s princi-pal provider of local telephone service and operates a 100 per-cent digital network. In addition to Verizon’s long-distanceservice, other long distance service providers with POPs inSan Angelo include AT&T, Sprint, Quest, Cable & Wireless,and CTTC. In addition to standard copper and fiber-basedservices that provide a range of voice, video and data services,San Angelo residential and business customers can also obtaindigital subscriber line (DSL) service, high-speed cable modemservice, LMDS, wireless DSL, and digital satellite service.Suddenlink Communications serves San Angelo and is amongthe 10 largest cable broadband companies in the UnitedStates, supporting the information, communication andentertainment demands of approximately 1.3 million residen-tial customers and thousands of commercial customers.REFUSE SERVICE: Refuse collection is provided byRepublic Services, Inc., a private contractor who operates theCity-owned landfill.2 yd3$41.18 $67.784 yd3$66.06 $101.248 yd3$98.95 $177.88For more information, contact Republic Services at(325) 481-7700.WATER SERVICE: San Angelo’s water supply is ownedand operated by the City of San Angelo. Several lakes arethe sources of San Angelo’s water. As of October 2006, SanAngelo’s maximum capacity of the water system is 55 milliongallons/day. The average daily use is 14 million, with thehighest recorded usage of 25 million gallons/day. Industrialbase rates are by meter size and as follows:5/8" $19.121" $23.141 1/2" $27.192" $35.863" $104.714" $130.736" $190.318" $257.97For more information, contact the San Angelo Water UtilitiesDepartment at (325) 657-4323.SANITARY SEWER: The City of San Angelo has anactivated sludge wastewater treatment facility. Thewastewater treatment capacity is 13.2 milliongallons/day. The current treatment is 9.21 milliongallons/day, and the highest peak treatment was13 million gallons/day.5/8" $19.811" $22.931 1/2" $26.082" $32.793" $86.164" $106.336" $152.528" $204.98For more information, contact the San Angelo Water UtilitiesDepartment at (325) 657-4323.Dumpster size (yd3) Weekly Bi-weeklyMeter Size Base RateWater Meter Size Base Rate
    • Q uality of LifeHEALTH CARE - San Angelo has two acute care hospi-tals: Shannon Medical Center and San Angelo CommunityMedical Center. With over 200 physicians and 50 dentistspracticing multiple specialties, San Angelo is widely rec-ognized as a regional medical center. Acute care servicesavailable include cancer treatment and cardiac care. Otherspecialized medical facilities include: a regional rehabilita-tion center, a geriatric care facility, and a mental health anddrug rehabilitation hospital. There are currently 8 nursinghomes and an additional 10 retirement centers providing avariety of living accommodations and levels of care, includ-ing Alzheimer’s care.RECREATION & SPORTS - San Angelos weather allowsresidents and visitors to enjoy year round recreational activi-ties. The summer temperatures are moderated by a trip toany of the three lakes that border the city limits. Boating,fishing, and water skiing are popular summer sports. If youhave children, you will find a variety of activities for them aswell. The City of San Angelo, Boys and Girls Clubs, and theYMCA operate several recreation centers. Organized sportsfor children include baseball, basketball, football, softball,saddle club, soccer, and gymnastics. Fourteen public tenniscourt locations, an indoor soccer facility, two public swim-ming pools, two country clubs with golf, tennis, and swim-ming, and three additional public golf courses all provideoutdoor recreation opportunities.Fall and winter provide some of the best deer, turkey andquail hunting in Texas. For those that enjoy a sideline seatfor their sports enjoyment, college football and basketballkick off in the fall and winter with Angelo State University.Professional sports include PRCA Rodeo, the San AngeloColts, a member of the United League Baseball, and the SanAngelo Bandits, a member of the Lone Star Football League.WEATHER & CLIMATE - San Angelo’s altitude of 1,900feet, location on the northern boundary of the Chihuahuandesert, and our proximity to rivers and lakes provide a verypleasant climate. With 3 lakes and rivers flowing throughthe city, San Angelo has an average morning humidity of79%, but that drops to a comfortable average of 44% in theafternoons. Temperatures do reach in the 100s during thesummer, but low humidity in the 15% to 25% range keepsthe “heat index” down. Snow and sleet are not common,but may occur once or twice each year. From an employer’sstandpoint, there are no lost workdays because of winter.The average annual temperature is 64.5 degrees, with aver-age highs of 77.1, and lows of 51.8. San Angelo receives 251days of sunshine each year, and the average rainfall is 20.91inches. *See Weather Chart below.Avg. Temp 44.9 49.7 57.2 65.0 73.1 79.2 82.4 81.3 74.8 65.4 54.0 46.4Avg. High 57.9 63.5 71.1 79.0 85.6 90.8 94.4 93.1 86.6 77.8 66.5 59.3Avg. Low 31.8 36.0 43.3 51.0 60.6 67.6 70.4 69.4 63.0 53.0 41.4 33.5Avg. Rain 0.82 1.18 0.99 1.60 3.09 2.52 1.10 2.05 2.75 2.57 1.10 0.94Days of Sunshine 17 17 20 19 21 24 24 25 22 23 20 19Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec2013 COMMUNITY PROFILE
    • Q uality of Life2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEPUBLIC EDUCATIONSan Angelo Independent School District - San Angelo hastwo high schools, 1 freshman campus, 3 middle schools,and 17 elementary schools. A major renovation and expan-sion of facilities is underway following voter approval of a$117 million bond issue in 2008. For more information onthe San Angelo Independent School District, call(325) 947-3700 or visit www.saisd.org.TLC Academy - Texas Leadership Charter Academyopened its doors in the fall of 2009. For more information,call (325) 224-2900 or visit www.tlca-sa.com.Angelo State University -Angelo State University has astudent enrollment of 6,800 with students from every re-gion of Texas, 40 additional states, and numerous foreigncountries. Both Baccalaureate and Masters Programs areoffered at ASU. For more information, contact the ASUadmissions office at (325) 942-2041 or www.angelo.edu.Howard County Junior College -Although the main cam-pus is in Big Spring, the San Angelo campus has a studentenrollment of 3,200. Instruction at this campus is con-centrated predominantly in technical/occupational fieldsof study that lead to Certification and/or Associate ofApplied Science Degrees. For more information on courseofferings, contact Howard College at (325) 944-9585 orwww.howardcollege.edu.Texas State Technical College - TSTC is located in Sweet-water, 75 miles from San Angelo. It provides advancedtechnical training in such areas as Applied EngineeringTechnology –Automation/Robotics Specialty, ComputerInformation Technology – Computer Business Systems,Computer Network Systems and Administration –Micro-soft Specialty, and Wind Turbine Maintenance. Addi-tional information can be obtained at (325) 235-7300 orwww.westtexas.tstc.edu.West Texas Training Center - WTTC is a comprehensiveregional training center, with the center’s mission be-ing to support and enhance regional economic develop-ment via workforce training. Howard College and theSan Angelo Independent School District are partners inthe WTTC consortium, and manage the WTTC projectwhich provides occupational and customized trainingprograms. Facility space in the 100,000 square foot facil-ity is also available to regional industry for conductingtheir specialized training classes, and the center’s “rapidresponse room” provides a 7,400 square foot area fornew and existing companies to conduct employee train-ing. The WTTC is located at 3501 North US Highway 67across from the San Angelo Business and Industrial Cen-ter, a 400 acre business park. For more information on theWest Texas Training Center, contact the director’s officeat (325) 942-2800 ext. 223 or visit www.wttcsa.org.PRIVATE EDUCATIONPrivate Schools - San Angelo has 7 certified private and/or parochial schools: Angelo Catholic School, Corner-stone Christian School, Gateway Christian Academy,Trinity Lutheran School, San Angelo Christian Academy,The Potter’s Hand School, and Ambleside School of SanAngelo. For more information, visit www.sanangelo.org/downhome/education.php.American Commercial College - ACC is a private schoolfor career education providing 750 and 1440-hour pro-grams leading to Diploma programs and Associate certifi-cates. Approximately 600 students are trained each yearat American Commercial College. For more information,contact ACC at (325) 942-6797 orwww.acc-careers.com.
    • Q uality of Life2013 COMMUNITY PROFILECULTURAL AFFAIRS - For a city with a populationunder 100,000, San Angelo provides a high level of culturalevents and activities. Texas theatre began in San Angelo.The San Angelo Civic Theater is the oldest community-based theater group in Texas. Annual performancesinclude comedy, musicals, and drama. Angelo StateUniversity is another excellent source for both stage anddinner theater performances. The San Angelo Symphonyperforms 8 times during the year, and is headquartered inthe restored City Auditorium. The Museum of Fine Arts,located on the river downtown San Angelo, provides anoutstanding venue for the visual arts and annuallysponsors the National Ceramic Arts Competition. SanAngelo is home to Fort Concho National Historic Land-mark. Founded in 1867 as a frontier outpost to protectearly West Texas settlers, Fort Concho is open to thepublic for tours seven days a week. The Cultural AffairsCouncil offers many attractive and exciting entertainmentoptions, such as the Cactus Jazz & Blues Festival and theTexas Wine & Food Festival. For more information onthe arts, contact the Cultural Affairs Council at (325) 653-6793 or www.sanangeloarts.com.HOUSING - In December 2012, new homes were sellingin San Angelo in a range of $90-125 per square foot. Theaverage cost of all homes sold in San Angelo in 2012 was$141,500. There are 68 apartment complexes in SanAngelo, and the cost for two bedroom unfurnishedapartments range from $430 to $680 per month. The“ACCRA Cost of Living Index” for the third quarter of2012 lists San Angelo as having a housing index that ranksour housing costs as approximately 20% belowthe national average.COST OF LIVING - San Angelo participates in theACCRA “Cost of Living Index” program. This index iscompiled from data submitted on a quarterly basis fromover 300 metropolitan areas. Each participating com-munity “shops” 64 items in their respective communitieson the same day of each quarter. These prices for goodsand services are sent to ACCRA, where a quarterly indexis compiled. The national average for each item is givena rating of 100. The 2012 annual averages for San Angelowere:Pricing Items Rankings 100 % Composite Index 89.4Grocery Items 86.6Housing 78.1Utilities 106.3Transportation 95.4Health Care 90.1Misc. Goods & Services 93.0SHOPPING - San Angelo has 10 shopping centersthroughout the community. Nine are shoppingcenters with outside entrances and one is a fully enclosedmall. Sunset Mall has 60-65 individual businesses andis anchored by Bealls, Dillard’s, JC Penny, Sears andMarshalls. San Angelo’s national chain retailers includeLowe’s Home Improvement Center, Home Depot, Target,Office Max, Office Depot, Pier One, Michaels, Best Buy,Academy Sports, Sam’s Club, Famous Footwear, PETCO,Petsmart, Inc., Bed, Bath & Beyond, Ross DepartmentStore, Rue-21, Family Power Sports, Furniture Row, Kirk-lands, Fed-Ex Office, Maurices and two Wal-Mart SuperCenters.
    • Q uality of Life2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEJANUARYCactus Music SeriesCelebration of Champions/Worlds GreatestHorsemanFEBRUARYBuffalo Soldier Heritage DaySan Angelo Rodeo ParadeSan Angelo Stock Show & RodeoSan Angelo Symphony SeriesMARCHCactus Music SeriesSan Angelo Symphony SeriesWorld Series Team RopingSan Angelo RelaysTexas Independence Day CelebrationStribling Art ExtravaganzaAPRILSan Angelo Wine & Food FestivalUncorked Wine & Food PairingBluegrass FestivalFrontier Day at Fort ConchoTexas Mesquite Wood Art FestivalSan Angelo National Ceramic CompetitionSpring Chicken AffairMAYCinco de Mayo CelebrationCactus Music SeriesTexas Blues FestivalMemorial Day Exercises at Fort ConchoJUNEBest of the West Texas Jr. Golf TournamentBig Bass TournamentJuneteenth CelebrationShowdown in San Angelo Drag Boat RacesSporting Clay ShootJULYSan Angelo Symphony Pops Concert at theRiver StageJuly 4th Lake Fireworks DisplayNational Cowboy Day FestivalWake the Desert – Wakeboarding ContestAUGUSTWool Capital TriathalonRope America Team Rope FinalsSEPTEMBERFiesta PatriasLily FestCactus Jazz & Blues FestivalA Taste of San AngeloLone Star Music FestNational Museum DayOCTOBERCactus Music SeriesBusiness ExpoArt-Ober-FestHalloween Tours & Programs at Fort ConchoRoping FiestaAQHA Horse ShowNOVEMBERSorantin Young Artist’s AwardChicken Farm Art Center Open HouseCactus Music SeriesDECEMBERChristmas at Old Fort ConchoConcho Christmas CelebrationConcho River Light TourNutcracker BalletSanta’s Santa Fe ChristmasTuba ChristmasSan Angelo Symphony Christmas Pops Concert2013 Event Calendar
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEBIOTECHONOLOGYTEXAS VET LAB - Jim Bob Harris, President1702 North Bell Street, 76903, 325-653-4505, Employment10-24, Est. 1977, Veterinary Biologics, www.texasvetlab.comCANDLES & GIFT ITEMSCANDLES HANDMADE BY JF - Judy Fowler, Owner4106 Sherwood Way Suite 2, 76901, 325-949-6200, Employ-ment 1-9, Est. 1998, Candles & bath soaps, wedding and west-ern gift items, wood crosses, clocks, fragrance candle scents,silk floral arangementsCHEMICALSHOUSE OF CHEMICALS, INC. - John David Barnett, President304 N. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-655-8376, Employment 10-24,Est. 1965, Janitoral supplies, equipment & speciality cleaningchemicals, www.everythingtocleananything.comPCA SHOE CARE PRODUCTS - Ben Balli, President & CEO538 Armadillo Road, 76904-9691, 325-651-7869, Employment1-9, Est. 1986, Polymer acrylic coating used in placo of shoepolish, www.pcashoecare.comCOMPUTER SOFTWAREDATA MANAGEMENT INC. (DMI) - Jorge Ellis, CEO3322 W. Loop 306, 76904, 325-223-9500, Employment 50-99,Est. 1988, Develops & markets TimeClock Plus™,www.timeclockplus.comELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & COMPONETSWEATHERSBEE ELECTRIC CO., INC. - Gregory L.Buchanan, OwnerP.O. Box 2236, 76902, 325-655-7555, Employment 10-24, Est.1934, Repair and rebuild alternators, starters, DC motors,www.weathersbeeelectric.comFOOD PRODUCTSDE COTY COFFEE CO. - Michael J. Agan, President & CEO1920 Austin St., 76903, 325-655-5607, Employment 50-99, Est.1929, Roasted coffee, teas & spices, www.decotycoffee.comARCTIC GLACIER INC. - Scott Condra, Manager332 Pulliam St. Suite G, 76903, 325-658-1011, Employment 1-9,Est. 1996, Crushed and block ice, www.arcticglacier.comJULIOS CORN CHIPS - Jose Angel Garcia, Owner1911 S. Chadbourne, 76904, 325-486-9300, Employment 10-24,Est. 1993, Tortilla chips & hot sauce, www.julioschips.comLONE STAR BEEF PROCESSORS - John Cross, President2150 E. 37th St., 76903, 325-658-5555, Employment 400 Plus,Est. 1997, Boneless beef for further fabrication & value addedproducts, www.lonestarbeef.netMRS. RIOS CORN PRODUCTS - Armando Martinez, Owner215 W. Ave. N, 76903, 325-653-5640, Employment 25-49, Est.1946, Mexican foods, corn & flour tortillas, taco shells, tortillachips, www.mrsrios.comPOPS BAKERY - Edward & Enoch Garcia, Owners208 E. Avenue J, 76903, 325-655-1170, Employment 25-49, Est.1959, Flour & corn tortillas, & chipsSAN ANGELO PACKING CO., INC. - Jarrod Stokes, President1809 N. Bell, 76905, 325-653-6951, Employment 200 Plus, Est.1983, Wholesale meat processorSUGAR DADDY DESSERTS - James Crowder, ReneeCrowder, Michelle Valentine, Owners2411 College Hills Blvd., 76904, 325-949-3248, Employment1-9, Est. 2008, Gourmet handmade chocolate candy with awestern theme, www.sugardaddydesserts.comTALK OTEXAS BRANDS INC. - Lawrence Ricci, President1610 Roosevelt St., 76905, 325-655-6077, Employment 50-99,Est. 1952, Food speciality items, pickled okra,www.talkotexas.comJEWELRYGOLDEN PHOENIX JEWELERY - Jon Peterson, Partner4016 Sherwood Way, 76901, 325-949-1400, Employment 1-9,Est. 1979, Custom design of fine jewelry, diamond, sapphire,ruby & emeraldHOLLAND JEWELRY, INC. - William S. Holland, CEOP.O. Box 1031, 76902, 325-655-3135, Employment 10-24, Est.1918, Custom jewelry in gold, silver, and gemstones, westernbelt buckles, western jewelry & accessories,www.hollandjewelry.comLEGEND JEWELERS - Mark Priest, Owner18 East Concho Ave., 76903, 325-653-0112, Employment 1-9,Est. 1995, Emblematic Jewelry, Company Logos, Brands, Cus-tom Corporate Gifts & Jewelry using cutting edge CANCAMdesigning, www.legendjewelers.comSLOPER JEWELRY CO., INC. - Janette Sloper, PresidentP.O. Box 869, 76902, 325-944-8783, Employment 1-9, Est. 1975,Fine gold & silver jewelry & jewelry castings,www.sloperjewelry.com
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILELIVESTOCK FEED & MINERALSANGELO PELLETS, LTD - Tom Latham, PresidentP.O. Box 1876, 76902-1876, 325-655-5751, Employment 10-24,Est. 1963, Livestock feed, www.angelopellets.comHTC INDUSTRIES, INC. - Henry Perez, General ManagerP.O. Box 3286, 76902, 325-949-0645, Employment 10-24, Est.1981, Tallow meat, & bone meal, inedible animal fatHUDSON LIVESTOCK SUPPLEMENTS, INC. - WayneHudson, President8193 Thompson Rd. Miles, Texas, 76861, 325-659-3992,Employment 10-24, Est. 1944, Livestock feed & supplements,www.hudsonlivestock.comPALMER FEED & SUPPLY, INC./ANGELO FEED - BlainePalmer, President1318 N. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-653-6765, Employment 25-49,Est. 1943, Livestock feed, www.palmerfeed.comSOUTHWESTERN LIVESTOCK MINERAL COMPANY -Tim Turner, PresidentP.O. Drawer 231, 76902-0231, 325-655-1430, Employment 10-24, Est. 1980, Livestock minerals & premixes, www.swlm.comMANUFACTURERS SUPPORT INDUSTRIESACME IRON & METAL COMPANY - Robert Gregory,President720 N. Buchanan, 76903, 325-653-1407, Employment 10-24, Est.1950, Scrap & waste materialsALL AMERICAN PUMP & MACHINE INC. - E.J. Bible,Owner1310 N. Bell St., 76903, 325-653-6597, Employment 1-9, Est.1995, Pump and electic motor repair and sales,www.allamericanpumpandmachine.comDANHIL CONTAINERS - John Hensley, General Manager6842 Templin Ct., 76904, 325-651-7378, Employment 50-99,Est. 1977, Corrugated boxes, www.danhillcontainers.comMEDICAL SUPPLIESETHICON - Ray Gonzalez, Plant Manager3348 Pulliam, 76905, 325-482-5200, Employment 500 Plus, Est.1963, Medical device manufacturer & assembly,www.ethicon.comMETAL FABRICATIONA+ FABRICATION - Robert Contreras, Owner1120 S. Oakes, 76903, 325-482-0910, Employment 1-9, Est. 1999,Specialized metal fabricationALNC, INC. - Kristin Barta, PresidentP.O. Box 669, 76902, 325-658-3612, Employment 50-99, Est.2003, Custom metal fabrication, www.alncsteel.comAERMOTOR WINDMILL CO., INC. - Guy Morrow, President& CEOP.O. Box 5110, 76902, 325-651-4951, Employment 10-24, Est.1888, Water-pumping windmills, towers & parts,www.aermotorwindmill.comAZTEC, INC. - Marlow Wojtek, PresidentP.O. Box 2647, 76902, 325-658-6257, Employment 1-9, Est.1990, Enclosures, metal stampings, metal mounting racksBOLANDERS WELDING & ORNAMENTAL IRON -Kenneth Bolander, Owner1236 N. Bell, 76903, 325-653-5015, Employment 1-9, Est. 1961,Livestock handling equipment and custom home decor,www.cowboyironcraft.comCONNER STEEL PRODUCTS, INC. - Joe Fiamingo, President& CEOP.O. Box 3287, 76902, 325-655-8225, Employment 200 Plus,Est. 1990, Fabricated oilfield equipment and tanks (steel &fiberglass), www.connersteelproducts.comGENERAL SHEET METAL - Leonard S. Branaman, OwnerP.O. Box 3766, 76902, 325-655-2982, Employment 1-9, Est.1987, Sheet metal fabrication, including flashings, gutters,commercial vent hoods & duct fabricationHENSON TOOLS, L.L.C. - Mike Henson, OwnerP.O. Box 3245, 76902, 325-651-4872, Employment 1-9, Est.1989, Manufacture oil field tools, thru tubing mills. Augercomponents, pilot bits & blades, www.mhbits.comHIRSCHFELD INDUSTRIES - Dennis Hirschfeld, CEOP.O. Box 3768, 76902, 325-486-4201, Employment 300 Plus,Est. 1945, Fabricated structural steel, www.hirschfeld.comRODEO WEST - Jim Williamson, President5840 Grape Creek Road, 76901, 325-486-1439, Employment10-24, Est. 1977, Metal livestock gates & panels,www.rodeowest.comSAN ANGELO FABRICATORS - Helen & Manuel Contreras,Owners5506 S. Loop 306, 76905, 325-655-2980, Employment 1-9, Est.1977, Sheet metal fabrication for industrial kitchen equipmentfor schools, hospitals & cafeteriasTOPPER COMPANY - Al Thomerson, OwnerP.O. Box 5198, 76902, 325-658-3277, Employment 1-9, Est. 1985,Mechanical windmills, solar water pump systems
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILETWIN MOUNTAIN FENCE CO. - Raymond Meza, OwnerP.O. Box 2240, 76902, 325-944-8661, Employment 50-99, Est.1947, Ranch gates, sheep panels & fencing materials,www.twinmountainfence.comVENTAIRE AWNING - Billy Tounget, Owner1217 S. Oakes, 76903, 325-655-6182, Employment 1-9, Est. 1945,Aluminum awnings, ornamental ironwork,www.sanangelopatioawnings.comWENDLAND MANUFACTURING CORP. - David Hirschfeld,President, Owner, CEOP.O. Box 808, 76903, 325-655-6778, Employment 25-49, Est.1921, Fabrication of steel tanks & pressure vessels,www.wendlandmfg.comWESTERN TOWERS - Charles A. Anderson, PresidentP.O. Box 2040, 76902, 325-658-6539, Employment 25-49, Est.1945, Manufactures, provides, installs communication towers,www.westerntowers.comWINGER MACHINE & TOOL - Mark Winger, Owner3916 S. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-658-5810, Employment 10-24,Est. 1977, Mfg. of percussion hammers & bits,www.wingermachine.comMISCELLANEIOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIESANGELO AWARDS - Karen Jackson, Sage Jackson, CaryCastor, Owners1809 W. Ave. N, 76904, 325-944-2302, Employment 1-9, Est.1980, Trophies, awards & medals,www.angeloawards.homestead.comAUTOMATIC FIRE PROTECTION, INC. - Joe M. Self,PresidentP.O. Box 1551, 76902, 325-651-9000, Employment 10-24, Est.1970, Fire sprinklers, www.automaticfireprotection.comCONCHO CARTRIDGE CO., INC. - Lee Ates, PresidentP.O. Box 1430, 76902, 325-653-5008, Employment 1-9, Est.1988, Manufactured and remanufactured ammunition/pressedcomposite technology (pct), www.conchocartridge.comCUSTOM SKIN COMPANY - Jimmy Cole, Vice President2800 North Bell, 76903, 325-655-9585, Employment 10-24, Est.1969, Salt & dry shep skinsHOUSE OF TELEPHONES - Odis W. LeVier, Owner2677 East Valley Drive, 76905-6803, 325-482-0101, Employment1-9, Est. 1974, Manufacturing antique cloth covered phonecords & accessoriesPRECISE OPTICAL - Dr. J. Warren Brasher & Dr. RussellSubia, Owners26 W. Avenue N, 76903, 325-655-5141, Employment 1-9, Est.1996, Wholesale manufacturer of optical lens as per doctorprescriptions, www.preciseoptical.comSOUTHLAND FRAME SUPPLY - Brad Green, Owner2311 Southland, 76904, 325-944-4624, Employment 1-9, Est.1996, Picture frames manufacturer/wholesaleT4C CUSTOM PORTABLE BUILDINGS - Bill Jernigan, ShayElkins, Owners6941 South US Highway 277, 76904, 325-655-2600, Employ-ment 10-24, Est. 2005, Custom portable buildings-greenhouses,gazebos, workshops, barns, cabins & carports, ready built andcustom homes, boatdocks and garages, www.t4cbuildings.comWEST TEXAS LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE BLIND - DavidWells, Executive Director2001 Austin, 76903, 325-653-4231, Employment 55-65, Est.1963, Canvas bags, ball point pens & markers, sewing,packaging, & writing instruments,www.westtexaslighthousefortheblind.orgPLASTIC & FIBERGLASS PRODUCTSCOVERLAY MANUFACTURING - Paul Cornwell, President4017 Highway 67 N., 76905, 325-659-4697, Employment 10-24,Est. 1983, Contoured plastic dash, replacement door panels forcars & trucks, www.coverlaymfg.comSEA ARROW MARINE CORPORATION - Robert W.Lovelace, President709 Rust, 76903, 325-655-0100, Employment 10-24, Est. 1973,Boats, fiberglass buildings, transport equipmentPRINTING/PUBLISHINGAMERICAN CLASSIFIEDS (A PUBLICATION OF THRIFTYNICKEL) - Pat Logan, Owner15 N. Tyler, 76901, 325-944-7653, Employment 10-24, Est. 1983,Advertising, www.angeloamericanclassifieds.comCOMPANY PRINTING - Lorenzo & Leslie Lasater, Owners3419 Knickerbocker Rd., 76904, 325-949-9941, Employment1-9, Est. 1992, Miscellaneous publishing or publishing &printing, commercial printing, copies, office supplies, mailingservices, www.companyprinting.comCORTESE FLAG & SILKSCREEN - Winkay Reed, JasonMoore, Co-owners1602 W. Beauregard, 76901, 325-653-4809, Employment 1-9,Est. 1969, Flags, flagpoles, screen printing, vinyl signs, customorders, embroidery, disc golfGANDY INK SCREENPRINTING & EMBROIDERY - PhilGandy, President2027 Industrial Ave., 76904, 325-949-7864, Employment 50-99,Est. 1988, Screen printing, advertising specialties & embroi-dery, www.gandyink.com
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEINDUSTRIAL PRINTING SOLUTIONS, INC. - LorenzoLasater, President3419 Knickerbocker Rd., 76904, 325-942-8581, Employment1-9, Est. 2000, Commercial printing, product packagingincluding folding cartons, blister and skinboard packaging,www.industrialprinting.bizLIVESTOCK WEEKLY - Robert Frank, PresidentP.O. Box 3306, 76902, 325-949-4611, Employment 10-24, Est.1948, Ranch newspaper, www.livestockweekly.comMEIER BUSINESS SYSTEMS - Jim Henry Meier, OwnerP.O. Box 3929, 76902, 325-655-3101, Employment 1-9, Est. 1981,Business formsPRINTERY, THE - Mike Branham, Owner204 W. Clearwater Dr., 76903-1024, 325-653-4188,Employment 1-9, Est. 1980, Commercial & personal printingQS PRINTING & DESIGN - H.S. Marshall, CEO20 Howard Suite 8, 76901, 325-944-2942, Employment 1-9, Est.1979, Full color commercial printing, graphic designRANCH MAGAZINE - Kenneth Wesner, OwnerP.O. Box 2678, 76902, 325-655-4434, Employment 1-9, Est.1920, Publisher periodicals, typesetting manufacturer,www.ranchmagazine.comRANGEL PRINTING - Manuel Rangel, Owner1502 W. Beauregard, 76901, 325-653-9889, Employment 1-9,Est. 1982, Printers, commercial printing, NEC, wedding an-nouncements & invitationsREPRODUCTION CENTER, THE - Sherri Trubenstein,Owner1101 S. Koenigheim, 76903, 325-655-6608, Employment 1-9, Est.1982, Miscellaneous publishing & printing, commercial printingSAN ANGELO STANDARD-TIMES - Jeff DeLoach, President& Publisher34 West Harris Ave, 76903, 325-653-1221, Employment 50-99,Est. 1884, Newspaper, www.gosanangelo.comTALLEY PRESS, THE - Stephen Talley, Owner21 E. Harris, 76903, 325-655-7361, Employment 1-9, Est. 1924,Commercial printing & publishing, www.talleypress.comTAYLOR PRINTING COMPANY - Lawrence or Steve Taylor,Managers109-111 N. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-655-5454, Employment 1-9,Est. 1938, Commercial printingWESTERN PRINTING COMPANY - Luther Moore, Owner51 N. Chadbourne, 76903-5888, 325-655-8124, Employment10-24, Est. 1930, Die-cutting of paper, commercial printing,lithographing, snap-out formsSIGNSADOBE SIGNS - Peggy Jonas, Owner2013 Junius, 76901, 325-655-9873, Employment 1-9, Est. 1991,Magnetic, point of interest, & vinyl graphics,www.adobedave.comANGELO SIGN CO. - Dave Levesque, Owner3014 Hemlock, 76904, 325-895-2222, Employment 1-9, Est.2000, Sign manufacturer specializing in dimensional signs,sandblasted and routed signs, full color printingA PLUS SIGN COMPANY - Robert Hendry, Owner405 Pruesser, 76903-3617, 325-653-5424, Employment 1-9,Signs, neon, vinyl, manufacturing, installationREBEL SIGNS - Rebel Dowdle, Owner905 Glenna, 76901, 325-944-8450, Employment 1-9, Est. 1971,Banners, magnetic flags, site, safety, vehicle signs, auto graph-ics, pin-striping and airbrushWESTERN POSTER SERVICE CO., INC. - William L. Pierce,President901 Strawn Road, 76904, 325-658-6153, Employment 10-24,Est. 1984, Outdoor billboard printing, magnetics, banners,store front signs, political, coroplast & metal signs, customdecals, vehicle & Marine graphics, www.western-posters.comSPORTING & ATHLETIC GOODSE-Z MOUNT CORP. - Karl Bookter, PresidentP.O. Box 2599, 76902, 325-653-8911, Employment 1-9, Utilitybacks, antler mounting kits, (deer) gun racks, adapter kitsWEST TEXAS GAME FEEDERS - H.L. Turnbow, Owner3312 N. Chadbourne., 76903, 325-653-3678, Employment 1-9,Est. 1958, Automatic game feeders and equipment,www.westtexasgamefeeders.comSTONE, CLAY, GLASS, & CONCRETE PRODUCTSBIRK MONUMENT MFG. COMPANY - Eddie & SusanHenry, Owners4102 Colesium, 76903, 325-653-5946, Employment 1-9, Est.1899, Monuments & markers, www.birkmonumental.comCHICKEN FARM ART CENTER - Roger Allen, CEO2505Martin Luther King Blvd., 76903, 325-653-4936, Employment1-9, Est. 1971, Pottery & art, www.chickenfarmartcenter.comCLAY CORNER - James Williams, Supervisor1501 Beauregard, 76901, 325-658-7750, Employment 25-49, Est.1978, Ceramic decorations & novelties
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEGLASS MENAGERIE STAINED GLASS STUDIO - BeverlyGrenda, Owner403 W. Avenue D, 76903, 325-653-6448, Employment 1-9, Est.1976, Leaded, beveled, etched stained glass windows, gift itemsINGRAM CONCRETE - Greg Cain, Area Manager1040 Foster, 76903, 325-653-3354, Employment 25-49, Est.1945, Concrete ready-mix, www.ingramconcrete.comTEXTILE PRODUCTSACME AUTO TOP AND AWNING COMPANY - Robert L.Young, Jr., Owner113 N. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-655-6130, Employment 1-9, Est.1927, Canvas window awnings & a/c coversBOLLMAN INDUSTRIES - Ladd Hughes, General ManagerP.O. Box 1351, 76902, 325-655-0112, Employment 25-49, Est.1986, Wool & mohair scouringJOE RAMOS ENTERPRISES - Joe Ramos, PresidentP.O. Box 62771, 76906, 325-655-5732, Employment 25-49, Est.1988, Award jackets, emblems, patches, caps & shirt embroideryLEDDYS M.L. BOOT & SADDLERY - Wilson Franklin,Owner222 S. Oakes, 76903, 325-653-3397, Employment 25-49, Est.1922, Custom handmade boots & saddles, novelty leather-goods, www.leddys.comMERCER, J.L. BOOTS - Lindsey Cranek, Owner224 S. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-658-7634, Employment 1-9, Est.1923, Men’s boots, women’s boots, children’s boots & ropers,www.jlmercerboots.comSAN ANGELO WOOL PROCESSING - Vincent Melone, Jr.,PresidentP.O. Box 2388, 76902, 325-653-6806, Employment 1-9, Est.1962, Process sheep & goat skins, dealer and processor of wool,mohair, alpaca & related fibersTABORS OF SAN ANGELO - Lydy Tabor, Owner4816 Knickerbocker Rd., 76904, 325-942-1696, Employment25-49, Est. 1979, Draperies, bedspreads, dust ruffles, comfort-ers, pillow shams & accessories, www.taborsofsanangelo.comZRC LTD. DBA CAROL TURNER COLLECTION - RandyTurner, CEO1821-B Knickerbocker Rd., 76904, 325-947-2106, Employment25-49, Est. 1988, Womens clothing & designTRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENTBRUTON EASY PULL TRAILER SALES, INC. - Kerry Bruton,President1801 N. Main, 76903, 325-655-5733, Employment 25-49, Est.1954, Personnel transport trailers, watertight moving vans,stock, horse, gooseneck & lowboy trailers, equipment trailers,www.brutontrailers.comCENTURY TRAILER OF SAN ANGELO - Larry Arledge,President868 N. Bell St., 76903, 325-653-5370, Employment 10-24, Est.1989, Trailer sales & service, truck accessory sales,www.centurytrailer.comTEXAS TANK CAR WORKS, INC. - David Green, Vice Presi-dentP.O. Box 5700, 76903, 325-653-2344, Employment 25-49, Est.1950, Building & rebuilding of railway equipment,www.ttcw.netWEST TEXAS TRAILER CO., INC. - Owen J. Gray, III,President1212 N. Bell Street, 76902-1227, 325-655-6445, Employment 1-9,Est. 1933, Horse, cattle, sheep, goat, & utility trailersWOOD PRODUCTSGUARDIAN BUILDING PRODUCTS DISTRIBUTION - AlanPelzel, Branch Manager1221 S. Hill, 76903, 325-655-4171, Employment 10-24, Est. 1967,Millwork, hardwood veneer & plywood, softwood veneer &plywoodCITY CABINET SHOP, L.L.C. - Terry Sinclair, Owner72 E. Ave. D, 76903, 325-653-3950, Employment 1-9, Est. 1957,Millwork, kitchen cabinets, vanities, entertainment centers,computer desks & custom woodworkCITY LUMBER COMPANY - Charles Duncan, PresidentP.O. Box 1002, 76902, 325-653-1403, Employment 25-49, Est.1949, Wooden trusses & doors, www.city-lumber.comHIDE-A-BOARD IRONING CENTER (WYNNE HOMES,INC.) - Bill Wynne, Owner824 Warehouse Rd., 76903, 325-655-2514, Employment 10-24,Est. 1986, Ironing BoardsJACK’S CABINET SHOP - Don Lowery, President1004 East 19th, 76903, 325-653-1537, Employment 1-9, Est.1984, Kitchen & bathroom cabinets
