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Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
Visual merchandising seminar for imcea
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Visual merchandising seminar for imcea

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How to merchandise for food service, specifically food bars.

How to merchandise for food service, specifically food bars.

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  • Read Slide- Self Explanatory
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  • Trend #1: HEALTH WELLNESS AND LOW CARBS – According the National Institutes of Health, approximately 64 percent of Americans are overweight or obese. This year, most foodservice operations are making adjustments to meet the increasing demand for nutritious food. More than 32 million Americans are on low-carb diets. Americans want less bad stuff and more of the good stuff in their food. Look for more foods that reduce heart-damaging trans fats, and more foods fortified with vitamins and minerals. Two-thirds of people who are not on a diet want fewer sugars, carbs and fats in their food. Customers want companies to post nutrition information on everything sold so they can decide and design a healthful meal for themselves. 1 1 “Smart Briefs’ Special Report,” National Restaurant Association, Paul King, pages 1-8, March 23, 25, 2004.
  • Trend #2: CONVENIENCE – As consumers’ lives become busier and increasingly rushed, c-stores, express units, and grab-and-go outlets are enjoying renewed popularity. Even on college campuses, 60 percent of traditional foodservice transactions take place at these convenience operations rather than in residential dining centers. Convenience is not an option – it’s a necessity. Consumers want ready-to-eat, no prep, handheld, no clean-up meals. New convenience trends include: single serve, bite-sized, resealable, portion-control, snack foods that are portable (fit in your pocket, hand, or cup holder). Consumers also want foods that produce minimal packaging waste, have no extra ingredients or utensils, won’t spoil or crush in transit and do not require dishwashing. 2 2 “Consumer Marketing: The Taste Experience,” IDDBA , Carol L. Christison, copyright 2004.
  • Trend #3: HEALTHFUL DRINK OPTIONS – The pursuit of health may be the motor behind all of the most significant trends in beverages. Whether in college cafeterias, baseball stadiums or company lunchrooms, people are turning to the one beverage whose most-prized characteristic is its nondescript nature: water. But the trend toward beverages perceived as healthful goes beyond bottled water. There is a huge move toward beverages that are low in carbs and caffeine free. In addition, there is an increasing desire for customization of beverages. Artificial flavors are losing ground to drinks with “all natural” claims. Antioxidant tea products are all the rage. At least one brand of coffee is adding herbs and minerals to its beans. 3 3 Nations’ Restaurant News , Dave Wolkowitz, page 22, July 19, 2004.
  • Trend #4: GLOBAL COMFORT FOODS – The comfort food taste experience includes hearty, flavorful foods that provide familiarity and satisfaction. Top-ranked comfort foods include steak and potatoes, chicken noodle soups, mashed potatoes and pot roast. In addition, there is a mixture of ethnic cultures producing a variety of products that evoke a sense of home and familiarity. Now many Mexican and Asian dishes that were once considered residents of the ethnic realm have migrated to comfort food status. Foods like beans, tortillas and sticky rice have become staples to many foodservice customers. 4 4 Nations’ Restaurant News , Dave Wolkowitz, page 20, July 19, 2004.
  • Trend #5: FOOD CUSTOMIZATION – Food Customization happens when diners can impact the ingredients used to cook their food or add different flavorings. Many food concepts such as Mongolian grills (where people can collect their ingredients and add their choice of sauce and meat), stir-fry wok stations, made-to-order sandwich stations, muffin stations, salad bars, potato bars, omelet stations, pasta stations and fresh vegetable grills are becoming big hits. Increasingly, people like to have their own healthful food options. 5 5 Nations’ Restaurant News , Dave Wolkowitz, page 20, July 19, 2004.
  • Trend #6: ETHNIC DIVERSITY – People today are so sophisticated and worldly that the usual type of ethnic cuisine – Chinese, Mexican and Italian – aren’t nearly enough anymore. Today’s diners express an increased desire for authentic, cultural cuisine and restaurant-style quality. Chinese food has evolved into Southeast Asian; Mexican food into more authentic dishes with a strong Latin accent from Central and South America; Italian has been replaced with Tunisian and Moroccan. These are all strong, flavorful types of cuisine. In our culinary melting pot, about 25 percent of consumers say they enjoy Cajun, 19 percent Spanish, 17 percent French or Japanese, 15 percent Greek or Middle Eastern, 14 percent Thai, 12 percent German, and 11 percent Caribbean. 6 6 “Consumer Marketing: The Taste Experience,” IDDBA , Carol L. Christison, copyright 2004.
