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Students With Emotional Behavior Disorders
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Students With Emotional Behavior Disorders

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  • 1. Emotional Behavioral Disorder
  • 2. Definition of Emotional Behavioral Disorder Inability to learn Symptoms / fears of school problems Pervasive unhappiness / depression Inappropriate in normal circumstances Inability to build / maintain relationships
  • 3. Definition of Emotional Behavioral Disorder Three conditions that must be met: a)Chronicity b)severity c)educational impact
  • 4. Causes of Emotional Behavioral Disorder (a)adverse early rearing environment (b)Aggressive behavior entering school (c)social rejection by peers Environmental Factors Family - School Society Biological Factors Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 5. Characteristics of Emotional Behavioral Disorder 48 %drop out [30% students disabilities 24% of all students] Withdrawn behavior Antisocial behavior Social skills and interpersonal relationships Highest absentee rate (18 days) Lowest GPA of any student disability group Two thirds could not pass AYP assessment
  • 6. Characteristics of Emotional Behavioral Disorder Motivation, anxiety, impulse Lack concentration , independence Success ? If perceived to be functional / relevant Typically 1.8 grade levels behind
  • 7. Emotional Behavioral Disorder Schools have limited mental heath services Males Social skills training is not typically taught Not enough time on instruction Behavior of students primary reason for attrition
  • 8. Class Instruction for students with EBD Teacher behavior may cause and maintain problem behaviors Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 9. What we Found Less engaged students received neglect coercion from teachers Treated more harshly with similar behaviors Twice a many negative statement to students More engaged students received more positive teacher behaviors Less than 2 praise statements per hour
  • 10. Child Effect on Adult Behavior Children influence the behavior of adults. Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 11. Deprivation within Classrooms Enter school with poor self-control inadequate social skills inappropriate behavior Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 12. Deprivation within Classrooms Correct academic responses = teacher praise Current classroom interactions focus primarily on behavior (not academics) Instructional interactions = less challenging
  • 13. Deprivation within Classrooms Curriculum of “non-instruction” Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 14. Ineffective Classrooms As a Cause of Antisocial Behavior Increase in negative behavior Academic failure leads to little reinforcement School begins to take on aversive properties Students influence teacher instructional behavior Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 15. Ineffective Classrooms As a Cause of Antisocial Behavior Teacher reliance on ineffective strategies Overemphasis on behavior control Inadequate teacher preparation and support Lack of an effective on academic instruction Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 16. Implications for Teachers Behavior has a goal: Attention Power Revenge Avoid failure Behavior is a choice: Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D. Can be learned / unlearned
  • 17. Implications for Teachers Define teacher expectations Set Rules Preventive Discipline Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 18. Implications for Teachers Inform what is expected of them Establish a positive learning climate Provide a meaningful learning experience Avoid threats Demonstrate fairness Build and exhibit self-confidence Recognize positive student attributes Time the recognition of student attributes Use positive modeling Structure the curriculum & classroom environment Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 19. What I can do ! Traps to Avoid Yelling Arguing Asserting your authority Degrading Embarrassing sarcasm’ Making assumptions Giving up control Preaching Having a tantrum Character attacks Double standards Threats Pleading or bribing Bringing up past events Making accusations Holding grudges Getting psychical Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 20. What I can do ! mental reminders keep your emotions in check Avoiding and defusing confrontations Describe the behavior without evaluating it Involving the student in class activities Seating arrangement and traffic rules Be friendly but firm (authoritarian)
  • 21. What I can do ! Grouping Time Management Cooperative learning. Stay in the present Remove the audience Control negative emotions Using non-verbal cues Release negative emotions
  • 22. Strategies for effective instruction Presentation Daily review (provide overview of lesson, teach new skills at a fast rate and in small increments, model procedures, check for understanding, teach to mastery) Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 23. Strategies for effective instruction independent practice corrective and positive feedback Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D. guided practice
  • 24. Grouping for instruction Research: Grouping adaptations reduce occurrences of use Grouping for instruction involves the behavioral problems (Penno, Frank, & Wacker, of small group instruction, one-on-one 2000) support, cooperative group activities, Peer-assisted learning promotes computational skills individualized instruction, and peer (Calhoon & Fuchs, 2003) tutoring Classwide peer tutoring is effective in strengthening basic math skills (Allsopp, 1997) Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 25. Grouping for instruction Peer Tutoring Cooperative learning Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 26. Grouping for instruction [Benefits] Providing a structured, task-focused opportunity for positive social interaction Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 27. Grouping for instruction [Benefits] Teaching self-management Providing students with immediate feedback Providing student’s opportunities to correct errors Promoting active student responding
  • 28. Instructional adaptation Students with disabilities have difficulties: advance organizers help identify, & – Remembering and recalling information (Olson Platt, 1996) organize, understand, and retain Strategy – Identifying relevant information informationinformation – Organizing Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 29. Instructional adaptation assignment adaptations maintain attention Inappropriate student behavior decreases when students are presented with a sequence of shortened assignments versus one long assignment Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 30. Instructional adaptation assignment adaptations maintain attention advance organizers help identify, organize, understand, and retain information Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 31. Instructional adaptation Require students to paraphrase an assignment's tasks Allow groups to complete some written assignments Extend time for completing assignments Divide assignments into chunks and have timelines for each chunk Reduce the amount of copying needed throughout the assignment (e.g., from board, notetaking) A reduction in the number of problems assigned to students (Salend, 1994) Encourage the use of calculators and computers
  • 32. Conclusions Higher levels of engagement = lower levels of inappropriate behavior It seems clear that children with emotional/behavioral disorders actively influence the behavior of adults An unanswered question is what levels of support are needed to maintain ‘good teaching’ Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 33. Keys to Effective Support Increase the frequency of praise and opportunities to respond. Target both child and adult behavior Early intervention Interventions should be comprehensive. Emphasize both academic and social behaviors simultaneously. Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.
  • 34. Presented by: Brent Daigle, Ph.D.