    • M anufacturers2013 COMMUNITY PROFILEPASCHAL, WILLIAM R. & SONS - Doug & Paul Paschal,Partners510 S. Chadbourne, 76903, 325-653-6063, Employment 1-9, Est.1964, Hardwood furniture, refinishing piano restoration, archi-tectural woodwork, www.paschalwoodworking.comS & S. CABINET SHOP INC. - Larry Smith, President3201 Lake Drive, 76903, 325-655-6757, Employment 1-9, Est.1965, Custom made countertopsTERRILL MANUFACTURING - Kent Terrill, President2816 Martin Luther King, 76903, 325-655-7133, Employment50-99, Est. 1946, Architectural woodwork & wood & plasticlaminate clad casework, www.terrillmfg.com
    • Texas Midwest Community Network (TMCN)is a coalition of 27 counties in West-CentralTexas that can help your business grow andprosper. The TMCN region is centrally locatedin the state of Texas and is the geographiccenter of the world’s largest free trade zoneproviding easy access to east and westcoasts, the industrial Midwest and northeast,and the large emerging markets in Mexico.The region is also host to one of the largestoil plays in history, the Cline Shale!Our region’s low cost of doing business,along with an educated, eager andabundant workforce, create the perfectenvironment for success. Join industryleaders in health care, alternative energy,oil and gas, agriculture,metal fabrication andglobal manufacturing inmaking the Texas Midwesthome. Put our resources towork for your company, and seefor yourself the benefits of doingbusiness in the Texas Midwest.Texas Midwest Economic Development AllianceCommunities working together to accomplishwhat one community cannot do alone.(325) 795-8626www.texasmidwest.orgTMCN Economic DevelopmentAlliance MembersDevelop Abilenewww.developabilene.comCity of Ballinger, Community Developmentwww.ballingertx.orgBrady Economic Development Corporationwww.bradytx.comBrownwood Economic Development Corporationwww.brownwoodbusiness.comCisco Development Corporationwww.ciscodc.comFB – Cisco Development CorporationClyde Economic Development Corporationwww.clydeamerica.comComanche Texas Economic Development Corporationwww.tupresentscomanche.com/edcEconomic Development Corporation of Early Texaswww.earlyecondev.comEden Economic Development Corporationwww.edentexas.comDevelopment Corporation of Haskell www.haskelltexasonline.comSan Angelo Chamber of Commerce/Economic Developmentwww.sanangelo.org/uptown.phpFB – San Angelo Chamber of Commerce –Economic DevelopmentSweetwater Enterprise for Economic Development Inc.www.sweetwatertexas.netFB – Sweetwater Economic DevelopmentGROWING STRONGER … TOGETHER … BETTERBUSINESS CLIMATESkilled Workforce & Customized Training • Low Cost of Real EstateLow Cost of Living • Pro-Business AttitudeThriving & Diversified Industries • Safe & Clean EnvironmentNatural Resources • Quality of Life • Good Climate – Year RoundINDUSTRIESOil & Gas – Alternative Energy – Wind & SolarInformation Technology • Education & Health ServicesManufacturing – Light & Heavy • Metal FabricationAgriculture – Beef, Farming, Vineyards, DairyLeisure & Hospitality • Government – Local, State, FederalProfessional & Business ServicesHome toDyess Air Force Base • Goodfellow Air Force BaseTexas Tech University College of Pharmacy • Angelo State UniversityTexas State Technical College • Abilene Christian UniversityMcMurry University • Hardin Simmons UniversityHoward Payne University • Four Community Colleges
    • COMMUNITY PROFILELOCATION - The City of San Angelo covers 58.61 squaremiles, and Tom Green County covers 1,540.05 squaremiles. We are located at Latitude 31.22 N and Longitude100.30 W in West Central Texas between the Texas hillcountry to the southeast and the rolling plains to thenorthwest. San Angelo is located between U.S.Interstate Highways I-10 and I-20. I-10 is 64 miles southof San Angelo, and depending on the route taken, it isapproximately 70-90 miles to I-20. Other majorhighways connecting to San Angelo includes U.S.Highways 67, 87, and 277.DEMOGRAPHICS – Tom Green County and San Angelohave a diverse population.2010 U.S. Census PopulationCity of San Angelo 93,200Tom Green County 110,2242010 Tom Green County Population BreakdownEthnicity 2010 Pop. PercentageWhite 63,799 58%Hispanic 39,315 36%African American 4,445 4%Asian 1,118 1%Other 1,547 1%MiscellaneousMedian Household Income $41,398Mean travel time to work 15.6 minutesFemale Persons 51.3%TRANSPORTATION - San Angelo is served by three U.S.Highways: 67, 87, and 277. Located between InterstateHighways 10 and 20, San Angelo is 1 hour and 1 ½respectively from each. Current highway improvementprojects are underway to connect the InterstateHighways with 4-lane access. U.S Highway 277 is SanAngelos closest connection to Mexico - a distance of155 miles to the border crossing at Del Rio and CiudadAcuña, Coahuila. The highway traffic in west centralTexas is light, and the four lane divided highways andtwo lane highways with full shoulders provide easy andsafe travel.San Angelo Regional Airport - Mathis Field is served byAmerican Eagle Airlines. They offer 4-5 flights per day tothe Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. San AngeloRegional Airport - Mathis Field is currently undergoing a$2.4 million renovation estimated to be completed thisyear.In 2006, the City of San Angelo and the Concho ValleyCouncil of Governments consolidated the urban and therural public transportation system. The transit office islocated at 2801 W. Loop 306. For more information, call(325) 947-8729. A new multi-modal terminal is openedin 2012.HEALTH CARE - San Angelo has two acute carehospitals: Shannon Medical Center and San AngeloCommunity Medical Center. With over 200 physiciansand 50 dentists practicing multiple specialties, SanAngelo is widely recognized as a regional medicalcenter. Acute care services available include cancertreatment and cardiac care. Other specialized medicalfacilities include: a regional rehabilitation center, a
    • geriatric care facility, and a mental health and drugrehabilitation hospital. There are currently 7 nursinghomes and an additional 10 retirement centersproviding a variety of living accommodations and levelsof care, including Alzheimer’s care.RECREATION & SPORTS - San Angelos weather allowsresidents and visitors to enjoy year round recreationalactivities. The summer temperatures are moderated bya trip to any of the three lakes that border the citylimits. Boating, fishing, and water skiing are popularsummer sports. The City of San Angelo, Boys and GirlsClubs, and the YMCA operate several recreationcenters. Organized sports for children include baseball,basketball, football, softball, saddle club, soccer, andgymnastics. Fourteen public tennis court locations, anindoor soccer facility, two public swimming pools, twocountry clubs with golf, tennis, and swimming, andthree additional public golf courses all provide outdoorrecreation opportunities.WEATHER & CLIMATE - San Angelo’s altitude of 1,900feet, location on the northern boundary of theChihuahuan desert, and our proximity to rivers andlakes provide a very pleasant climate. With 3 lakes andrivers flowing through the city, San Angelo has anaverage morning humidity of 79%, but that drops to acomfortable average of 44% in the afternoons.Temperatures do reach in the 100s during thesummer, but low humidity in the 15% to 25% rangekeeps the “heat index” down. Snow and sleet are notcommon, but may occur once or twice each year. Froman employer’s standpoint, there are no lost workdaysbecause of winter. The average annual temperature is64.5 degrees, with average highs of 77.1, and lows of51.8. San Angelo receives 251 days of sunshine eachyear, and the average rainfall is 20.91 inches.EDUCATION - San Angelo Independent School District -San Angelo has two high schools, 1 freshman campus, 3middle schools, and 17 elementary schools. A majorrenovation and expansion of facilities is underwayfollowing voter approval of a $117 million bond issue in2008. For more information on the San AngeloIndependent School District, call (325) 947-3700 or visitwww.saisd.org.Texas Leadership Charter Academy opened its doors inthe fall of 2009. For more information, call (325) 224-2900 or visit www.tlca-sa.com.Angelo State University has a student enrollment of6,800 with students from every region of Texas, 40additional states, and numerous foreign countries. BothBaccalaureate and Masters Programs are offered atASU. For more information, contact the ASU admissionsoffice at (325) 942-2041 or www.angelo.edu.Howard County Junior College -Although the maincampus is in Big Spring, the San Angelo campus has astudent enrollment of 3,200. Instruction at this campusis concentrated predominantly in technical andoccupational field of study that leads to Certificationand/or Associate of Applied Science Degrees. For moreinformation on course offerings, contact HowardCollege at (325) 944-9585 or www.howardcollege.edu.CULTURAL AFFAIRS - For a city with a population under100,000, San Angelo provides a high level of culturalevents and activities. The San Angelo Symphonyperforms 8 times during the year, and is headquarteredin the restored City Auditorium. The Cultural AffairsCouncil offers many attractive and excitingentertainment options, such as the Cactus Jazz & BluesFestival and the Texas Wine & Food Festival. For moreinformation on the arts, contact the Cultural AffairsCouncil at (325) 653-6793 or www.sanangeloarts.com.HOUSING - In December 2012 new homes were sellingin San Angelo in a range of $90-125 per square foot. Theaverage cost of homes sold in San Angelo in 2012 was$141,500. There are 68 apartment complexes in SanAngelo, and the cost for two bedroom unfurnishedapartments range from $430 to $680 per month. The“ACCRA Cost of Living Index” for the third quarter of2012 lists San Angelo as having a housing index thatranks our housing costs as approximately 20% belowthe national average.COST OF LIVING - San Angelo participates in theACCRA “Cost of Living Index” program. This index iscompiled from data submitted on a quarterly basis from
    • over 300 metropolitan areas. Each participatingcommunity “shops” 64 items in their respectivecommunities on the same day of each quarter. SanAngelo continues to be one below the national averagein six categories.SHOPPING - San Angelo has 10 shopping centersthroughout the community. Nine are shoppingcenters with outside entrances and one is a fullyenclosed mall. Sunset Mall has 60-65 individualbusinesses and is anchored by Bealls, Dillard’s, JCPenny, and Sears. San Angelo’s national chain retailersinclude Lowe’s Home Improvement Center, HomeDepot, Target, Office Max, Office Depot, Pier One,Michaels, Best Buy, Academy Sports, Sam’s Club,Famous Footwear, PETCO, Petsmart, Inc., Bed, Bath &Beyond, Ross Department Store, Rue-21,Family Power Sports, Furniture Row, Kirklands,Fed-Ex Office, Maurices, Marshalls and two Wal-MartSuper Centers.TAXES - The State of Texas mandates a $15,000homestead exemption for school taxes for all Texashomes. The tax rate for San Angelo is $2.591 per$100.00 of assessed value. Tax ratios are established inSeptember of each year. Texas also authorizes localschool boards to provide an additional percentageexempted for homeowners.Property TaxCity Tax 0.7810County Tax 0.5250School District Tax 1.2600Total 2.5660Sales TaxState 6.25%County 0.50%City 1.50%Total 8.25%UTILITES – Natural gas service is provided by AtmosEnergy in San Angelo. Residential, Commercial andIndustrial service is available by calling the AtmosEnergy Customer Call Center at 1-888-286-6700. Forcurrent rates or questions, contact Shelley Burnett at(325) 481-3716 or www.atmosenergy.com.Electrical line service is provided by AEPTexas. SanAngelo is currently served with 13 transmissionlines - 69,000 volts (4), 138,000 volts (6), and 345,000volts(3). Under deregulation, San Angelo residents andbusinesses can select their own retail electric provider.For detailed information on service providers and rates,visit www.powertochoose.org.Verizon is the region’s principal provider of localtelephone service and operates a 100 percentdigital network. In addition to Verizon’s long-distanceservice, other long distance service providers with POPsinSan Angelo include AT&T, Sprint, Quest, Cable &Wireless, and CTTC. In addition to standard copper andfiber-based services that provide a range of voice, videoand data services, San Angelo residential and businesscustomers can also obtain digital subscriber line (DSL)service, high-speed cable modem service, LMDS,wireless DSL, and digital satellite service. SuddenlinkCommunications serves San Angelo and is amongthe 10 largest cable broadband companies in the UnitedStates, supporting the information, communication andentertainment demands of approximately 1.3 millionresidential customers and thousands of commercialcustomers.Refuse collection is provided by TrashAway Services,Inc., a private contractor who utilizes the City-ownedlandfill.San Angelo’s water supply is owned and operated bythe City of San Angelo. Several lakes are the sources ofSan Angelo’s water. As of October 2006, San Angelo’smaximum capacity of the water system is 55 milliongallons/day. The average daily use is 14 million, with thehighest recorded usage of 25 million gallons/day.The City of San Angelo has an activated sludgewastewater treatment facility. The wastewatertreatment capacity is 13.2 million gallons/day. Thecurrent treatment is 9.21 million gallons/day, and thehighest peak treatment was 13 million gallons/day. Formore information, contact the San Angelo WaterUtilities Department at (325) 657-4323.
    • LARGEST EMPLOYERS – San Angelo is home to manylarge businesses and over 100 manufacturingcompanies.Firm SizeGoodfellow Air Force Base 5,165Shannon Health System 2,627San Angelo ISD 2,014Angelo State University 1,680San Angelo State Supported Living Center 920San Angelo Community Medical Center 860City of San Angelo 855Tom Green County 727SITEL, Inc. 572Ethicon (Johnson & Johnson) 510Lone Star Beef Processors 480Verizon, Inc. 459BlueCross BlueShield of Texas 400Hirschfeld Industries 380Performant DCS/HCS/VFI 375Reece Albert 330Baptist Retirement Center 301Stripes Convenience Stores 298San Angelo Packing 269HISTORY - With the end of Americas civil war,thousands of settlers began moving west in search oftheir fortunes. Realizing its need to protect thesecitizens from hostile threats, the governmentestablished forts on the frontier.One such placement, Fort Concho, was made in 1867 atthe confluence of three rivers in West Central Texas.The fort at different times was home to mountedcavalry, infantry, and the famous Black Cavalry whosemembers were respectfully called "Buffalo Soldiers" bythe Native Americans in the area. Almost as soon as thefirst units arrived at Fort Concho, a small and somewhatlawless village by the name of Santa Angela came to lifejust across the river. As the village grew into acommunity, it became a trade center for the manyfarmers and ranchers who had settled in the area.By 1889, the hostilities had ended and the soldiersabandoned Fort Concho. However, with the economicbase of agriculture and trade, the community laterrenamed "San Angelo" continued to grow as it movedinto the 20th Century.Weather and climate also played an important role inSan Angelos early development. When tuberculosisbecame widespread in the first half of this century,patients from all over the nation were sent to atreatment center near San Angelo. Our dry climateproved to be an effective healing factor, and themedical center reputation and the services we nowenjoy can be attributed to this role played in the early1900s.The military returned to San Angelo during World WarII, when an Army Air Corps training base wasestablished in the city. While flight training is no longerprovided, Goodfellow Air Force Base still providesmilitary intelligence training and a fire fighting schoolfor the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marines. Thediscovery of oil and gas, the influx of lightmanufacturing, the initial development of acommunications center, the establishment and growthof Angelo State University, and the growth of themedical community provided diversification to agrowing community. Today, this city of 93,200 is thetrade and services hub of a 13 county area, supportedby agriculture, manufacturing, education, business andhealth services, military, tourism, and retirement.FOR MORE INFORMATION – The Chamber ofCommerce and Visitors Center are more than willing toanswer any questions you may have about San Angeloor the region. Our contact information is below:418 W. Ave BSan Angelo, TX 76903(325) 655-4136www.sanangelo.orgwww.visitsanangelo.org
    • SAN ANGELO CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU1stQuarter ReportJanuary - March, 20131. Convention Activities …………………………..........……. 1 - 92. Marketing and Promotions …………………..........……… 10 -123. Financials …………………………………..........………… 13 - 164. Visitor Statistics ……………………..........……………….. 17 - 20
    • CONVENTION ACTIVITIESSA]V AIVGELOCOIVVEIVTIO]Y & VISITORS B UREAU2013 7" QuurterJunuary-MurchAssisted with 17 conventions, meetings, sporting events ormotor coach tourso Projected attendance: 2I.954o Projected room nights : 3"602o Average length of days spent: 3.5 dayso Total Economic Impact: $5.571.4961
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    • Sass10Texas Events Calendar SPRING 2013
    • 11Texas Town & City APRIL, 2013
    • Texas Highways - April, 2013Texas Monthly - April12
    • CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAUINCOME, EXPENSE AND PROFIT/LOSS STATEMENTFOR THE ONE MONTH AND THE THREE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31 ,2013INCOME:HOTEL/MOTEL TAX RECEIPTSINTEREST INCOMEVISITORS CENTER SALESTOTAL INCOMEOPERATING EXPENSES:SALARIES & BENEFITSOVERHEADADMIN EXPENSETOTAL EXPENSESMARKETING EXPENSES:MARKETING EXPENSESTOTAL PROGRAM EXPENSESTOTAL EXPENSESOPERATING INCOME(LOSS)DESIGNATED FUND EXPENSESSports Fund ExpenseWayfi nding Signage ExpenseTOTAL DESIGNATED FUND EXPENSESDESIGNATED FUNDS INCOMESports Fund DonationsWayfinding DonationsTOTAL DESIGNATED FUND INCOMEMONTH TO DATE$ 74,054.9230.59784.1574,869.66YEAR TO DATE$ 220,043.9986.171,719.46221,949.6218,629.3910,416.0664,665.7920,340.622.943.31 7.640.9531,988.76 92,647.3627 440.28 46.538.5727 440 28s9.429.O415,440.622,000.002.418.004,418.000.000.000.0046.538.57139,125.9382,723.692,000.002.418.004,418.00500.000.00500.00NET PROFTT/(LOSS) $ 11,022.62 $ 78,805.6913
    • Convention & Visitors BureauOPERATING INCOME STATEMENTFOR THE ONE MONTH AND THE THREE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31,203INCOME:Hotel/Motel Tax Receiptslnterest lncomeVisitors Center SalesTotal lncomeOPERATING EXPENSES:Extra Help/Part{imeAdministrative WagesSocial SecurityBookkeeping & Administration FeeMedicareRetirement PlanUnemployment CompGroup lnsuranceAuditRent/Storage BldgFacility AgreementCornerstone ExpenseEquipment ExpenseGeneral lnsuranceUtilitiesPostageSecurityTelephoneCom puters/Database SupportOffice SuppliesChristmas Lights ExpenseAutomobile AllowanceMaintenanceMiscellaneous Office SupportTotal Operating ExpensesMARKETI N G/ADVE RTISI N G :Volunteer ProgramProfessional DuesProfessional Training/ConferencesSubscriptionsPostage/MarketingAdvertisin g/Publ icityPublic RelationsTelephone (800 Number)Visitor Event lncentiveConvention Servicing SuppliesVisitor Center MerchandiseCVB WebsitePromotional ltemsPrintin g/Brochure DevelopmentVisitors & Travel MarketingConvention & Travel TradeMONTHACTUALMarch$ 74,Q54.9230.59784.15YEARTO DATE2013$ 220,043.9986.1 71,719.46221,849.62YEARTO DATE2012$ 180,961 .4583.201,212.46182,257.11ANNUALBUDGET2013$ 795,000.00350.008,000.00803,350.0074,869.66905.4013,780.79913.891,416.66213.741,268.908.391,538.280.00100.00500.00816.323,387.921,923.201,485.310.00131 .59603.570.00551.830.001,355.86916.32170.7931,988.76 92,587.36 88,177.13 390,967.002,665.00 3,101.06 17,500.00 15.2348,872.98 45,534.55 197,887.00 24.703,312.93 3,042.12 1 1 ,800.00 28.084,249.98 4,249.98 17,000.00 25.00774.83 711.50 2,700.00 28.713,076.69 2,981.73 10,600.00 29.03121.72 71.85 600.00 20 325,941.64 6,269.73 29,150.00 20.040.00 0.00 2,600.00 0.00300.00 240.00 1,000.00 30 031,000.00 1,500.00 6,000.00 16.671,446.65 570.17 200.00 726.965,703.38 4,210.52 18,000.00 31 .691,923.20 996.80 4,680.00 41.103,483.34 3,Q74.18 1,4,000.00 24.88138.91 295.52 2,400.00 5.79394.77 269.91 2,000.00 19.751,749.98 2,436.35 7,000.00 25.00554.50 509.20 5,000.00 11.09852.65 1,445.93 6,500.00 13 120.00 0.00 1,750.00 0.002,983.04 3,480.52 19,000.00 15.702,793.24 2,793.08 11,600.00 24.083q.9! 392.43 2,000.00 17.410.000.00300.0013.0000015,293.73622.1912.770.006,800.000.000.000.000.00590.353,771.0360.0050.00300.0041.60133.3933,707.08622.1912.770.006,980.000.00145.000.000.002,018.512,104.690.001 ,910.0045.0042.250.0041,384.2467.8220 335,000.003,028.32888.17120.004,191.410.001,126.631,834.982,400.007,000.004,500.005,000.003,500.00185,000.005,000.00400.0040,000.0027,000.006,000.002,500.0011,500.0012,000.0029,575.0048,000.00YEAR TO DATEPERCENT201327.6824.6921.5027.6223.682500716.670.833.8118.2212.453.200.0025.850.005.800.000.006.834.3814
    • Convention & Visitors BureauOPERATING INCOME STATEMENTFOR THE ONE MONTH AND THE THREE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31,2013Trade ShowsTotal Marketi n g/Advertis i n gTOTAL EXPENSESOPERATING BUDGET INC/LOSSDESIGNATED FUNDS INCOMESports Fund DonationsWayfinding DonationsTOTAL DESIGNATED FUNDINCOMEDESIGNATED FUNDS EXPENSESports Fund ExpenseWayfi nding Signage ExpenseCVB Bid lncentive ExpensesCommunity Events ExpenseCVB Reserves Exp.Depreciation ExpenseTOTAL DESIGNATED FUNDEXPENSESURPLUS (DEFICIT)MONTHACTUALMarch37.2127.440.2859,429.4415,440.620.000.000.00YEARTO DATE201.3363.3446,538.57139.125.9382,723.69YEARTO DATE2012127.2559,786.40147,963.5334,293.58ANNUALBUDGET201323,000.00412,375.40803,342.008.00YEAR TO DATEPERCENT24131.5811.29500.00 17,345.640.00 0.00500.00 17,345.642,000.002,418.000.000.000.000.004,418.002,000.002,418.000.000.000.000.004,418.004,000.000.000.002,500.000.000.006,500.0011,022.62 78,805.69 45,139.22:=:=::15
    • Convention & Visitors BureauBALANCE SHEETAs of March 31,2013 and March 31,2012AssetsCurrent YearCurrent AssetsPrimevest M/Mkt - 3 month working capitalCommunity Events Checking- Texas BankWayfinding Checks - First Financial BankSports Fund CheckingCash in Bank - First Financial BankTotal Current AssetsFixed AssetsProperty & EquipmentAccumu lated DepreciationTotal Fixed AssetsTotal Assets353,699.2630,828.582,078.7629,382.43427.661.25843,650.2889,561.01(86,132.33)3,428.68$ 847,078.96$ 246.33(ee1.35)97.90(243.81)11.49(879.44)702,975.7230,803.9630,876.274,496.7678.805.69847 958.40$ 847.078.96Prior Year153,679.9040,809.394,496.7626,401.54473,,102.3289,561.01(86,132.33)3,428.68L__*_4?S3!94_$ 0.00(ee1.35)185.690.007.77(7e7.8e)371,334.5943,303.9613,054.364,496.7645,139.22477,328.89-$-__-_47gsruq_Liabilities and Fund BalanceCurrent LiabilitiesWrite Off Old ChecksPayroll Tax PayableUnemployment - SUTA Tax PaYableOn Account - 09 Travel Council SponsorSales Tax PayableTotal Current LiabilitiesFund BalanceFund Balance - CVBFund Balance/Community Events (not occupanSports Promotion Fund BalanceFund Balance/ Wayfinding Project (not occupaEarnings Year to Date (Loss)Total Fund BalanceTotal Liabilities andFund Balance16
    • San Angelo Visitor GenterStatistics - lst Quarter, 2013TexasCaliforniaNew MexicolllinoisOklahomalndianaMinnesotalowaFloridaMissouriColoradoOhioNew YorkWashingtonArizonaKansasWisconsinVirginiaGeorgiaLouisianaWyomingSouth CarolinaMontanaMichiganTennesseeAlabamaMarylandNorth CarolinaPennsylvaniaUtahArizonaAlaskaldahoArkansasNew HampshireSouht DakotaNevadaNebraskaOregonMississippi823484844443935312928262626252417171716141312121211111110II8776655543281416321242419421323401052035343512I202456351335421891424617
    • MassachusettsWest VirginiaKentuckyNew JerseyVermontSan Angelo Visitor GenterStatistics - lst Quarter, 2013TOTAL32221155227321CanadaUnited KingdomKoreaGermanyAustraliaMexicoChinaCubaBelgiumSouth KoreaVietnamFrance479I6443322119{16,43348322581122TOTALGUMULATIVE18
    • Walk-Ins By CityEntered between 1/1/2013 and 3/31/2013TX OnlyTotal Avg.StayVisitors (Days)San Angelo Gonvention & Visitors Bureau418 West Avenue BSan Angelo, TX 76903EMai I : cvb@sanangelo.orgcia ciaTotal Avg.StayVisitors (Days)Midland TXOdessa TXSan Antonio TXAbilene TXLubbock TXAustin TXHouston TXFort Worth TXBig Spring TXDallas TXMuleshoe TXKerrville TXStephenville TXChristoval TXDenton TXArlington TXMarathon TXFreeport TXCutn Shoot TXSpring TXBaytown TXAmarillo TXColorado City TXBoerne TXPflugerville TXGarland TXBurnet TXForsan TXMansfield TXMarfa TXPottsboro TX6453454334313026251615141410I8888777777776666Cleburne TXFredericksbu TXHillsboro TXLevelland TXGeorgetown TXWeslaco TXMarshall TXWaller TXBrownsville TXGoldthwaite TXMcKinney TXFabens TX525251514241434246414114243424241424141414132323333323133323537Deer Park TXDel Rio TXGatesville TXEldorado TXWaco TXLeander TXPlainview TXPaint Rock TXEl Paso TXCherokee TXCedar Park TXHawley TXConroe TXBryan TXCanyon TXJunction TXDe Soto TXLittle Elm TXSpringtown TX19
    • San Angelo Visitor Genterlst Quarter,2Ol3 Purpose of VisitLeisureFamilyBusinessPassing throughHorsemanTOTAL901.00334.00258.00125.0025.0011643.00243111020
    • City of San AngeloMemoMeeting Date: May 21, 2013To: City Council membersFrom: Jeff Hintz, Interim Senior PlannerSubject: Area examination and study of properties situated in northwesternSan Angelo as requested by the Planning Commission at theFebruary 18, 2013 meeting for a potential amendment to the VisionPlan Map of the Comprehensive Plan.Location: An area bounded to the west by Short Street, to the south by 37thStreet, to the east by Columbia Street, and to the North by 44thStreet. This area is south and west of the Coliseum and bisected byNorth Chadbourne Street. A map of this area is included in thebackground of this report.Purpose: Approval or modification of this request will update the Vision PlanMap component of the Comprehensive Plan.Contacts: Jeff Hintz, Interim Senior Planner 325-657-4210AJ Fawver, Interim Director of Development ServicesCaption: APPROVAL OF AN AMENDMENT TO VISION PLAN COMPONENTOF THE SAN ANGELO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATEADOPTED IN 2009, SPECIFICALLY PROPERTIES LOCATEDBETWEEN 43RD STREET TO THE NORTH, COLISEUM DRIVE TOTHE EAST, 40TH STREET TO THE SOUTH AND GRAPE CREEKROAD AND CHADBOURNE STREET TO THE WEST, INNORTHWESTERN SAN ANGELO.Summary: The City Council may:Approve the proposed Vision Plan map amendments as presented;Remand the Vision Plan map back to Planning Commission for furtherdiscussion; or
    • Deny the proposed Vision Plan Map Amendment in its entirety or on aproperty by property basis.Recommendation: Planning staff recommends no changes at this time to the VisionPlan Map for the area that was examined.At the April 15, 2013 meeting, the Planning Commission recommended extending theNeighborhood Center designation eastward as shown on the last map of this report, bya vote of 5-1.History and Background:On January 28, 2013 the Planning Commission directed Planning staff to examine aseries of properties bounded by 40th Street to the south, Grape Creek Road to thewest, Coliseum Drive to the east, and 43rd Street to the north. The direction was toprovide the commission with a zoning history of the property. Upon this presentationand subsequent discussion at the February 18, 2013 meeting, staff was directed toexamine the area and see if some changes to the Vision Plan Map would beappropriate at this time.Analysis:The staff recommendation is based upon the statements listed below.This area is a unique area in the community in that it sees zoning that allows forintensive commercial opportunities, low-density residential opportunities anddevelopment, and medium-density residential development all within several blocks ofone another. North Chadbourne Street is really a dividing line in this particular area interms of development density and land usage. Properties situated west of ChadbourneStreet occupy much larger tracts and include uses that are generally residential innature, and have accessory buildings and large yards. In addition, this area has severalopportunities for infill development both commercial and residential in nature.East of Chadbourne Street, the density of the residences increases slightly but is stillmore of a medium density. East of Chadbourne Street there are a few neighborhood-serving commercial enterprises, despite the higher intensity General Commercial/HeavyCommercial (CG/CH) zoning that is presently in place. This area east of ChadbourneStreet is mainly residential in nature and the properties that are commercially zonedalso sit vacant at this time.Staff has found that this area has opportunities for infill development that are not beingimplemented at this time. Given the generally low nature of development density west ofChadbourne Street, this particular area is not needing additional commercialopportunities at this moment in time since the commercial opportunities present andenvisioned in the Comprehensive Plans Vision Plan map for this area are not beingutilized now. This could mean that these areas are not properly located, but in staffs
    • analysis of the area, "Neighborhood Center" and "Commercial" areas were found to bepresently placed in locations where they will be successful.The presently identified "Neighborhood Center" is located in an area where it will beable to serve the neighborhoods surrounding Chadbourne Street. This "NeighborhoodCenter" shown on the vision map excerpt attached to this report is located at the centerof this well-established residential area; this placement along a major arterial streetensures access to the center will be adequate and capable of handling the traffic flow.In addition, this placement establishes an appropriate transition into the neighborhoodfrom the high intensity traffic present on Chadbourne Street. Staff realizes the zoningenvisioned in this plan is presently not in place, but in the future (which is the purpose ofa Comprehensive Plan) development of a "Neighborhood Center" caliber will allow thisarea to thrive and keep intensive uses in parts of the city where neighborhoods andcommunity attractions are not present. This category is intended for lower intensitycommercial opportunities and higher intensity residential opportunities.Staff has found this type of opportunity to be lacking in this general area with thepresent zoning in place, but in the future, this type of development opportunity would behighly appropriate along a major gateway into town and just south of an establishedcivic events center (the Coliseum). Higher-intensity commercial development in thisarea in general is not consistent with the Comprehensive Plans goals to buffer theseintense uses from neighborhood development. Chadbourne street in this area is a wellestablished neighborhood with opportunities for both low and medium density housing;allowing higher intensity uses with no buffer into these neighborhoods and along amajor gateway into town and along a major route to a main entertainment arena wouldbe contrary to the intent and goals of the Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Ordinance.The particular properties that specifically triggered this request are located just south ofthe Coliseum and occupy the Bill Murray subdivision. The properties fronting alongChadbourne Street are appropriate for commercial development from a trafficperspective. The arterial classification of this roadway and its design allows for this typeof development to be successful and compatible with the neighborhood. The currentconfiguration of Coliseum Drive is not presently developed in a manner from a trafficperspective that would make commercial development possible. Even when an event atthe coliseum fills the parking lot just half full, there are problems along Coliseum Drive.When larger events take place, the traffic situation becomes exacerbated to anotherdegree; adding commercial properties with the potential to draw more traffic into an areathat is generally speaking residential in character. This would not be an ideal situationfor the property owners who presently live in this area, nor would it be ideal for anypotential business in the future. A business that has trouble bringing customers,workers, and deliveries to it will not last long and given the present status of thethoroughfares in this area, staff finds this to be the case.That being said, in the future there are several streets defined to be collector streetsadjacent to this neighborhood center. In the future, if and when these collector streetsare improved, a Vision Plan amendment may be in order at that time. Collector streetsare designed to have 60 feet of right-of-way and 50 feet of pavement. At this time, thecollector streets that are in place have the appropriate right-of-way dedicated but lackthe proper pavement width by nearly 15 feet in one case and 10 feet in another (anentire driving lane or two). The only way(s) these collector streets would be widened is
