2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Survey Report by Employer Brand International
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2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Survey Report by Employer Brand International written by Brett Minchington, Chairman/CEO

2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Survey Report by Employer Brand International written by Brett Minchington, Chairman/CEO

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2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Survey Report by Employer Brand International Document Transcript

  • 1. 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study Report Brett Minchington MBA Chairman/CEO Employer Brand International May 2014 www.employerbrandinternational.com
  • 2. OUR PASSION Connecting PEOPLE & ORGANISATIONS around the world to build employer brand leadership capability 1
  • 3. Table of Contents Message from the Chairman/CEO................................................................................................................. 4 The Employer Brand International Team ...................................................................................................... 5 About Employer Brand International ............................................................................................................ 6 Connect with our international employer branding online communities ....................................................... 7 Research partner acknowledgements ........................................................................................................... 8 Objectives .................................................................................................................................................... 9 Method ....................................................................................................................................................... 9 1.0: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................................................... 10 2.0: IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS .............................................................................................................. 14 3.0 ‐ PART 1: .............................................................................................................................................. 17 GLOBAL SURVEY RESPONDENTS: DEMOGRAPHICS ...................................................................................... 17 Demographics (Global) ............................................................................................................................... 18 3.0 ‐ PART 2: GLOBAL & REGIONAL FINDINGS ............................................................................................. 21 Employer Brand Responsibility ......................................................................................................................... 22 Figure 1: Which department(s) is currently responsible for managing your employer brand? .................. 22 Table 1: Inside the regional data ‐ Departments responsible for managing the employer brand .......... 23 Expenditure Forecast ........................................................................................................................................ 24 Figure 2: In 2014 what are your plans for expenditure on employer branding activities?.......................... 24 Table 2: Inside the regional data ‐ Investment plans for employer branding .......................................... 25 Employer Brand Strategy .................................................................................................................................. 26 Figure 3: Has your company developed a clear employer branding strategy? ........................................... 26 Table 3: Inside the regional data ‐ Status of employer brand strategy ................................................... 27 Employer Branding Initiatives ........................................................................................................................... 28 Figure 4: Which activities are you currently undertaking to enhance your employer brand? .................... 28 Table 4: Inside the regional data ‐ Which activities are you currently undertaking to enhance your employer brand? ...................................................................................................................................... 29 Achieving employer branding objectives .......................................................................................................... 30 Figure 5: How important are the following in order to achieving your employer branding objectives? .... 30 Table 5: Inside the regional data ‐ Achieving employer branding objectives .......................................... 31 Attracting talent ............................................................................................................................................... 32 Figure 6: How important do you believe the following employer brand attributes are in attracting new talent to your company? .............................................................................................................................. 32 Table 6: Inside the regional data – The most important employer brand attributes to attract talent ... 33 2
  • 4. Employer Branding Challenges ......................................................................................................................... 34 Figure 7: What are the challenges you have encountered in managing your employer brand program? ... 34 Table 7: Inside the regional data ‐ Challenges in managing the employer brand program ..................... 35 What’s important? ............................................................................................................................................ 36 Figure 8: Which of the following is most important to you? ....................................................................... 36 Table 8: Inside the regional data ‐ What is important to people? ........................................................... 37 Employer Brand Metrics ................................................................................................................................... 39 Figure 9: What metrics does your company use to measure return on investment (ROI) of your employer brand strategy? ............................................................................................................................................. 39 Table 9: Inside the regional data ‐ Metrics used to measure return on investment (ROI) of the employer brand strategy .......................................................................................................................................... 40 Employer brand communications ..................................................................................................................... 41 Figure 10: What is the main communication medium your company is planning to use to communicate your Employer Brand during 2014? .............................................................................................................. 41 Table 10: Inside the regional data ‐ Communicating the employer brand in 2014 ................................. 42 Most Effective Employer Branding Initiatives .................................................................................................. 43 Figure 11: Which activity has been most effective in enhancing your company’s employer brand? ......... 43 Table 11: Inside the regional data – Most effective employer branding initiatives ................................ 44 Major benefits .................................................................................................................................................. 45 Figure 12: What are the main benefits you have gained from your employer brand program? ................ 45 Table 12: Inside the regional data ‐ Main benefits of employer branding .............................................. 46 Appendix A: Employer Brand Excellence Pathway ...................................................................................... 47 Appendix B: Employer Brand Excellence Framework .................................................................................. 49 Additional resources .................................................................................................................................. 51 3