  • Trend #7: THE SMALL PLATE – As an offshoot of the tapas trend, today’s healthful food customers are asking for smaller portions of foods. Customers want to put together a tasting plate of three or four items from the entrée line. While most fish, meat or poultry servings in main dishes are six to eight ounces, the protein serving in a small plate is closer to three ounces. Along with the smaller serving of meat or seafood, the small plate is garnished with a vegetable and a starch. Customers love the idea that they can savor different flavors and styles of cuisine in one seating. Because the servings are smaller and cheaper, people are spending and eating less. 7 7 Food Fit.com , Frances Largeman, February 4, 2004
  • Trend #8: HOT SANDWICHES – Popular national sandwich chains like Subway and Quiznos have led the way in transforming cold-wrap sandwiches into heated sandwich programs. Foodservice operators are working overtime to please the increasingly sophisticated palates of customers who want more upscale breads like focaccia, more zesty toppings such as pesto spread, hot subs, hot hoagies and hot wraps. Jumping on the low-carb bandwagon, many companies are also filling lettuce with hot meat fillings. P.F. Chang’s made this offering very popular. 8 8 Nations’ Restaurant News , James Peters, June 21, 2004.
  • Trend #9: BREAKFAST: MOST IMPORTANT MEAL – Across the country, breakfast has regained its status as the most important meal of the day. Citing the popularity of high-protein diets like Atkins and South Beach, food operators look to jump-start their customers’ day by piling on more sausage varieties and egg whites. Breakfast consumption is on the rise, because customers are demanding more protein in their meals. The average American ate more than 254 eggs this year. Omelets that include ham, cheese and sausage have been the big winner. New items are showing up like potato skins filled with various types of prepared eggs and omelets with other ingredients such as cheese, bacon and mushrooms. 9 9 Nations’ Restaurant News , James Peters, June 21, 2004.
  • Trend #10: FOOD SAFETY – The entire food supply chain from ground to consumer is aware of food safety issues and demands nothing less than safe food. The headlines about Hepatitis, E.Coli, and Mad Cow Disease have kept food safety in the forefront of consumers’ minds. Easy-to-clean and sanitize equipment and utensils, automated cleaning systems, cleaning agents, HACCP programs, traceability, country of origin labeling (COOL) and well-trained, food safety-certified employees are crucial. 10 10 “Consumer Marketing: The Taste Experience,” IDDBA , Carol L. Christison, copyright 2004.
  • Trend #11: CLEAN FOOD INDEPENDENCE – More consumers are becoming educated through new Web sites and food educational material and are demanding alternative clean foods. These people are creating an individual lifestyle that requires food that is different. Raw food enthusiasts believe that heating food above 118 degrees kills enzymes that are key to life. Nearly six million adults in the United States currently pursue a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle. A vegetarian meal cannot contain meat. A vegan lifestyle is free of any products derived from animals. Organic cuisine requires organic foods that are created under conditions that enhance the ecological balance of natural systems. Consumers want pesticide free, responsibly grown, locally grown, and environmentally friendly food products. 11 11 “Consumer Marketing: The Taste Experience,” IDDBA , Carol L. Christison, copyright 2004.
  • Trend #12: ENTREÉ SALADS – Entrée salads are becoming familiar fare on many quick-service menus nationwide. This reflects a growing trend among restaurant chains to showcase more healthful selections in response to critics who have assailed the industry for contributing to the nation’s obesity and health problems. Quick-service restaurants saw orders for entrée salads rise 12 percent over the past year. With industry heavyweight McDonald’s giving its new premium salad line credit for increased sales, many more restaurants like Chick-fil-a, Church’s Chicken and Blimpies are adding entrée salads. 12 12 Nations’ Restaurant News , page 11, October, 2003.