    • as people do subdivisions or replats of current property adjacent to these called forthoroughfares; the other way would be for these streets to be included in the capitalimprovements plan and funded in that capacity.At this time, the development patterns and dominance of residences in the area and thecapacity and capabilities of the street network in the area, changing the Vision Plan Mapis not justified. Staff would be hesitant to expand just the "Neighborhood Center" portioneast at this time given the lack of improvements on the street network and the increasesin capacity and demand a "Neighborhood Center" designation could bring. Going to ahigher-intensity "Commercial" designation would generate more traffic and intense usesthan a "Neighborhood Center". The proximity to a decades established neighborhoodand lack of traffic capabilities have lead staff to the conclusion that the Vision Plan inthis area if followed will allow for predictable and consistent development of the entirearea which is a main objective of the Comprehensive plan and Zoning Ordinance.United States Census data indicates that for this area (minus about 15 lots in southeastcorner of this study area due to the block protruding outside this study area) thatapproximately 171 people lived within our study area. This confirms our findings thatthis area is predominately home to low density, more sprawling residences; nearly onethird of all parcels accounting for 45% of the total land area in this study had a land useof low density residential. The next dominant land usage in terms of total acreage wasvacant commercial land. To say that this area is lacking commercial developmentopportunity would not be accurate given that there are 17 parcels totaling 29 acres(nearly 22%) of the study area that are zoned for commercial opportunities similar towhat triggered this request that are going un-utilized at this moment in time. Introducingmore commercial envisioned development opportunities to an area with a little under200 people and nearly 30 acres of vacant commercially zoned land would not beappropriate at this time. As the area increases in density, staff has found more thanenough opportunities in appropriately envisioned areas for this type of development. Atthis time, the demand of such a small population does not necessitate additionalcommercial property to the area. Perhaps in the future and as the area grows inpopulation and commercial properties become more sparse additional commercial maybe necessary; however given the data staff found in this analysis, that time is not now.The conditions in this area have not changed substantially in the time since the 2009amendment was made to justify any change at this moment. Improvement to the streetnetwork and/or changes in development patterns in the future may lead staff to adifferent conclusion at that time; at this moment in time, adding more commercial zoningto an area over served by intensive commercial zoning, and with a street network that isnot ready to handle this increased demand would not be advisable. This area ispredominately residential in nature and will likely remain this way for some time. Anyintroduction of commercially envisioned areas needs to be done with the utmost careand concern to protect present and anticipated residential development patterns in theregion.Attachments: chart summarizing acreage and parcel findings for study areaand;
    • Aerial photo of the area;Current Land Use Map of the area;Vision Plan Map of the area;Thoroughfare Plan excerpt for the area;Planning Commissions recommended Vision Plan Map ofthe area;Minute excerpt from February 18 PlanningCommission Meeting; andMinute excerpt from April 15, 2013 Planning CommissionMeeting.Presentation: Jeff Hintz, Interim Senior PlannerTotal Parcels % of Total Parcels Land Area (acres) % Land AreaLow Density Residential 52 32.30% 60.9 45.07%Higher Density Residential 55 34.16% 13.53 10.01%Vacant Land Residential 23 14.29% 17.32 12.82%Vacant Land Commercial 17 10.56% 29.13 21.56%Neighborhood Serving Commercial 8 4.97% 4.57 3.38%Non-Neighborhood Serving Commercial 6 3.73% 9.68 7.16%Total 161 100.00% 135.13 100.00%
    • VII. Review and discussion of staff findings resulting from Planning Commissionsdirection at the January 28, 2013 meeting for staff to examine the zoninghistory of properties specifically occupying the Bill Murray Subdivision, Lots1-4 in northwest San Angelo.Jeff Hintz, Planner, came forward to present this item. At the direction of thePlanning Commission at the last meeting, staff did research the zoning history of thisproperty. Ms. Fawver asked Mr. Hintz to take a step back for a moment and provideorientation as to the property that is the subject of this discussion. Mr. Hintz thenproceeded with his presentation. Mr. Hintz also showed excerpts of the zoningmaps of 1954, 1956, and it shows that a strip of C-2 (now CG/CH) was runningthrough the property and bisecting it since 1956. The C-2 strip, 350 from the centerline of the street, was also on the zoning map in 1969, 1979, 1987, and 2013. Thedetails of this research are contained within the background report, but, in summary,staff was unable to find any evidence that - since the properties initial zoning in1954, the property was never entirely zoned as commercial, other than the 350 stripof commercial.A: Discussion and possible action regarding the Vision Plan MapMr. Hintz explained that the current Vision Plan Map calls for a split (reflecting thezoning split) of "Commercial" and "Neighborhood". The only option for a zoningproposal would be to a) apply for something that would likely be denied by theCommission due to the legal requirements in place that municipalities zone inaccordance with a Comprehensive Plan. The Plan can be re-examined at any time,with the direction of the Planning Commission. Changes to the Comprehensive Planshould be made based upon evidence and study.Bill Murray, the property owner in this location, came forward to speak to this item.He mentioned that there was a dairy at this site at some time, and sales of calicheand soil was conducted, after the tornado that wiped out a good deal of the area.There are only three houses on Coliseum Drive - there are some businesses alongthis street. The State of Texas leased this property and raised fish for the fishhatchery. Then, Mr. Jennings began selling water at this location. There was anorchard in this area as well. He produced water for the trees in this orchard. Mr.Hintz addressed the document which Mr. Murray produced. The document whichMr. Murray produced is a subdivision plat, which does not show zoning information.Bill Lawrence spoke regarding what is considered in the approval of a subdivisionplat. Mr. Hintz passed around the subdivision plat to the Commission members.Bill Lawrence asked Mr. Murray what he wanted to do with the property. Mr. Murraydescribed a use that staff concluded sounded substantially like "Industrial Services",which is allowed by right in a CH zoning district or as a Conditional Use in a CGzoning district. There was some lengthy discussion about the matter.Motion, to direct staff to re-examine the Vision Plan in that area, was made by JoeGrimes and seconded by Jennifer Boggs. The motion passed unanimously, 5-0.
    • VI. Discussion and possible action to amend portions of the Vision PlanComponent of the 2009 update to the San Angelo Comprehensive Plan,specifically properties bounded to the west by Short Street, to the south by37th Street, to the east by Columbia Street, and to the North by 44th Street.This area is south and west of the Coliseum and bisected by NorthChadbourne Street in northwest San Angelo.Presented by Jeff Hintz, Interim Senior Planner. Mr. Hintz recounted the presentVision map and explained how the Planning Division was directed to investigate apossible change to the Vision Plan. Using maps, Mr. Hintz pointed out typical landuses in the area. He recounted the history of current zoning designations as well,illustrating them with maps. Hintz shared that the staff recommendation for thisrequest was no change in the area. He explained the process by which staffresearched this area and stated according 2010 Census data, approximately 200people lived in the area, and that an addition of more commercial uses would not beharmonious with residential uses. Infill development was discussed, both residentialand commercial, as there are many vacant lots within the area. An aerial photographillustrates the lack of use on many of the vacant lands. *Mr. Hintz stated that addingmore commercial wouldn’t be prudent since streets in the area are not equipped orwide enough to handle commercial uses, stating the subdivision ordinancerequirements for these types of streets. He also discussed that the Vision Plan callsfor a Neighborhood Center in the area, and that it is already located at a future keynode and serves the community. Other evidence that Hintz recounted in support ofStaff recommendation was that the street network in the area is not fully improved atthis time and that there is not much infill occurring at this time.Mr. Ryan Smith asked the history of why the request was before us today, so Mr.Hintz recounted a prior Planning Commission meeting. Mr. Wynne brought up that atornado had wiped out much of the area at one time.Bill Murray, property owner in the area, got up to speak to this Vision Plan. He statedthat the map is wrong and that the Family Neighborhood Center is the Coliseum andthat a traffic count should be done. A map was consulted so that Mr. Murray couldshow the Commission members his land. He stated that he was upset at not beingable to get a permit to run a bar-bq and provide cold drinks to students. He statedthat a dairy was operated to the east of N. Chadbourne, and that caliche was soldnear the coliseum. He recounted the thought behind who created the Vision Planand questioned who made it and that this has not been explained to him. He statedthat there were 5 exits to the coliseum and directed the city engineers to redirecttraffic to City property. He stated that he wanted his back gate to be included incommercial property hed already owned. He stated that he came before theCommission in 1979 for a special permit. He said that the plat he showed was“Okay” with the city and that the special permit was permitted. He is opposed to theneighborhood zoning designation in the area, stating that the area is not big enoughor any logical explanation as to why there is residential there, and that an existingpipeline should have been a reason not to use that area as commercial. Mr. Murrayshowed the Commission a petition signed by area neighboring properties that werein favor of him having his property zoned commercial. He asked why he was nevergiven a notice of a split zoning to his property. He questioned why the City, whom heclaims owns a Mobile Home park across the coliseum.
    • Mr. Hintz spoke to Mr. Murray’s discussion on zoning history and ordinance and alsostated that he would check into the alleged City-owned Mobile Home park. Mr. Hintzdiscussed the 1954 zoning map for the City and how zoning was changed in thearea later on with no legal description given regarding the property lines. Mr. Hintzalso clarified several statements that were made regarding the intent of the VisionPlan Map.Mr. Saluri, Assistant City Attorney explained the legal premise of the ComprehensivePlan, Zoning Ordinance and the Vision Plan. Mr. Murray offered to sell his propertyfor $25,000 a lot essentially to preserve the Zoning Map.Brent McCaden came to speak in opposition of this request to keep the Vision Planthe same. He stated that he grew up in the area and explained that streets that weremeant to go through properties were not built out. He claimed that there isn’t muchtraffic on 43rd. He claimed that Mr. Murray’s back gate shouldn’t be changed. Hewanted to know why we should take away something that has already beencommercial, with reference to the residential land to the east of N. Chadbourne. The1956 Ordinance, Mr. Hintz explained, is how the Zoning was dictated at that timeand that any commercial use in the RS-1 zone since was illegal.Mr. Hintz answered questions regarding the meaning of the maps used at Mr.Wynne’s request. Mr. Hintz discussed the pipeline with Ms. Jones, who wanted toknow when the pipeline was in. Mr. Grimes posed the idea that the pipeline couldalready exist through neighborhoods in the area, and contended that the Memorialbusiness is an example of spot zoning. Mr. Hintz explained that it is a legal non-conformance, and not spot zoning.Mr. Lawrence explained, is much different than using the street for a “normal” arterialthrough a neighborhood area, and that a choke point would be created. Motion wasmade to direct staff to make a map from which to decide how the Vision Map.Darlene Jones wants to change to neighborhood center east from its presentdesignation, east to Coliseum Drive to encompass the entire block between 40th and43rd Streets Vision to allow neighborhood center opportunities, Mr. Wynneseconded it. Mr. Lawrence would like to see a map before anything went forward.The motion passed 5-1 with Mr. Lawrence opposed.
    • City of San AngeloMemoMeeting Date: May 21, 2013To: Mayor and City Council membersFrom: AJ Fawver, Interim Director of Development ServicesSubject: Permission to execute contract, with terms previously agreedupon by Council, with top ranked consulting group in responseto PL-01-12Contacts: AJ Fawver, Interim Director of Development Services657-4210Caption: Consideration of authorizing the City Manager to execute acontract between Catalyst Urban Development and the City ofSan Angelo to carry out services regarding a Master Developeras outlined in PL 01-12.Summary: At the directive of the Downtown Development Commission, andfollowing the requirements of the establishing ordinance for this group, City staff puttogether a RFQ (Request for Qualifications) and worked with the PurchasingDirector to put this RFQ out to solicit responses from a variety of firms. Now thatthe Downtown Development Commission has interviewed and scored thissubmission/firm, and made a formal recommendation to Council to select CatalystUrban Development as the candidate for this project, the Planning Manager isasking the Council for permission to enter into negotiations with the firm. Once anacceptable arrangement is made, staff will again approach the Council forpermission to enter into a contract.Background: Beginning in early 2011, discussion of the "Master Developer"concept began among City Council and City management. In October of 2011, anordinance establishing the Downtown Development Commission (DDC), wasapproved. Following the compilation and approval of a draft downtown
    • development plan in December of 2011, the DDC then began discussion of the nexttwo duties assigned to them.The next task was to develop a scope of service for a downtown Master Developer;following that, the assignment was to solicit proposals for the selection of a masterdeveloper and make a recommendation to the City Council regarding the finalselection.On January 31, 2012, the DDC instructed City staff to draft a scope of services forpublishing and solicitation of applicants. In February, the DDC reviewed thepackage prepared by staff and directed staff to have the RFQ open for a period of60 days. The following month, on April 13, the RFQ was published, with a deadlineof June 7th. The package was published on the City website as well as two otherwebsites which cater to planning and development consulting firms. The packagewas also sent to 26 firms with experience in a master developer arrangement. Theweek of June 7th, only one submission had been received, so the deadline wasextended to June 21st. At the June 26th meeting of the DDC, staff distributed thesubmission packets to the Commission members. The Commission set their nextmeeting date for August 28th, and asked staff to make arrangements to have theconsulting group attend for a presentation and interview.On August 28th, a representative from Catalyst Urban Development, GatewayPlanning Group, and NE Development provided a presentation and interviewedwith the DDC members. At the close of this meeting, the DDC members preparedscore sheets and made a recommendation to be forward to the City Council thatthis group be selected for the task.In a joint session with the Downtown Development Commission on December 18,2012, the members from both bodies heard a presentation by Paris Rutherford withCatalyst Urban Development and held discussion, after which the Council formallyaccepted the DDCs recommendation to approve the proposed scope, the Letter ofIntent (with the understanding that staff will present each Phase [1-4] for CityCouncils review and approval for further direction), and authorized staff tonegotiate a contract with the terms from the earlier presentation, and to include theidentification of funding sources.Catalyst Urban Development revised the Letter of Intent to include the approvalbetween each phase by the City Council. They also submitted a draft contract,which has been reviewed, amended, discussed, and approved by the CityAttorneys office, and which is attached to this report. Conference calls andmeetings were held between various City staff and Catalyst to work throughinsurance requirements, contract structuring, and other issues, which have nowbeen worked out accordingly.Related Vision Item: Provide adequate amenities for all neighborhoods.Attract reinvestment.Develop strategic plan for recruitment.Examine liquidation of underutilized City properties.
    • Financial Impact: At this time, only the Phase I costs ($68,000, plusreimbursable expenses estimated at $12,000 -$22,000, with $22,000 being the maximum allowed)Recommendation: City staff recommends approval of this request.Attachments: Excerpt of minutes from Joint Hearing of December 18,2012Revised Letter of IntentDraft contract, reviewed by City Attorneys officePresentation: AJ Fawver, Interim Director of Development Services
    • SPECIAL JOINT SESSION:BE IT REMEMBERED City Council and Downtown Development Commission convened in a special jointmeeting at 9:24 A.M., Tuesday, December 18, 2012, in the San Angelo McNease Convention Center, 500RioConcho Drive, San Angelo, Texas. All duly authorized members of the Commission, to-wit:Co-Chair Jim CummingsCo-Chair Tim EdwardsBoard Member Sharon Rainey AlexanderBoard Member Gary CoxBoard Member Lisa EadyBoard Member John FuentesBoard Member Jim Raymondwere present and acting, thus constituting a quorum. Whereupon, the following business was transacted:AUTHORIZATION ON MATTERS AS LISTED BELOW RELATING TO PL-01-12, A REQUEST FORQUALIFICATIONS SEEKING TO RETAIN A MASTER DEVELOPER FOR THE PURPOSES OFOVERSEEING DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT:• ACCEPTANCE OF THE QUALIFICATIONS OF AND PROPOSED SCOPE OF SERVICES BYCATALYST URBAN DEVELOPMENT;• AUTHORIZATION FOR THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE THE LETTER OF INTENT WITHCATALYST URBAN DEVELOPMENT• AUTHORIZATION FOR THE CITY MANAGER OR DESIGNEE TO BEGIN NEGOTIATIONSWITH CATALYST URBAN DEVELOPMENTPlanning Manager AJ Fawver and Paris M. Rutherford IV of Catalyst Urban Development, LLC, presentedbackground information. A copy of the report/presentation is part of the Permanent Supplemental Record.General discussion was held on the various phases of the project, the costs associated with each phase, similarstudies in other municipalities, conducive local market place interest, expressed interest by local investors,consultant’s expertise to recruit and showcase the City, creative collaboration and practical implementation ofcommunity investment, investment procurement and investor networking, leveraging funds, and various fundingsources available to the City.Commission Co-Chairs Mr. Cummings and Mr. Edwards and Board Member Ms. Rainey Alexander spoke insupport of the proposal and recommended approval.Further discussion was held on whether Council should review the process after each proposed phase, timelineand cost associated with each phase, whether staff should seek prior approval by City Council to proceed throughthe various phases, the rate of return on City’s investment, identifying funding for the project, and acknowledgingthe sunk cost within each phase of the project should City Council decide not to proceed to the next phase.Assistant City Manager/Chief Financial Officer Michael Dane stated funding for the project has not beenappropriated; however, staff will identify funding and present options to City Council at a future meeting.Motion, to accept the Downtown Development Commission’s recommendation to approve the proposed scope ofservice, the Letter of Intent with the understanding staff will present each Phase for City Council’s review andapproval for further direction, and authorization for staff to negotiate a contract to include the identification offunding sources, as presented, was made by Councilmember Hirschfeld and seconded by Councilmember Farmer.Councilmember Morrison suggested postponing action on the item until further discussion and review can be heldwith local investors and bankers.
    • Public comment was made by Andre Nicholas of NR Construction and Tommy Hiebert, Baptist Memorials BoardMember, speaking in support of the project.A vote was taken on the motion on the floor. Motion carried unanimously.ADJOURNMENTMotion, to adjourn the special joint meeting, was made by Mr. Fuentes and seconded by Mr. Cox. Motion carriedunanimously.The meeting adjourned at 10:57 A.M
    • CONSULTING AGREEMENTMASTER DEVELOPERTHIS CONSULTING AGREEMENT (“Agreement”) is made as of ____________,2013 (the “Effective Date”), between the City of San Angelo, Texas (“Client”) and Catalyst UrbanDevelopment, LLC, a Texas limited liability company (“Consultant”).1. Services. Client and Consultant agree and understand that both parties are entering into thisAgreement with the intent of moving towards a potential joint venture partnership and/or verticaldevelopment opportunity by Consultant, its affiliates, or other identified parties. To do so,Consultant will provide certain master developer services (“Services”) as described in more detailon Exhibit A.2. Additional Services. Additional Services are all Services not covered in Exhibit A. Consultantwill perform Additional Services agreed to by the parties in writing, including the compensationto be paid.3. Payment. Client agrees to pay Consultant for the Services in accordance with Exhibit Battached.4. Independent Contractor Status. Consultant and Client agree that Consultant is an independentcontractor and that neither Contractor nor Contractors staff is or will be deemed to be anemployee of Client. Client is contracting with Consultant for the Services described on ExhibitA, and Consultant reserves the right to determine the method, manner, and means by which suchServices will be performed. The order or sequence in which the Services are to be performed isunder the control of Consultant. Consultant is not required to perform the Services during a fixedhourly or daily time and, if the Services are to be performed at Clients premises, Consultantstime spent at the Clients premises is to be at Consultants discretion, subject only to Clientsnormal business hours and security requirements. Consultant is not required to devoteConsultants full time nor the full time of Consultants staff to the performance of the Services,and Client acknowledges that Consultant has other clients and offers services to the generalpublic. Client will not provide any insurance coverage of any kind for Consultant or Consultantsstaff, and Client will not withhold any amount that would normally be withheld from anemployees pay. All insurance coverage, payroll tax, and withholding required for Consultant andConsultants staff will be the sole responsibility of Consultant. This Agreement is not one ofgeneral agency by Consultant for the Client. Nothing herein contained shall constitute or beconstituted to be or create a partnership, joint venture, agency, employer-employee, or otherrelationship between Consultant and Client.5. Confidentiality. Each party acknowledges that it may receive information relating to the otherpartys research, development, trade secrets, or business affairs (collectively, “ConfidentialInformation”) as a result of the Services to be performed under this Agreement, and agrees touse reasonable efforts to keep all such Confidential Information confidential and not to discloseany such Confidential Information to any third party; provided, that Consultant may, subject toappropriate confidentiality restrictions, disclose Confidential Information to Consultantsassociates and professional advisers, to the extent reasonably necessary to enable Consultant toperform Consultants obligations under this Agreement; and further provided, that either partymay disclose Confidential Information to the extent required by law. Confidential Informationdoes not include (i) information that is, or becomes, public knowledge through no fault of thereceiving party or its employees or agents; (ii) information that becomes available to the receivingparty legitimately and lawfully from a third party not under a confidentiality obligation to the
    • other party; (iii) information that is independently developed by the receiving party withoutaccess to the other partys Confidential Information; or (iv) information that is already in thereceiving partys possession prior to the execution of this Agreement and was not received inanticipation of the execution of this Agreement or the performance of the Services. Theobligations contained in this Section 5 will survive the termination of this Agreement.6. Term and Termination. Consultant shall commence providing the Services on or about_______, 2013. Either party may terminate without cause by giving not less than sixty (60) days’written notice to the other party and this Agreement shall terminate immediately. In addition,either party may terminate for cause as follows: Consultant may terminate by written notice toClient if Consultant fails to pay fees when due and fails to cure such breach within ten (10) daysafter receipt of written notice from Consultant demanding same. Client may terminate by writtennotice to Consultant if Consultant breaches its obligations under this Agreement and fails to curesuch breach within ten (10) days after receipt of written notice from Client specifying the natureof such breach and what Client asserts is required to cure.7. Disputes. The parties have entered into this Agreement in good faith and in the belief that it ismutually advantageous to each respective party. It is with that same spirit of cooperation that theparties pledge to attempt to resolve any dispute amicably without the necessity of litigation.Accordingly, both parties agree, if any dispute arises between them relating to this Agreement,that prior to the commencement of any legal action to interpret or enforce this Agreement, theparties will first enter into non-binding mediation of the dispute in accordance with the mediationrules of the American Arbitration Association, unless litigation could be barred by an applicablestatute of limitations, or in order to request equitable relief.8. LIMITATION OF DAMAGES. IN NO EVENT SHALL EITHER CLIENT ORCONSULTANT BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES,WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT, OR OTHERWISE, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER THEPOSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES HAS BEEN DISCLOSED TO THE OTHER PARTY INADVANCE OR COULD HAVE BEEN REASONABLY FORESEEN BY EITHER PARTY.9. Notices. All notices required or permitted hereunder shall be in writing and shall be served onthe parties at the addresses set forth below. Any such notices shall be either (a) sent by overnightdelivery using a nationally recognized overnight courier, in which case notice shall be deemeddelivered upon receipt or refusal of receipt, or (b) sent by personal delivery, in which case noticeshall be deemed delivered upon receipt. A partys address may be changed by written notice tothe other party; provided, however, that no notice of a change of address shall be effective untilactual receipt of such notice. Notices should be addressed as follows:If to Client: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________If to Consultant: Paris RutherfordConsultant Urban Development, LLC25 Highland Park Village, Suite 100-280Dallas, Texas 75205Telephone: (214) 796-6063Email: paris@catalysturban.com
    • 10. Complete Agreement. This Agreement contains the complete agreement of the parties withrespect to the subject matter hereof and there are no other agreements, representations, orwarranties, written or oral, between the parties with respect to such subject matter.11. Severability. In the event that any provision of this Agreement is held to be illegal, invalid orunenforceable, laws, then (i) such provision will be fully severable and this Agreement will beconstrued and enforced as if such illegal, invalid or unenforceable provision were not a parthereof; (ii) the remaining provisions of this Agreement will remain in full force and will not beaffected by such illegal, invalid or unenforceable provision or by its severance from thisAgreement; and (iii) there will be added automatically as a part of this Agreement a provision assimilar in terms to such illegal, invalid or unenforceable provision as may be possible and still belegal, valid and enforceable.12. Assignment. The Client shall have the right to assign this Agreement, with the written consent ofConsultant, to its successors or assigns, and all covenants and agreements herein shall inure to thebenefit of, and be enforceable by or against, such successors or assigns. The terms "successors"and "assigns" shall include any natural person or any entity that buys all or substantially all of theClients assets or all of its stock or with which the Client merges or consolidates. The rights andduties of, and benefits to, Consultant hereunder are personal to Consultant, and no such right,duty, or benefit may be assigned by Consultant.13. Miscellaneous.A. This Agreement shall be binding upon and inure to the benefit of the parties hereto and theirrespective executors, administrators, personal representatives, heirs, successors, and permittedassigns.B. This Agreement may not be amended or modified in any respect except by a written instrumentsigned by all parties hereto.C. The failure by either party to insist upon or enforce any of its or his rights under this Agreementshall not constitute a waiver thereof by such party or a waiver of any subsequent breach of thesame or a different provision hereof. No waiver of any provision of this Agreement shall beenforceable unless it is in writing and signed by the party against whom or which it is sought tobe enforced. No waiver by any party of any breach or any provision of this Agreement shalloperate or be construed as a waiver of any subsequent breach.D. THIS AGREEMENT AND THE RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF THE PARTIES HERETOSHALL BE CONSTRUED AND ENFORCED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THESTATE OF TEXAS. THIS AGREEMENT IS PERFORMABLE, AND VENUE OF ANYLITIGATION PURSUANT HERETO, SHALL BE IN DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS.E. This Agreement supersedes any and all other agreements, other than the Purchase Agreement andthe agreements contemplated thereby, either oral or written, between the parties hereto withrespect to the subject matter hereof and contains all of the covenants and agreements between theparties with respect thereto.F. The captions and Section headings used herein are for convenience only and are not a part of thisAgreement and shall not be used in construing this Agreement.