  • 5. Message from the Chairman/CEO It is with great pleasure I present Employer Brand International’s 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study Report. Our aim is to connect with leaders from developed and emerging nations to discover their opinions and insights on employer branding and how it is being applied inside their organisations to attract, engage and retain talent. Employer Brand International (EBI) is committed to the advancement of the employer brand concept through our global research, training, consulting, events and publications agenda. We believe Your Employer Brand is your competitive advantage where success in business is increasingly being determined by the value of your company’s intangible assets. Today’s most successful companies are those with the BEST PEOPLE, not just the best products. This report provides comprehensive insight into the current status and future ambitions of organisations in employer branding. It presents key findings to identify how employer branding has evolved over the past five years around the world. We believe the results of this survey will provide leaders with further clarity on how to develop and implement an employer brand strategy that builds competitive advantage. It will also provide insights into which initiatives deliver most value to organisations and how these initiatives are being measured. I predict the role of the employer brand manager will become more commonplace in the coming years. We are now seeing more job advertisements for employer brand specialists at companies such as Google, Starbucks, Adidas, Philips, Volvo Cars, EY, IBM, HSBC, Amazon, UnitedHealth Group and IKEA. Most recently Facebook placed an advertisement for a leader to manage their global employer branding function. I believe we will see this trend continuing across all sectors in the next few years. Over the past seven years I have presented at conferences and conducted employer brand masterclass events in more than 50 cities in 28 countries with thousands of leaders and it is pleasing to learn that companies are becoming more strategic in their approach to employer branding. Employer Brand International’s mission is to build employer brand leadership capability around the world. We are confident graduates from our ‘Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership’ course will play a key role in inspiring a new generation of leaders who will go on to lead the employer brand strategy in global and national companies. Employer Brand International will continue to push the boundaries of employer branding research. We will seek and find innovative ways to inform leaders on their employer brand strategy focused on developing better working environments more closely aligned with the needs of all stakeholders. This will assist leaders to find a better balance between the financial objectives of their firm and its social, people and customer objectives. I welcome your feedback on how employer branding is evolving inside your company and can be contacted at brett@employerbrandinternational.com Please enjoy this global report, Brett Minchington MBA Chairman/CEO Employer Brand International Twitter: @brettminch www.facebook/brett.minchington www.linkedin.com/in/minchington 4
  • 6. The Employer Brand International Team Chairman/CEO Brett Minchington MBA (Founder) SENIOR ASSOCIATES USA Ryan Estis Managing Director Ryan Estis & Associates David Parks Vice President of Business Development Bluepoint Leadership Development Europe Eugenio Amendola Managing Director Anthea Consulting Véronique Frogé Partner, Head of Employer Branding practice Burson‐Marsteller i&e Birgitte Seldorf Birgitte Seldorf Consulting Aps & ex‐Partner, Summit Consulting A/S Radosław Knap Managing Partner, KNAPRO Consulting Per Olof Hall Managing Director, PlanetPeople Australasia Steven Goodman Senior Lecturer (Marketing) Program Director ‐ Higher Degrees by Research The University of Adelaide Business School Ron Tomlian Managing Director, Marketing Counsel Sonja Visic Chief Executive Officer at Regional Development Australia Far North Queensland & Torres Strait REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARD Sara Edling People & Employer Brand Strategy Manager Volvo Car Group Heather Polivka Senior Director of Global Employment Branding & Marketing, UnitedHealth Group Fabio Dioguardi Global Employer Branding & Talent Acquisition Director, Ferrero Stephen Fogarty Senior Manager Employer Branding & Digital Recruiting, adidas Group Michael Holm Employer Brand & HR Manager, Lego René Herremans Director Employer Branding & Employee Engagement Birgitte Brix Andersen Lead Consultant, Talent Management, DONG Energy Els van de Water HR Director Southern Europe Johnson & Johnson Kerry None Employer Brand Manager, Amtrak Marta Najbert Regional Marketing & PR Manager Pandora Jewelry CEE Kellie Tomney Director, Employer Brand Works, Linda Halse HR Contractor at Thiess Services Ex‐General Manager Human Resources Australian Wine Research Institute Karen Nelson‐Field. PhD Senior Research Associate | Social Media and Digital Ehrenberg‐Bass Institute for Marketing Science (UNISA) Prenai Pillay Brand and Attraction Manager, Absa/ Barclays Africa Giuliana Massimino Country Communications Manager, Sandvik 5
  • 7. About Employer Brand International EBI provides research, advisory and thought leadership in employer branding through strategic consulting, conferences/training, publications, research and global think‐tanks. EBI’s expert services are provided through an international network of expert employer brand Senior Associates. EBI’s Global Advisory Board consists of leading corporate professionals and academics from around the world. Senior Associates International Diversity Global Advisory Team Industry Collaboration View the team online at www.employerbrandinternational.com 6
  • 8. Connect with our international employer branding online communities Employer Brand International is committed to building a global community of professionals to contribute to its research agenda and provide a focal point for knowledge transfer to advance the principles and practice of employer branding. We invite you to join our EBI Employer Branding Global Community of more than 3500 members on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=1338647 We invite you to follow Employer Branding Online on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Employer‐Branding‐Online/115743318452966 7
  • 9. Research partner acknowledgements At EBI, we value highly the level of support from individuals and organisations in the Employer Branding Global Community who are committed to furthering the science of employer branding to assist leaders develop a working environment that is more aligned with the needs of employees and customers. I would like to thank the Senior Associates and Advisory Team at Employer Brand International who contributed to the development and distribution of the survey around the world. We also received tremendous support from Associations, Companies and Individuals to distribute the survey to their client networks around the world. Our sincere appreciation of their support is extended to: • RoMarketing – www.romarketing.ro • HeadHunter – www.hh.ru • People Matters www.peoplematters.com • Radosław Knap, KNAPRO Consulting • HR Future – www.hrfuture.net • HainesAttract – NZ www.hainesattract.co.nz • Ryan Estis & Associates – www.ryanestis.com • Bluivy Group – www.bluivygroup.com We look forward to the ongoing support of the employer brand global community and our regional partners for our future research initiatives. Thank you! The team at Employer Brand International 8
  • 10. Objectives Employer Brand International Senior Associates consulted with regional partners, companies and vendors to assist in defining objectives for this research project. The key objectives of the survey are: 1. To engage with leaders around the world to discover their opinions and insights on how employer branding is currently being applied inside their organisations to attract, engage and retain talent and their future plans for their employer branding program. 2. To better understand the regional differences in the evolution of employer branding around the world. 3. To obtain the latest empirical data on employer branding to share with the Global Community to advance employer brand theory, principles and practice. 4. To identify the key employer branding trends during the period 2009‐2014. Method The survey was conducted during the period 23rd October 2013 to 28th February 2014. Responses were collected via an online survey. The survey was also promoted in social media channels and in magazine and journal articles written by the Employer Brand International team. It was also promoted via blogs and banner ads on websites of our distribution partners. A total of 1143 responses were received from 18 countries and regions. Europe (other) includes all European countries except Poland, Romania and Spain which are included separately in this study. Responses have been weighted to remove bias when presenting the global results and the actual responses have been used to present the regional findings. Some totals or averages may not add up due to rounding. The survey consists of 20 closed ended questions. 9
