Geography of    Precipitation
Western Canada
Precipitation

• The amount of precipitation a location receives
  depends on its distance from the sea and the
  prevaili...
Orographic
Precipitation
Orographic Precipitation

• The prevailing winds blow moist air onshore
• As the air hits higher land, the air is forced t...
Convectional
Precipitation
Convectional Precipitation

• Water in the ocean and lakes is warmed by the sun
• The air above becomes heated
• This make...
Frontal
Precipitation
Frontal Precipitation

• Two air masses of warm and cold air meet, causing
  a front
• When they meet, the less dense, war...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Precipitation

3,003 views
2,680 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,003
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Precipitation

  1. 1. Geography of Precipitation Western Canada
  2. 2. Precipitation • The amount of precipitation a location receives depends on its distance from the sea and the prevailing winds • Precipitation = drizzle, showers, heavy rain, hail, or snow — all have an impact on the location they fall • Western Canada experience three types: orographic, convectional, and frontal
  3. 3. Orographic Precipitation
  4. 4. Orographic Precipitation • The prevailing winds blow moist air onshore • As the air hits higher land, the air is forced to rise • When air rises it begins to cool • When it can no longer hold all its water; it starts to condense and form clouds • Orographic = affected by mountains
  5. 5. Convectional Precipitation
  6. 6. Convectional Precipitation • Water in the ocean and lakes is warmed by the sun • The air above becomes heated • This makes the air less dense, so it rises; as it rises it cools • Cool air can not hold as much water vapour = condensation occurs, gradually becoming clouds
  7. 7. Frontal Precipitation
  8. 8. Frontal Precipitation • Two air masses of warm and cold air meet, causing a front • When they meet, the less dense, warm air is forced above the denser, heavier cold air • When air can no longer hold its water, clouds form

×