    • G. The use of "herein", "hereof", and similar terms shall refer to this Agreement as a whole and notto any specific provision of this Agreement, unless the context clearly requires otherwise.H. This Agreement may be executed in two or more counterparts, each of which shall be deemed anoriginal, and such counterparts together shall constitute one and the same document. If anyaction at law or in equity is necessary to enforce or interpret the terms of this Agreement, theprevailing party shall be entitled to reasonable attorneys’ fees, costs, and necessary disbursementsin addition to any other relief to which it or he may be entitled.I. This Agreement is not intended to give or confer any benefits, rights, privileges, claims, actionsor remedies to any person or entity as a third party beneficiary, decree, or otherwise.IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have executed this Agreement to be effective as of theEffective Date.CLIENT:_____________________________________________________________________CONSULTANT:CATALYST URBAN DEVELOPMENT, LLCa Texas limited liability companyBy:Printed Name: Paris RutherfordTitle: Principal
    • EXHIBIT A: SCOPE OF SERVICESPhase 1: Implementation Action PlanTask 1.1: Investment/Horizontal Land AnalysisConsultant will undertake an analysis of the downtown zone to determine opportunity sites for newdevelopment. Based on Tom Green County Appraisal District data, this will include the analysis ofcurrent assessed values, vacant land, public lands, areas of declining tax base, etc. This analysis will takethe form of GIS mapping to determine specific land/block/parcel groupings showing redevelopmentpromise. These findings will be further refined through our on-site review and determinations.Task 1.2: Market-Based ProgrammingConsultant will prepare an opportunities study that identifies market trends in demographics, demand,land use, capital market preferences, funding sources and uses, and practical implementation concerns.This analysis will generate a specific redevelopment program concept for a range of specific projecttypes. It is assumed that such efforts will be done in coordination with key stakeholders in one publicmeeting.Task 1.3: Policy ContextConsultant will consolidate the recommendations from the Client’s current downtown plan (as part of itscomprehensive plan update), current TIF and other incentive program potential, existing downtownzoning and development restrictions, and other policy goals gleaned from discussion with Client andstakeholders in prior meeting. This context will be compared to the results of Tasks 1.1 and 1.2 to beginto refine down to a specific target project list based on desired land use and location.Task 1.4: Ownership EvaluationConsultant will meet with specific property owners for land/block/parcel groupings identified in theprevious tasks to determine their goals, pricing, etc for use in the project prioritization process below. Itis anticipated these meetings will occur during a one day worksession, in separate individual meetings.Task 1.5: Project and Location PrioritizationConsultant will identify the results of all tasks prepared to date to build a prioritized project list fordiscussion with the Client. Prioritization is often associated with a project’s probability ofimplementation, its ability to generate critical mass, strength of its location, and its ability to entice themarket. Consultant will present its analysis of all identified project sites to the Client. This purpose willbe to prioritize the projects and identify an initial phasing.Task 1.6: Implementation TimetableConsultant will create an implementation timetable to advance the prioritized projects. Timetables willinclude short-term (i.e. 12 months), mid-term (2-4 years) and long-term (5-10 years) efforts.Task 1.7: Project PackagingBased on the results of the refined programming and prioritization, Consultant will assemble supportingmarket data, project programming, physical planning, artist rendering, pricing, financial analysis,identified sources and uses of funds, incentive programs and related public/private partnership structures(if needed), and other information for 3 prioritized projects. This information will be assembled in projectpackages for use in marketing discussion in phase two upon Client approval to do so.
    • Task 1.8: Identify Potential Project Investors and DevelopersConsultant will identify potential investment and developer prospects. In addition, and depending on theprojects identified, Consultant and its affiliates, and/or NE Development and Construction and itsaffiliates will analyze these projects as a potential vertical developer/investor itself; but this process doesnot guarantee these parties will commit to executing such a development agreement.Task 1.9: Client ApprovalConsultant will present the full results of all phase one tasks to the Client for review and final approval toadvance to phase two.Phase 2: Horizontal Development PositioningConsultant will not proceed into this phase without prior approval from Client at the completion of Phase1 work tasks.Task 2.1: Developer/Investor DiscussionsOnce the results of the phase one tasks are approved by the Client, Consultant will reach out to thedeveloper/investor prospects identified in phase one to attempt to secure their interest. This process willalso determine the Consultant team member’s desire to move forward as vertical developers.Task 2.2: Horizontal Funding StrategyDepending on the requirements of the prioritized projects, Consultant will help identify and positionavailable special finance tools to gain property control and fund horizontal improvements as appropriate.Task 2.3: ZoningConsistent with prioritized projects, Consultant will work with the Client and property owners in acoordinated effort to seek necessary zoning for these projects.Task 2.4: Property AssemblyShould the Client be required to acquire certain properties or facilitate acquisition by third-parties,Consultant will coordinate this process.Task 2.5: Market OutreachBased on the Client’s approval gained in Phase 1 and the completion of the work items listed above,Consultant will coordinate the market roll-out for these projects.Task 2.6: Marketing TeamTo facilitate this outreach, Consultant will coordinate and help the Client select a brokerage firm that willto prepare marketing and public relations strategy for these projects. It is anticipated this team wouldinclude both national/regional and local entities (JLL, CBRE, Grubb & Ellis, Dierchske & Dierschke,Scott Allison Realtors, etc).Phase 3: Vertical Development PositioningOnce the Implementation Action Plan is approved by the Client and the work associated with Phase 2 iscompleted or well underway, the Consultant team will undertake the following work efforts for specificprojects that a third-party developer or the Consultant team desires to vertically execute. Should our teambecome the developer/investor, the Client may utilize a non-interested party to undertake some of thework defined below.• Financial Analysis -- Consultant will prepare a refined financial analysis based on furtherdeveloper input for Client’s more detailed understanding. This analysis will be performed withemphasis on any economic gap requiring a public/private partnership.
    • • Public/Private Partnership -- As third party developers/investors become interested, and if such(initial) focus projects require public/private partnerships to properly implement, Consultant willwork with the Client attorney in its drafting of public/private partnership agreements.• Pricing of Public Improvements -- Consultant would work with civil engineer and landscapearchitects on the conceptual design of necessary public improvements associated with each focusproject that has gained market interest (if such improvements are the responsibility of the Clientin the public/private partnership proposed), and would work with site contractors to obtain relatedpricing to help define or verify the pricing proposed by each third-party developer/investor.• Bond Strategy -- Should the sale of bonds be necessary to implement the identified projects,Consultant will assist the Client in its definition of the improvements/projects associated withsuch a sale. Consultant will work with the Client’s attorney and bond sales agent in its formalprocessing of such efforts.• Development Agreements -- If identified third-party developer/investor is interested in movingforward, Consultant will assist the Client in its negotiation/finalization of related developmentagreements. Consultant will work with the Client’s attorney in all related drafting of suchagreements.Phase 4: Construction Management / Project OversightOnce vertical development project(s) are approved by the Client, Consultant will undertake actions aimedat helping guide the implementation of horizontal improvements (public improvements, masterinfrastructure, etc) necessary to the vertical development(s) as defined by the Public Private Partnership.This will include such efforts as the following:• Master Infrastructure Design -- Consultant would facilitate the engagement of civil engineers andlandscape architects necessary to design and engineer construction drawings for the necessarymaster infrastructural improvements (public and/or private) associated with specific advancingdevelopments.• Refined Pricing Analysis – Based on this design process, Consultant would refine the preliminarypricing of such improvements (as performed in Phase 1), based on detailed constructiondrawings.• Bidding and Contract Negotiation – Consultant would coordinate the bidding of the masterhorizontal improvements and assist the Client in its evaluation, selection, and contract negotiationof a contractor to complete the public improvements.• Public Approvals and Permitting – Consultant would coordinate the public approvals andpermitting of the public improvements.• Utility Provider Negotiation and Contracts – Consultant would coordinate and negotiate utilityprovider improvements and agreements.• Construction Management – Consultant would assist the Client in the oversight of theconstruction contract with the general contractor for the master infrastructure, reporting suchprogress to the Client as it progresses.
    • EXHIBIT B: PAYMENT TERMSA. Fees for Services. All Services provided under the attached Consulting Agreement will be billedunder the following terms. No work beyond Phase One will be executed without prior writtenauthorization by Client. All compensation as described by phase below is exclusive to the phase andconsidered separate from other phase compensation.i. Phase One – Consultant proposes to complete this work for a lump sum amountof $68,000, excluding reimbursable expenses. We estimate there may be anadditional $12,000 to $22,000 for outside groups as approved by the Client toinclude attorneys, civil engineers, etc. Whether these are necessary will bedetermined in the initial tasks.ii. Phase Two -- Upon approval by the Client, Consultant will progress into thesecond phase. To complete these tasks, Consultant would receive $10,000 permonth until project-related development agreement(s) are executed. It isanticipated that this will occur with a 6 month time period. If the Client choosesto acquire property, Consultant would be entitled a fee of 3% the gross purchaseprice as Client’s consultant.iii. Phase Three -- Should Consultant become a developer/investor, fees for PhaseThree efforts would be part of a negotiated public/private partnership ordevelopment agreement. If Consultant engages on Client’s behalf with a third-party developer/investor to further induce implementation through the tasksidentified in phase three, Consultant would provide a fee proposal for such workat the time such work and developer/investor is further defined.iv. Phase Four Fee -- Should Consultant become a developer/investor, fees forPhase Four efforts would be part of a negotiated public/private partnership ordevelopment agreement. If Consultant engages on Client’s behalf with a third-party developer/investor, or simply on the Client’s behalf for a non-project-related public improvement, Consultant would be entitled to a fee of 1.5% thetotal value of improvements for the work outlined in Task 4 for which Consultantwould provide oversight. This amount would be part of the overall improvementbudget and would be paid in equal monthly installments during the life of theconstruction period for said improvements.v. Other On-Going Tasks -- While the work described in this letter shouldconstitute the primary work effort necessary to gain the market awarenessnecessary to urge implementation, there may be other tasks that arise out of thisprocess that are not included here. Compensation for such tasks will be analyzedon a case-by-case basis for the Client’s approval.B. Reimbursable Expenses and Third Party Fees.i. Consultant’s Reimbursable Expenses: Consultant’s reimbursable expenses willbe billed on a monthly basis as incurred and will be supported by copies ofappropriate receipts and sub-consultant invoices. Reimbursable expenses shallinclude, without limitation: all reasonable travel costs and per diem expenses,reproduction and printing costs, delivery fees, presentation materials, if
    • applicable, professional services or sales taxes, if applicable; mileage at thecurrent IRS prevailing rate; and other miscellaneous out-of-pocket expensesdirectly related to the project.ii. Third Party Fees: Client shall be solely responsible for any an all third partyconsultant fees which shall include, without limitation: architectural fees,engineering fees, economic/demographic consultants, attorneys’ fees and allother third party consultants necessary for the implementation of the Servicesprovided hereunder by Consultant. Client shall be responsible for contractingwith any third party consultants and shall pay said third parties directly.C. Fees for Additional Services. Additional Services will be charged and billed as agreed inwriting by the parties before commencement of the Additional Services.D. Invoices. Client shall invoice Consultant on a monthly basis and Client shall pay Consultantwithin 30 days of receipt of Client’s invoice. All invoices will be considered past due after 30 days. Pastdue invoices shall accrue interest at the rate of 1 ½% per month until paid in full.
    • EXHIBIT “B”SCOPE OF SERVICESPhase 1: Implementation Action PlanTask 1.1: Investment/Horizontal Land AnalysisProvider will undertake an analysis of the downtown zone to determine opportunity sites for newdevelopment. Based on Tom Green County Appraisal District data, this will include the analysis ofcurrent assessed values, vacant land, public lands, areas of declining tax base, etc. This analysis willtake the form of GIS mapping to determine specific land/block/parcel groupings showingredevelopment promise. These findings will be further refined through our on-site review anddeterminations.Task 1.2: Market-Based ProgrammingProvider will prepare an opportunities study that identifies market trends in demographics, demand,land use, capital market preferences, funding sources and uses, and practical implementationconcerns. This analysis will generate a specific redevelopment program concept for a range ofspecific project types. It is assumed that such efforts will be done in coordination with keystakeholders in one public meeting.Task 1.3: Policy ContextProvider will consolidate the recommendations from the City’s current downtown plan (as part ofits comprehensive plan update), current TIF and other incentive program potential, existingdowntown zoning and development restrictions, and other policy goals gleaned from discussionwith City and stakeholders in prior meeting. This context will be compared to the results of Tasks1.1 and 1.2 to begin to refine down to a specific target project list based on desired land use andlocation.Task 1.4: Ownership EvaluationProvider will meet with specific property owners for land/block/parcel groupings identified in theprevious tasks to determine their goals, pricing, etc for use in the project prioritization processbelow. It is anticipated these meetings will occur during a one day worksession, in separateindividual meetings.Task 1.5: Project and Location PrioritizationProvider will identify the results of all tasks prepared to date to build a prioritized project list fordiscussion with the City. Prioritization is often associated with a project’s probability ofimplementation, its ability to generate critical mass, strength of its location, and its ability to enticethe market. Provider will present its analysis of all identified project sites to the City. This purposewill be to prioritize the projects and identify an initial phasing.Task 1.6: Implementation TimetableProvider will create an implementation timetable to advance the prioritized projects. Timetables willinclude short-term (i.e. 12 months), mid-term (2-4 years) and long-term (5-10 years) efforts.Task 1.7: Project Packaging
    • Based on the results of the refined programming and prioritization, Provider will assemblesupporting market data, project programming, physical planning, artist rendering, pricing, financialanalysis, identified sources and uses of funds, incentive programs and related public/privatepartnership structures (if needed), and other information for 3 prioritized projects. This informationwill be assembled in project packages for use in marketing discussion in phase two upon Cityapproval to do so.Task 1.8: Identify Potential Project Investors and DevelopersProvider will identify potential investment and developer prospects. In addition, and depending onthe projects identified, Provider and its affiliates, and/or NE Development and Construction and itsaffiliates will analyze these projects as a potential vertical developer/investor itself; but this processdoes not guarantee these parties will commit to executing such a development agreement.Task 1.9: City ApprovalProvider will present the full results of all phase one tasks to the City for review and final approvalto advance to phase two.Phase 2: Horizontal Development PositioningProvider will not proceed into this phase without prior written approval from City at the completionof Phase 1 work tasks.Task 2.1: Developer/Investor DiscussionsOnce the results of the phase one tasks are approved by the City, Provider will reach out to thedeveloper/investor prospects identified in phase one to attempt to secure their interest. Thisprocess will also determine the Provider team member’s desire to move forward as verticaldevelopers.Task 2.2: Horizontal Funding StrategyDepending on the requirements of the prioritized projects, Provider will help identify and positionavailable special finance tools to gain property control and fund horizontal improvements asappropriate.Task 2.3: ZoningConsistent with prioritized projects, Provider will work with the City and property owners in acoordinated effort to seek necessary zoning for these projects.Task 2.4: Property AssemblyShould the City be required to acquire certain properties or facilitate acquisition by third-parties,Provider will coordinate this process.Task 2.5: Market OutreachBased on the City’s approval gained in Phase 1 and the completion of the work items listed above,Provider will coordinate the market roll-out for these projects.Task 2.6: Marketing TeamTo facilitate this outreach, Provider will coordinate and help the City select a brokerage firm that willto prepare marketing and public relations strategy for these projects. It is anticipated this team
    • would include both national/regional and local entities (JLL, CBRE, Grubb & Ellis, Dierchske &Dierschke, Scott Allison Realtors, etc).Phase 3: Vertical Development PositioningOnce the Implementation Action Plan is approved by the City and the work associated with Phase 2is completed or well underway, the Provider team will undertake the following work efforts forspecific projects that a third-party developer or the Provider team desires to vertically execute.Should Provider become the developer/investor, the City may utilize a non-interested party toundertake some of the work defined below.• Financial Analysis -- Provider will prepare a refined financial analysis based on furtherdeveloper input for City’s more detailed understanding. This analysis will be performed withemphasis on any economic gap requiring a public/private partnership.• Public/Private Partnership -- As third party developers/investors become interested, and ifsuch (initial) focus projects require public/private partnerships to properly implement,Provider will work with the City attorney in its drafting of public/private partnershipagreements.• Pricing of Public Improvements -- Provider would work with civil engineer and landscapearchitects on the conceptual design of necessary public improvements associated with eachfocus project that has gained market interest (if such improvements are the responsibility ofthe City in the public/private partnership proposed), and would work with site contractorsto obtain related pricing to help define or verify the pricing proposed by each third-partydeveloper/investor.• Bond Strategy -- Should the sale of bonds be necessary to implement the identified projects,Provider will assist the City in its definition of the improvements/projects associated withsuch a sale. Provider will work with the City’s attorney and bond sales agent in its formalprocessing of such efforts.• Development Agreements -- If identified third-party developer/investor is interested inmoving forward, Provider will assist the City in its negotiation/finalization of relateddevelopment agreements. Provider will work with the City’s attorney in all related draftingof such agreements.Phase 4: Construction Management / Project OversightOnce vertical development project(s) are approved by the City, Provider will undertake actionsaimed at helping guide the implementation of horizontal improvements (public improvements,master infrastructure, etc) necessary to the vertical development(s) as defined by the Public PrivatePartnership. This will include such efforts as the following:• Master Infrastructure Design -- Provider would facilitate the engagement of civil engineersand landscape architects necessary to design and engineer construction drawings for thenecessary master infrastructural improvements (public and/or private) associated withspecific advancing developments.
    • • Refined Pricing Analysis – Based on this design process, Provider would refine thepreliminary pricing of such improvements (as performed in Phase 1), based on detailedconstruction drawings.• Bidding and Contract Negotiation – Provider would coordinate the bidding of the masterhorizontal improvements and assist the City in its evaluation, selection, and contractnegotiation of a contractor to complete the public improvements.• Public Approvals and Permitting – Provider would coordinate the public approvals andpermitting of the public improvements.• Utility Provider Negotiation and Contracts – Provider would coordinate and negotiate utilityprovider improvements and agreements.• Construction Management – Provider would assist the City in the oversight of theconstruction contract with the general contractor for the master infrastructure, reportingsuch progress to the City as it progresses.[End of Exhibit “B”]
    • EXHIBIT “C”COMPENSATIONProvider proposes to execute the work outlined through the specific compensation format asoutlined below. This compensation is exclusive to Provider; fees for outside groups and services(additional planners, attorneys, designers, reproduction houses, travel, etc) would be reimbursableexpenses as approved separately by the City if deemed necessary.• Phase One – Provider proposes to complete this work for a lump sum amount of SixtyEight Thousand Dollars ($68,000), excluding reimbursable expenses. Reimbursableexpenses are estimated to be an additional Twelve Thousand Dollars to Twenty TwoThousand Dollars ($12,000 to $22,000) for outside groups as approved by the City toinclude attorneys, civil engineers, etc. Whether these are necessary will be determined in theinitial tasks.• Phase Two - Upon written authorization by the City, Provider will progress into the second phase.To complete these tasks, Provider shall receive Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000) per month untilproject-related development agreement(s) are executed; total amount of compensation payable byCity to Provider for Phase Two shall not exceed Sixty Thousand Dollars ($60,000), excludingapproved reimbursable expenses. It is anticipated that this will occur with a 6 month time period. Ifthe City chooses to acquire property, Provider would be entitled a fee of 3% the gross purchase priceas City’s Provider.• Phase Three - Upon written authorization by the City, Provider will progress into the third phase.Should Provider desire to become a developer/investor, fees for Phase Three efforts would be partof a negotiated public/private partnership or development agreement. If Provider engages on City’sbehalf with a third-party developer/investor to further induce implementation through the tasksidentified in phase three, Provider would provide a fee proposal for such work at the time such workand developer/investor is further defined.• Phase Four - Upon written authorization by the City, Provider will progress into the fourth phase.Should Provider become a developer/investor, fees for Phase Four efforts would be part of anegotiated public/private partnership or development agreement. If Provider engages on City’sbehalf with a third-party developer/investor, or simply on the City’s behalf for a non-project-relatedpublic improvement, Provider would be entitled to a fee of 1.5% the total value of improvements forthe work outlined in Task 4 for which Provider would provide oversight. This amount would be partof the overall improvement budget and would be paid in equal monthly installments during the lifeof the construction period for said improvements.• Other On-Going Tasks - While the work described herein should constitute the primary work effortnecessary to gain the market awareness necessary to urge implementation, there may be other tasksthat arise out of this process that are not included here. Compensation for such tasks will beanalyzed on a case-by-case basis and Provider shall not commence such tasks without prior writtenauthorization by City.[End of Exhibit “C”]
    • City of San AngeloMemoDate: May 17, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: John Seaton, Risk ManagerSubject: Agenda Item for 3/21/13 Council MeetingContact: John Seaton, Risk Management 657-4359Caption: Regular ItemAcceptance of the FY 2012 Actuarial Report submitted by Jason Martin of TowersWatson: on 3/5/13 and approval of their recommendation and authorizing funding forthe self-insurance fund consisting of the Workers’ Compensation Fund in the amountof $2,675,000 and the Property Casualty Fund in the amount of $1,973,000.Summary: John Seaton, Risk Manager will update Council on the City’s self-insurance fundactivity for 2012, and recommend funding approval for 2013.History: Annual report to Council.Financial Impact: The amounts approved for the Property/Casualty and Workers’ Compensationfunds will determine the availability of funds for claims handling for the period10/1/12-9/30/13.Related Vision Item Not applicableRecommendation: Staff recommends Council approval of the Actuary’s recommended $2,675,000 infunding for the Workers’ Compensation fund and $1,973,000 in funding for theProperty Casualty fund.Attachments:Presentation: Power Point presentationPublication: noneReviewed byDirector:Lisa Marley, HR/Risk Director
    • City of San AngeloParks & RecreationMemoDate: May 17, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Carl White, Parks & Recreation DirectorSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013, Council MeetingContact: Carl White, Parks & Recreation Director, 234-1724Caption: Regular Agenda ItemConsideration of adopting the 2013 Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Use Planand any action related thereto.Summary: Staff recommends adoption of the 2013 Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Use Plan.See attached Executive Summary for additional background information.Although the City has managed the Bureau of Reclamation’s Twin Buttes Reservoirproperty for decades, a Recreation Use Plan had yet to be developed. This planspeaks to all of the major land use issues and provides solutions and guidance foraddressing them. Follow up action with the Bureau, City Staff and City Council will beneeded.History: On July 19, 2011, the Council authorized staff to negotiate an agreement betweenthe City and Texas Outdoors Consulting for the development of a Twin ButtesReservoir Recreation Use Plan and authorized the Mayor and/or the CityManager to execute said agreement.Financial Impact: The City incurs no expense with adopting the plan. The cost of this plan was $18,000,shared 50% with the Bureau of Reclamation, therefore the cost to the City was $9,000.Related Vision Item: N/AOther Information/Recommendation:The Bureau of Reclamation has reviewed the plan and provided edits which wehave incorporated. Staff recommends approval.Attachments: Proposed Plan for Adoption and Executive Summary.Presentation: PowerPointPublication: N/AReviewed byDirector:Rick Weise, Assistant City ManagerApproved by Legal: N/A
    • aTwin Buttes ReservoirRecreation Use Plan2012
    • 1CONTENTSIntroduction...................................................................................................................................................................2Assessment of Natural and Cultural Resources.............................................................................................................3Assessment of Current Recreation Use .......................................................................................................................11Challenges....................................................................................................................................................................18Successful Park Models ...............................................................................................................................................23Texas State Park Model ...........................................................................................................................................23Off-Road Vehicles (ORV) Best Management Practices ............................................................................................28Hunting Best Management Practices ......................................................................................................................31Innovative Partnerships...........................................................................................................................................35Public Participation......................................................................................................................................................37General Public Meeting ...........................................................................................................................................37Stakeholder Visioning Workshop.............................................................................................................................39Public Survey............................................................................................................................................................44Planning Guidelines .....................................................................................................................................................49Recreation Use Zones ..............................................................................................................................................49Management Recommendations ............................................................................................................................52Capital Improvements .............................................................................................................................................58Special Events ..........................................................................................................................................................59Funding Opportunities.................................................................................................................................................60Conceptual Maps.........................................................................................................................................................63Appendix......................................................................................................................................................................74
    • 2INTRODUCTIONTwin Buttes Dam and Reservoir consist of approximately 12,858 acres of land, of which 9,800 acres are included inthe conservation pool. The reservoir and surrounding land is part of the San Angelo Project administered by theU.S. Department of Interior; Bureau of Reclamation. Thereservoir was created by the construction of Twin ButtesDam in 1963 in Tom Green County, Texas. The MiddleConcho River and Spring Creek form the North Pool, whilethe South Concho River forms the South Pool, and the twopools of the lake are connected via an equalization channel.The recreation area is managed by the City of San Angelo viaa contract with the Bureau of Reclamation. The reservoirprovides flood control, irrigation, and municipal drinkingwater, while the surrounding land and shoreline allows formany recreational opportunities such as fishing, hunting, andcamping.Challenges the area faces are fluctuating water levels due todrought conditions, management of mesquite, salt cedar,and willow baccharis, road maintenance and vehicularmanagement, managing litter and illegal dumping, and maintaining public safety of multiple user groups. On thepositive side, the open space that Twin Buttes affords is a tremendous natural resource, essentially in the City ofSan Angelo’s backyard, that could be a fantastic public recreation area given some improvements andmanagement actions. This plan aims to explore the different options available for the future of Twin ButtesReservoir Recreation Area through review of case studies of successful park models, public input, and bestpractices in natural resource management.
    • 3ASSESSMENT OF NATURAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCESWater BodiesTwin Buttes Reservoir is the centerpiece of the Recreation Area, designed and constructed for 640,568 acre feet oftotal storage capacity (including flood control) inundating 23,508 acres of land. The San Angelo Project wouldconsist of approximately 9,800 water surface acres, 3,060 land acres, and 55 miles of shoreline if the lake was filledto conservation pool level of 1,940 ft. At the time of this publication, current pool elevation was 1,890.12 ft. withthe reservoir being 4.1% full at 7,705.27 acre-feet of water.The reservoir has only been above elevation 1,930 ft. twice since 1980, and approximately 5,900 surface acres areinundated at this elevation, potentially opening up additional lands for interruptible uses.Spring Creek and the Middle Concho River flow into the North Pool of the reservoir, which is the largest, main poolof the reservoir complex. The South Concho River flows into the South Pool of the reservoir, which is the smallerand shallower pool and is most affected by evaporation. This evaporation loss has contributed to a decision (at thetime of this publication) to pump the remaining water out of the South Pool into the North Pool to salvage theremaining water from evaporation. Given the reservoir’s main function of providing drinking water – theconservation of water is a priority – and this presents challenges to recreational use which will be explored furtherin this plan.VegetationThe Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area is located in Tom Green County which lies at the crossroads of theEdwards Plateau and the Rolling Plains eco-regions in Texas shown in the Gould Ecoregions of Texas map below.The Recreation Area falls within the Plains eco-region and has plants such as buffalo, grama, wheat, and Indiangrasses, as well as mesquites, salt cedars, willow baccharis, ashe juniper, cat’s claw acacia, prickly pear, cacti, andyucca. The river and creek bottom areas house pecan trees, and some oak trees.
    • 4The primary vegetation in the Recreation Area isby far mesquite, which poses problems whenunchecked. Mesquite trees are very hardy,drought tolerant plants that can draw water upfrom the water table using their very long taproots. The overgrowth of mesquites obviouslyposes a problem in an arid area with a reservoirdesigned to hold water.Additionally, salt cedar is prominent in the TwinButtes Reservoir Recreation Area, and is aninvasive species with a similar long tap root thatdraws water from the water table. Willowbaccharis is another aggressive invader speciesfound in the Twin Buttes area that has little valuefor wildlife or livestock and competes with othermore desirable vegetation. Mesquite, salt cedar,and willow baccharis continue to invade newareas of the Recreation Area as the reservoirlevels drop due to drought conditions.The Upper Colorado River Authority, in coordination with the Bureau of Reclamation, has engaged in herbicidespraying of these brush species to maintain the water storage capacity of the reservoir and water flow oftributaries. The following maps show areas surrounding Twin Buttes Reservoir that have been sprayed withherbicide to control this vegetation.
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    • 9WildlifeCommon wildlife of the Rolling Plains eco-region and Twin Buttes ReservoirRecreation Area include key hunting species such as whitetail deer, RioGrande turkey, mourning dove, quail, and feral hogs. Small mammals suchas foxes, bobcats, rabbits, skunks, and squirrels also call the area home.Reptile species that inhabit the Twin Buttes area include the Texas hornedlizard and the western diamondback rattlesnake.The reservoir provides habitat for several species of fish that have beenstocked over the years - Largemouth bass, White bass, White crappie,Sunfish, Channel, Flathead & Blue catfish. The reservoir also providescritical stop-over habitat for migrating bird species such as ducks, pelicans,grebes, wrens, herons, and hawks.All of the wildlife present affords great viewing opportunities for naturelovers and photographers, as well as great public hunting opportunities forSan Angeloans and visitors to enjoy.Cultural ResourcesThere are approximately 200 archeological sites recorded within the boundaries of the Twin Buttes Project. Acomplete archeological study was done in 2001 (Twin Buttes Archaeological Report, David L. Nickels and RaymondP. Mauldin,) which provides a unique picture and history of the lives of earlier inhabitants from both theprehistoric and historic periods. The remains of early historic structures and farmsteads are found all around thereservoir. Historic Indian Tribes such as Comanche, Apache, and Kiowa frequented the area. Prehistoric Indiansites representing over 10,000 years of occupation are common, and unique paleontological sites show evidenceof life from before the first humans arrived. These sites are all extremely important, and protecting them is notonly very beneficial to the community, but is also required under several Federal and State laws.One of the more easily-identifiable sites is in an areathat is frequented by recreationists on a rock cliffoverlooking the Middle Concho River. The site is hometo bedrock mortar holes that were used by earlyinhabitants to grind things like seeds, mesquite beans,corn and nuts. Currently this site is not protected fromvehicular traffic and is not interpreted to the public viasignage or other form of map or brochure material.The best way to protect and preserve these valuablesites is to educate the public on their importance.Wherever possible, cultural and historical resourcesshould be incorporated into future projects. Wellresearched interpretive signs and brochures would notonly engage the public in protecting these valuable sites, but could also significantly enhance the recreationalexperience of those using the park. These interpretive efforts would not only educate on the historical importanceof the sites, but would also provide information about the penalties for damaging these resources. For example,metal detector use is not allowed on federal property except in limited situations where a permit is issued and the
    • 10impacts to the area have been previously evaluatedunder guidelines of the National Environmental PolicyAct. Additionally, off road vehicles can cause extremedamage to archeological sites. There is also the veryreal prospect that human remains associated withthese sites may be exposed by erosion andrecreational activities. The Native American GravesProtection and Repatriation Act established veryspecific requirements for protection and repatriationof Native American human remains that might beencountered, and this information should beconveyed to the public.
    • 11ASSESSMENT OF CURRENT RECREATION USECurrently there are many different types of recreational activities that are popular at Twin Buttes ReservoirRecreation Area. This section highlights the various activities and identifies any organized groups associated withthe activity currently - whether a legal or illegal use as defined by the Bureau of Reclamation.All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Trail RidingThere is an organized group of motorized trail riders known as the San Angelo Dirt Riders, who are very invested inthe future of the Twin Buttes Recreation Area. The group has built a network of single-track motorized trails forall-terrain vehicles (ATVs) or motorcycle “dirt bikes” and works to maintain them and self-police them. The grouphas also built trail signage and installed them on the trails to direct visitors, as well as collected GPS coordinates tocreate a trail map available on the group’s website. The trail map has also been provided to city officials foremergency management and to address any 911 calls that may come from the parks’ trails.The San Angelo Dirt Riders group has initiated clean-up events on their own, to address the litter and dumpingproblem in areas of the trail network, but many members are frustrated by the lack of area management and thecontinued occurrence of more dumping after they have just cleaned up an area. The Dirt Riders support safe andregulated trail riding, and are in favor of instituting common sense rules such as riding with helmets and nodrinking and driving.There are visitors who ride ATVs or dirt bikes in other areas of the park, and not on the designated trails, and thiscould pose a problem for public safety. For instance, an ATV rider could collide with a trail runner, or the fewvisitors that have been witnessed racing around the parking lot could collide with a vehicle or other visitors in theparking lot.Legally, Reclamation lands are closed to all off road vehicle (ORV) use unless an area is specifically designated as anORV area. If the City of San Angelo wishes to develop a designated ORV use area at this location, coordinationwith Reclamation should begin. The following map shows the current trail system developed by the San AngeloDirt Riders group.