  • 11. 1.0: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Employer Brand International (EBI) is committed to undertaking global research to assist companies and their leaders to better manage the employment experience and create a better place to work for employees, whilst assisting to enhance the communities they operate in. In support of this objective EBI conducted its third global study on employer branding trends and this report provides highlights of the study and insights into what’s changed during the period 2009‐2014. The differences in regions across the world which should be considered by leaders when managing their employer brand strategy is also presented. The workplace has changed somewhat since our first employer branding study published in 2009. Today the challenges facing many companies in their ability to attract, engage and retain talent who can contribute to their strategic objectives have become increasingly complex. In today’s borderless global environment companies are face with challenges such as: • Political instability • Social and technological changes • Immigration quotas • The need for people systems integration • Understanding of culture diversity • Jobless economic recovery in many countries • Declining fertility rates • Inequality in global education standards • Aging populations in many developed economies. These threats come at a time as companies are finding it increasingly difficult to match available jobs and talent with the skilsets required. Minchington (2005) defines Your Employer Brand as “the image of your organization as a ‘great place to work’ in the mind of current employees and key stakeholders in the external market (active and passive candidates, clients, customers and other key stakeholders).” Employer branding is therefore concerned with the attraction, engagement and retention initiatives targeted at enhancing your company's employer brand. This report will inform leaders around the world across all industries and company sizes on how employer branding is evolving around the world and presents implications for companies to consider in developing their employer brand strategic agenda. Employer Branding Global Insights and Regional Analysis The global survey was conducted during the period 23rd October 2013 to 28th February 2014. A total of 1143 responses were received from respondents in nineteen regions across the world including Asia, Australia, Belarus, Canada/USA, Europe, India, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Russia, Scandinavia, Spain, South Africa, South America, Turkey, UAE, UK, and Ukraine. The survey provides detailed insights into the current status of employer branding and future plans for organisations. It also details key trends over the past five years. Strategy ownership We discovered employer branding is no longer the sole domain of the HR department, the traditional custodians. Increasingly teams of HR, Marketing and Communication professionals are managing the employer brand strategy. 36% of employer brand strategies are now managed by HR departments compared to 31% in our 2009 study (43% in 2009). Investment plans Employer branding is continuing to receive a larger resource allocation with 38% of companies planning to increase their investment or maintain current expenditure levels (32%) for employer branding initiatives in 2014. 10
  • 12. The number of companies planning to increase their investment is higher than in 2011 (33%) and comes at a time when economic indicators show more promising signs of economic growth in Europe, UK and USA. Clarity of strategy Whilst the survey found employer branding continues to rank highly on the leadership agenda, many organisations still lack a clearly defined strategy with only 17% reporting they have evolved to this status. However this is a 21% improvement on the 2011 result of 14%. More than a third of companies (35%) have an employer brand strategy but believe it can be further developed. Interestingly, respondents also said having a clearly defined strategy is the key to achieving their employer brand objectives. The need for a clearly defined strategy is critical given the plethora of communication channels available to promote your employer brand and employer value propositions (EVP’s) to your target audience. The online environment provides companies with the opportunity for greater market reach and can be a cost effective tool to integrate the various channels to market and provide a reliable measure of your return on investment. Employer branding initiatives The survey found social media is the main activity (58%) being undertaken by companies to enhance their employer brand. Career website development (56%) continues to rate highly along with recruitment advertising/ employer marketing (51%), recruitment branding (45%), induction programs (42%), developing an employer brand strategy (39%) and defining an EVP’s (39%). Advocacy It is widely accepted word of mouth is a credible and effective form of promotion for products and services. In an employment context, how companies are perceived as a place to work by an employee’s friends and family is also important. The survey found 53% of respondents said it is important other people want to work for their employer and other people’s perception of the company they work for is also important (45%). Measuring return on investment There is no universal standard of employer branding effectiveness, nor should there be ‐ all organisations are different. Metrics should be defined which can be assessed against the objectives of the employer brand program. Companies are using a range of metrics to measure ROI of their employer brand projects. Globally, employee engagement (44%), retention rates (41%), number of applicants (34%), quality of hire (33%) and cost per hire (33%) are the main metrics being used to measure ROI. At the regional level, employee engagement is the main metric used to measure ROI in places including Asia, Canada/USA, Scandinavia, New Zealand, Turkey and UAE. Communicating the employer brand Social media (76%) remains the main communication channel being used to promote the employer brand. Career websites (64%), training and development programs (43%), internal newsletters (40%), employee referral program (39%) and online job boards (38%) also rate highly. The speed at which social media has been embraced by companies is evident by the 209% increase (between 2009‐2011) and 72% increase (between 2011 to 2014) of companies using social media channels to communicate their employer brand. Strategy effectiveness The survey demonstrates a lack of measures to determine the effectiveness of the employer brand strategy. Many activities such as social media participation and talent management are lagging indicators and will require time to assess the most effective benefits of your strategy Across regions many companies are still in the early stages of their employer brand strategy. 17% of companies report their most effective initiatives are not yet clear which a vast improvement on 26% in 2011 is. The survey found social media participation (11%), defining EVP’s (11%), talent development strategy (9%) and career website development (9%) are the most effective activities to enhance the employer brand. 11
