• If you could be told your
future, would you want to
know what it is?
• What would you think if you
were told you were go...
• Macbeth is Shakespeare’s most
violent, gripping play. It seethes with
tension, the plot is swift and
unrelenting, and th...
• The play “Macbeth” takes place in
Scotland, in the 11th Century.
• Scotland is ruled by a benevolent
king, Duncan, and l...
• On the way home, Macbeth and Banquo
are met by a trio of three women who
greet Macbeth by the prophecy that he
will be K...
• Macbeth was most likely written in 1606,
early in the reign of James I, who had
been James VI of Scotland before he
succ...
• Macbeth - Macbeth is a Scottish general
and the thane of Glamis who is led to
wicked thoughts by the prophecies of the
t...
• King Duncan - The good King of Scotland whom Macbeth, in his ambition for the
crown, murders. Duncan is the model of a v...
• The main theme of Macbeth is the
destruction and bloodshed that occurs
when ambition and greed overcome
human morals.
• ...
• Visions and hallucinations recur throughout
the play.
• When he is about to kill Duncan, Macbeth
sees a dagger floating ...
• Prophecy sets Macbeth’s plot in motion—
namely, the witches’ prophecy that
Macbeth will become first thane of Cawdor
and...
"There's daggers in men's smiles".
Act II, Sc. III
“What's done is done".
Act III, Scene II
"Fair is foul, and foul is fai...
• Probably the most well known theatre
superstition involves William Shakespeare's
play, Macbeth -- often called, by actor...
• Macbeth has become one of Shakespeare’s
most influential works. It’s been adapted
into ballets and operas.
• There have ...
A Nutsy the Squirrel Production
Copyright 2013 Oak Hills Media Center
All Rights Reserved
Shakespeare - Macbeth
Shakespeare - Macbeth
Shakespeare - Macbeth
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Shakespeare - Macbeth

1,371 views

Published on

You can view this and other Shakespeare PowerPoints online at: http://www.davis.k12.ut.us/Page/18289

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,371
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Shakespeare - Macbeth