    • 12Trail Running & Mountain BikingTrail running and mountain biking are two other popular activities that occur mainly in a specific area of the TwinButtes Recreation Area known as “Spillway Hill” near the reservoir’s spillway and the boundary with MiddleConcho Park. The trail running and mountain biking community has built the trail network in this area and hascollected GPS coordinates and created a trail map to share with the running and biking community.The Spillway Hill trails are not signed on the ground, but are marked on the following map and add up to a 5.5 mileloop. The problem with Spillway Hill is that motorized traffic is not restricted and the area currently sees a lot offull-size vehicle “rock-crawling” or off-road driving. It is evident on the map that there are other trails or roads thatcross the running and biking trails, posing a problem for public safety.There are organized groups in the trail running and mountain biking community and they are the San Angelo RoadLizards Running Club (www.roadlizards.org) and the San Angelo Bicycling Association(www.sanangelobicycleassociation.com.) The Road Lizards Running Club hosts races within Twin ButtesRecreation Area at various times of the year in the Spillway Hill trail area and both groups have hosted clean-ups ofthe trails they use.The San Angelo Bicycling Association has developed a map of their mountain biking trail course that is includedbelow. Most of the mountain biking trails are the same trails that the running club uses and since these two usesare compatible uses, there are little problems. However, some of the mountain biking course travels along other
    • 13dirt roads and trails where vehicle access is not restricted, thus causing a potential problem. The group’s mapdenotes one portion of the trail on the west side as a single-track trail (meaning narrow and one-directional), yetthis trail is not signed on the ground, thus a new visitor would not be aware of the direction they are supposed totravel unless they had prior access to the group’s map.HuntingHunting is allowed at Twin Buttes Recreation Area but is restricted to only bow hunting and hunting with a shotgun(no slugs). No other sorts of firearms may be fired at Twin Buttes and no firearms may be discharged outside ofdesignated hunting seasons. Currently, no permit structure is in place which means hunters do not have toregister with the city and do not have to pay any fees to hunt. Hunters are required to follow all state regulationswhich are in the Parks & Wildlife Code and all federal regulations specific to Bureau of Reclamation land which are43 CFR Part 423 and Part 429.Most hunters are likely law-abiding recreationists, and the many who turned out for public meetings expressedtheir disdain for those few hunters who are not following the rules. After spending a few minutes browsing theposts on the local bow hunting thread, www.texasbowhunter.com, it is evident that there is much confusion as towhat the hunting regulations actually are at Twin Buttes Recreation Area. Since it isn’t managed by a traditional
    • 14agency such as the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, or managed in a traditional way with a permitting system,there is a sense of “anything goes” prevalent throughout the comments listed on the website thread.The city has established designated hunting areas within the park, which is essentially the entire park, except forthe main entrance area off of Twin Buttes Marina Road. The designations merely delineate the areas for referencepurposes, and the regulations don’t differ between the areas. There are also no markings or signage on theground to delineate where one area ends and another area starts unless there is a geographical boundary such asSpring Creek. This could pose a potential problem if a hunter was near the boundary of a hunting area and thepublic area near the boat ramps and fired in the direction of the boat ramps.Waterfowl hunting is also a popular activity at TwinButtes Reservoir; however as water levels shrink, theopportunities are diminished. There are two localorganized Ducks Unlimited chapters in San Angelo – theSan Angelo chapter (www.facebook.com/pages/San-Angelo-Ducks-Unlimited-Chapter), and the Angelo StateUniversity chapter(www.facebook.com/angelostateducksunlimited.) TheSan Angelo chapter has already offered their assistancefor future volunteer labor projects such as installingfloating docks at the South Pool for ease of launchingsmall boats and kayaks.
    • 15
    • 16FishingFishing is a popular activity at Twin Buttes Reservoir, but as water levels shrink the opportunity to launch boats islimited. Currently, all boat ramps are dry so only small craft such as flat-bottom boats or canoes or kayaks can belaunched into the water to fish deeper areas of the reservoir. Shoreline fishing is still available on both the NorthPool and the South Pool of the reservoir, however as the water recedes, the visitor has to drive farther and fartherin the dry lake bed to reach the shore.Fishermen must follow all state fish and game regulations. There is an organized group of fishermen in the SanAngelo area, the Concho Bass Club, which utilizes Twin Buttes Reservoir for some of its fishing tournaments. Thisgroup has many members who are concerned and invested about the future of Twin Buttes Recreation Area.WindsurfingUnbeknownst to many area residents, there is a small,dedicated group of windsurfers who utilize Twin ButtesReservoir for this recreational activity. Windsurfersparticularly enjoy the South Pool of Twin Buttes Reservoirfor its gradually sloping shorelines (for ease of launching)and for the favorable winds that are present there. Lowwater levels are also a challenge for the windsurfingcommunity, because as water levels drop, access tolaunching spots becomes more of a challenge to get to.The following map shows the desirable launching spotsfor windsurfing enthusiasts at the North Pool at the endof Twin Buttes Marina Road.An additional issue for the windsurfers is the fact that the waters of the South Pool have been pumped to theNorth Pool during the summer months of the current drought situation. This was conducted to decreaseevaporation losses and utilize the remaining water in the South Pool. The San Angelo Project’s authorizinglegislation lists recreation and wildlife benefits after irrigation, municipal, domestic and industrial use, andtherefore recreation activities are subject to a lower priority and would be impacted by available water supplydemands of the project.KayakingKayaking the reservoir is a popular activity and is often enjoyed intandem with other recreational activities such as fishing orwaterfowl hunting. Currently, there are no specific facilities forlaunching a kayak, a visitor can drive down to the shoreline andput in virtually anywhere they see fit.GeocachingGeocaching is a unique recreational activity where a person uses a GPS unit and coordinates found online toparticipate in a “treasure hunt” of sorts to find “caches” placed by others, often in park areas. Once the cache hasbeen found, the participant often signs their name in a logbook in the cache box and/or takes out or places small
    • 17trinkets in the box for others to find. Geocaching enthusiasts are often also advocates for parks (like otherrecreationists) and often pick up trash along their adventures.The activity has become very popular in recent years and the Twin Buttes Recreation Area has no shortage ofcaches. According to several area geocaching websites, there are anywhere from 40-60 caches located in the TwinButtes Recreation Area.CampingPrimitive camping is another recreational activity that is fairly popular at Twin Buttes Recreation Area, howeverwith limited management there have been some challenges. There currently are no designated campsites, nor arethere any facilities such as hook-ups or restrooms. There are a few scattered picnic tables available off the mainTwin Buttes Marina Road that could be used as a “campsite” but most are in poor condition.Many visitors enjoy the primitive nature of the camping experience at Twin Buttes, however with littlemanagement or directional signage campers can set up camp virtually anywhere – within hunting areas, right onthe water’s edge in prime windsurfing launch spots or fishing spots, or too close to motorized ATV trails.Horseback RidingThe popularity of the Twin Buttes Recreation Area forhorseback riding is unknown, though it can be surmiseddue to the property’s large size, that some equestrianowners do use the area for horseback riding. There wasone equestrian owner who participated in a publicmeeting who expressed the idea that equestrian trails atTwin Buttes would be beneficial for the equestriancommunity. The nearby San Angelo State Park is verypopular for horseback riding and the terrain of the twoproperties are similar, thus horseback riding could bepopular at Twin Buttes, however the current use of theproperty for this activity is undetermined at this time.
    • 18CHALLENGESThere are several challenges that the City of San Angelo faces in regards to management of the Twin ButtesRecreation Area. There have been periods of time where the area was more controlled, with a manned entrancestation, restroom facilities, and camping areas. But in the most recent two decades facing budget cuts and limitedpolitical will, the area has been largely “left alone” with little oversight and little maintenance. Restroom facilitieswere removed and all that remains currently are a few covered picnic tables in poor condition.Litter and Illegal DumpingBecause of little oversight and no controlled access, litter andillegal dumping has become a big problem at Twin ButtesRecreation Area. There are many areas where people havedriven into the area and dumped a truck load of contents ontothe ground or down into ravines and creek beds. Items such ascouches, mattresses, televisions, plastic swimming pools,sheetrock, carpet, and general trash have all been spotted invarious areas of the recreation area.Local stakeholder groups such as the San Angelo Dirt Ridershave maintained trails for OHV riding in the north section of therecreation area, and have held volunteer clean-ups of the area, only to see more dumping occur a few weeks later.The group is frustrated because with unlimited use of vehicles in the area and uncontrolled access, the dumpingproblem will continue to the detriment of their hard work and stewardship.Additionally, some hunters have been bringing in material such as wooden pallets and brush from their home, tobuild permanent hunting blinds. Permanent blinds are not allowed on public hunting lands, and any materialbrought in from outside constitutes illegal dumping and/or abandonment of property. The only blinds that areallowed per federal regulations are temporary blinds that are carried in and out each day.Trash from some general visitors, some fisherman, and fireworks use, is also a problem in the recreation area.While there are some trash cans still in the area, they are only emptied on a limited schedule, allowing for thepossibility of some overflow and/or the windy conditions to blow the litter out of the receptacles and into thebrush. Plus, as the water recedes, fisherman are traveling farther and farther away from the existing receptaclesand a few who exhibit irresponsible behavior are leaving their trash near the water’s edge instead of packing it outin their vehicle to the nearest trash can.The recreation area also has some historical use ofpersonal fireworks use by visitors. The area hasbecome over the last two decades as “the place toshoot fireworks” due to its large open areas and lackof regulations. The litter from the fireworks is atremendous problem because it often produces suchsmall pieces of paper and litter that is difficult to pickup out of the grass and brush. City officials haveattempted to alleviate the problem by placing adumpster in the parking lot for visitors to use for
    • 19their fireworks trash and other trash, but to no avail. The previous photograph shows the parking lot littered withfireworks trash and a fairly empty dumpster sitting amongst it all.Illicit ActivitiesThere have been reports by stakeholder groups and city staff that there are illicit and illegal activities occurring inthe recreation area due to its isolation and lack of oversight. Suspicious looking vehicles have been spottedhanging around in the parking lots, only to drive away quickly when law enforcement arrives to patrol the area.Drug paraphernalia has also been spotted in the parking lot areas of the park.Additionally, while not a common occurrence, human remains were found near the south shore of the North Poolin 2008 in relation to an earlier homicide in San Angelo. The remoteness of the location and lack of “closing time”with gated entrance, and lack of on-site management and law enforcement creates an environment where thiskind of criminal activity can take place. If the recreation area had controlled access with an entrance fee required,then this type of activity would be reduced if not eliminated.Little Vehicular ManagementThere is one main paved road that enters the Twin Buttes Recreation Area from the north and it is Twin ButtesMarina Road. From that main road, a maintained dirt road veers east back towards Middle Concho Park where thedividing property line is at the dam and spillway. There is also a maintained dirt road that enters the recreationarea in the south portion near the South Pool, but it branches out into many unmaintained dirt “road” trails. Otherthan the paved road and the two maintained dirt roads, there are no other official roads within the recreationarea, yet there are numerous dirt roads and trails that vehicles and OHV’s have created all over the property. Insome areas, dirt roads split around trees only to come back to each other, or some roads dead end into brush thathas overtaken the previous “road”, thus a new one is created adjacent to the old path. This unfettered vehicleaccess has created problems such as a maze of dirt roads with no clear direction or signage for visitors, plus it hascreated paths to the backcountry areas where there are no witnesses and dumping can occur. Additionally, inareas where the unfettered vehicle access overlaps the areas of active recreation such as OHV trails, mountain biketrails, and running trails, there is a potential for accidents that could be fatal.Reclamation Manual LND 01-03 – Recreation Program Management provides guidelines to ensure effectivemanagement of public outdoor recreation on Bureau of Reclamation lands and water bodies. This Directive andStandard (D&S) benefits Reclamation because it establishes the roles, responsibilities, and direction that provideconsistency in planning, developing, and managing public outdoor recreation resources on Reclamation lands andwater bodies.Section 22 of this D&S states “Off-Road Vehicle Use. Reclamation lands will be closed to off-road vehicle (ORV) useunless, through an approved planning process, a Reclamation area is designated as limited or open to off-roadvehicle ORV use and conditions of use are specifically described. The process of determining whether an area,road, or trail is designated as open to ORV use, open to limited use, closed to use, and the level of use allowed willinclude a combined public involvement process, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and thedevelopment of planning documents. For more information concerning the rules, regulations, and procedures foruse of ORVs on Reclamation lands, see 43 CFR part 420; EO 11644, dated February 8, 1972; and EO 11989, datedMay 24, 1977.”
    • 20Low Water LevelsLow water levels and continuously receding shorelines are a major challenge not only for the city’s drinking watersupply, but also for recreational use. Currently, at the time of this publication, all 4 boat ramps into the reservoirare unusable due to low water levels. Because the water has receded so much, the boat ramps have essentiallybecome vehicle ramps into the area that was oncecovered by water. Vehicles are not contained in anymanner and can drive wherever there is a blazed trail orroad, or wherever they decide to blaze a new road. Mostvisitors are driving directly to the water’s edge to be ableto fish or launch kayaks, but then they are also drivingalong the shorelines creating concentric rings oftrails/roads around the lake that can be viewed onsatellite or aerial imagery.Low water levels not only create access problems forfishermen and kayakers, they also present accessproblems for windsurfers. A low grade slope or “beacharea” is preferred for a windsurfing launch area and as the water recedes it creates unmanageable slopes in someareas, making access more difficult for this type of recreational activity. Additionally, low water levels crowd moreusers into a smaller space than before, creating the potential for conflicts among user groups vying for diminishingrecreational space on the water.Low water levels also contribute to stress on wildlife, which have to venture farther and farther to access water.Additionally, as the water level decreases it makes the area less desirable habitat for migratory bird species, and itmay affect the number of birds that stop over. This would decrease the amount of viewing opportunities forbirders and photographers and would decrease the amount of hunting opportunities for duck hunters.Stakeholder Group ConflictStakeholder group conflict can and does occur at Twin Buttes Reservoir, just as it does in any recreation area withcompeting groups utilizing a limited amount of space. Most of the time, stakeholder groups get along fine, and theorganized groups who utilize Twin Buttes have defined their own unofficial areas for their particular activity.However, there have been instances where a few irresponsible individuals participating in one of these activities inan inappropriate way has caused conflict for other stakeholder groups. It is inevitable that some of theseindividuals will be associated with a specific stakeholder group given the activity they are participating in, even ifthey are not formally part of the organized group or following its accepted behaviors or ethics. For instance, aperson discharging firearms will probably be associated with hunters, a person riding an ATV haphazardly will beassociated with the trail riders, and a kayaker seen littering will be associated with kayakers, when in reality themajority of the group of recreationists cannot be characterized by these few individuals.More specifically, there have been reports of dirt bike riders or ATV riders who are not associated with theorganized San Angelo Dirt Riders racing in circles around the parking lots or riding off designated trails in certainareas, creating a danger to themselves and other visitors. The Dirt Riders group does not endorse this type ofbehavior and wants controlled access to the area, and rules established and enforced for safe operations of all-terrain vehicles on designated trails. Creating designated areas for activities, such as a designated ORV area,through the proper planning process with Reclamation is something that each stakeholder group shouldcoordinate with the City of San Angelo.
    • 21Additionally, there have been reports by city staff of hunters bringing in materials to construct permanent huntingblinds in the recreation area which is a violation of federal regulations. These hunters are essentially trying tostake out their “own area” by creating permanent blinds and this creates conflicts amongst hunters in this publichunting area, in addition to being against federal regulations. The unfettered access hunters have via full-sizedvehicles also has the potential to create conflict between hunters on foot or bow hunters positioned in tree stands.There have been a few reports of people driving vehiclesright past other hunters that are quietly staked out, onlyto have the wildlife scared away by the vehicle noise.There are also reports of firearms being dischargedoutside of designated hunting seasons, and muchevidence of skeet and trap shooting debris, which are alsoassociated with the hunting group, whether a fairassociation or not.Essentially, the irresponsible users as a group should beeliminated – so that the rest of the law-abiding andstewardship oriented groups can enjoy the area throughtheir recreational activity of choice.Public SafetyWhile there currently is not a huge problem of conflict amongst stakeholder groups, there is a great potential forconflict between motorized and non-motorized use of the area, whether it be full size vehicles, ATV’s, and boats,or trail runners, mountain bikers, and kayakers. The potential for a fatal incident exists given the lack of control offull-sized vehicular traffic and reports of full-size vehicles attempting to drive on established ATV trails orrunning/biking trails. This potential stakeholder conflict then becomes a public safety issue.Best management practices in park management would support separation ofmotorized and non-motorized recreational activities wherever possible. On areservoir for example, motorized boats would be serviced by a boat ramp and most oftheir boating would take part in the main body or center of the reservoir. Kayaks andcanoes could be launched at the same ramp that motorized boats use, but they do notneed the same amount of depth of water to launch. They are more likely to paddle onthe edges of the reservoir or in secluded or shallow water arms of the reservoir, thusthey would be better served by a separate launching dock in a less crowded area.Additionally, motorized and non-motorized trail use should be separated if trail conditions do not allow for theintegration of the two types of activities. There are some multi-use trails operated by the U.S. Forest Service thatallow motorcycles or ATV’s as well as equestrian, hiking, and mountain biking. The trail conditions must provide agreater width for multi-use and longer lines of sight to prevent collisions, and most of these multi-use trails are oldlogging roads. The current trails at Twin Buttes are single track (meaning narrow for one-way traffic only), andhave lots of sharp curves and hills which make them unfit candidates for mixing motorized and non-motorized useson the same trails.
    • 22The use of firearms on the property for anything other than legal huntingpurposes poses a significant risk to public safety and needs to beaddressed by city staff. There are many piles of shotgun shells across theproperty, pieces of clay shooting discs on the ground, and holes shotthrough what little signage there is within the recreation area. Thisevidence coupled with reports of people hearing gunshots on holidayssuch as the Fourth of July, or gunshots throughout the day outside ofhunting seasons, identifies that there is a problem with people dischargingfirearms illegally within the recreation area. Some of the areas whereshotgun shell litter is present are very near areas where other activerecreation is taking place such as the running trails, posing a danger topublic safety.
    • 23SUCCESSFUL PARK MODELSThere are several successful park models in the United States, and their positive attributes will be analyzed in thisplan and correlated with the challenges at Twin Buttes. Additionally, the consultant personally interviewed thePark Superintendent for another reservoir recreation area that is operating on Bureau of Reclamation land in thesame Oklahoma-Texas Area district – the Quartz Mountain Arts & Conference Center and Nature Park – to gatherinsight into their park model and management challenges. Those findings will be explored further in this section.TEXAS STATE PARK MODELThe Texas State Park System, while faced with financial constraints, is still one of the model systems of parkmanagement systems in the country. The agency does a phenomenal job of balancing conservation, visitor use,wildlife habitat, interpretation of historic sites, and active and passive recreation throughout the properties theymanage. The model can be broken down into several aspects which all contribute to the success of the model.Vehicle controlTo preserve the park’s resources, protect wildlife habitat, and maintain public safety, vehicle traffic and parking isstrictly controlled in the state park model. Paved or maintained dirt roads direct park visitors to the variousrecreation areas, campgrounds, boat ramps, parking areas, etc. Signage informs visitors that parking is onlyallowed on the pavement or in designated areas for parking, especially in campground areas where the impact isthe greatest. Wooden bollards or stone boulders are used to line roadways or delineate parking areas in parts ofthe park where it is necessary to control traffic physically.As far as driving vehicles “off-road” or on designated “off-road” trails, there is currently only one park –Eisenhower State Park - where this is allowed in the state park model. However, the Texas Parks & WildlifeDepartment recognizes off-road trails as a need in the state and has made efforts to increase opportunities for thisrecreational activity to occur safely and in non-sensitive areas. Currently, across the state there are 13 differentparks at the commercial, county, and national level that are supported by Texas Parks & Wildlife and more sitesare being studied and developed every year.Designated use zonesBest management practices in the state park model call for designated use zones in park planning andmanagement of resources. Camping areas where intensive use will take place are located in the least sensitiveareas and away from critical wildlife areas such as nesting sites or fragile watering holes. Day-use areas, wherevisitors come for the day to enjoy the park but do not stay overnight, are normally located in separate areas fromwhere the overnight camping areas are located. The separation of the two groups diminishes the amount ofvehicle traffic that is coming through the campground areas since the day-use visitors are directed to other areas.This in turn creates a quieter environment for the overnight campers and allows the roadways to be used forwalkers and children biking, etc.The state park model also allows for designated hunting areas within some state parks and in other stateproperties such as Wildlife Management Areas (WMA). The designated hunting areas are located away fromcamping areas and day-use areas for public safety reasons and any trails that cross the hunting area aretemporarily closed. In parks not large enough for separate hunting areas away from camping and day-use areas,the entire park is temporarily closed for the duration of the hunt (usually weekend periods.)
    • 24Controlled accessControlled access via manned gates or “Iron Rangers” (self-pay stations) is a hallmark of the state park model. Allstate parks have defined entrances with gateway signage that welcomes the visitor to the park. Some entranceshave more elaborate stone columns and signage while others have more simple wooden signs, but all haveentrance signage. This lets the visitor know they are entering a “managed” area.In addition to the entrance signage there is almostalways a gate that can be closed and locked at nightat the park’s closure time for any visitors not stayingovernight to camp. The locked gate provides securityfor campers in some cases where parks are nearurban areas, but more importantly prevents any un-registered visitors from entering the park. If visitorsare to arrive late, after the gate has been locked,then arrangements are usually made at the time ofcampground reservations for the visitor to be giventhe access code to the gate.Whether there is a physical gate or not, there isalmost always an entrance station that is manned atcertain hours to collect camping and entrance fees. If the entrance station is closed, there is signage that directsthe visitor to either pay at a self-pay station (known as “Iron Rangers”) or to proceed to a campsite and then returnin the morning to pay the fees. When physical rangers (or volunteers) come back on duty they then monitor the“Iron Rangers” and verify that those visitors in the park have registered and paid any fees due.The key here is that the use of gates, manned entrance stations, or self-pay stations (that are still monitored), areall methods for controlling access to the park which aids in eliminating negative behaviors or illegal activities.Park Host ProgramThe park host concept has become even more popular in the last several decades as publicly-funded budgets forparks have dwindled. It is a major component of the successful Texas state park model, as well as in other statesand at the national level. Essentially, a park host program uses volunteer labor to perform park operation dutiesthat were traditionally performed by paid park staff.The “Park Host” is usually a retired couple who own their own recreationalvehicle (RV) and, in exchange for a free campsite and hook-ups (plussometimes phone line, wireless internet, cable TV, or laundry), performsduties such as collecting camping fees, cleaning restrooms, manning entrancestations or visitor centers, and reporting incidents or illegal activities to theappropriate authorities.This volunteer labor is invaluable to the park systems as the camp hosts arethe “eyes and the ears” on the ground since they are living in the park 24hours a day and 7 days a week for a period of time. Having this type ofwatchful eyes on the property reduces unwanted behaviors in the park suchas littering or discharging of firearms.
    • 25Public hunting programThe success of the Texas state park model can also be contributed to the public hunting program that is offeredthroughout park properties, wildlife management areas, and leased private properties across the state. Carefullymanaging the wildlife resources contributes to a healthy ecosystem and hunting is a management tool that thepublic can participate in.A Texas hunting license and a public hunting permit(annual permit $48) are required to utilize the publichunting lands which provide access to nearly a millionacres of land for hunting, fishing, and camping duringoperational hours. Permit holders have access to over 200different areas, with many areas open year round, and canhunt a wide variety of species including: deer, dove, feralhogs, quail, squirrel, turkey, waterfowl, and other legalgame.The public hunt drawing system is for the most covetedproperties or special game such as bighorn sheep,alligator, or exotic animals. There are special draws forboth adult hunts and youth-only hunts. The funds from permit fees go back to manage the wildlife resources sospecies will be around for future generations to hunt also.Litter managementThe Texas state park model handles litter management differently than most local and regional parks in the state,in that individual trash cans are rarely used throughout the parks, except in restroom or concession areas. Mostcampground areas and day-use areas have a large dumpster in the area for visitors to put their trash in after theycollect it themselves in their own trash bag. The system relies on the “pack it in, pack it out” ethic (at least to thedumpster) and works fairly well. There are always those few people who still litter, but most people manage theirown trash and dispose of it properly at the end of their visit.The dumpster system reduces labor costs significantly because the agency doesn’t have to pay staff to do the time-consuming task of collecting trash from individualized trash cans at each campsite or picnic site. Instead thedumpsters are a contracted service and are emptied on a regular schedule by the waste company. In addition tolabor savings, the agency saves on the purchase of trash bags for individual cans. In the state park model, campersand visitors are responsible for bringing their own trash bags and collecting their own trash and disposing of it inthe provided dumpsters.Interpretation and RecreationInterpretation and recreation is an important component of the Texas state park model because it is the means bywhich a caring constituency is continuously developed and fostered over time. Park staff are continuously workingto educate the public on rules and regulations and to engage them in conservation of the resources throughvarious interpretive activities.Interpretive signage can be found in every state park and varies; from describing wildlife or plant species native toan area, to identifying historical features or artifacts. Interpretive programs also are an important feature of the
    • 26state park model, though numbers of programs have been reduced in recent years due to budget cuts. Manyinterpretive programs are in the form of “ranger talks” or guided hikes, where a park ranger or a volunteer(possibly a Park Host) educates visitors on the local flora and fauna, historical significance of an area, or “Leave NoTrace” – a conservation ethic program.Recreation and recreational activities are the reason most people visit a park in the first place and thus are animportant criterion in the Texas state park model. The model allows for as many recreational activities as possibleto take place in one park without causing user group conflict or excessive impact on the natural resources. Forinstance, swimming, tubing, kayaking, paddle-boating, fishing, and picnicking would be available along a riverbanksetting in a park, but turkey hunting along the same riverbank would not be allowed in the same spot when theother recreational activities are taking place. Likewise, primitive areas would likely host lower-impact recreationalactivities such as bird watching or backpacking, or hunting activities such as bow hunting or rifle hunting, that areaway from the developed areas for higher-impact recreational activities such as campgrounds, restrooms,volleyball courts, etc.Unified management structure, signage, rules, feesAnother aspect of the Texas state park model is the unified management structure and regulations structure thatis evident at all parks across the system. The benefit to these unified structures is that park patrons know what toexpect when visiting any park in the system. As soon as the visitor drives through the entrance they see thefamiliar signage and make the mental connections that they are entering a state park property, and that the rulesand regulations are the same as the last state park they visited. This helps eliminate confusion amongst visitorsabout what is or isn’t allowed, what the fees are, and what the behavioral expectations are for a certain park orarea (i.e. park quiet hours or “Leave No Trace” in primitive areas.)
    • 27The unified management structure at each park also makes it easier for the public to understand who is theappropriate authority managing a certain park and to whom they should report incidents or illegal activities. In thestate park model there is always a Park Superintendent position that lives on-site at the park so that they canrespond to any emergencies or issues. An on-site superintendent also deters unwanted behaviors such aspoaching, dumping, or vandalism since there is a greater chance someone will witness the illegal activity versus anarea that is not monitored.With a few exceptions across the system, the fee structure is unified in the Texas state park model. There is a day-use fee charged for entrance into any state park, around $3-$5 per person depending on the popularity andamenities in the park, and a campsite fee for overnight guests. Campsites vary from primitive walk-in sites with noamenities, to tent sites with water spigots, to full RV hook-ups and range from $8 per site to $26 per site. Acrossthe system all categories of campsites offer the same amenities and are set-up similarly - with a parking pad, picnictable, lantern hook, water spigot and/or electrical hook-ups, and signed numbering system - offering additionalfamiliarity for users.Rules and regulations are also unified in the state park model which again, makes it easier for park visitors to knowwhat to expect when arriving at any park in the system. If there are any additional rules to the standardregulations, or temporary rules for a certain time frame – like a burn ban – these will be clearly posted atentrances, visitor centers, restrooms, or in other areas where needed.All of the criteria mentioned here, combine to make up the successful Texas state park model – and it is thecombination that makes it so successful – without one or the other, the visitor experience would suffer.
    • 28OFF-ROAD VEHICLES (ORV) BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICESQuartz Mountain Nature ParkThe Quartz Mountain Arts & Conference Center and Nature Park (www.quartzmountain.org) is a park propertyoperating on leased land from the Bureau of Reclamation and is managed by a Board of Trustees through the Stateof Oklahoma’s University system. The Quartz Mountain complex is located on the shores of Lake Altus-Lugert inLone Wolf, Oklahoma. Quartz Mountain is included in this analysis because of its similarity to the Twin Buttesproperty with it being owned by the Bureau of Reclamation and with both areas hosting multiple recreationalactivities including an area for off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails.The nature park has 8 different campground loops with tent sites, group sites, full RV hook-ups and cabins as wellas a full-service resort right on the water. In addition to camping, there are 5 miles of trails for hiking, biking, andbird watching plus a Nature Center, paddle-boat rentals, and miniature golf. On the water, there is boating,fishing, water-skiing, kayaking, etc. Some of the unique offerings at Quartz Mountain are the rock climbing area,the off-road trail riding area, the performing arts center.The off-road trail riding area – called Eagle’s Roost - is seasonal due to the bald eagles that roost in the area.Access is restricted to the months of April 1 – October 31, 7 days a week from sunrise to sunset. Included in theoff-road riding area are single track trails (meaning narrow and one-way only) and a sand dunes area for freeriding. The off-road riding area’s size fluctuates with reservoir levels - as the lake level goes up, the riding areashrinks, and as the lake level goes down, the riding area expands. The park superintendent and other paid parkstaff monitor the lake levels and adjust steel cable barriers accordingly – they are also keeping riders away fromthe water and the immediate shoreline to protect the water quality.The off-road riding area has limited access hours and iscontrolled by a gate that is locked at night (by paidstaff) after the area has closed. There is a parking areafor regular vehicles and trailers and a portable restroomset-up. There is a fee - per off-road vehicle - per day of$7.00 to use the area, and this is payable at a self-paystation (“Iron Ranger”) or in the busy season to a paidstaff member at the gate. The fees collected go tooffset the costs of the ranger monitoring the area plusany new improvements to trails, restrooms, or parkingareas.Rules and regulations for the off-road riding area aredetermined by State of Oklahoma ORV laws andcommon sense safety which includes: requiring all passengers and drivers 18 and under to wear crash helmets, nomore than one rider per vehicle (unless designed for two), no drinking and driving, and all off-road vehicles musthave a 10 foot whip with an orange/red safety flag on it.Barnwell Mountain Recreation AreaBarnwell Mountain Recreation Area (www.barnwellmountainra.com) is a 1,850 acre park dedicated strictly to off-road trail riding and camping located in East Texas near Gilmer, TX. The park is owned and operated by the TexasMotorized Trails Coalition (TMTC), a 501(c)3 non-profit organization with 1,400 motorized trail enthusiast-
    • 29members. The Barnwell Mountain Recreation Area is one of two motorized trail parks that the group hasdeveloped. The other – Escondido Draw Recreation Area is located in West Texas near Ozona, Texas and is stillunder development.Barnwell Mountain Recreation Area has a 27+ mile single-track trail for motorcycles and many more miles of scenictrails and challenging hills for ATVs and OHVs. All of the trails are mapped, rated from easy to difficult, and markedwith proper signage for ease of way-finding. The park has primitive campsites, 30-amp RV hook-ups, 2 cabins forrent, restrooms, showers, an air station, a pavilion, and on-site management.All off-road vehicles must have the Texas Parks &Wildlife issued Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) stickerdisplayed while in the park. All adults must sign awaiver and a rules sheet upon entrance into the parkand minors must have a wavier signed by a parent orlegal guardian and accompanied by an adult.Examples of rules and regulations include: all ridersmust wear a DOT approved helmet; no double-ridingallowed except on vehicles specifically designed for 2or more passengers; no public consumption of alcoholand no alcohol on the trails; no trail riding after 10:00pm; and no trail blazing. Failure to follow theproperty’s rules results in a 3 step discipline processthat ends in suspension from the park.The park has a $30 entrance fee per vehicle and a $5.00 per guest or passenger fee (no vehicle). Discounts areavailable for Texas Motorized Trails Coalition members, with a family membership costing $60 per year. All fees goback to support the park and the trails. In addition to regular trail-riding, the park hosts many events and racesthroughout the year and is the meeting place for many organized groups from across the state. The park hasbecome extremely popular and has contributed much economic impact to the surrounding communities due tothe amount of tourists the park brings in. The local chambers of commerce and economic developmentcorporations have a strong relationship with the TMTC Operations Board that oversees the operation of the park.Black Mountain Off-Road Adventure AreaBlack Mountain Off-Road Adventure Area (www.harlancountytrails.com/blackmountain) is an 8,000 acre propertylocated in Harlan County, Kentucky with over 150 miles of marked and rated trails. The park is open all day and allyear long. ATV trails are rated at beginner, intermediate, and extreme and there are 5 levels of 4x4 trails andobstacle courses. There is also a commercial canopy tour now operating within the park as well, with discountsoffered to permit holders who come to ride the off-road trails. Nearby to the park are numerous commercialbusinesses offering cabins, RV parks and campgrounds.