  • 13. Company videos which have become increasingly popular for companies to communicate their employer brand and EVP’s in recent years, rates low (1%) as an effective initiative. It will be interesting to see how this develops in the coming years when penetration rates increase and company videos evolve from highly scripted storytelling to more authentic insights about what it’s like to work at the company. The main benefits Ease in attracting candidates (35%), employee engagement (32%) and recognition as an employer of choice (28%) are the main benefits gained from employer branding programs. Other major benefits include reduced recruitment costs (22%), higher job acceptance rate (19%) and decrease in staff turnover (19%). Achieving objectives Employer branding programs require top down sponsorship by the CEO and Executive. Having a clearly defined strategy (average 6.08 on a scale of 1=least important to 7=most important), engaging senior management (5.98) and CEO (5.97) rank highest in importance to achieving employer branding objectives. Attracting talent Career development (average 6.07) is the most important attribute in attracting new talent to a company along with leadership (6.02), work environment (5.97), corporate reputation and culture (5.95) and reward and recognition (5.76) Employee research (4.49), corporate social responsibility (4.81) and communication systems (4.95) rated the lowest in importance. The employer branding process is about building and sustaining employment propositions which are unique, compelling and relevant to your internal and external target audience. This is an area where organisations need to apply more focus and use the collective experience of internal teams and experts in the broader marketplace to build capabilities. The challenges In today’s uncertain economic climate companies need to ensure money invested in their employer brand strategy provides short and long term value. The survey found defining an adequate budget (average 4.89 on a scale of 1=very little extent to 7=very great extent) is the biggest challenge facing companies in managing their employer brand program. Employer brand messaging across departments (4.75), being creative and innovative to distinguish the employment offering (4.66) and senior leadership engagement (4.64) and are also major challenges. There are many employer branding activities companies can implement which have a high impact at a low cost. However the key to success is ensuring the initiatives sit within a framework which allows your company to strategically manage the employer brand strategy across the business. Leaders require training in how to implement the employer brand strategy and clarity in how to deliver an optimal employment experience. In 2012 Employer Brand International launched the ‘Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership’ to build leadership capability in this area. The findings of the survey highlight areas leaders need to address and take action to ensure their employer brand strategy is holistic and not one that is solely focused on recruiting talent. It needs to align with talent engagement and retention programs which will require coordination and input between the different business units responsible for these functions. As talent shortages become more prevalent around the world your employer brand will become an increasingly valuable asset in ensuring your company’s sustainability. We encourage companies to apply the results of this survey and critically assess the regional differences to better understand the impact of culture and geographical location on their employer brand. Global leaders must empower regional leaders to localise the strategy and identify which functions will be managed at a global level (e.g. applicant tracking system, employer brand blueprint, recruitment templates, etc) and those adaptable at the local level (e.g. media, recruitment strategy, leadership development, etc). 12
  • 14. This report highlights the need to educate leaders about the business benefits of employer branding and train leaders how to develop and implement the employer brand strategy. Ask any CEO their main priorities and ‘attracting and retaining talent,’ will generally appear in their top three. Employer brand strategy provides a way forward for organisations to ensure they can attract and retain the talent required for growth. The pathway to employer branding success should be considered an ongoing journey (see appendix A Employer Brand Excellence Pathway Model). The evolution of the employer brand concept over the past five years has been significant and what was for many years considered to be a recruitment function is now being embraced by companies as a strategic response to building competitive advantage around their talent. Companies are fast realising that “Today’s most successful companies are those with the BEST PEOPLE, not just the best products!” 13
  • 15. 2.0: IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS The findings of this Employer Branding Global Trends Study have several implications for business. We present 65 Questions for consideration by your organisation: Strategy 1. Do we adopt a strategic approach to employer branding and consider all factors which impact on our employer brand (see appendix B). 2. Have we identified the priority areas to invest in our employer brand strategy over the next two years? 3. Have we allocated sufficient resources to effectively deliver our employer brand strategy? 4. How integrated is our customer engagement and employee engagement initiatives? 5. Are we prepared to meet our next phase of growth? How strong is our talent pipeline to support this growth? 6. Can we source the expertise internally to deliver our employer brand strategy or do we need to partner with external experts? How are we connected to these experts? 7. Do we have the right measures in place to measure the effectiveness of our employer brand strategy in the short, medium and long term? 8. How will the political environment in the regions we operate impact on our employer brand strategy? 9. Are we developing strategies to tap into the talent amongst the rising levels of youth unemployment in many countries? 10. Have we defined our employer value propositions (EVP’s)? 11. How effective are we in communicating our EVP’s to our target audience(s)? 12. How are we managing social changes which impact on our employer brand? How effective are we in supporting our employee’s need for a richer, fuller lifestyle? 13. How are we perceived by our external partners? Do we treat them any differently to our employees? 14. How distinctive is our employer brand and EVP’s? Have we identified our distinctive assets? 15. How do we differentiate our employment experience compared to our competitors? 16. How do we identify opportunities for innovation? 17. How do we know we are attracting and retaining the best latent? 18. How do we measure our corporate reputation? Is it a reliable measure? How does it impact our employer brand? 19. How engaged are the Executive team in our employer brand strategy? Are they assisting or hindering our progress? 20. How important is the support of our CEO to effectively deliver our employer brand strategy? 21. How integrated is our employer brand across online and offline touchpoints? 22. How much do we know about the employer brand strengths of our competitors? 23. How prepared are we to meet the challenges from market forces which will impact on our business over the next three years? 24. How well do we collaborate across functions to implement our employer brand strategy? 25. How will mergers or acquisitions impact on our employer brand? How effective are we in managing change and integrating cultures? 26. How will the uncertainty of the global economic environment impact on our employer brand program? What are the key initiatives we should focus on over the next five years? 27. Is our employer brand strategy aligned with our organisational objectives? 14
  • 16. 28. Is our investment in employer branding consistent with achieving our objectives? 29. What are the challenges we need to address to ensure leaders in countries where we operate engage in the effective delivery of our employer brand strategy? 30. What are the key focus areas to ensure we address the priorities of our people policies, systems and processes which will have most impact on our employer brand? 31. What are we doing to communicate our employer brand objectives to line managers and how engaged are they in supporting the strategy? 32. What are we doing to improve the community we operate in? 33. What is the best team we can bring together based on our objectives and resources to deliver our employer brand strategy to the highest standard? 34. What is the connection between our corporate, consumer and employer brand strategies? Are we optimising the outcomes for each and investing efficiently? 35. What is the optimal staffing model for our company and how will contingent workforce planning benefit our employer brand? 36. What is the role of diversity in our company and how is it impacting on our employer brand? 37. What leadership skills, experiences and capabilities do we need to effectively deliver our employer brand strategy? Talent Acquisition 38. Do we collect feedback from candidates on their satisfaction with our recruitment process? 39. Have we assessed our most effective channels for recruiting talent? Are we allocating sufficient resources to optimise the quality of new hires? 40. How effective are we in developing our existing talent? Have we identified the skill and capability gaps? 41. How effective is our employer referral program? 42. What are we doing to mobilize our recruitment processes? 43. How effective are we in inducting new hires? What are three initiatives we can implement to enhance our employer brand during the induction process? Social media 44. How effective are we in using social media to better understand the needs of our target audience? 45. How effective is our social media content strategy and how does it enhance our employer brand? 46. How social is our company? Who are the key social media influences in our company? 47. Do our social media policies support or hinder our ability to become a social business? Technology 48. How capable are our employees in using mobile technology to support our employee engagement initiatives? 49. How can we leverage mobile technology to build a stronger employer brand? 50. How can we use technology to assist internal teams and external vendor collaborations to foster innovation and growth? 51. How well do we communicate our EVP’s on mobile devices? 52. How are we ensuring the privacy and integrity of our employee and candidate online data? 53. Do we provide employees with access to modern technology and equipment to enhance their workflow? 15
