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Why would someone want to work for you?

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Article sample from the certificate in employer brand leadership, details at www.employerbrandinternational.com

Article sample from the certificate in employer brand leadership, details at www.employerbrandinternational.com

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  • 1. BRANDING Why Would Someone Want to Work for You? A global study by Employer Brand International looking at what job candidates want, depending on factors such as age and gender. By Brett Minchington, Chairman and CEO, Employer Brand International If more companies had the answer to the question, “Why would someone want to work for us?” chances are we wouldn’t have the increasingly high levels of disengagement we do now amongst employees in companies around the world. The past few years have witnessed one of the most severe periods in economic history following the meltdown of the global financial system, which had its roots in the subprime mortgagemarket and took hold when Lehman Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September 2008. The effect of the global financial crisis resulted in record rates of unemployment inmany countries following years of growth, and some of the lowest unemployment rates for over 30-40 years.The recruitment drives which accelerated during the years of economic prosperity came to a screaming halt. Now, in 2010,many countries, such as Germany,China, and the U.S., are starting to show positive signs of econom-ic recovery, albeit at varying degrees.There is also still some concern over the recovery of the European economy.The legacy fromthe financial crisis has resulted in employees hav-ing to sacrifice a number of employment benefits they took for granted prior to the financial crisis, such as bonuses, com-pany cars, and investments in their training and development. In countries such as Australia, employees were asked to re-duce their five-day working week (and salary!) by one day. Many didn’t have a choice: it was either accept the reduc-tion in working hours (many were happy to do that!) and salary (many were unhappy to accept that!) or risk losing their job. During the economic downturn we also witnessed an ex-plosion in the adoption of socialmedia worldwide.Today the world has become more connected and with this has come greater access to knowledge, cultural differences, andmillions ofwebsiteswhere people are in amuch better position tomake an informed choice about where they want to work. Companies who were earlier adopters of social media for talent acquisition such as Sodexo, Starbucks, and Best Buy are now in a position to use this media to influence the em-ployment choice of passive and active candidates.Most peo-ple search online for information about companies, and so-cial media provides the opportunity to build a “fan” or “fol-lower” base which is similar to customer relationship man-agement platforms that came for before it.The difference is that people choose to “follow” companies and are not sim-ply put into a database and bombarded withmessages of lit-tle relevance or impact. Social media provides an opportu-nity for companies to interact and engage with their target au-dience, and secondary to this is that people will forman opin-ion about what it is like to work for your company. Understanding which combination of employment attrib-utes at the rational (or functional) and emotional (or senso-ry) level have the strongest influence on a person’s employ-ment choice will contribute to a better understanding and ap-plication of the employer brand concept.Your employer brand is “the image of your organization as a ‘great place to work’” in themind of current employees and key stakeholders in the external market (active and passive candidates, clients, cus-tomers, and other key stakeholders).A person’s image of your company is formed through the sumof high-touch and low-touch experiences it has with your company acrossmultiple touchpoints (e.g. career website, interview, Facebook page, etc.) and has the ability to influence the employment choice of your target audience. The Influencers of Employment Choice To better understand what the key influencers or employ-ment choice are, Employer Brand International conducted a global research study and found that not all candidates are influenced by the same attributes. Complicating the matter further is that when we analysed the data we found differences by the country region, gender, age, organization type, posi-tion levels, and employment tenure. 10 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc.
  • 2. BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 Figure 1: Influencers of employment choice - By gender Copyright: Employer Brand International 18-29 30-39 40-49 50+ ©2010 ERE Media, Inc. Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 11 increasing influence Figure 2: Influencers of employment choice, by age 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Copyright: Employer Brand International Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 increasing influence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Male Female Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective
  • 3. BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 increasing influence increasing influence Figure 3: Influencers of employment choice - By organization type 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Employer Brand Attributes 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective Figure 4: Influencers of employment choice - By position levels Private NFP Government Copyright: Employer Brand International 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Administration Management SeniorManagement Executive 1. Corporate reputation 2. Thought Leadership 3. Performance Management 4. Internal Business Processes 5. Leadership 6. Innovation and Re-invention 7. Strategic Intent 8. Corporate Social Responsibility 9. Communications 10. Customer Relationships 11. Developing People 12. Measurement & Evaluation 13. Flexibility 14. Work Environment 15. Global Perspective Copyright: Employer Brand International Employer Brand Attributes 12 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc.
  • 4. BRANDING WHY WORK FOR YOU? about other cultures; understand what is important for them. 3. We change with age. People over 55 tend to focus more on their impact to society, so no wonder they are the only group that is strongly influenced by your corporate social responsibility activities or customer relationships.On the other hand, they are far less influenced by strong leader-ship or performance management. 4. Many of your recruitment campaigns will focus around college graduates and entry-level positions.Remember they are looking for a good career startmore so than some “big words” in your recruitment ads, as they don’t know yet what to really expect fromwork. It’s no surprise then that they don’t focus as much on leadership, strategic intent, or customer relations in employment choice.They will fo-cusmore on the everyday aspects: new colleagues (work environment), clearly defined career path development, and global perspective. 5. The kind of organization you have also builds certain ex-pectations. People who are driven to work for private com-panies, governments, or not-for-profits value different things, and are attracted to organizations who can meet these expectations. Ensure the offering you are commu-nicating can be matched by your ability to deliver on it. 6. The research shows private company employees value lead-ership, rewards for performance, and global perspective much higher than their other colleagues in the not-for-profit and government sectors. On the other hand, gov-ernment employees value flexibility and corporate social responsibility. This comparison shows that different kinds of organizations usually hire different profiles of peo-ple, and it is really difficult for themto appeal to the same talents. 