    • 30A general use permit is required for each vehicle entering Black Mountain Off-Road Adventure Area and can bepurchased at either of the two trailheads (entrances to park) or the Harlan County Campground. An annual permitcan be purchased for $35.00 or a 31-day permit can be purchased for $20.00. Family discounts are available formultiple vehicle permits.Rules and regulations are in correspondence with Kentucky state laws for ATV laws and motorcycle laws.Examples of park rules include: a permit sticker is required for all vehicles; helmets are required; no consumptionof alcohol before or while operating a motorized vehicle is allowed; firearms are prohibited; no littering (pack it in-pack it out); and removal or destroying of trees, shrubs, plants, or animals is prohibited.Many events are held at the park and the economic impact from the park is evident by looking at the Convention &Visitor Bureau-operated website that lists all of the area’s lodging options, dining options, and local events. Trailmaps, brochures, fee and regulation information is all readily available on their website as well.Lake Meredith National Recreation AreaLake Meredith National Recreation Area is located nearAmarillo, Texas and in addition to the boating, fishing,camping, and hunting offered; the park also has two areasthat are open to off-highway vehicles. Off-highway vehiclesare defined in this park as motorcycles, four-wheelers, anddune buggies. The two areas are the Blue Creek area –vehicles can travel anywhere between the two cut-banks ofthe creek; and the Rosita Flats area (below 3,000 ft.elevation) where vehicles can travel within the CanadianRiver bed east of the Dumas bridge to Chicken Creek.A Texas Parks & Wildlife issued OHV sticker decal is requiredon each vehicle in the OHV areas; otherwise there are nopermits to enter the recreation area. Off-road vehicles arerestricted to the two areas only, and are prohibitedthroughout the rest of the recreation area. Maps of the areas are available online or at the park entrance stations.
    • 31Best Management Practices ComparisonThe following chart highlights the major components of each of the OHV areas for comparison and analysis. TheTwin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area column has “YES” under Public Consumption of Alcohol because while theorganized San Angelo Dirt Riders does not condone this, there is no official rule established. Also, under“Designated Trails” Twin Buttes is listed as a “NO” because while the Dirt Riders have created designated trailsthere is no enforcement in the rest of the park and rogue riders and visitors in vehicles are blazing new trails.Permit/Fee TexasOHVDecalAccessHoursHelmetRequiredPublicConsumptionof AlcoholDesignatedTrails OnlyMarkedTrailsBarnwellMountainRecreationArea$30.00 pervehicle $5.00per passengerYES 8:00 AMFriday –6:00 PMSundayYES NO YES YESBlackMountainOff-RoadAdventureArea$20.00/31-day$35.00/annualN/A NO YES NO YES YESLakeMeredithNationalRecreationAreaNO YES NO YES NO NO, withinbanks ofcreek andriverNOTwinButtesReservoirRecreationAreaNO NO NO NO YES NO YESQuartzMountainNaturePark$7.00 pervehicleN/A April 1 –Oct. 31Sunriseto sunsetYES NO YES exceptin free-riding DunesAreaYESHUNTING BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICESThis section identifies best management practices for agencies that allow hunting on public park lands. Severaltypes of agencies were considered and their best management practices are compared to those at Twin ButtesReservoir Recreation Area. The following agencies were compared: National Forest, National Recreation Area,National Wildlife Refuge, a Texas state park, and a local municipal water district.Across all agencies, hunting is managed fairly extensively, and public information about hunting is readily availablevia websites and ranger stations. All of the agencies analyzed work cooperatively with the Texas Parks & WildlifeDepartment to survey game and create bag limit recommendations individual to the site or to correspond withcounty-wide guidelines.Currently at Twin Buttes Recreation Area no permit is required to hunt; all that is required is what is required bythe state – a valid hunting license and proof of Hunter Education Course if applicable. In all but two of the
    • 32agencies analyzed, a permit is required to hunt – Lake Meredith National Recreation Area and the National ForestLands in Texas (exclusive of Wildlife Management Area’s) are areas where a permit is not required. However,within the National Forest, if one chooses to hunt antlerless deer, then a permit is required.Vehicle access to hunting areas is not currently limited at Twin Buttes,but in every other agency analyzed, vehicle access is restricted. TheNational Forest system and Lake Meredith National Recreation Areaallow vehicle access via designated dirt roads into the interior of thepublic lands, but hunters must remain on the designated roads. Off-roadvehicles (ORVs) are also not allowed in many of the hunting areas – thereare 2 areas where ORV use is allowed in Lake Meredith NRA, and 1 multi-use trail in the Sam Houston National Forest. In the Laguna AtascosaNational Wildlife Refuge, the Colorado River Municipal Water District,and San Angelo State Park, only walking in on foot is allowed.All of the agencies analyzed require hunters to wear 400 square inches offluorescent orange for safety with waterfowl, turkey, or archery huntersoften being exempt. Currently, at Twin Buttes Recreation, no such safetyrules requiring hunter orange are readily promoted.However, TPWD still has jurisdiction over the hunting and fishing at Twin Buttes. State law requires that “Allpersons on public hunting lands (state, national forests, and grasslands) during daylight hours when hunting withfirearms must wear at least 400 square inches of hunter orange material with orange headgear, and at least 144square inches appearing on both chest and back.Exempt from these requirements are: Persons hunting turkey, migratory birds, alligators, or desert bighorn sheep; Persons within the enclosed passenger compartment of a motor vehicle; or Persons within a designated campground, designated vehicle parking area, designated boat launchingfacility, or departmental check station”All of the agencies allow the use of temporary, portable blinds that must be tagged with the hunter’s name andtelephone number, and must be removed within 24-72 hours, depending on the agency. None of the agenciesallow brush or wood materials to be brought into the park to create a blind, nor do they allow natural materials tobe harvested in the park to create one. At Twin Buttes there is a problem with hunters bringing in materials tobuild blinds and there are semi-permanent blinds existing since the rules are not readily understood (federalregulations prohibit this.)Baiting of wildlife is also not allowed at any of the agencies analyzed, yet it is a common practice at Twin ButtesRecreation Area. Legal weapons differ from agency to agency, with some being more restrictive than othersdepending on the level of other recreation activities that takes place in the area, or the amount of residences andother population centers nearby. All other agencies only allow the firing of weapons at legal game, and prohibitthe discharge of firearms at any other time (i.e. no sighting guns in or target shooting.) Currently at Twin ButtesRecreation Area, only archery and shotgun hunting are allowed, and no other firearms are allowed, nor arefirearms allowed to be discharged outside of hunting season. Visitor reports of gunfire throughout the year, andevidence of trap and skeet target shooting are left in many portions of the recreation area, suggesting that this ruleis not well understood or basically ignored.
    • 33Reclamation Manual LND 01-03 provides guidelines for hunting, fishing, and trapping. Section 23 states:“Reclamation will provide for public use of lands in accordance with state and Federal laws and will allow publichunting, fishing, and trapping within statutory limitations pursuant to 43 CFR 423.32. Hunting, fishing, andtrapping will be compatible with Reclamation project purposes and be conducted in a manner that protects thehealth and safety of the public and a managing entity’s infrastructure and personnel. Reclamation lands aregenerally open to hunting, fishing, and trapping unless closed, as deemed necessary, or designated as special useareas with restrictions. Any such closures or special use area designations related to hunting, fishing, and trappingwill be in consultation with appropriate state game and fish agencies and will include a public involvement andNEPA process. Refer to 43 CFR part 24, Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Policy, for further guidance onhunting, fishing, and trapping on Federal lands, 43 CFR part 423, and EO 13443.”
    • 34Permit&FeeApplication,ProofofHunterEducation&LicenseLimiton#ofPermitsHuntingSeasonLegalWeaponsVehicleAccessUseofBlinds(temporary&portableonly)WearHunterOrangeUseofBaitWildlifetoHuntAreaclosedtootherVisitorsduringHuntColoradoRiverMunicipalWaterDistrict(O.H. Ivie)YES,$100Bow$200GunYES YES DesignatedweekendsonlyBowShotgun (nobuckshot)MuzzleloaderNO(onfootonly)N/A YES N/A DeerTurkeyQuailYESLakeMeredithNationalRecreationAreaNO NOappYEStolic.NO Varies bygame,weekdaysandweekendsBowShotgunRiflesMuzzleloaderYES(muststay onpavedor dirtroads)YES YES NO DeerDovePheasantTealTurkeyQuailRabbitCoyoteRaccoonNOLagunaAtascosaNationalWildlifeRefugeYES,$75.00YES YES DesignatedweekendsonlyBowMuzzleloaderRiflesCrossbowNO(onfoot orbicycleonly)YES YES NO DeerNilgaiantelopeFeral hogYESNationalForests &Grasslandsin TexasYES,Free$48.00forWMAsYES YESforantler-lessVaries bygame,weekdaysandweekendsAny legalweaponYES(muststay onpavedor dirtroads)YES YES NO DeerQuailDoveTurkeyRabbitSquirrelNOSan AngeloState ParkYES,$48.00YES NO Varies bygame,weekdaysandweekendsBowShotgunRifleMuzzleloaderNO(onfootonly)YES YES NO Deer YESTwinButtesRecreationAreaNO NO NO Defers toTPWDseasonsBowShotgun (noslugs)YES YES NO YES Defers toTPWDrulesNO
    • 35INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPSLake BryanThis power plant cooling reservoir and surrounding park are owned and operated by Bryan Texas Utilities and islocated 5 miles west of Bryan, Texas. The park has an 829 acre lake with a boat ramp for access to the lake forboating, fishing, and other water sports - and through a partnership with Texas A&M University – is the home forthe rowing, sailing, and wakeboarding teams.The park has 7 water and electric campsites for RV’s that can be reserved and 125 acres of first-come, first-servedtent and RV camping areas. There is a central dumping station and water fill-up station as well. There are publicrestrooms but no shower facilities. In addition to the overnight camping there are day-use areas with swimmingbeaches, picnic tables, 2 pavilions, a sand volleyball court, and a stage and special event area where large outdoorconcerts are held.PartnershipsThe public-private partnership model has worked well at Lake Bryan and that is why it is included in this analysis.Bryan Texas Utilities (a wholly municipally owned entity) contracted with a concessionaire to build and operate alakeside restaurant and entertainment venue with live bands and private party rental space available. The venturehas been highly successful and has added an amenity to the lake that can be enjoyed year round.Visitors can pay entrance fees and camping fees at the manned gatehouse or the actual lakeside restaurant itself ifthe gatehouse is closed. The park is gated and closes from dusk to 6 AM daily; overnight guests receive a gatecode upon check-in so they may leave and re-enter afterdusk if needed.In addition to camping and boating, the park has over 20miles of mountain biking trails that were made possible bya partnership with the Brazos Valley Mountain BikeAssociation, whose members build and maintain them. Thegroup is a 501 (c)4 non-profit organization and its membersspend many hours maintaining trails, hosting race events,and educating other riders about the trail rules andetiquette expected. The group is very protective of theirinvestment in the Lake Bryan Park property and help toself-police the mountain biking community that visits thepark.Special EventsA main event that has been going on for over 20 years is the “Power Pedal” event which includes 5K and 10Krunning races and mountain bike races of varying distances. The event is put on by Bryan Texas Utilities (theproperty owner) and all proceeds benefit a local community non-profit or charity.In addition to recreational races, the park hosts large special events such as music festivals. Ziegfest, sponsored byZiegenBock Beer, is an all-day music festival that has been held at Lake Bryan for the last ten years. The festivalhas brought thousands of visitors to the park over the years and has brought much needed revenue to the park.
    • 36The special events held at Lake Bryan and the partnerships with both a private concessionaire and a non-profitorganization help to make this park a successful model for park management best practices. While lake levels arelow at Twin Buttes Reservoir and likely will continue to be if drought trends continue – a lakeside restaurant is notthe type of concessionaire partnership the city should pursue – but a similar partnership could be developed withan outdoors-based business such as hunting guide operators or ATV retailers.
    • 37PUBLIC PARTICIPATIONPublic participation is an important part of any planning process, and especially in this case of Twin ButtesReservoir Recreation Area, where there are many dedicated stakeholder groups who are passionate about thepark property. There was one (1) general public meeting held and the meeting was advertised on the city’swebsite and other social media and email invitations were sent out to specific contacts from stakeholder groups.Additionally, there were articles about the entire park planning process (City of San Angelo Parks, Recreation, &Open Space Master Plan was concurrently developed) in the Standard Times newspaper that alerted residents tofuture public meetings for both planning projects.An online survey was also developed as part of the San Angelo Parks, Recreation, & Open Space Master Planprocess, and there were several questions on that survey that were relevant to the Twin Buttes Recreation UsePlan which are discussed further in this section.GENERAL PUBLIC MEETINGA general public meeting was held on December 1, 2011 at the McNease Convention Center in San Angelo. Thirtyfour (34) citizens signed the Sign-In Sheet, and there were a handful of city staff present as well as City CouncilMember Paul Alexander and Mayor Alvin New. There were several themes that can be derived from the publiccomments and they are detailed below.Reinvestment of FeesMany citizens felt strongly that whatever fees were collected from accessing Twin Buttes Recreation Area or fromactivities at the park, should be reinvested back into the property’s infrastructure, programs, or operations. Therewas also quite a bit of discussion on keeping revenues from Twin Buttes separate from those collected at LakeNasworthy, since a combined annual pass had been previously proposed by city officials. The citizens who spokefelt that the Nasworthy lake parks and Twin Buttes Recreation Area were two separate kinds of parks withdifferent activities taking place in them and the needs of the recreationists were different, therefore the moneyshould be separate. Since Lake Nasworthy parks are more developed and the Twin Buttes area is more primitive,the differentiation is similar to the state park model where there is a differentiation between a state park and astate natural area (discussed previously in the Park Models section.)EnforcementWhether it is actual law enforcement patrolling the area more to suppress illegal activity, or whether it is justgeneral enforcement of simple park ethics and ordinances by a volunteer or park ranger staff member, a majortheme of the public meeting was to enforce rules in the park. Citizens felt there was little need to create morerules or ordinances because there already are ordinances, state laws and federal regulations from the Bureau ofReclamation in place – they just need better enforcement.Along with the enforcement sentiment, there were several citizens who spoke against the duplication of rulesgiven the city had previously proposed some ordinances that were in conflict with and/or where duplications ofstate law. One example given was the proposed city ordinance stating that hunters could not shoot a firearmwithin 300 yards of a fence line, yet state law already prohibits shooting a firearm across a property line but allowsyou to essentially be “on the fence line” as long as you are shooting “into” your property (or public huntingproperty.) Many of the hunters in the public meeting felt this was an unnecessary duplication of rules.
    • 38Management of Visitor RegistrationThere were many comments throughout the course of the meeting in support for management of the Twin ButtesRecreation Area to eliminate the irresponsible users that were ruining the recreation experience for the rest of theresponsible users. Several citizens mentioned some sort of visitor registration – whether it is purchasing an annualpass, paying entrance fees at a manned gate, or registering for access to special gate keys or gate codes – as aneed to create the best environment for responsible recreation.A discussion did take place about the existence of a manned entrance station that used to be in operation up until1996. It was suggested that due to city budget constraints the entrance station was closed. Several citizenscommented that things seemed to be “better” when this manned entrance station was in operation, andsuggested that it should be re-instituted.Maintain Recreational AccessEssentially all groups who were represented at the public meeting – hunters, fishermen, ATV trail riders, kayakers,mountain bikers, and equestrian lovers – were in agreement that whatever happens in future plans for Twin ButtesRecreation Area – that maintaining access for the recreational groups was a priority.This is particularly important when related to the receding water levels of the lake and maintaining access to thewater for fishermen, kayakers, windsurfers, and primitive campers. Several citizens expressed that theyunderstand the reasoning for the pipe rail vehicle barriers in some places, but that as the water level recedes thereshould be temporary bollards and cable put in place down towards the water to give a certain amount of access.Whatever managed access system is put in place – whether it be gate keys or a manned entrance – citizens felt itwas important that there be a way for out of town visitors to access the area instantly versus having to buy a passahead of their arrival. The citizens were insinuating if there was a manned entrance and it was closed, thereshould be a process for those out-of-town visitors to enter and pay at a self-pay station or get passes somewherenearby like at local retailers. The citizens felt it would be a detriment to tourism if visitors traveled here to camp orride the trails and were faced with a locked gate with no recourse to gain entry immediately and would have toreturn home.Economic Impact of RecreationAnother common theme of the public meeting was that of the economic impact associated with recreationalactivities at Twin Buttes Recreation Area. Several citizens talked about the numbers of people they were aware ofwho travel to San Angelo to ride the ATV trails from as far away as Midland/Odessa and Abilene; and who spendtheir money in local gas stations, restaurants, and hotels.Engage Responsible User GroupsOverwhelmingly, the citizens who turned out to the public meeting felt that there is just a small group of “badapples” who are participating in the illegal activities and damaging the resource by littering and dumping. Themain stakeholder groups that were represented at the meeting (hunting, fishing, and ATV trail riding) were prettymuch in agreement that they get along fairly well with other user groups and want to eliminate only the badbehavior of the few. They want to be engaged by city staff and want to help manage the park by self-policing usergroups and hosting volunteer clean-ups of the area, etc.
    • 39In addition, the concept of a citizen board to advise city staff on management direction and engage the public ininterpretive and recreational activities was supported by several citizens.STAKEHOLDER VISIONING WORKSHOPThe Stakeholder Visioning Workshop was held on February 16, 2012 at the McNease Convention Center and lasteda little over 2 hours. There were approximately 36 citizens invited to participate in the workshop representingeach stakeholder group. A stakeholder is defined as a recreationist who has an interest in the future of the TwinButtes area. The groups represented were OHV (off-highway vehicle) Riding, Disc Golf, Fishing, Hunting, Biking,Running, and Windsurfing. There were 25 stakeholders in attendance and 4 law enforcement officers and parkmanagement representatives there to observe and field questions if necessary (SAPD, TPWD Game Warden, andSan Angelo State Park Superintendent.)The workshop was facilitated utilizing a modified Nominal Group Technique (NGT) process, whereby individualsshare individual ideas that are then combined with group ideas through a process of discussion, consolidation, andvoting of ideas. A decision is made by taking into account every one’s ideas instead of a simple majority rulesvoting process. Facilitation of the process allows for more discussion among participants’ ideas, identifyingcommon ground and a plurality of ideas and approaches.Participants were broken up into four groups of 5-8 people at round tables in the workshop room, with each tablehaving one representative from each stakeholder group. One table also had a representative from the Geocachingcommunity. Examples of other successful park models and maps were on display in the room for participants toview and get ideas of how the future of Twin Buttes Recreation Area could be.The consultant began the workshop with an introduction to why the visioning workshop was needed and how theprocess would work. Each participant was given a stack of notecards to write down their ideas or solutions to thequestions offered up by the consultant on a flipchart at the front of the room. The questions were:What should the City of San Angelo (in partnership with Bureau of Reclamation) do to provide the best environmentfor recreational activity, public safety, and resource protection? To enhance a family environment for recreation? To separate users to minimize conflict between user groups and ensure groups’ safety? To maximize resource protection while minimizing resource destruction?No discussion was allowed at this point, the individuals were only to write their individual ideas down. Next, eachindividual at the table was to read their ideas out loud to the other participants at their table, going around thetable until all had read their ideas out loud. No debating was allowed at this level of the process, participants weremerely sharing their ideas to their small group. After all of the ideas had been heard by those at the table, thenthe group could discuss the ideas and deliberate. The group was tasked with consolidating any ideas that wereduplicate or similar ideas, so as to minimize the total number of ideas at the table.The next step required the consultant to go around the room and ask each table to read their consolidated ideas tothe larger group in the room, while Carl White, Parks and Recreation Director, wrote the ideas down on the flipchart. The ideas were written down as spoken at this point, and no deliberation was allowed. After all of the ideashad been written on the flip chart, all of the pages were taped across the wall and the consultant proceeded to
    • 40identify similar or duplicate ideas for consolidation, with the participants’ approval. The consultant continued toask the participants which ideas could be grouped into themes or combined ideas, and the list became amanageable number of approximately 25-30 ideas.At this point, each participant was given 8 green dot stickers each, to use in the voting process. The consultantexplained that each participant could use their stickers to vote on the ideas that they felt were the most importantfor the future of Twin Buttes Recreation Area. Participants could place as many dot stickers next to an idea as theychose, but they would only have a total of 8 stickers or 8 “votes.” The items with the most dot stickers in the endwould be the items that were the most important to the group overall and would be considered priority items.The top three ranked items were: Trash management/cleanliness Add restrooms (flushing, vault, composting - depending on area) Maintain access to the water for all user groupsThis shows a commonality among all participants that trash management is a major issue to be addressed, addingrestrooms is a major need, and maintaining access to the water (as it recedes in drought) is a priority for all usergroups. These three items should be at the forefront as all of the other ideas are also addressed and incorporatedinto any future plans or developments.Other highly-ranked items included: Maintain areas for multi-use/instill multi-user trail ethic Increase signage/access to information/website for information Add a disc golf courseThe first two items in this group demonstrate a desire from the stakeholders for an increased “multi-user trailethic” among visitors to the area and a management approach to provide signage to direct appropriate behavior toappropriate places and to provide more information in general via a website for information or park informationboards on site. The plan will explore these ideas further in the planning guidelines section. Adding a disc golfcourse was the 6thhighest ranked idea, and it appears that there is support in the stakeholder groups to add moreamenities to the property in addition to the course (as shown in lower-ranked ideas.)Next in ranking were the following ideas: Keep hunting areas as they are currently Limit additions of new regulations (state law already applies) More police/law enforcement presence Designated areas for access/gate permits/fees Close north road from Marina Road east to Middle Concho ParkThis group of ideas demonstrates the stakeholders’ frustration with any addition of new regulations that areduplicates of what already exists in state law, and that the current laws need to be enforced with increased lawenforcement presence. Additionally, by creating designated areas for access to the recreation area and installing agate permit or fee, the controlled access should make existing laws easier to enforce and be a deterrent for illegalactivities. The various stakeholder groups showed strong support in the workshop for controlling access toeliminate some of the irresponsible users that are ruining the recreation experience for the majority of the law-abiding citizens.
    • 41Closing the north road from Marina road east to Middle Concho Park had a fair amount of votes as well, and wassuggested to allow that area to remain free of full-sized vehicles to protect the users of the OHV trails, the biketrails, and the running trails, and to eliminate illegal dumping that occurs in that area via full sized vehicles.The next highest ranked items were: Any access fees reinvested into Twin Buttes Recreation Area Close Hunting Area #7 Resource/cultural protection & install interp./nature trails and education Add established campgrounds, RV hook-ups, cabins, facilities, playscapes Adjoining private property accessThere was strong support in the workshop for any access fees that are collected at Twin Buttes Recreation Areashould be reinvested back into the area. Several participants felt that the entrance fees and annual entrance passshould be sold separately from Lake Nasworthy fees and annual entrance passes, and that those revenues shouldremain separate. The concept is explored further in the planning guidelines section.Closing Hunting Area #7 was suggested because it overlaps the same area where there are currently OHV trails,mountain biking trails, and running trails. This overlap of activities creates a potential for conflict among huntersand other recreationists. Hunters need quiet and undisturbed areas for the best possible experience and chancesof finding game. OHV riders, mountain bikers, and trail runners create a lot of noise and activity that contradictsthe hunting experience. On top of this basic incongruity is the fact that some people try and drive their full-sizedvehicles on existing trails meant for OHV’s, bikes, or runners to “get back to a hunting spot.” The presence of full-sized vehicles in these areas could potentially be fatal for other recreationists, not to mention the presence of gunsand the possibility of firing upon someone else in this actively used area. There are many other hunting areas inthe recreation area that do not have the nucleus of trails that this area does, and thus allowing hunting in this areais not the best management choice. This idea is explored further in the planning guidelines section.Resource and cultural protection, as well as developing interpretive and nature trails and providing educationalopportunities was the next highest ranked item. The stakeholders felt the addition of interpretive exhibits aboutcultural sites or nature trails would enhance the area and provide another type of recreational experience, andproviding educational opportunities – whether guided nature walks – or educational exhibits about flora and faunaor even a multi-use trail ethic or conservation ethic would be beneficial.Adding established campgrounds, RV hook-ups, cabins, facilities, and playscapes was the next highest ranked idea.While there were a few vocal stakeholders who felt that the area should remain as it is with no improvements orchanges, the majority agreed that some development and/or changes were needed. There were suggestions foran established campground area versus the current “camp anywhere” situation, and some even suggested RVhook-ups due to a lot of OHV trail riders wanting to bring their RV’s out for the weekend. A few stakeholdersmentioned cabins would be nice, as well as playscapes in the more popular day-use areas or future campgroundareas, while the majority of stakeholders agreed some type of facilities needed to be added to the area.The concept of adjoining private property access was also mentioned by a few stakeholders and was ranked in thisprocess. One particular participant felt strongly about maintaining his access to the recreation area via his privategate on his adjoining private property. There were several stakeholders who disagreed that adjacent privateproperty owners should have unfettered access to the public lands, and some even mentioned a “creeping” ofprivate property owners onto public lands. The Bureau of Reclamation’s stance is that there are two authorizedforms of access to Reclamation lands from private property. The first authorized access would be in the form of a
    • 42walk-through gate. Foot access from private property is allowable. However, walk-through gates would need tobe approved and permitted by Reclamation. The second authorized access from private property is for livestockwatering lanes. At the time of project construction, a few of the adjacent land owners retained the right for alivestock watering lane to the reservoir. These access lanes are for livestock only, and no vehicular access isallowed. No vehicular access of any kind is allowable under the two current authorized forms of access fromprivate property. This access issue needs to be addressed further by the City of San Angelo, the Bureau ofReclamation, and law enforcement.Lower in rankings were the following ideas: Separation of user groups/activities/keep primitive area No rules against alcohol consumption (except hunting and driving) Increase wildlife management/resource management/water qualityThe next idea on the ranking list was that of separation of user groups/activities/keep primitive area. The conceptis that some uses need to be separate (not all), but that allowing each stakeholder group to have their “own” areawould eliminate any instances of conflict amongst user groups, eliminate unwanted behavior in delineated areas,and allow the stakeholder group to “adopt” the area for maintenance and litter management. While theparticipants agreed that some areas and uses needed to be separated, they wanted to also make sure that someprimitive areas were maintained at Twin Buttes. Several said the primitive experience was what they enjoyed atTwin Buttes, thus they did not want this to be eliminated once other facilities or rules were added.Some stakeholders felt that there shouldn’t be any additional rules against alcohol consumption in the recreationarea, except what already applies by state law such as no drinking and driving and no drinking and hunting. Thisidea followed along the same theme as the previous idea that no additional regulations needed to be added by theCity which would duplicate existing state laws.The next highest ranked item was to increase wildlife management, resource management, and water quality. Theworkshop participants showed support for protecting the natural resources at Twin Buttes. They understand thatan unhealthy landscape and unhealthy reservoir will diminish the recreation experience, thus the need to monitorand manage the resources. Ideas were discussed for the City’s Parks & Recreation Department to work withagencies such as the Upper Colorado River Authority, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, and the City’s WaterUtilities Department to continue brush control, continue water quality testing, stock fish species in the reservoir,and improve game management on the property.The lowest ranked items in the voting process were the following: Manning of gates (accessible to all - at all hours of intended use) Budget sufficient funds to maintain areas and apply for grants for funding Citizen group to promote recreation use of TBR including information, education, marketing,improvements, etc. Area(s) for full-sized vehicles (off-road)While these were the lowest ranked items in the voting process, it is important to point out that there were otherideas that didn’t receive any votes. Thus, these items, while low on the list, still have value given that they wereoffered up by stakeholders, made it to the final round of discussion, and did receive some stakeholder votes.
    • 43The issue of manning any future gates was brought up because of some of the participants’ concerns with gainingaccess after traditional operating hours of parks. Several stakeholders expressed their current usage at thereservoir involved fishing at night, and/or arriving at the area to camp after getting off of a late shift at work. Theywere concerned that if access hours were restricted to 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, like some parks with manned gates,then their recreation experiences would be limited. This is an important issue to consider when evaluating accessoptions and weighing local users’ needs versus out of town visitors’ needs.Budgeting sufficient funds to maintain areas and applying for grants to fund projects was the next highest rankeditem. The stakeholders at the workshop showed support for the city investing funds to maintain the area,especially any revenues that are collected from entrance fees (a separate idea ranked much higher.) Additionally,stakeholders agreed that the city should apply for grants to fund projects such as development of facilities,development of trails, or implementation of outdoor recreation programs.Another idea to come out of the workshop was the need for a citizen group to promote recreation use of TwinButtes Recreation Area, including information, education, marketing, improvements, etc. Historically, there wasan existing Lake Parks Advisory Board that oversaw both Lake Nasworthy and Twin Buttes Reservoir issues anddevelopments. That board disbanded and hasn’t been in operation for years, yet it appears that the same kind ofconcept is popular with current stakeholders. The advisory board could be made up of representatives from eachof the stakeholder groups present at the visioning workshop: OHV riding, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, trailrunning, windsurfing, and geocaching and would be akin to current “Friends Groups” at other state and nationalparks. These groups fundraise, market, provide volunteer service, and act as general ambassadors to the public forthe recreation area. More information on this idea is explored in the planning guidelines section.Common Idea or Theme Number of VotesTrash management/cleanliness 15Add restrooms (flushing, vault, compost – depending on area) 14Maintain access to the water for all user groups 14Maintain areas for multi-use/instill multi-user trail ethic 12Increase signage/access to information/website for information 10Add a disc golf course 10Keep hunting areas as they are currently 8Limit additions of new regulations (state law already applies) 8More police/law enforcement presence 7Designated areas for access/gate permits/fees 7Close north road from Marina Road east to Middle Concho Park 7Any access fees reinvested in Twin Buttes Recreation Area 6Close Hunting Area #7 6Resource/cultural protection & install interp./nature trails and education 5Add established campgrounds, RV hookups, cabins, facilities, playscapes 5Adjoining private property access 5Separation of user groups/activities/keep primitive area 4No rules against alcohol consumption (except hunting & driving) 4Increase wildlife management/resource management/water quality 3Manning of gates (accessible to all) at all hours of intended use 2Budget sufficient funds to maintain areas & apply for grants for funding 2Citizen group to promote recreation use of TBR incl. information, education,marketing, improvements, etc.1Area(s) for full-size vehicles (off-road) 1
    • 44PUBLIC SURVEYThe public survey was part of the overall planning process for the San Angelo Parks, Recreation, & Open SpaceMaster Plan, but several questions were relevant to the Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area and those resultsare discussed here. The survey was developed using an online tool called Survey Monkey, with 39 questionscovering topics such as: Parks, Trails, & Open Space; Recreation Facilities; and Fees & Reservations; and wasavailable for the public to respond to for a total of 5 weeks. There were over 500 responses received, but not all ofthe surveys were 100% complete. Response levels for each individual question are noted in most of theillustrations or the narrative that corresponds with each question’s analysis.Question 6This question asks citizens to specify what types of park land they would like to see added to San Angelo’sofferings. A large percentage (35.2%) of the 452 respondents chose “linear parks/trails/creek corridors” as themost-needed type of park land. These numbers clearly support other trail projects on-going in the San Angelo areasuch as the downtown Concho River trails, but also supports the addition of trails anywhere, including at TwinButtes Reservoir. Specialty parks such as OHV areas or golf courses at 27.9% of responses, support the theme fromthe public meetings that more non-traditional recreational activities need to be supported in San Angelo and thatan “off-road” trail area at Twin Buttes is important.