  • 17. Talent retention 54. Have we provided training for our managers and senior leaders in how to deliver an ‘on brand’ employment experience for their teams? What should we include in the training program to maximise impact? 55. What is the most effective way to ensure all employees understand what behaviors are reflective of our brand promise? 56. How can we align rewards and incentives to reduce the focus on the salary package as the key driver of why people join or leave our organisation? 57. How do we consider and adapt to the changing needs of employees as they transition through the employee lifecycle from hire to retire? 58. How effective are we at managing employee engagement across the company? How do we make leaders accountable for engagement in their teams? 59. How effective are we in rewarding talent in an environment of low wage growth? 60. How effective are we in managing the diversity of generations in the workplace? 61. How effective does communication flow throughout our company? 62. What are the benefits to our employer brand in offering employees the opportunity to work virtually? 63. What are we doing to empower employees to take charge of their career and personal development? What are we doing to support the development of our employees? 64. What are we doing to support a family friendly workplace? 65. Can we realistically offer job security to our employees and what are we doing to ensure our talented employees have a future with us? 16
  • 18. 3.0 ‐ PART 1: GLOBAL SURVEY RESPONDENTS: DEMOGRAPHICS 17
  • 19. Demographics (Global) © Employer Brand International 2013 Employer Branding Global Insights Research Study Asia 44 • Australia 78 • Belarus 24 • Canada/USA 86 • Europe (other) 102 • India 36 • New Zealand 51 • Poland 78 • Romania 49 Russia 231 • Scandinavia 45 • South Africa 36 • South America 45 • Spain 78 •Turkey 30 • UAE 24 • UK 62 • Ukraine 44 59% 41% 18
  • 20. Demographics (Global) Age Employee Number Organisation Type 14% 42% 13% 29% 2% <20‐29 30‐39 40‐49 50‐59 60 13% 15% 33% 16% 23% 1‐10 11‐100 101‐1000 1001‐5000 5000 3% 5% 92% Government Not for profit For profit © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 19
  • 21. Demographics (Global) 8% 8% 6% 6% 5% 4% 4% 3% Industry 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 5% 7% 10% Consulting Advertising & Marketing Manufacturing Information Technology Recruitment/Staffing Professional Services Education Services Engineering Consumer Products‐… Retail Transportation & … Banking Telecommunications Construction Health Care Financial Services Electricity, Gas & Water Position Level 9% 8% 6% 4% 4% 2% 1% 5% 12% 26% 23% Senior manager Manager CEO/Managing Director Officer Executive Team leader General Manager Supervisor Vice President Administrator Chairman 5% 16% 15% 14% 12% 14% 24% 5‐10 3‐5 10‐20 2‐3 1‐2 < 1 20+ Tenure Other industries <3% © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 20
  • 22. 3.0 ‐ PART 2: GLOBAL & REGIONAL FINDINGS 21
  • 23. Employer Brand Responsibility Figure 1: Which department(s) is currently responsible for managing your employer brand? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) 11% 8% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 4% 4% 2% 2% 1% Human Resources Marketing CEO HR & Communications Directors HR, Marketing & Communications Executive team Talent Management Communications HR & Marketing Branding I don't know © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 36% Corporate Affairs 46 HR Ownership 5 year trend 33 36 percent 2009 2011 2014 22
  • 24. Table 1: Inside the regional data ‐ Departments responsible for managing the employer brand Top 3 responses –the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Human Resources 55% 35% 40% 73% 40% 60% 53% Marketing 2 2 2 2 CEO 3 2 Directors 3 3 HR, Marketing & Communications 3 Talent Management 3 3 HR & Communications 2 2 Communications 3 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Human Resources 56% 31% 48% 2 2 56% Marketing 3 2 3 33% 2 Executive team 2 3 CEO 3 3 Directors 2 HR, Marketing & Communications 2 Branding 3 Human Resources & Communications 3 Human Resources & Marketing 27% 25% Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Human Resources 65% 2 35% 3 Marketing 3 CEO 38% 2 Talent Management 2 HR & Communications 2 3 2 HR & Marketing 25% 23
  • 25. Expenditure Forecast Figure 2: In 2014 what are your plans for expenditure on employer branding activities? 5% 13% 12% 32% 38% An increase in the amount invested Approximately unchanged investment Need to justify investment Unsure A decrease in the amount invested 46 Increased investment 5 year trend 33 38 percent 2009 2011 2014 © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 24
  • 26. Table 2: Inside the regional data ‐ Investment plans for employer branding Top response ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA An increase in the amount invested 46% 46% 59% 44% Approximately unchanged investment 37% 53% 45% Need to justify investment Unsure A decrease in the amount invested Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America An increase in the amount invested 48% 33% 31% 45% Approximately unchanged investment 41% 44% Need to justify investment 44% Unsure A decrease in the amount invested Turkey UAE UK Ukraine An increase in the amount invested 45% 38% Approximately unchanged investment 36% 37% Need to justify investment Unsure A decrease in the amount invested 25
  • 27. Employer Brand Strategy Figure 3: Has your company developed a clear employer branding strategy? 2% 17% 14% 35% 32% Yes, but it can be further developed No, but we are working on it Yes, we have a clear strategy No, we have not developed a strategy I don't know 16 Clear strategy 5 year trend 14 17 percent 2009 2011 2014 © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 26
  • 28. Table 3: Inside the regional data ‐ Status of employer brand strategy Top response ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Yes, we have a clear strategy Yes, but it can be further developed 41% 48% 41% 53% No, but we are working on it 32% 35% 42% No, we have not developed a strategy I don't know Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Yes, we have a clear strategy Yes, but it can be further developed 46% No, but we are working on it 39% 33% 31% 39% 47% 56% No, we have not developed a strategy I don't know Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Yes, we have a clear strategy Yes, but it can be further developed No, but we are working on it 40% 38% 29% 45% No, we have not developed a strategy I don't know 27
  • 29. Employer Branding Initiatives Figure 4: Which activities are you currently undertaking to enhance your employer brand? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) 45% 42% 39% 38% 36% 35% 31% 29% 24% 23% 22% 21% 21% 19% 15% 11% 8% 15% 23% 31% 39% 58% 56% 52% Social media Career website development Recruitment advertising/employer marketing Recruitment branding Induction program Developing employer brand strategy Defining EVP's Leadership development program Employee referral program Current employee research Coaching/mentoring Applicant tracking system Employer brand positioning Audit of current employer brand Retention initiatives Competitor analysis Alumni program Mobile careers site Public relations Focus groups with current employees Employer brand forums with external stakeholders Customer research Employer brand forums with leaders Focus groups (external) 14 Social Media 5 year trend 44 58 2009 2011 2014 percent © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 28