7. Do you have a different recruitment strategy for different position levels? Different position levels are like different market segments formarketing communications you con-duct for your products and services.They have different characteristics, needs, expectations, andmost important-ly, goals. Understand your employees and help them achieve those goals. 8. People view employment offerings differently as they progress along their career path. Entry-level or admin-istrative workers will focus on how the company affects their life and work-life balance; hence the importance of flexibility, work environment, and developing people. Seniormanagement and executives lookmore at the type of company you are, and are influenced by thought lead-ership, innovation, strategic intent, and customer rela-tionships. 9. If your challenge is retention, think about how your em-ployment offer changes with employees’ tenure.Themost commonmistake would be to offer a person the same ben-efit each time along the employment lifecycle, ignoring how the employee’s needs are changing. Employees differ in their expectations depending on how long they have been working for the same company.Global perspective is one example which ismore important for young recruits, but eventually over the years it becomes less important in com-parison to corporate reputation or customer relationships. 10.Your line managers should play a crucial role in identi-fying the values whichmost attract employees and ensure they are aligned with the organization’s values.You can build up a frameworkmodel of how employees’ expecta-tions change over time and develop and equip yourman-agers with the skills and capabilities to deliver on the prom-ises articulated during the recruitment campaign. Brett Minchington is the Chairman/CEO of Employer Brand International, and a global authority, strategist, and corporate advisor on employer branding.His new book,Employer Brand Leadership—A Global Perspective, is now available from the publisher at www.collectivelearningaustralia.com. 14 Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership | crljournal.com | October 2010 ©2010 ERE Media, Inc.
  • 5. Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership About Employer Brand International EBI provides research, advisory and thought leadership in employer branding through strategic consulting, conferences/training, publications, research and global think-tanks. EBI’s expert services are provided through an international network of expert employer brand Senior Associates. EBI’s Global Advisory Board consists of leading corporate professionals and academics from around the world. Why choose to study the Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership? • Study for an in demand leadership skill • Case study approach to support theoretical frameworks • Real world application • Flexible study options • Supportive learning environment • Access to the world’s most extensive employer branding learning resources • Alumni support 1. Since 2007 EBI has trained thousands of managers in employer branding in more than 50 cities in 28 countries. 2. Access to an employer branding global community of 3500+ members. 3. Course is supported by world class learning resources including books, handbooks and global research reports. 4. The first course of its kind offered in partnership with educational institutions, business and the community. 5. Accredited by EBI 5 QUICK FACTS Enrol Today! www.employerbrandinternational.com
  • 6. WELCOME FROM THE CHAIRMAN/CEO Welcome to the Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership Course – a contemporary leadership program for managers around the world. Since 2007, Employer Brand International has conducted training for thousands of managers in employer branding in more than 50 cities in 28 countries including Australia, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, UAE, UK, and the USA. Employees are fast becoming central to the process of brand building and their behavior can either reinforce a brand’s advertised values or, if inconsistent with these values, undermine the credibility of your messages. Employer branding is a whole of business concept concerned with the attraction, engagement and retention initiatives targeted at enhancing your company’s employer brand. The contest amongst employers to attract and retain talented workers takes place in a world where changes in the political, economic, social and technological environments and concerns about a company’s environmental footprint is driving widespread change in employment patterns. Today, competition for the best employees is as fierce as competition for customers and market share. The course brings together a talented team of academics, strategists and corporate leaders to create an inspiring learning experience in the growing field of employer branding. Our emphasis is on assisting you to develop leadership, communication, problem solving and team building skills, which will enable you to better understand and deal with the complex issues of management in a changing business environment. In selecting students we look for high quality people with the potential to not only benefit but also contribute to the learning experience. Whilst practical in orientation, your learning experience will include networking with like minded professionals around the world to support a solid theoretical grounding in employer brand leadership. Organizations that can attract and retain the best minds by leveraging a unique, relevant and distinctive employer brand will have a competitive edge in the marketplace. We look forward to welcoming you and wish you the very best with your studies. Brett Minchington Chairman/CEO Employer Brand International PROGRAM STRUCTURE CORE MODULE A THE BUSINESS CASE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 1: The Fundamentals Of Employer Branding (EBLFU) CORE MODULE B BEST PRACTICE IN EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 2: Employer Brand Leadership Principles & Practices (EBLPP) Study Unit 3: Employer Brand Strategic Management (EBLSM) Study Unit 4: Employer Branding Mapping & Competitor Analysis (EBLCA) Study Unit 5: Employer Brand Analytics & Reporting (EBLAR) Study Unit 6: Contemporary Practices in Employer Branding & Social Media (EBLSM) Study Unit 7: Employee and Customer Experience (EBLCE) CORE MODULE C THE FUTURE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 8: Employer Branding Social Responsibility (EBLSR) Study Unit 9: Future Trends in Employer Branding (EBLTD) Study Unit 10: Employer Branding Case Study Analysis (EBLCS) HOW TO APPLY Apply online at www.employerbrandinternational.com or to enquire please email Andrea at: andrea@employerbrandinternational.com Please direct all course enquiries to: Ms Andrea Fielding P +61 8 8443 4115 F +61 8 8443 4149 ALUMNI SUPPORT The EBI Employer Branding Global Community is an important part of the life and community of the School, as it forms an integral part of the School’s business relationships. The network is diverse, including students and graduates who work and live locally, interstate and overseas. With more than 3500 members, the EBGC supports members in various ways: • Fostering global networking opportunities • Informing the business community of latest trends in employer branding www.employerbrandinternational.com