    • 45Question 7Question 7 asks citizens if they feel there are enough multi-use trails in San Angelo. Multi-use trails are designedwith proper widths and materials for multiple user groups to utilize at the same time – whether they are motorizedor non-motorized uses. Motorized multi-use trails would be designed for single-rider all-terrain vehicles (ATVs),multiple-rider utility-terrain vehicles (UTVs), and motorcycles. Non-motorized multi-use trails would be designedfor hiking, biking, and equestrian users.The overwhelming majority (62.6%) of respondents said there are not enough multi-use trails in San Angelo. Theseresults support the existing multi-use trails already in the Twin Buttes Recreation Area but also could be asupporting factor in developing new trails in the park.
    • 46Question 8Question 8 asked citizens which recreation facilities need to be added to existing parks or future parks in the Cityof San Angelo with choices of “Definitely Needed,” “Needed,” “Neutral or No Opinion,” “Somewhat Needed,” and“Not Needed.” The graph above shows the aggregate of responses. Hike/Bike Trails were overwhelmingly thenumber-one choice of recreation facilities that need to be added, with 53.8% “Definitely Needed” responses and22.5% “Needed” responses for a total of 76.3% out of 413 responses. This data supports the existing trails that arecurrently at Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area, and supports future development of more trails.The facility choices in this question were developed from initial discussions with city staff as well as feedback frominitial meetings with the Recreation Advisory Board and stakeholder groups. For those types of facilities that werenot listed as a choice in this question, there was an option for the public to write-in facilities that they felt wereneeded. Out of the 60 write-in responses there were 11 responses requesting additional off-road trail areas ormaintaining the current one at Twin Buttes Reservoir.
    • 47Question 21Question 21 asked citizens what types of recreation activities they would participate in if the Recreation Divisionoffered them. There were 17 activities to choose from and an “Other” category to write in responses. Citizenscould “check all that apply”, meaning they could have chosen multiple activities that they were interested in. Thetop 10 choices are shown in the chart.The overwhelming activity of choice was “Canoeing & Kayaking” at 48.9% of responses. This is the kind of activitythat would do well at Twin Buttes Reservoir given the more primitive nature of the park, and as water levelsrecede access for a kayak is easier to maintain versus motorized boats. The “Other Responses” category had 56responses and there were 16 responses mentioning the types of activities that are currently available at TwinButtes or activities that could occur in the future. Activities such as mountain biking, hiking, running, disc golf,triathlons, and motorcycle and ATV riding were all mentioned.
    • 48Question 34Question 34 asked citizens what they would be willing to pay for an annual entrance pass to Lake Nasworthy andTwin Buttes Reservoir Parks. 32.3% of responders said they would pay $20.00. Interestingly, over half of the pie –51.7% of responders – said they would pay anywhere from $25.00 to more than $35.00.There were 69 responses from the “Other” category and they were varied and diverse. Quite a few commentsreferenced that there shouldn’t be a fee to enter the parks because they feel their tax dollars have already paid forthe park. Some comments referenced that entrance to Twin Buttes should still be free, or at least while there areno facilities there. Several responses indicated they would pay $15.00 for an annual entrance pass. Several othersindicated they would pay $10.00 for an annual entrance pass. Additional comments indicated that the amountthey were willing to pay for an annual entrance pass would be dependent upon the upgrades proposed for theparks. A few respondents commented that they would not go to the parks if there was a fee. A few respondentsalso commented that off-road access was important and if there were no area for that activity, then they wouldnot visit the parks, and thus would not pay for the annual pass.
    • 49PLANNING GUIDELINESThe following items are planning guidelines that were developed after reviewing other successful park models andconsidering public input and survey results. The guidelines are a roadmap for the future development andmanagement of Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area with some immediate actions available within someguidelines and some more long-range goals to work towards within other guidelines. The City of San Angelo isresponsible for the management of the Federal lands, but any development shall comply with existing ReclamationDirective and Standards. Many will require Reclamation approval or concurrence. In some cases documentedcompliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) may be required.Twin Buttes Reservoir has 199 documented archeological sites and one of Reclamations’ paramount concerns isthe protection of these cultural resources. A partial list of applicable Reclamation Directive and Standards are: LND 01-03 Recreation Program Management LND 02-04 Administration of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act on Bureau of Reclamation Land LND 04-02 Concession Management by Non-Federal PartnersRECREATION USE ZONESThe concept of recreation use zones refers to defining areas within Twin Buttes Recreation Area where certainactivities can take place and separating those uses that are incompatible for a multi-use environment. Forexample separating passive recreational activities such as bird watching or kayaking - and active recreationalactivities such as ATV riding or jet-skiing are considered best management practices in the park management field.In addition to separating passive and active recreation, day-use areas and overnight camping areas are commonlyseparated and along similar lines, managers of parks near major population centers have to consider local residentuse versus tourist use when designing their park’s use zones.High-Impact ZonesHigh-impact zones are areas where visitor impact on the resource is the greatest and include entrance stations,visitor centers, parking areas, restroom facilities, campground loops, and other similar developed facilities. Thehigh impact zones in the Twin Buttes Recreation Area are the main entrance to the North Pool side of the parkfrom Twin Buttes Marina Road and the entrance to the South Pool side of the park from Ranch to Market Road584. The entrance to the North Pool has the remainder of an old picnic/camping loop with some covered picnictables still being used. The area around these picnic tables is heavily impacted by vehicle use since they areallowed to drive right up to and around all of the picnic sites.The boat ramp areas that provide access to the reservoir would also be considered in the high-impact zone, so asthe water level recedes, the high-impact zone boundary will progress within the area that is temporarily allowedfor access to the reservoir. Vehicle traffic is allowed in high-impact zones as well as motorized recreation such asATV riding and motorcycle riding.Any additional development of campground loops, RV hook-ups, restroom facilities, playgrounds, etc. would belocated in the high-impact zones which are detailed in the conceptual maps section.
    • 50Primitive ZonesPrimitive zones are just the opposite of high-impact zones – they are theareas that are impacted the least by humans and generally only allow accesson foot, by horseback, or by mountain bike. Primitive zones are oftendetermined based on the sensitivity of the local environment – for instance- a pristine creek that is critical for aquatic and terrestrial species wouldnormally be classified as a primitive area to reduce the amount of humanimpact versus a large open field that is part of a larger complex of grasslandhabitat that could be developed for park use and could stand up to morerepeated use.Specifically in Twin Buttes Recreation Area, the areas farthest from the park entrances and deeper into the interiorof the property would be considered primitive zones – particularly along Spring Creek and the peninsula betweenSpring Creek and the Middle Concho River, and along the South Concho River. See the conceptual map section ofthis plan for more detail.Hunting ZonesIn the case of Twin Buttes Recreation Area, the current set-up allows hunting to take place everywhere on theproperty and city staff have only designated hunting “zones” on a map mainly for reference purposes. There is nosignage nor really anyway to tell what hunting area you are in or if you cross into the area where hunting is notallowed unless you have a GPS unit with the boundaries programmed in it.The fact that hunting can take place in an area with heavily-used ATV trails, running trails, and mountain bikingtrails is not the best management practice. The potential for conflict and for human fatality is too high. Thickbrush characteristic of the property would inhibit hunters from knowing what is on the other side of the brush, andin reality there could be a trail with a mountain biker riding by that gets accidentally shot were the hunter to missthe animal, or worse yet, mistake a person for an animal.Hunting Area VII (as seen on the map below) is the area where there aremany heavily-used trails and where hunting should no longer beallowed. There have also been some suggestions from city staff tofurther categorize hunting zones by the type of hunting that is allowed.For example, designating Hunting Area VI as a waterfowl hunting areaonly would separate those hunters from deer hunters or turkey hunters.This type of separation has merit given the different environmentsdesired for each different type of hunting. Plus, waterfowl hunters areconcentrated near the water and will be shooting towards the water orthe sky and not through the brush at the level of potential trail users, since there areproposed trails in Hunting Area VI. Hunting in the other zones should remain as is; howeveraccess restrictions should be enforced, as discussed in more detail in the next section.Additionally, paint markers or flags should be installed on trees or other posts to notify hunters that they are at aboundary line of a hunting area. GPS coordinates of hunting area boundaries should also be available to huntersso that they can program coordinates into their GPS units if desired (and if technologically-savvy.) An example canbe found at this link: http://www.kdwpt.state.ks.us/news/KDWPT-Info/Locations/Hunting-Fishing-Maps-by-County/Fall-Hunting-Atlas/GPS-Information-Files
    • 51
    • 52Off Road Vehicle Use ZoneReclamation Manual LND 01-03 – addresses ORV use on Reclamation lands and states that Reclamation lands willbe closed to off-road vehicle (ORV) use unless, through an approved planning process, a Reclamation area isdesignated as limited or open to off-road vehicle (ORV) use and conditions of use are specifically described. Theprocess of determining whether an area, road, or trail is designated as open to ORV use, open to limited use,closed to use, and the level of use allowed will include a combined public involvement process, a NationalEnvironmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the development of planning documents. For more informationconcerning the rules, regulations, and procedures for use of ORV’s on Reclamation lands, see 43 CFR part 420; EO11644, dated February 8, 1972; and EO 11989, dated May 24, 1977.”The City of San Angelo, in cooperation with the San Angelo Dirt Riders, should begin the process to legitimize theuse of ORV’s at Twin Buttes. The current trail map should be submitted for review by the Bureau of Reclamationand any adjustments to trail placements need to be made to avoid sensitive archeological sites. Preliminaryreviews show some area of overlap between existing trails and archeological sites but many areas where they donot. Additionally, a portion of the existing trail network is actually on private land – a small linear parcel on theinside of Twin Buttes Marina Road. Given practicality issues, it is advised that the city lease this small parcel to beincluded as part of the park since it is widely believed by the public to be a part of the park and already includes aportion of the trail network. Effort should be made by city officials to be inclusive of the stakeholder groups whodeveloped the trail systems and work within the existing framework wherever possible. This effort will likelytranslate into a designated ORV use area with a legitimate trail system approved by Reclamation and a healthystakeholder group invested in the conservation of the park.MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONSIn addition to defining recreation use zones within the Twin Buttes property, there are several managementrecommendations that the consultant has identified for city staff to implement. Whether the city decides to fundand manage these programs themselves or contracts them out to a concessionaire, the following managementtools should be implemented.Friends GroupMany national, state, regional, and local level parks have a “Friends of X Park” group that is a vital part of themanagement, operation, and success of the park. Some Friends Groups are loosely organized groups of volunteerswho occasionally participate in service projects throughout the park; and some are highly organized whosemembers spend thousands of hours volunteering in parks and fundraising for park projects and programs. Most ofthe highly organized groups maintain a 501(c)3 federal tax status which is critical for fundraising and applying forgrants.The Twin Buttes Recreation Area currently has several organized “Friends Groups – by Activity” whichrepresentatives could be solicited from to form one cohesive “Friends Group.” The new group should haverepresentatives from all of the following at a minimum: the San Angelo Dirt Riders (ATV and motorcycle riders); theSan Angelo Road Lizards Running Club; the San Angelo Windsurfers Club; the San Angelo Bicycle Association; theSan Angelo Ducks Unlimited chapter; and the Concho Bass Club. Additionally, city staff should seek outrepresentation from the equestrian community, the hunting community, the kayaking community, and thegeocaching community. City staff needs to foster the development of a Friends Group that combines all of thesegroups and encourage this new “Friends of Twin Buttes” group to obtain 501 (c)3 federal tax status.
    • 53In theory, the group will elect its own officers, develop its own by-laws, and operate on their own independently ofthe city, but work closely with the city or private management company (if city decides to go that route) to planprojects and programs for the recreation area. The benefit to this arrangement is that the Friends Group can applyfor grant funding that can only be disseminated to 501 (c)3 organizations and leverage this funding with cityfunding or other grant funding.In addition to the benefit of extra funding capabilities, having a dedicated Friends Group with passionate, engagedcommunity members is invaluable to the operation and success of the park.Park Host ProgramA park host (also called campground host) is a volunteer (usually a retired couple), that provide volunteer labor tothe park in exchange for a free campsite with RV hook-ups. Depending on the amenities of the park, some parkhosts also receive free cable TV, laundry use, or wireless internet access. Typical park host duties includeregistering visitors and campers, collecting fees, cleaning restrooms, leading guided hikes, selling firewood, andeducating visitors on park rules and regulations.A park host is also a valuable asset to a park property if there is no on-site management such as a parksuperintendent living on the property because they can be the “eyes and the ears” on the property and report anyillegal activities or issues of concern to the appropriate authorities. They can also act as the after-hours contact forany questions that people may have or if there are any emergency situations that happen overnight they can helpdirect people to the appropriate resource.The establishment of a Park Host Program should be a priority for the city because this position is so critical forsuccessful day to day operations and only costs the city a minimal amount in utility costs.On-site ManagementOn-site management, where a park superintendent lives on the park property 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, is abest management practice found at the national, state, and regional park level across the field. It is a criterion inthe Texas State Park Model (discussed earlier in this plan), and is suggested for Twin Buttes Recreation Area as wellbecause of its large size (approx. 8,000 acres) and because of the primitive nature of the park.Establishment & Enforcement of RulesHiring a park superintendent that lives on site combined with aPark Host Program and continued patrolling by the San AngeloPolice Department and Texas Parks & Wildlife State GameGardens will significantly make a positive impact in deterringunwanted and illegal activities and make enforcement of rulesand regulations much easier. Besides park rules that aredeveloped by the city in the form of city ordinances, there arealso federal regulations that city staff must consider whenimplementing this recreation use plan.Particularly in reference to the problem of visitors bringing inmaterials to build permanent blinds and leaving tree standsand other temporary blinds beyond a 24 hour period, anddriving off road anywhere in the park, the existing federal regulation needs to be enforced:
    • 5443 CFR Part 420.11 Off-Road Vehicle Use: Requirements-vehiclesEach off-road vehicle that is operated on Reclamation lands shall meet the following requirements:a) It shall conform to applicable state laws and vehicle registration requirements.b) It shall be equipped with a proper muffler and spark arrestor in good working order and in constantoperation. The spark arrestor must conform to Forest Service Spark Arrestor Standard 5100-1a, and thereshall be no muffler cutout, bypass, or similar device.c) It shall have adequate brakes and, for operation from dusk to dawn, working headlights and taillights.43 CFR Part 420.12 Off-Road Vehicle Use: Requirements-operatorsa) In addition to the regulation of Part 420, operators shall comply with any applicable State laws pertainingto off-road vehicles; if State laws are lacking or less stringent than the regulations established in this part,then the regulations in part 420 are minimum standards and are controlling.b) Each operator of an off-road vehicle operated on Reclamation lands shall possess a valid motor vehicleoperator’s permit or license; or, if no permit or license is held, he/she shall be accompanied by or underthe immediate supervision of a person holding a valid permit or license.c) During the operation of snowmobiles, trail bikes, and any other off-road vehicle the operator shall wearsafety equipment, generally accepted or prescribed by applicable State law or local ordinance use for useof the particular activity in which he/she is participating.d) No person shall operate an off-road vehicle:1. In a reckless, careless, or negligent manner;2. In excess of established speed limits;3. While under the influence of alcohol or drugs;4. In a manner likely to cause irreparable damage or disturbance of the land, wildlife, vegetativeresources, or archeological and historic values of resources; or5. In a manner likely to become a nuisance to other users of Reclamation or adjacent lands.43 CFR Part 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property(a) You must not abandon personal property of any kind in or on Reclamation facilities, lands, orwaterbodies.(b) You must not store or leave unattended personal property of any kind.(1) Unattended personal property is presumed to be abandoned:(i) After a period of 24 hours;(ii) At any time after a posted closure takes effect under Subpart B of this part 423; or(iii) At any time for reasons of security, public safety, or resource protection.(2) If personal property is presumed abandoned, an authorized official may impound it, store it, andassess a reasonable impoundment fee.(3) The impoundment fee must be paid before the authorized official will return the impounded propertyto you.(c) An authorized official may impound or destroy unattended personal property at any time if it:(1) Interferes with safety, operation, or management of Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies; or(2) Presents a threat to persons or Reclamation project resources.(d) An authorized official may dispose of abandoned personal property in accordance with the procedurescontained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the Interior policy.
    • 55In reference to visitors using fireworks at Twin Buttes Recreation Area, the following federal regulation needs to beenforced:43 CFR Part 423.30 Weapons, firearms, explosives, and fireworks(c) You must not use or possess explosives, or fireworks or pyrotechnics of any type, except as allowed by a permitissued pursuant to Subpart D of this part 423, or in special use areas so designated by an authorized official underSubpart E of this par 423.In reference to visitors who bring in trash, old furniture, building materials, and other refuse to dump in theinterior areas of the park, the following federal regulation needs to be enforced:43 CFR Part 423.34 Sanitation(a) You must not bring or improperly dispose of refuse on Reclamation facilities, lands, and waterbodies.Both the owner and the person bringing or disposing refuse may be issued a citation for violating thisprovision.(b) Campers, picnickers, and all other persons using Reclamation lands must keep their sites free of trash andlitter during the period of occupancy and must remove all personal equipment and clean their sites beforedeparture.Entrance FeesCharging an entrance fee for a park changes its perception in the minds of people, in that – if you have to pay toget in – the park is worth something. Versus the current psychological state of many people who know about TwinButtes as a “dumping ground” or a place to go and cause destruction because it is free to get in and no one caresabout it. Adding an entrance fee in combination with all of the other recommendations here will create a positivechange for Twin Buttes and create a small stream of revenue to help make improvements to the park.A modest entry fee per person is suggested in the $2 - $5 range depending on how many amenities are added tothe park. At the present a $2 per person fee would be appropriate and as amenities are added, it could beincreased up to $5 or more. The important thing to note about pricing is that visitors have to see some tangibleresult from the monies before they will be willing to pay more. The establishment of an annual pass is alsosuggested for the local residents who visit the park regularly.SignageThe implementation of park entrance signage, regulatory signage,directional signage, and interpretive signage are all recommended for TwinButtes Recreation Area. Currently, there is little to no signage in the park.Park entrance signage creates a psychological barrier for park visitors, thatas they physically drive past the entrance sign, they understand they areentering a park area with its own set of rules and behavior ethics associatedwith parks. Park entrance signage can also be aesthetically pleasing andhelp foster a sense of pride about the park.Regulatory signage should be present where necessary such as boatingregulations at a boat ramp, or where problems have occurred in the past,such as at historical dumping areas. Directional signage is needed so that
    • 56visitors can find their way around the park with ease.Currently, there is no signage directing people to theboat ramps or to the ATV trail area, etc.Informational signage should be installed at or near theentrances to the park with park rules and regulationsposted, hunting seasons and regulations posted, as wellas entrance fee information and instructions on whereto pay fees and/or purchase hunting permits andannual park passes. It is recommended that one largemessage board be installed at each park entrancewhere different updated versions of rules andinformation can easily be replaced by installing newpostings or signs on the larger board.Interpretive signage should be implemented over time as city staff and the Friends Group develop more trails andprograms that could interpret the natural resources or historical aspects of the property to the public. Bothinterpretive signage and park entrance signage construction could easily be community volunteer projects or localEagle Scout projects.Vehicular ManagementOne of the signature challenges besides receding water levels at Twin Buttes Recreation Area is the lack ofvehicular management. A designated road system needs to be established and vehicular barriers put in placewhere they are needed. Currently, city staff has already installed a pipe rail barrier in some places where the needwas greatest. The designated road system would need to be approved by Reclamation and be NEPA compliant.Road infrastructure in the North Pool area would be based on the existing paved Twin Buttes Marina Road, andcould be extended to the west along the Middle Concho River arm of the reservoir and end in a new parking areafor hunters to access the interior regions of the park. A temporary dirt road would be established where itcurrently exists off of the main boat ramp at the end of Twin Buttes Marina Road, and would continue to thecurrent shoreline to provide continued access to the water for fishermen, windsurfers, waterfowl hunters, andkayakers. The dirt road would be defined by a temporary cable and post system that would be removed orextended as water levels increase or decrease.The improved caliche road that is accessible from TwinButtes Marina Road on the north side and connects toMiddle Concho Park on the east side should be closed toregular vehicle traffic. There are existing gates on eitherend, so there will be no problem in locking them andclosing that road off. The road will still be available foremergency crews to utilize when needed, and will also beavailable for stakeholder group access for special eventspermitted by the city. Closing this road off will eliminatevehicular traffic into this area of the park which isdominated by trail systems and where vehicles have triedto access trails before, and where dumping has occurred.
    • 57Litter ManagementAnother challenge that needs to be addressed is litter management. There are several methods that could be usedin combination to help combat the problem. Controlling vehicular management will automatically limit access tothe deep interior reaches of the park so popular with those who illegally dump, thus making an immediatereduction in litter in the park. Second, installing dumpsters in key areas in the high-impact zones such as at boatramps and camping loops will give responsible visitors a place to dispose of their trash. Dumpsters should only beinstalled however, after a gated or manned access has been instituted, otherwise they will fill up from peoplebringing in trash.With the addition of on-site management, a Park Host Program, and increased patrolling by law enforcement it isexpected that outright littering will also decrease with more authority figures present. Also, if a manned entrancestation is implemented, each visitor to the park could be given a free trash bag to encourage personalresponsibility of trash. The same program could occur if visitors had to check-in with a Park Host.Managed Hunting ProgramThe hunting activity at Twin Buttes desperately needs to be managed. A permitting process needs to beestablished and a fee assessed to offset the cost of the program. Currently, Twin Buttes’ status as a “no-man’sland” allows for confusion as to what the regulations are and leads some to engage in irresponsible and illegalbehavior. The pure lack of information provided by the city contributes to this atmosphere, and thus, regulationsneed to be set (using the management best practices in this plan) and available on the web and in hand-out format local municipal offices and visitor centers.It is recommended that all vehicle traffic intotraditional hunting areas be restricted byallowing only permitted hunters accessbeyond locked gates by issuing the gate codefor that hunting season only. No hunting willbe permitted outside of Texas Parks &Wildlife Department-determined huntingseasons and no access (beyond foot orequestrian traffic) will be allowed into thedesignated Primitive Zones when huntingseason is over. Permitted hunters who areallowed vehicle access beyond the lockedgates will only be allowed to drive on themain designated road to an interior parkinglocation where vehicles must remain parkedin designated areas and hunters mustproceed on foot from that point.The conceptual maps later in this plan outline potential main roads into the interior of the Primitive Zones basedupon heavily-traveled existing dirt roads. City staff would have to do some work to block off other side roads byusing either native brush piled up or temporary stake and flag type barriers to direct traffic. Signage would alsoneed to be installed to remind visitors to keep vehicles on the designated main road. If violations occur then citystaff and the San Angelo Police Department have the option to enforce the rule and ticket the violator and revokehis or her hunting permit. If violations continue then the city has the option to shut down the entire Primitive
    • 58Zone to hunting. The majority of hunters are law-abiding and would most likely report violators to authorities toprotect their privilege of hunting in the area.If city staff chooses not to engage in hunting management then efforts need to be made to join the Texas Parks &Wildlife Public Hunting Program. As part of the Public Hunting Program, the recreation area lands will be includedin a state-wide map of available properties to hunt in, and will be included in the existing permitting process.Currently, those who choose to hunt on public lands (or leased private lands) must purchase an Annual HuntingPermit for $48. The permit can be purchased at major sporting goods stores in the state and gives hunters’ accessto nearly a million acres of land all across the state. In the program, TPWD biologists will monitor and assess thewildlife populations at Twin Buttes Reservoir, in order to suggest bag limits, if they should need to be differentthan county-wide limits. Additionally, being in a TPWD sponsored program will make it easier for hunters to knowand understand the regulations – as the same as what they are used to at other properties – and will ease some ofthe confusion as to what is and isn’t legal at Twin Buttes Recreation Area.CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTSInvestment in the capital infrastructure of the park is recommended. As the owner of the land, the Bureau ofReclamation may cost share up to 50% for recreation improvements depending on the availability of funds.Reclamation approval is also required for all construction and other improvements, and that new improvementsmust be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the National Environmental Policy Act(NEPA.)While there is not significant political will in the municipal arena for improvements, there is significant communitysupport for at least basic capital improvements such as road infrastructure, restroom facilities, and continuedenhancement of trail systems. Additionally, investment in entrance signage, entrance gates, and entrance stationsthat could be manned by volunteer park hosts should be considered given the value they will serve in controllingthe unwanted behaviors by irresponsible users.Additionally, investments need to be made in vehicle control where access is allowed to the receding shoreline.Since the shoreline is so far away from the current boat ramps on the North Pool, vehicles should be allowed todrive down the existing boat ramps along one main, designated road to an area of shoreline for fishing,windsurfing and kayak launching, and waterfowl hunting. It is recommended that removable posts and cables beinstalled along the main road and the defined shoreline areas in the immediate future to gain control of the vehicletraffic and allow past roads to be reclaimed by vegetation.Small projects with the support and assistance of thecurrent user groups should be encouraged and facilitatedby city staff as much as possible. For example, local groupssuch as the San Angelo Ducks Unlimited Chapter havevolunteered their time to assist in installing a floating dockon the South Pool to make it easier to launch small boats.This group like many other stakeholder groups at TwinButtes may be able to get materials and equipmentdonated for use in park projects.Additionally, the Concho Valley Disc Golf Association hasinterest in installing a disc golf course on the east side of
    • 59the park near the gate to Middle Concho Park. The group provides the volunteer labor to establish the course andmaintain it, plus purchases all of the equipment needed for the course. This is a win-win for city officials whichmerely have to provide space and help monitor its use.The San Angelo Dirt Riders have made significant improvements to the OHV trail system such as installing signage,mapping the area, and cleaning up the trails where people have dumped trash. The group supports moreinvestment in the area such as trailhead informational signage, restroom facilities, and a camping loop for riderswho want to stay overnight.SPECIAL EVENTSCity staff should continue to support the local stakeholder groups already hosting special events in the park, andwork to enhance those special events by providing Convention & Visitors Bureau marketing support among otherorganizational support.Triathlons, mud runs, 5K and 10K races, and mountain bike races hostedby the San Angelo Road Lizards Running Club or the San Angelo BicyclingAssociation should continue to be supported at Twin Buttes RecreationArea. Additionally, any tournaments initiated by the Concho Valley DiscGolf Association at a future course within Twin Buttes Recreation Areashould be supported by city staff. Not only do these kinds of eventsinvolve a lot of local residents, they also bring in a lot of visitors to thearea, who have come solely to race or compete in a tournament. Theeconomic impact associated with these events, should also garnerConvention & Visitor Bureau marketing support for the associated non-profits hosting these events.The idea of an off-road “Baja-style” race to be held at Twin ButtesRecreation Area was presented by the San Angelo Dirt Riders, the LucasOil Baja organization, and the San Angelo Chamber of Commerce duringthis master planning process. The proposed race course would mostly consist of existing dirt roads throughout therecreation area. The idea should be considered with the following precautions: the race course should not crosswater bodies such as an arm of the lake or Spring Creek; the course should only be routed on existing dirt roadsalready established within the park – no new trails should be blazed.; the day of the event the park should beclosed to other conflicting activities such as hunting or biking near the course; and the race course should avoidsensitive archaeological areas as defined by the Bureau of Reclamation.
    • 60FUNDING OPPORTUNITIESIn addition to traditional funding sources such as the City of San Angelo’s General Fund, and any fees generated bypark users, there are many other funding opportunities available for outdoor recreation facilities and programs.The following section highlights just some of the grants available; there are many more out there. Many of thesefunding opportunities require the recipient be a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, which is why it is important forcity staff to engage with the local user groups who already have attained this status and/or help to foster a TwinButtes Recreation Area Friends Group that will attain this status.TPWD Trail GrantsThe Texas Parks & Wildlife Department administers the National Recreational Trails Fund in Texas under theapproval of the Federal Highway Administration. This program receives funding from a portion of federal gastaxes paid on fuel used in non-highway recreational vehicles. The grants can cover up to 80% of a project’s cost upto $200,000 for non-motorized trail grants. Currently there is no limit for motorized trail projects. Funds can bespent to build new recreational trails, to improve existing trails, to develop trailheads or trailside facilities (i.e.parking, restrooms, air stations), or to acquire trail corridors. The application deadline is Feb. 1 of each year.http://tpwd.state.tx.us/business/grants/trpa/#trailBoating Access GrantsThis grant program also administered by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department provides up to a 75% match ofproject funds up to $500,000. The applicant must provide: the land, the 25% match in funds or in-kind labor, andguarantee public access to the area and maintenance and operation responsibilities for a minimum of 25 years.These funds are allocated annually from the federal Sport Fish Restoration Act and can be used to construct boatramps or boat lifts, breakwaters, loading docks, land acquisition, fish cleaning stations, restrooms, sewagetreatment facilities, potable water, showers, security lights, parking areas associated with the access facilities,signage, navigational aids, retaining walls, engineering and dredging. The application deadline is Oct. 31 of eachyear. http://tpwd.state.tx.us/business/grants/trpa/#boatrampOutdoor Recreation GrantsThese grants administered by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department provide up to a 50% match of project fundsfor outdoor recreation projects such as parkland acquisition, construction of playgrounds, sport courts, sportfields, swimming pools, splash pads, camping facilities, canoe launches, nature trails, etc. The maximum amount ofthe grant award is normally $500,000; however recent budget cuts in the legislature have reduced the amount offunds available. Special calls for applications will be sent out when funds are available – the most recent deadlinewas August 1 of the year and there were matches available up to $100,000.http://tpwd.state.tx.us/business/grants/trpa/#outdoorGreat American TrailsAdministered by the National Recreation and Park Association, with funding provided by the Darden Foundationand Longhorn Steakhouse Restaurants, the Great American Trails program provides funding for refurbishing andimproving trails across the country. In 2012, eight communities were awarded the grants including twocommunities in Texas. http://www.nrpa.org/greatamericantrails/
    • 61Tread Lightly! Stewardship GrantsThese grants of up to $1,000 are available to help with a volunteer-based trail clean-up, or trail maintenanceprojects. The grants are available to Tread Lightly organization members at the $100 per year level andmembership is open to anyone. Grants cover expenses such as tools necessary for projects, trash bags and/ordumpster rental, water or other non-alcoholic beverages for volunteers, fuel used at project location, signagematerials, trail building and restoration materials, and facility rentals. The deadline to apply for each cycle isMarch 1, June 1, August 1, and December 31. http://treadlightly.org/tread-lightly-stewardship-grant-program/Bell Built GrantsSponsored by Bell and administered by the International Mountain Biking Association there are 3 grants availablefor $100,000 to build one of each type of trail: Pump Track/Bike Park, Flow Trail, and a DH/Gravity Trail.Applications are accepted until Feb. 8 in 2013 and then finalists will be selected. The finalists will then be enteredinto a voting contest throughout the mountain biking community and the 3 projects with the most votes will beselected as winners. It is anticipated that this will be an annual granting opportunity.http://www.imba.com/resources/grants/bell-builtIMBA/CLIF Bar Trail Preservation GrantsThese grants of $500 are administered by the International Mountain Biking Association and sponsored by CLIFBar. The grants are available to IMBA affiliated clubs to support trail restoration and preservation projects.Applicants must have 501(c)3 status and fill out a short application. The deadline to apply is April 15 annually. CLIFBar also supports volunteer trail events with donations of CLIF Bars and can be ordered on the IMBA website.http://www.imba.com/resources/grants/2011-imba-clif-bar-grantsIMBA/HucknRoll Trail Improvement GrantsThe International Mountain Biking Association administers these $700 grants sponsored by HucknRoll. The grantsare available to IMBA affiliated clubs and can be used to support projects that maintain and improve thesustainability of trails, preserve the environment, and enhance conservation in the mountain biking community.The deadline to apply is April 15 and application materials can be found on the IMBA website.http://www.imba.com/resources/grants/hucknroll-trail-improvement-grantsIMBA/USAC Trail Tune-up GrantsUSA Cycling funds these grants through member donations on license applications and renewal forms. Projectsthat create or improve trails used for mountain bike racing will be given the highest consideration but the $2,000grants can also be used to improve trails for race training and recreational riding. The grant also includes technicalassistance from one of the Subaru/IMBA Trail Care Crews with an on-site visit. The application period for 2012 wasMay 15 – August 15. http://www.imba.com/resources/grants/2010-imbausac-trail-tune-grants-availableBikes Belong Coalition GrantsThe Bikes Belong Coalition provides grants to support projects such as bike paths, rail trails, mountain bike trails,bike parks, BMX facilities, and large-scale bicycle advocacy initiatives. Grants awarded at this time are calledCommunity Partnership Grants and are awarded to a combined partnership of (1) non-profit 501(c)3 organization,(1) municipality, and (1) business. Grants are in the $2,000 - $10,000 range and a specific match is not required,however grants where more than 50% of project funds are requested from Bikes Belong will not be considered.