  • 30. Table 4: Inside the regional data ‐ Which activities are you currently undertaking to enhance your employer brand? Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Career website development 59% 2 2 76% 2 2 Defining employer value proposition(s) 3 3 Employee referral program 3 3 Recruitment ad./employer marketing 2 3 2 3 Social media 62% 67% 2 75% 55% 71% Alumni programs 3 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Career website development 2 59% 2 Defining employer value proposition(s) 44% Developing employer brand strategy 3 Employer brand positioning 2 Employee referral program 3 Induction program 67% 3 64% 2 Leadership development program 3 Recruitment ad./employer marketing 83% 2 69% Recruitment branding 2 Social media 56% 3 3 FG with employees to define EB 3 2 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Career website development 2 63% 2 Applicant tracking system 3 Induction program 55% Recruitment ad./employer marketing 62% 3 2 Social media 3 2 67% FG with employees to define EB 3 29
  • 31. Achieving employer branding objectives Figure 5: How important are the following in order to achieving your employer branding objectives? (1 = least important 7= most important) Having a clearly defined strategy Senior management engagement CEO engagement Communications planning Defining our EVP’s Developing strategies for retaining talent Developing strategies for recruiting talent Collaboration b/t different departments Conducting internal research Producing communications materials Participation in social media © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 4.8 6.08 5.98 5.89 5.88 5.84 5.75 5.57 5.56 5.53 5.27 5.97 Conducting market research 6.04 Clearly defined strategy 5 year strategy 5.9 6.08 percent 2009 2011 2014 30
  • 32. Table 5: Inside the regional data ‐ Achieving employer branding objectives Top response (rating out of 7) ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Having a clearly defined strategy 6.06 5.76 6.07 5.93 CEO engagement Senior management engagement 6.32 6.09 6.13 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Having a clearly defined strategy 6.23 5.82 6.78 Senior management engagement 5.90 6.63 Communications planning 6.56 6.49 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Having a clearly defined strategy 6.37 CEO engagement 6.50 Senior management engagement 6.09 Defining our EVP 6.13 31
  • 33. Attracting talent Figure 6: How important do you believe the following employer brand attributes are in attracting new talent to your company? (1 = least important 7= most important) Career development Leadership Work environment Corporate reputation and culture Reward and recognition People management practices and policies Mission, vision, values Recruitment and induction processes Compensation and benefits Performance management Innovation Communication systems Corporate Social Responsibility © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 6.07 5.97 5.95 5.76 5.65 5.58 5.43 5.38 5.33 4.95 4.81 4.49 5.26 6.02 Employee research 5.99 Leadership 5 year trend 5.76 6.07 percent 2009 2011 2014 32
  • 34. Table 6: Inside the regional data – The most important employer brand attributes to attract talent Top response (rating out of 7) ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Compensation and benefits 6.32 6.17 Corporate reputation and culture 6.19 Leadership 6.25 5.96 6.33 Work environment 6.09 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Career development 6.35 6.40 Compensation and benefits 5.90 5.27 Corporate reputation and culture 6.50 6.33 Recruitment and induction processes 6.67 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Career development 6.50 Corporate reputation and culture 6.43 Leadership 5.97 Work environment 6.50 33
  • 35. Employer Branding Challenges Figure 7: What are the challenges you have encountered in managing your employer brand program? 1‐7 (1 = very little extent 7= very great extent) 4.89 4.66 4.64 4.42 4.18 3.81 3.51 4.16 4.75 Obtaining an adequate budget EB messaging across departments Distinctive employment offering Senior leadership engagement Communicating EB to candidates CEO engagement Communicating EB to customers Communicating EB to suppliers Engaging external agency Employer branding messaging across departments 4.56 5 year trend 4.4 4.75 percent 2009 2011 2014 © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 34
  • 36. Table 7: Inside the regional data ‐ Challenges in managing the employer brand program Top response (rating out of 7) ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Being creative and innovative to distinguish our employment offering 5.17 Senior leadership engagement 4.70 4.38 Obtaining an adequate budget 4.99 4.71 4.91 Communicating key employer brand 5.32 messages to potential recruits Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Being creative and innovative to distinguish our employment offering 4.48 Senior leadership engagement 5.38 Obtaining an adequate budget 5.09 5.89 5.33 Communicating key employer brand 5.13 messages to potential recruits Co‐oordinating employer brand messages across different departments 5.45 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Being creative and innovative to distinguish our employment offering 4.90 Obtaining an adequate budget 5.40 Co‐oordinating employer brand 5.25 5.07 messages across different departments 35
  • 37. What’s important? Figure 8: Which of the following is most important to you? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) That other people want to work for my employer Other people’s perception of the company I work for My friends’ perception of the company I work My family's perception of the company I work That my friends know the company I work for That my family knows the company I work for © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 14% 24% 21% 30% 29% 45% 53% None of the above Other people’s perception of the company 53 I work for is important 5 year trend 51 45 percent 2009 2011 2014 36
  • 38. Table 8: Inside the regional data ‐ What is important to people? Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA It is important to me that my friends know the company I work for 3 My friends’ perception of the company I work for is important 2 3 It is important to me that my family knows the company I work for My family's perception of the company I work for is important 2 3 3 3 2 It is important that other people want to work for my employer 46% 2 3 2 2 63% 53% Other people’s perception of the company that I work for is important to me. 3 46% 43% 47% 47% 2 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America It is important to me that my friends know the company I work for 3 2 My friends’ perception of the company I work for is important 3 3 3 2 3 It is important to me that my family knows the company I work for My family's perception of the company I work for is important 2 3 It is important that other people want to work for my employer 75% 67% 69% 67% 75% 67% 60% Other people’s perception of the company that I work for is important to me. 2 2 2 3 2 37
  • 39. Turkey UAE UK Ukraine It is important to me that my friends know the company I work for 3 My friends’ perception of the company I work for is important 2 It is important to me that my family knows the company I work for My family's perception of the company I work for is important 3 2 3 It is important that other people want to work for my employer 72% 48% 72% Other people’s perception of the company that I work for is important to me. 2 68% 3 2 38
  • 40. Employer Brand Metrics Figure 9: What metrics does your company use to measure return on investment (ROI) of your employer brand strategy? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) 5% 34% 33% 29% 25% 25% 20% 19% 15% 24% 33% 44% 41% Employee engagement Retention rate Number of applicants Quality of hire Cost per hire Ranking in best employer awards Promotion of internal candidates Employee referral rate of new hires None defined as yet Candidate conversion ratio Sourcing effectiveness Profit per employee I don't know 12 Ranking in best employer awards 5 year trend 15 29 2009 2011 2014 percent © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 39
  • 41. Table 9: Inside the regional data ‐ Metrics used to measure return on investment (ROI) of the employer brand strategy Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Cost per hire 3 Employee engagement 37% 3 2 41% 53% 2 48% Employee referral rate of new hires 3 Number of applicants 2 Ranking in best employer awards 2 3 46% Retention rate 2 39% 3 2 3 2 Quality of hire 46% 3 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Cost per hire 2 3 2 Employee engagement 2 3 2 2 Employee referral rate of new hires 3 3 3 Number of applicants 46% 3 Ranking in best employer awards 64% Retention rate 52% 3 48% Quality of hire 2 49% None, we haven't defined our metrics as yet 2 44% 52% Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Cost per hire 3 53% Employee engagement 68% 37% 2 Number of applicants 2 Ranking in best employer awards 45% Retention rate 3 Quality of hire 3 3 2 None, we haven't defined our metrics as yet 2 40