  1. 1. • If you could be told your future, would you want to know what it is? • What would you think if you were told you were going to be rich, famous, and powerful? • Would you kill in order to make that future come true? • This is the premise of William Shakespeare’s play MACBETH
  2. 2. • Macbeth is Shakespeare’s most violent, gripping play. It seethes with tension, the plot is swift and unrelenting, and the drama still has the power to seize audience’s imaginations. • Additionally, the inclusion of supernatural elements, and the ghostly apparitions that appear throughout Macbeth make this one of Shakespeare’s most thrilling entertainments. • Macbeth’s powerful prose, vivid characters, and a fitting ending are only a few of the reasons this play ranks as one of Shakespeare’s most popular and enduring works.
  3. 3. • The play “Macbeth” takes place in Scotland, in the 11th Century. • Scotland is ruled by a benevolent king, Duncan, and lower nobles, called Thanes. • “Thane” was the title given to a local royal official in medieval eastern Scotland, equivalent to a count. • At the beginning of the play, Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis), and his friend and comrade Banquo, are coming back victorious from a great battle, in which the Thane of Cawdor has formed a rebellion and tried to seize the throne. • Macbeth valiantly fights in the battle, single-handedly winning the day.
  4. 4. • On the way home, Macbeth and Banquo are met by a trio of three women who greet Macbeth by the prophecy that he will be King one day. (video) Banquo is told that while he will not be king, his sons will inherit the throne. • Consumed with ambitious thoughts and goaded to action by his wife, Macbeth murders King Duncan while he sleeps and seizes the throne for himself. • He begins his reign racked with guilt and fear and soon becomes a tyrannical ruler, as he is forced to commit more and more murders to protect himself from enmity and suspicion. The bloodbath swiftly propels Macbeth and Lady Macbeth to arrogance, madness, and death.
  5. 5. • Macbeth was most likely written in 1606, early in the reign of James I, who had been James VI of Scotland before he succeeded to the English throne in 1603. • James was a patron of Shakespeare’s acting company, and of all the plays Shakespeare wrote under James’s reign, Macbeth most clearly reflects the playwright’s close relationship with the sovereign. • In focusing on Macbeth, a figure from Scottish history, Shakespeare paid homage to his king’s Scottish lineage. • Macbeth was first published in the first folio, in 1623.
  6. 6. • Macbeth - Macbeth is a Scottish general and the thane of Glamis who is led to wicked thoughts by the prophecies of the three witches. • Lady Macbeth - Macbeth’s wife, a deeply ambitious woman who lusts for power and position. • The Three Witches - Three “black and midnight hags” who plot mischief against Macbeth using charms, spells, and prophecies. • Banquo - The brave, noble general whose children, according to the witches’ prophecy, will inherit the Scottish throne.
  7. 7. • King Duncan - The good King of Scotland whom Macbeth, in his ambition for the crown, murders. Duncan is the model of a virtuous, benevolent, and farsighted ruler. His death symbolizes the destruction of an order in Scotland that can be restored only when Duncan’s line, in the person of his son Malcolm, once more occupies the throne. • Macduff - A Scottish nobleman hostile to Macbeth’s kingship from the start. He eventually becomes a leader of the crusade to unseat Macbeth. The crusade’s mission is to place the rightful king, Malcolm, on the throne, but Macduff also desires vengeance for Macbeth’s murder of Macduff’s wife and young son. • Malcolm - The son of Duncan, whose restoration to the throne signals Scotland’s return to order following Macbeth’s reign of terror. Malcolm becomes a serious challenge to Macbeth with Macduff’s aid (and the support of England). Prior to this, he appears weak and uncertain of his own power, as when he and Donalbain flee Scotland after their father’s murder.
  8. 8. • The main theme of Macbeth is the destruction and bloodshed that occurs when ambition and greed overcome human morals. • Macbeth is a courageous Scottish general who is not naturally inclined to commit evil deeds, yet he deeply desires power and advancement. He kills King Duncan against his better judgment and afterward stews in guilt and paranoia. • Lady Macbeth, on the other hand, pursues her goals with greater determination, yet she is less capable of withstanding the repercussions of her immoral acts.
  9. 9. • Visions and hallucinations recur throughout the play. • When he is about to kill Duncan, Macbeth sees a dagger floating in the air. Covered with blood and pointed toward the king’s chamber, the dagger represents the bloody course on which Macbeth is about to embark. (video) • Later, he sees Banquo’s ghost sitting in a chair at a feast, pricking his conscience by mutely reminding him that he murdered his former friend. • Lady Macbeth also eventually gives way to visions, as she sleepwalks and believes that her hands are stained with blood that cannot be washed away by any amount of water.
  10. 10. • Prophecy sets Macbeth’s plot in motion— namely, the witches’ prophecy that Macbeth will become first thane of Cawdor and then king. • The weird sisters make a number of other prophecies: they tell us that Banquo’s heirs will be kings, that Macbeth should beware Macduff, that Macbeth is safe till Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane, and that no man born of woman can harm Macbeth. (video) • Save for the prophecy about Banquo’s heirs, all of these predictions are fulfilled within the course of the play. • Still, it is left deliberately ambiguous whether some of them are self-fulfilling— for example, whether Macbeth wills himself to be king or is fated to be king. • Additionally, the prophecies must be interpreted as riddles, since they do not always mean what they seem to mean.
  11. 11. "There's daggers in men's smiles". Act II, Sc. III “What's done is done". Act III, Scene II "Fair is foul, and foul is fair". Act I, Scene I "I bear a charmed life". Act V, Sc. VIII "Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness." Act I, Scene V "Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood clean from my hand?” Act II, Sc. II "Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble." Act IV, Scene I "Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under 't." Act I, Scene V "Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand?" Act II, Scene I "To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.” Act V, Scene V “By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes.” Act IV, Scene I
  12. 12. • Probably the most well known theatre superstition involves William Shakespeare's play, Macbeth -- often called, by actors, 'the bards play' or 'the Scottish play'. • The superstition follows that any company performing the play will be beset with horrible luck, ranging anywhere from uncanny accidents on the set to actual deaths within the company! • This superstition arose from the inclusion of the witch’s characters on stage, and the chants and incantations they invoke. • The superstition is so prevalent that many actors and directors will not even say the name “Macbeth” inside a theater, for fear of bringing back luck upon the company.
  13. 13. • Macbeth has become one of Shakespeare’s most influential works. It’s been adapted into ballets and operas. • There have been over sixty film and television adaptions of Macbeth, the first in 1908! • Other notable film adaptions are the 1948 Orson Welles adaption; • The 1957 adaption Throne Of Blood which takes place in feudal Japan; • A 1979 TV adaption with Ian McKellan and Judy Densch • And a 2008 TV adaption starring Patrick Stewart. • There has even been a 2012 animated science fiction version of Macbeth entirely with robots!
  14. 14. A Nutsy the Squirrel Production Copyright 2013 Oak Hills Media Center All Rights Reserved

×