    • 62Special consideration is given to applications where funds are leveraged by partnerships or other funding sources.The application deadline for this year is May 24, 2013. http://www.bikesbelong.org/grants/The NorthFace Explore FundThis grant program is sponsored by The NorthFace outdoor gear retailer and provides grants up to $2,500 for non-profit groups to encourage youth outdoor participation, connect children to the outdoors, increase access to bothfrontcountry and backcountry recreation, and provide education for both personal and environmental health.Organizations must have 501(c)3 status and provide specific proposals with measurable outcomes. The 2013application deadlines have not yet been announced. http://www.explorefund.org/NEEF Every Day Capacity Building GrantsThe National Environmental Education Foundation administers this grant program which is sponsored by Toyota.The program provides grants of up to $5,000 to strengthen Friends Groups to unleash their potential to serve theirpublic lands. These grants strengthen stewardship of public lands by strengthening Friends Groups throughfunding for organizational capacity building. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and there are 2 deadlines:October 30 and April 30. http://www.neefusa.org/grants/every_day_grants.htm
    • 63CONCEPTUAL MAPSTwin Buttes Recreation Area Overview (Detailed maps to follow)
    • 64North Pool Recreation Use Zones – Middle Concho Arm
    • 65North Pool Recreation Use Zones – Spring Creek Arm
    • 66South Pool Recreation Use Zones
    • 67North Pool Overview
    • 68North Pool – Main Entrance
    • 69North Pool – Middle Concho River Arm
    • 70North Pool – Spring Creek Arm
    • 71South Pool Overview (detailed maps to follow)
    • 72South Pool - Main Entrance
    • 73South Pool – South Concho Arm
    • 74APPENDIX
    • 223Find your way with easy tounderstand trail signs and mapsTrail Number & DirectionATV RatingGreen = Beginner,Blue = Intermediate,Red = Advanced4x4 / Jeep RatingGreen = Class 2, Blue = Class 3Orange = Class 4, Red = Class 5Black Mountain Off-Road AdventureArea Office & General Store(606) 837-3205Office Hours:8-430 Sunday thru Thursday8-8 Friday and SaturdayTrails always openOperated by the Harlan CountyOutdoor Recreation Board Authoritywww.HarlanCountyTrails.comLodgingEvarts Tourism Commission, EvartsRV Sites, Camping, 1 Mile from Trailhead (877) 737-0778Black Mountain Cabins, Evarts2 Miles from Trailhead (606) 837-9961Harlan County CampgroundCabins & RV Park, Putney Trailhead (606) 573-9009Little Inn of Harlan, Harlan8 Miles from either Trailhead (606) 573-7011Holiday Inn Express, Harlan9 Miles from either Trailhead (800) 465-4329Mount Aire Motel, Harlan9 Miles from either Trailhead (800) 988-4660America’s Best Value Inn, Cumberland12 Miles from Putney Trailhead (606) 589-4911Benham School House Inn, Benham15 Miles from Putney Trailhead (800) 231-0627For more lodging information, visitwww.HarlanCountyTrails.com/lodgingCome Ride The Best“Possibly the best ATVRiding area in North America”- ATV IllustratedPermit Fees (Per Vehicle)$35 - Yearly Permit (One year from month of purchase)Family Discount: $5 off your second permit and $15off each additional (Yearly Permit only)$20 - 31-Day PermitPrimitive Campsites and Tent Decks Available
    • Events all-year roundBlack Mountain is home to an array ofevents and competitions held by local andnational clubs each year. Be sure to checkout our events schedule online atwww.HarlanCountyTrails.comOver 150 Miles of Trails...Open 24 hours per day, 365 days per yearTrails for everybodyIt doesn’t matter if you prefer sport quads,side-by-sides or rail buggies, Black Moun-tain offers an experience for families andhardcore off-roaders, all at rates lowerthan any other off-road trail system.Come Join the Fun!!Black Mountain Off-Road Adventure Area isfast-becoming the most popular ATV and 4x4destination on the east coast. The reason issimple; Great trails, breathtaking views andold-fashioned Appalachian hospitality.- Beginner, Intermediate and Extreme trails.- Every trail is marked, rated and mapped.- Open to ATVs, Trucks, Dirtbikes and more.- Never closes, open all day, year-round.- Two convenient trailheads.Find out more online atwww.HarlanCountyTrails.comElevations up to 3,300 FeetBreathtaking views from atopthe Appalachian MountainsClass 4 & Class 54x4 ObstaclesVariety of trails rated for every skill level…Beginner, Moderate or Advanced
    • 2012 Firearm Hunt RegulationsLaguna Atascosa National Wildlife RefugeNew Information:All hunt permits are now $75 each.Two-deer bag limit: one male(antlered or button buck) and onefemale or two females per huntpermit.Scouting periods are November9-11 and 16-18, 2012.Refuge Firearm HuntsFive 2-day hunts, 3 consecutive days eachhunt, from noon the first day to noon the lastday, 35 hunters per hunt, as follows:Hunt #1: December 4-6Hunt #2: December 8-10Hunt #3: December 14-16Hunt #4: December 21-23Hunt #5: December 28-30Firearm Permit Process & FeeAll firearm hunts are a random drawing.Applications are only accepted and have to bepostmarked during August, 2012. Applicantsonly pay if they are selected. All hunts arenow $75 per hunt permit. Replacementpermits will be issued for an additional $5 fee.Applicants can mail, fax, or apply in person atthe Refuge Office, Monday-Friday; 7:30 a.m.to 4:00 p.m. A maximum of three applicantsmay be listed on each application but anindividual hunter may apply only once. Onlysuccessful applicants will be notified by mailin September, 2012. All hunt fees are non-refundable. All hunts may be cancelledwithout notice for public safety or resourceprotection reasons (e.g., high wildfire danger).Firearm Hunt UnitsRefuge Units 2, 3, 5, and 8 will be open forfirearm scouting and hunting. Hunt Units orareas within a unit may not be reserved.Closed AreasThe following areas are closed to hunting:Adolph Thomae, Jr. County Park in Unit 3,Units 1, 4, 6, and 7 and all areas posted “NoHunting Zone” or as indicated on the FirearmHunt Map.Hunting AccessOnly permitted hunters will be allowed in theHunt Units during the firearm hunts. On thefirst day of your scheduled hunt, you mustreport to the Refuge check station at 12 noonfor a hunter orientation. For the remainder ofthe hunt, you may enter the Refuge one hourbefore legal shooting hours (i.e., 1½ hoursbefore official sunrise). All harvested game isrequired to check out at the Refuge checkstation.Parking and Vehicle AccessVehicle parking is allowed at the Unit 1parking area, along the roadsides of GeneralBrant Road (FM 106), and County Road.Motorized vehicle access is allowed onRefuge roads that are not closed by gates orsigns. All other roads may only be accessedby foot or bicycle.Mobility Impaired HuntersHunters with mobility impairments mustcontact the Assistant Refuge Manager byOctober 28, 2012 to obtain the newapplication forms for special accessaccommodations.Scouting AccessPermitted hunters may scout during thefollowing periods: November 2-4 and 16-18,2012. Scouting access hours will be fromofficial sunrise to official sunset. A permittedhunter, and a limit of two non-permittedindividuals accompanying the hunter, mayenter the Hunt Units during the scoutingperiod. A Refuge-issued Vehicle ValidationTag & Scouting Permit must be conspicuouslydisplayed on vehicle dashboard. Possession offirearms or archery equipment is not permittedduring scouting.Flagging & MarkersThe use of flagging and markers to marktrails and stands is prohibited.Hunting Stands & BlindsWe allow hunting from portable stands or bystalking and still hunting. There is a limit ofone blind or stand per permitted hunter. Youmust attach hunter identification (name andphone number), to the blind or stand. Weprohibit attaching blinds and stands to trees ormaking blinds and stands from naturalVegetation. You must remove all blinds andstands at the end of the permitted hunt season.Other UsesWe prohibit use of or hunting from any typeof watercraft or floating device. We prohibitthe possession or use of dogs while scoutingor hunting.Legal WeaponsWe only allow the use of shoulder-firedmuzzleloaders, rifles and crossbows duringthe firearm hunt. Persons may only use(discharge) firearms in accordance withRefuge regulations. Muzzleloader firearmsmust be .40 caliber or larger, and modernrifles must be center fired and .22 caliber orlarger. All firearms must be unloaded andcased while in a vehicle. Loaded is definedhas having rounds in the chamber or a firingcap on a muzzle-loading firearm. We prohibittarget practice or ‘‘sighting-in’’ on the refuge.BaitThe possession and/or distribution of bait orhunting over bait is prohibited.Legal Species and Bag LimitTwo-deer bag limit: one male (antlered orbutton buck) and one female per hunt permit.There is no bag limit on feral hogs and nilgaiantelope. Hunting of javelina is prohibited.You may not kill or wound an animal coveredin this section and intentionally or knowinglyfail to make a reasonable effort to retrieve andinclude it in your bag limit.Hunters 17 and YoungerEach youth hunter, ages 9 through 17, must beaccompanied by, and remain within sight andnormal voice contact of, an adult age 21 orolder.Hunter OrangeHunters must visibly wear 400 square inchesof hunter orange including 144 square inchesvisible on both the chest and back, and ahunter orange cap or hat visible on the head.Hunter orange camouflage patterns may beworn.Field DressingHunts are primitive; therefore, assistance fromRefuge personnel will be very limited to none.Make harvest plans accordingly. Harvestedgame must be field dressed before removedfrom the Refuge. You may quarter your game.You may use a non-motorized cart/wagon totransport harvested game. A meat cooler isavailable at the Refuge check station fortemporary storage of game.Alcoholic Beverages and DrugsThe use or possession of alcoholic beveragesand drugs on the Refuge is prohibited.CampingWe allow camping only at Adolph Thomae Jr.County Park. Access to the Refuge is notpermitted directly from the county park.We reserve the right to revoke or deny anypermit for up to five years due to unsafeconduct or violation of one or more refugeregulations.For Additional Information Contact:Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge22817 Ocelot RoadLos Fresnos, Texas 78566(956) 748-3607(956) 748-3609 (Fax)FW2_RW_Laguna@fws.gov (E-mail)Download hunt applications atwww.friendsofsouthtexasrefuges.orgU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    • National Park ServiceU.S. Department of the InteriorLake Meredith National Recreation AreaAlibates Flint Quarries National MonumentTexasLake MeredithHunting Information and RegulationsProhibited ActivitiesSeasons, Bag Limits andRegulationsGeneral InformationSafety
    • .05.11.04.03.04.05.07.19.17.10.10.13.15.09.02.06.23.24.05.16.24.29.18.391.38.11.02.01.02.38.22.16.33.43.04.04.06.04.35.16.25.09.33.21.21.061.02.55.11.09.01.03.06.77.19.03.32516154913121110618317192 17814.04 .03 .12.14.13.07.43.09.63.10.26.10.28.13.20 .04 .12.02.59.11.02.20.361.11.58.12.08.13.49.251.29.56.02.02.04.321.64.021.14.11.43.01.12.01.14.08.68.04212827326134 56257891123241022151214162117201918RYESCHOOLRDSANDY POINT RDMUMFORD RDSANDY POINT RDMUMFORDRDMUMFORD RDOSRPavilionLakesideIcehouse & GrillDANSBY POWER PLANTWEST SIDEEAST SIDETrails created and maintained by the Brazos Valley Mountain Bike AssociationTotal Trail Distances:East SideEast Loop distance - 11.62 miles(start and finish as indicated on mapand follow the direction arrows;mix of trail, levee, and dirt road)Total single-track distance - 11.56 milesTotal levee distance - 1.50 milesTotal dirt road distance - 0.58 milesTotal East Side distance - 13.64West SideWest Loop distance - 6.80 miles(start and finish as indicated on mapand follow the direction arrows;mix of trail, levee, and dirt road)Total single-track distance - 5.97 milesTotal levee distance - 1.98 milesTotal dirt road distance - 0.10 milesTotal West Side distance - 8.05East and West Loop trails are ONE WAY and flow in acounter-clockwise direction, denoted by the directionalarrows on the map. Check the BVMBA web site for trailclosures due to muddy trails and/or trail maintenance.http://www.bvmba.net1 Good to Go Trail2 Slippery Slope Trail3 Stairway to Hell Trail4 Monkey Butt Trail5 Doggie Dash Trail6 Little Warda Trail7 Elliotts Elation Landmark8 Half Pipe Landmark9 J-9 Trail10 Bumblee Bee Boldry Dash Trail11 Valley of the Thorns Trail12 Poison Ivy Ali Trail13 Bloody Lip Landmark14 Flat Tire Flyer Trail15 Texas Twister Trail16 Hutchs Hell Trail17 Cement Descent Landmark18 Junkyard Landmark19 Last Pass TrailWest Loop Trails and Landmarks1 Roller Coaster Trail2 Rock Garden Landmark3 Wild Flower Alley Trail4 Munnerlyn Loop Trail5 Munnerlyn Bridge Landmark6 Clavical Calamity Landmark7 Jessicas Landing Landmark8 Little Indy Landmark9 Horseshoe Bend Landmark10 Godzillas Tail Landmark11 Cutoff/Turbo Road Landmark12 Game Trail Trail13 New Cut Trail14 Rat Maze Trail15 Holler Hill Landmark16 Hematoma Hill Landmark17 Gameras Tail Landmark18 Sunset Strip Trail19 Prelude Trail20 Skinny Dip Trail21 Goat Trail Trail22 Blair Witch Woods Trail23 Peaceful Woods Trail24 Camel Humps Landmark25 Switchbacks Landmark26 BMX Loop Trail27 Last Call Trail28 Fishermans Alley TrailEast Loop Trails and LandmarksLegendTrailCutoff TrailLeveeTrail or Landmark LocationTrail IntersectionA Trail DistanceParkingRestroomBuildingPowerlinePaved RoadDirt RoadParking LotLake BoundaryLAKE BRYAN TRAILSLoopStartLoopFinishLoopStartLoopFinish0 .10 .20sale in milesNMap is for general references purposes only and only at thepublished scale. Distance listed along trail is in miles andshow the distance between trail intersection markers.Map created by Chris Matus, 2009.
    • ¬«208£¤67£¤67£¤8721058532288Tom GreenCountySan Angelo SP - 7,063 acreså Headquarters!e Info/Registration Station[_ Deer Check StationÅF Designated Access PointÆü ParkingÆQ Camp Sites!y Boat Ramp!| Canoe/Small Craft Launch!Ê Equestrian Trailhead/ParkingU Viewing Blind] Water Troughspo Guzzlersr WindmillS Gate!H CityFenceCanalLeveePipeline! ! Transmission LinePublic Hunt PropertyNo Hunt ZonePrivate In-holdingsArchery Hunting OnlyWaterfowl Hunt AreaWaterfowl SanctuaryRecommended Dove AreaSpecial ATV/ORV Use AreaEquestrian AreaCounty!H!H!H^_^_¬«208£¤277£¤277£¤67£¤87216621051223228820345842335853Coke Co.IrionCo.Tom GreenCo.SanAngeloGrapeCreekE Map compiled by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department. 06/2012No claims are made to the accuracy of the data or to the suitability of the data to a particular use.0 1 20.5 MilesRefer to Legal Gamebox in your "2012-13 Map Booklet for Public Hunting Lands" for hunting information and regulations.*Annual Public Hunting Permit Required*
    • Spillway Hill TrailsThe Spillway Hill trailhead is located just outside the back gate of Middle Concho Park in SW SanAngelo. To get there, take Knickerbocker Blvd south from Loop 306 until you reach Red BluffRoad. There is a large Baptist on the left and Packsaddle BBQ on the right.Turn right onto Red Bluff and follow it until it dead ends in the park (see image #1). When youenter Middle Concho Park, make an immediate right on the paved park road and follow it 1 mile tothe back gate. The paved road will change to gravel after ½ mile.Park near the back gate and bike, run, or walk out the back gate (if it’s closed just go over or aroundit). There is an opening in the rock berm directly ahead at the base of the hill just a few yardsoutside the back gate. That opening leads you onto the Spillway Hill trails (see image #2).Although most trails are not currently marked with signs, you can see the worn path used bycyclists, runners, and hikers (see image #3). There are numerous 4WD roads and trails on the hill,and additional trails and dirt roads to the west of Spillway Hill on the other side of the levee.Image #1: Middle Concho Park locationKnickerbocker and RedBluff RoadSpillway HillBack gate ofMiddle ConchoMiddle Conchofront gate
    • Image #2: Back gate and trail headImage #3: Spillway trailsExisting back gate of MiddleConcho Park. Note- a new pipefence is being constructed thatwill move the gate 4/10 of a mileback into the park to where thepavement ends.The MacKenzie trailstarts at opening inrock bermAdditionalmotorcycletrails in theseareasBack gateSpillwayThe complete loop on Spillway Hill isapproximately 5.5 miles long.Additional distance can be added bylinking up with the motorcycle trailsand 4WD roads to the north and westof the hill.This dirt road continuesfor several miles – a goodroute for running or bikeworkouts.MacKenzie trailBig Snake trailTop of SpillwayHill – scenic vistasGary’s trailValley trail
    • Image #2: Back gate and trail headImage #3: Spillway trailsExisting back gate of MiddleConcho Park. Note- a new pipefence is being constructed thatwill move the gate 4/10 of a mileback into the park to where thepavement ends.The MacKenzie trailstarts at opening inrock bermAdditionalmotorcycletrails in theseareasBack gateSpillwayThe complete loop on Spillway Hill isapproximately 5.5 miles long.Additional distance can be added bylinking up with the motorcycle trailsand 4WD roads to the north and westof the hill.This dirt road continuesfor several miles – a goodroute for running or bikeworkouts.MacKenzie trailBig Snake trailTop of SpillwayHill – scenic vistasGary’s trailValley trail
    • 1EXECUTIVE SUMMARYTwin Buttes Dam and Reservoir consist of approximately 12,858 acres of land, of which 9,800 acres are included inthe conservation pool. The reservoir and surrounding land is part of the San Angelo Project administered by theU.S. Department of Interior; Bureau of Reclamation. The reservoir was created by the construction of Twin ButtesDam in 1963 in Tom Green County, Texas. The Middle Concho River and Spring Creek form the North Pool, whilethe South Concho River forms the South Pool, and the two pools of the lake are connected via an equalizationchannel.The recreation area is managed by the Cityof San Angelo via a contract with the Bureauof Reclamation. The reservoir providesflood control, irrigation, and municipaldrinking water, while the surrounding landand shoreline allows for many recreationalopportunities such as fishing, hunting, andcamping. The open space that Twin Buttesaffords is a tremendous natural resource,essentially in the City of San Angelo’sbackyard, that could be a fantastic publicrecreation area given some improvementsand management actions.Assessment of Natural and Cultural ResourcesThe master plan includes an assessment of the natural and cultural resources at Twin Buttes; highlighting theinvasive vegetation problem, the wildlife population, and the significant cultural resources - such as the 200archaeological sites documented in the Twin Buttes Archaeological Report by David L. Nickels and Raymond P.Mauldin in 2001.Assessment of Current Recreation UseAn assessment of current recreation use at Twin Buttes identified both the authorized and unauthorized activitiesand described the various stakeholder groups associated with each activity. Activities such as off-road vehicleriding, trail running, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, windsurfing, kayaking, geocaching, camping, and horsebackriding all take place at Twin Buttes. Off-road vehicle use such as ATV and motorcycle riding has not been officiallysanctioned by the Bureau of Reclamation and the plan calls to take the next step to authorize it among other steps.ChallengesLitter and illegal dumping are big problems at Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area. With no controlled accessinto the recreation area, irresponsible citizens can easily bring in truckloads of construction materials, couches,electronics, trash, etc. to dump within the back areas of the recreation area. Additionally there has been a historyof fireworks use and unchecked firearms use which has resulted in major fireworks trash scattered about and hugepiles of shotgun shells and debris from shooting clays.
    • 2Illicit activities have also been noted in the area by concerned usersand local police, and this is compounded by little vehicularmanagement in the recreation area. Currently, visitors can wanderfor miles on various dirt road trails that crisscross across theproperty and around the lake in concentric circles and this createsproblems for way-finding and public safety and does damage to theresources from erosion and trail-blazing.Low water levels are an increasing problem at the reservoir andsteps to maintain access for users are discussed in the plan.Stakeholder group conflict and public safety are also addressed,especially in areas where motorized vehicles, non-motorized users,and firearms overlap.Analysis of Successful Park Models & Best Management PracticesSuccessful park models and best management practices were analyzed among various agencies including the TexasState Park system; Quartz Mountain Nature Park operated by Oklahoma State Parks; Barnwell MountainRecreation Area operated by the non-profit - Texas Motorized Trails Coalition; Black Mountain Off-Road AdventureArea operated by Harlan County in Kentucky; Lake Meredith National Recreation Area operated by the NationalPark Service; Colorado River Municipal Water District; Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge; and the NationalForest Service. Innovative management and operational partnerships and special events from certain agencieswere also discussed for their potential application to Twin Buttes Reservoir Recreation Area.Public ParticipationPublic participation is important to the success of any planning process and this process included one generalpublic meeting and one intensive stakeholder visioning workshop. Various community members from thedifferent stakeholder groups were invited to attend the workshop and a Nominal Group Technique (NGT) wasutilized to facilitate the visioning process. The technique allows for better group consensus and the developmentof shared ideas that are ranked in popularity versus one or two participants or groups dominating the discussion.The top three ranked items from the discussion were: (1) trash management/cleanliness; (2) add restrooms(flushing, vault, composting – depending on area); and (3) maintain access to the water for all user groups.Planning Guidelines & Management RecommendationsBased upon the public input and analysis of best management practices, several planning guidelines weredeveloped and management recommendations were identified and discussed. A major planning guideline is todefine the recreation area into recreation use zones; such as high-impact zones, primitive zones, hunting zones,and off-road vehicle use zones. By defining the activities that can take place in certain areas, stakeholder conflictsare reduced, illegal dumping and other unwanted activities are reduced, and public safety and resource protectionare enhanced.Top management recommendations include developing a Friends Group for recreation area, implementing a ParkHost Program, and establishing on-site management. A Friends Group would be a functioning 501(c)3 non-profitorganization comprised of local stakeholders that raises funds and acts as conservation ambassadors for therecreation area. A Park Host Program would take the Friends Group one step further and employ volunteers as on-
    • 3site staff to man entrance gates, collect fees, cleanbathrooms, pick up trash, etc. in exchange for a campsitewith utilities. This model has worked successfully in manyagencies across the country.Establishment and enforcement of rules is critical to thesuccess of the recreation area and to do that the cityneeds full authority to enforce its ordinances; thus fullannexation of the recreation area is recommended.Charging entrance fees, implementation of signage,vehicular management, litter management, andimplementing a managed hunting program are othermanagement recommendations discussed in the plan.Investment in the capital infrastructure of the park is also recommended, and as owners of the land, the Bureau ofReclamation may cost share up to 50% for recreation improvements depending on the availability of funds.Funding OpportunitiesFinally, funding opportunities are included in the plan to assist city staff in implementing the recommendations. Adozen grant opportunities are identified that can fund projects such as boat ramps, trails, mountain bike trails,capital infrastructure development, and conservation and recreation programming.Conceptual MapsConceptual maps demonstrate proposed recreation use zones, areas for proposed manned entrance stations, anda defined road system throughout the recreation area. The maps include areas where trails already exist anddefine new areas where more trails could be added. Further on-the-ground planning and engineering will need totake place to define specific areas where roadways and campgrounds will be located, but the conceptual maps area good guideline for the future.
    • City of San AngeloParks & RecreationMemoDate: May 17, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Carl White, Parks & Recreation DirectorSubject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013, Council MeetingContact: Carl White, Parks & Recreation Director, 234-1724Caption: Regular Agenda ItemConsideration of approving additional improvements at Civic League Park tosupport the operation of the International Water Lily Collection including a newbasin, pavilion and a water-misting system and authorizing City staff to negotiatean agreement for the construction of the improvements with the San AngeloCouncil of Garden Clubs.Summary: Proponents of the International Water Lily Collection, especially the San AngeloCouncil of Garden Clubs, are requesting authorization to move forward with someimprovements at Civic League Park to support the Collection. Specifically, they wouldlike to construct another raised basin, install a water-misting cooling system for visitorsand construct a pavilion that could be used for educational purposes, events andrentals. Construction of some of these items would require the removal of the largeLive Oak tree adjacent to the Collection.The additional basin was envisioned before the last Collection expansion project in2005 however, lack of funding prevented its implementation.General improvements to the Collection, including the addition of the proposed basin,have officially been accepted as part of the City’s Capital Improvement Plan.The proposal is for the San Angelo Council of Garden Clubs to fund theimprovements. The City would be responsible for ongoing costs of maintenance of theimprovements. If Council approves, we would return with a negotiated agreement withthe San Angelo Council of Garden Clubs for the construction of these improvements.History: Two raised basins were added to the original reflection pond with money raised by theCouncil of Garden Clubs from a San Angelo Health Foundation Grant in 2003.Additional improvements were added, including the three large raised basins in 2005with mostly Federal funds. The annual Lily Fest began in 2006 to celebrate theCollection and to highlight its importance. In 2009, the City entered into agreementwith Mr. Ken Landon to operate and manage the Collection at Civic League Park.Financial Impact: Funds are not requested to assist with the construction of the proposed improvements.Funds would be required for the additional maintenance required in an estimatedamount of $2,500.00 annually.Related Vision Item: N/AOther Information/ xxx
    • Recommendation: The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board reviewed the proposed improvementsand recommends approval.Attachments: • Civic League Park improvements CIP sheet• Plan sheet of the proposed additional basin• Conceptual rendering of the proposed pavilion and information on theproposed water-misting system.Presentation: PowerPointPublication: N/AReviewed byDirector:Rick Weise, Assistant City ManagerApproved by Legal: N/A
    • City of San AngeloFinance DepartmentMemoDate: May 15, 2013To: Mayor and CouncilmembersFrom: Laura Brooks, Budget Analyst, Sr.Subject: Agenda Item for May 21, 2013 Council MeetingContact: Morgan Chegwidden, Budget Manager, 653-6291Caption: Regular (1streading) Consent (2ndreading)First public hearing and introduction of an Ordinance amending the 2012-2013 Budgetfor new projects, incomplete projects, capital projects and grants.Summary: This proposed amendment contains the following items (additional informationattached):City of San Angelo Operating Budget• Energy Recovery Rebate• PHEP Grant Local Match• Nursing Program STD Grant• Pedestrian Bridge• Burial Containers• Community Housing Development• Avenue P Street & Drainage Improvement• 2013 Mill & Overlay ProjectsHistory: See attached Budget Amendment Request memorandum.Financial Impact: $1,920,470 (see attached detail on Exhibit A of the Ordinance)Related Vision Item (if applicable): N/AOther Information/Recommendation: Staff recommends approval.Attachments: Ordinance including Exhibit A; Department request memosPresentation: N/APublication: N/AReviewed by Service Area Director: Michael Dane, ACM/CFO
    • AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SAN ANGELO AMENDINGTHE BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER1, 2012, AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2013, FOR NEWPROJECTS, INCOMPLETE PROJECTS, CAPITAL PROJECTS,AND GRANTS.WHEREAS the City of San Angelo has determined that new projects not included in thecurrent budget should begin, andWHEREAS the City of San Angelo has determined that certain budgeted amounts shouldbe amended due to project changes and unforeseen circumstances, andWHEREAS the resources necessary for these changes are available;NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OFSAN ANGELO, TEXAS THAT:The City’s budget for fiscal year 2012-2013 be amended by the amounts contained inExhibit A.INTRODUCED on the 21st day of May, 2013, and APPROVED and ADOPTED on thisthe 4thday of June, 2013.CITY OF SAN ANGELO, TEXAS__________________________________Alvin New, MayorATTEST:__________________________________Alicia Ramirez, City ClerkApproved as to Content and Form:__________________________________Michael Dane, Assistant City Manager/CFO
    • City of San AngeloProposed Budget AmendmentExhibit AFund DescriptionTotalRevenueAmendmentTotalExpenseAmendmentNetBenefit/(Cost)COSA Operating Budget101 General Fund 27,330 27,330 0103 Intergovernmental Fund 36,637 36,637 0320Property & CasualtyFund – Fund Balance0 84,000 (84,000)440 Cemetery Fund 16,200 16,200 0483 HOME Fund 1,303 1,303 0502 General Capital Fund 0 1,755,000 (1,755,000)Totals 81,470 1,920,470 (1,839,000)
    • City of San AngeloProposed Budget AmendmentAdditional InformationProject/Need Source of Funding Revenue ExpenseNet Benefit/(Cost)AEP Energy Recovery RebateAEP Energy RecoveryRebate5,298 5,298 0PHEP Grant Local MatchGeneral Fund- FundBalance/PHEP Grant22,032 22,032 0Nursing Program STD Clinic 1115 Waiver Funds 36,637 36,637 0Pedestrian BridgeProperty/Casualty Fund –Fund Balance0 84,000 (84,000)Burial ContainersContainer SalesRevenue16,200 16,200 0Community Housing Development HOME Funds 1,303 1,303 0Avenue P Street & Drainage ImprovementCapital Projects Fund-Fund Balance0 755,000 (755,000)2013 Mill & Overlay Projects Capital Projects Fund-Fund Balance0 1,000,000 (1,000,000)Totals 81,470 1,920,470 (1,850,016)