  • 42. Employer brand communications Figure 10: What is the main communication medium your company is planning to use to communicate your Employer Brand during 2014? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) 22% 22% 22% 19% 16% 16% 11% 11% 10% 4% Social media Career website Training & development programs Internal newsletters (e.g. staff e‐news) Employee referral program Online job boards Company brochures Career fairs Employee video testimonials On campus activities Graduate programs Induction process Performance appraisal Company events Blogs Mobile careers site Sponsorship Alumni events External newsletters Mobile app Newspaper job ads Trade shows © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 22% 43% 39% 38% 37% 34% 33% 32% 32% 31% 40% 64% 76% I don't know 14 Social media 5 year trend 44 76 2009 2011 2014 percent 41
  • 43. Table 10: Inside the regional data ‐ Communicating the employer brand in 2014 Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Career fairs 3 Career website 59% 2 78% 2 2 76% Employee referral program 3 Internal newsletters (e.g. staff e‐news) 2 Online job boards 3 Social media 3 65% 2 70% 72% 57% 2 Training & development programs 3 3 3 Company brochures 2 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Career fairs 59% 3 Career website 78% 69% 60% 2 67% Employee referral program 3 3 3 3 Induction process 2 Internal newsletters (e.g. staff e‐news) 2 Social media 2 2 Training & development programs 3 2 2 74% On campus activities 71% Company brochures 3 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Career website 70% 62% 80% 70% Company events e.g. AGM, product launches Employee referral program 3 Online job boards 3 2 Social media 3 2 2 3 Training & development programs 2 42
  • 44. Most Effective Employer Branding Initiatives Figure 11: Which activity has been most effective in enhancing your company’s employer brand? 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% None identified as yet, too early to tell Social media participation Defining our EVP's Talent development strategy Career website development Ranking in best employer awards Training leaders to manage employment exp Effective leadership dev. program I don't know Talent pool development Increased comms b/t internal depts Employee referral program Introducing work flexibility policies Talent relationship management Salary increases CSR program © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 6% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 6% 9% 9% 11% 11% 17% Company videos 14 Defining our EVP's 5 year trend 9 11 percent 2009 2011 2014 43
  • 45. Table 11: Inside the regional data – Most effective employer branding initiatives Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Effective leadership development program 2 Career website development 18% 3 2 3 Defining our employer value propositions 2 3 Our ranking in Best Places to Work survey 16% Social media participation 3 2 2 22% Talent development strategy 2 30% 3 None identified as yet, too early to tell 3 16% 17% 38% 3 2 Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Effective leadership development program 3 2 2 Defining our employer value propositions 2 2 3 Employee referral program 2 3 3 Increased communications b/t int. depts. 3 3 2 Social media participation 22% Talent development strategy 33% 25% I don't know 2 None identified as yet, too early to tell 30% 23% 20% 41% 3 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Career website development 2 Defining our employer value propositions 2 18% Employee referral program 3 Increased communications b/t int. depts. 2 Our ranking in Best Places to Work survey 2 Social media participation 20% 3 Talent development strategy 3 38% I don't know None identified as yet, too early to tell 2 38% 44
  • 46. Major benefits Figure 12: What are the main benefits you have gained from your employer brand program? (>100% as more than one answer is possible) 3% 13% 12% 11% 10% 8% 7% Ease in attracting candidates Increased employee engagement Recognition as an employer of choice Reduced recruitment costs None, too early to tell Higher job acceptance rate Decrease in staff turnover Increased internal hire rate Increase in unsolicited resumes Setting a standard/framework for HR Decreased time‐to‐fill Increased customer engagement I don't know Engaging customers through social media © Employer Brand International 2014 Employer Branding Global Trends Study 11% 22% 21% 19% 19% 28% 35% 32% Increased investor engagement Ease in attracting candidates 5 year trend 28 28 35 percent 2009 2011 2014 45
  • 47. Table 12: Inside the regional data ‐ Main benefits of employer branding Top 3 responses ‐ the % represents the highest response Asia Australia Europe (other) New Zealand Scandinavia Spain Canada/USA Decrease in staff turnover 3 Ease in attracting candidates 36% 36% 43% 3 33% 3 34 Higher job acceptance rate 3 3 Increased employee engagement 2 2 2 47% Recognition as an employer of choice 3 2 2 Reduced recruitment costs 2 None identified as yet, too early to tell 35% 28% Setting a standard & framework for all 2 HR activity Belarus India Poland Romania Russia South Africa South America Decrease in staff turnover 2 Decreased time‐to‐fill 52% 33% Ease in attracting candidates 2 2 37% 3 30% Higher job acceptance rate 3 Increase in number of unsol. resumes 2 44% Increased employee engagement 3 62% 33% 2 3 2 Recognition as an employer of choice 3 3 None identified as yet, too early to tell 3 2 Turkey UAE UK Ukraine Decrease in staff turnover 2 2 55% Decreased time‐to‐fill 2 Ease in attracting candidates 38% 42% Higher job acceptance rate 60% 3 Increase in number of unsol. resumes 3 Increased employee engagement 3 Recognition as an employer of choice 2 None identified as yet, too early to tell 3 46
  • 48. Appendix A: Employer Brand Excellence Pathway 47
  • 49. EMPLOYER BRAND EXCELLENCE PATHWAY • Employer branding for business transformation • Support of culture diversity across countries • Dedicated employer branding department with representatives living in countries outside headquarters • Open lines of communication across borders • Systems integration to support global talent attraction, engagement and retention strategy • Support of employer brand strategy at Executive level • Integrating Employer Brand and EVP’s into company culture • Alignment of policies, systems, processes with EVP’s • Development and management of global careers site • Employer brand metrics developed and reported on • Employer branding across employee lifecycle • Internal and external research to define EVP’s • Distinctive assets defined and promoted • Employer brand strategy developed • Cross functional collaboration on employer brand strategy • Training of line managers in employer brand management • Company siloed with very little collaboration on employer branding between departments • Above the line EVP development • Employer branding for recruitment • Knowledge of employer branding limited to a few people in organisation • Lack of support for employer brand strategy at Executive level • Technical skills focus • Cost control v quality of hire/talent • Recruitment disorganised, dysfunctional and highly operational • Web 1.0 career site • Absence of coordinated global talent attraction, engagement and retention strategy © www.brettminchington.com FOCUS
  • 50. Appendix B: Employer Brand Excellence Framework 49
  • 51. Employer Brand Excellence FrameworkTM Stakeholders Market Forces Prospective Employees Customers Corporate Brand EBSP EBEP EVP Employer Value Proposition Employer Brand Employee PlatformTM (EBEP)  Recruitment and induction  Compensation and benefits  Career development  Employee research  Reward and recognition  Communication systems  Work environment Employer Brand Strategic PlatformTM (EBSP)  Mission, vision, values  CSR  Leadership  Corporate reputation and culture  People management policies and practice  Performance management  Innovation www.brettminchington.com
  • 52. Additional resources ‘Employer branding & the new world@work’ (2013) The final book in the employer branding trilogy by Brett Minchington explores how companies are addressing the challenges of the ‘bigger picture workforce trends’ and how employer branding will play a pivotal role in driving economic prospects in not only developed economies but in emerging markets where growth prospects look more promising in the coming years. Supported by the latest global research by Employer Brand International along with ‘on the ground’ insights by Brett from his global tours to more than 50 cities in 28 countries, ‘Employer branding & the new world@work’ will provide insights into how the world’s leading companies are becoming more social, mobile, connected and innovative in their strategies to attract, engage and retain talent. Previously unseen global employer brand case studies from top global brands such as IKEA, Volvo Car Group, Ahold, Sodexo and JTI are featured. Whether you're just starting out or well advanced with your employer brand strategy, leaders across all industries will benefit from Brett’s strategic guidance supported by industry proven frameworks, research methodologies, strategies and tools to develop, implement and manage a best‐in‐class employer brand strategy. FOR FURTHER DETAILS CLICK HERE> The world's leading resource on how to develop a world class careers website with practical guidance and case study examples of best practice. FOR FURTHER DETAILS CLICK HERE> 51
  • 53. ‘'EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP ‐ A Global Perspective' (2010) The follow up book to Your Employer Brand Attract, Engage, Retain, ‘EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP ‐ A Global Perspective' defines a practical approach to building a world class employer brand from concept to design, to organisation wide integration, to measuring your return on investment. Sharing the best insights from the author’s Employer Brand Global Tour where he has shared best practice and trained thousands of leaders around the world, ‘EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP‐A Global Perspective' is a practical management resource for leaders at all levels and includes frameworks, models, tools, strategies and tips to assist you to lead your employer brand strategy. The book features previously unseen world's best practice employer branding global case studies from companies including Philips, IBM, Deloitte, UnitedHeath Group, BASF, Sodexo, Intuit, Australia Wine Research Institute and Vestas Wind Systems. The key learnings from these companies will ensure you focus your resources to achieve the best return on your employer brand investment. FOR FURTHER DETAILS CLICK HERE> ‘Employer Brand Managers Handbook’ ‐ 2014 Edition Previously published in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 The Annual, “Employer Brand Manager's Handbook” provides a wealth of knowledge, tools and tips shared with thousands of senior managers around the world during Brett Minchington's Employer Branding Global Tour to 50+ cities in 28 countries since 2007. The publication is the world's leading management resource on how to develop, implement, measure and manage a world class employer strategic program. The publication contains practical exercises which can be conducted with your team FOR FURTHER DETAILS CLICK HERE> 52
  • 54. Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership About Employer Brand International EBI provides research, advisory and thought leadership in employer branding through strategic consulting, conferences/training, publications, research and global think-tanks. EBI’s expert services are provided through an international network of expert employer brand Senior Associates. EBI’s Global Advisory Board consists of leading corporate professionals and academics from around the world. Why choose to study the Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership? • Study for an in demand leadership skill • Case study approach to support theoretical frameworks • Real world application • Flexible study options • Supportive learning environment • Access to the world’s most extensive employer branding learning resources • Alumni support 1. Since 2007 EBI has trained thousands of managers in employer branding in more than 50 cities in 28 countries. 2. Access to an employer branding global community of 3500+ members. 3. Course is supported by world class learning resources including books, handbooks and global research reports. 4. The first course of its kind offered in partnership with educational institutions, business and the community. 5. Accredited by EBI 5 QUICK FACTS Enrol Today! www.employerbrandinternational.com
  • 55. WELCOME FROM THE CHAIRMAN/CEO Welcome to the Certificate in Employer Brand Leadership Course – a contemporary leadership program for managers around the world. Since 2007, Employer Brand International has conducted training for thousands of managers in employer branding in more than 50 cities in 28 countries since 2007 including Australia, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, UAE, UK, and the USA. Employees are fast becoming central to the process of brand building and their behavior can either reinforce a brand’s advertised values or, if inconsistent with these values, undermine the credibility of your messages. Employer branding is a whole of business concept concerned with the attraction, engagement and retention initiatives targeted at enhancing your company’s employer brand. The contest amongst employers to attract and retain talented workers takes place in a world where changes in the political, economic, social and technological environments and concerns about a company’s environmental footprint is driving widespread change in employment patterns. Today, competition for the best employees is as fierce as competition for customers and market share. The course brings together a talented team of academics, strategists and corporate leaders to create an inspiring learning experience in the growing field of employer branding. Our emphasis is on assisting you to develop leadership, communication, problem solving and team building skills, which will enable you to better understand and deal with the complex issues of management in a changing business environment. In selecting students we look for high quality people with the potential to not only benefit but also contribute to the learning experience. Whilst practical in orientation, your learning experience will include networking with like minded professionals around the world to support a solid theoretical grounding in employer brand leadership. Organizations that can attract and retain the best minds by leveraging a unique, relevant and distinctive employer brand will have a competitive edge in the marketplace. We look forward to welcoming you and wish you the very best with your studies. Brett Minchington Chairman/CEO Employer Brand International PROGRAM STRUCTURE CORE MODULE A THE BUSINESS CASE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 1: The Fundamentals Of Employer Branding (EBLFU) CORE MODULE B BEST PRACTICE IN EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 2: Employer Brand Leadership Principles & Practices (EBLPP) Study Unit 3: Employer Brand Strategic Management (EBLSM) Study Unit 4: Employer Branding Mapping & Competitor Analysis (EBLCA) Study Unit 5: Employer Brand Analytics & Reporting (EBLAR) Study Unit 6: Contemporary Practices in Employer Branding & Social Media (EBLSM) Study Unit 7: Employee and Customer Experience (EBLCE) CORE MODULE C THE FUTURE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Study Unit 8: Employer Branding Social Responsibility (EBLSR) Study Unit 9: Future Trends in Employer Branding (EBLTD) Study Unit 10: Employer Branding Case Study Analysis (EBLCS) HOW TO APPLY Apply online at www.employerbrandinternational.com or to enquire please email Andrea at: andrea@employerbrandinternational.com Please direct all course enquiries to: Ms Andrea Fielding P +61 8 8443 4115 F +61 8 8443 4149 ALUMNI SUPPORT The EBI Employer Branding Global Community is an important part of the life and community of the School, as it forms an integral part of the School’s business relationships. The network is diverse, including students and graduates who work and live locally, interstate and overseas. With more than 3500 members, the EBGC supports members in various ways: • Fostering global networking opportunities • Informing the business community of latest trends in employer branding www.employerbrandinternational.com
  • 56. © 2014 Employer Brand International All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publishers, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non commercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests please write to EBI, Publications Department, Box 614, Torrensville SA 5031 Australia The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavour to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee such information is accurate as of the date it is received or it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act on such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation. 53
  • 57. www.employerbrandinternational.com