  • Trend #13: HEALTHIER KIDS – The vast majority of households with children are seeking healthier foods and beverages. Half of today’s households trade off convenience for health benefits. Food manufacturers are starting to resize product packages, formulations and serving sizes to suit children’s needs without overdoing it. McDonald’s stopped super-sizing its foods. Canteen Vending Service made a dramatic shift in vending service with the introduction of Balanced Choices, a bank of vending machines that offer a mix of healthful snacks, sugar-free and caffeine-free beverages and a variety of other meal choices, like low-carb foods, salads and fresh and dried fruit. 13 13 Monster Trends , Bob Messenger, May 7, 2004, p. 12.
  • Transcript

    • 1. VISUAL MERCHANDISING Presenters: Brenda Hamm / John Becker Hubert LLC
    • 2. Agenda I. PowerPoint Presentation on Visual Merchandising in the Food Industry II. “Hands-on” Visual Merchandising in Teams (design, set, and present) III. Questions & Answers
    • 3. Goals
      • To define Visual Merchandising and its impact on Sales in the Food Industry
      • To identify and successfully incorporate the 5 Elements of Design into your everyday food displays
      • To identify new Foodservice Merchandising Trends
      • To practice “hands-on” Visual Merchandising in teams (design, set, and present)
    • 4. What is Visual Merchandising?
      • $elling goods in small increments to customers through a visual medium
      • Projecting the image of the seller
      • Incorporating the 5 elements of design: color, texture, landscaping, décor and communication
      • Creating a Dining/Shopping Experience that places the customer in harmony or gives them a New experience
    • 5. Why is Visual Merchandising Important?
      • It creates the optimum $ALE$ environment
      • The art of turning a “ Passive Looker into an Active Buyer ”
      • Generates Impulse Sales
    • 6. The 5 Elements of Visual Merchandising COLOR TEXTURE LANDSCAPING DECOR COMMUNICATION
    • 7. COLOR The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising
    • 8. COLOR
    • 9. COLOR The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising Color Basics 101 Color The presence or absence of light as it is reflected or deflected on a given surface Color Hue The particular wavelength of spectrum color to which we give a name (example: Red) Color Intensity Degree of Saturation; purity, strength & brilliance Color Value reference to the lightness or darkness in a color Tint = color + white added Shade = color + black added
    • 10. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green COLOR WHEEL A color wheel will indicate the approximate color that will result from mixing adjacent hues in a given color scheme. Primary Primary Primary Secondary Secondary Secondary Primary & Secondary Hues
    • 11. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Monochromatic 1 Hue- different shades and tint; soothing COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 12. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Analogous 3-4 Adjacent Hues, but may also contain all intensities and values of Hues between; soothing COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 13. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Triadic 3 Hues of equal distance on the color wheel; makes intense, dramatic presentations COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 14. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Complementary Two hues exactly opposite on the Color Wheel; dramatic COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 15. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Split Complementary 1 opposite with 2 on either side of the opposite; dramatic COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 16. Orange Yellow Red Orange Blue Green Green Blue Blue Violet Red Violet Red Yellow Orange Purple Yellow Green Tone-On-Tone Two hues next to each other on the color wheel; soothing COLOR WHEEL COLOR SCHEME
    • 17. How to Blend Color Into Displays
      • First determine the purpose of the display
      • Movement L to R, T to B as in reading
      • Use bright, strong, dramatic hues with or without repetition to attract and lead the eye
    • 18. COLOR The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising Color Families Cool Colors: blue, green, violet and blue-green Warm Colors: red, yellow orange, rust and peach Neutral Colors: white, black, brown and beige
    • 19. Effects of Background Color on Display Color
    • 20. Social & Psychological Reactions to Color The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising 1. Yellow happy, bright, cheerful, vital in food needs to be true yellow to be successful 2. Yellow-orange not well received in food areas 3. Orange Friendly, sociable, glowing, vibrant great color for food displays & merchandising 4. Red exciting, loving, warm stimulates appetite, red, rust and spice shades gets attention in displays and décor
    • 21. Social & Psychological Reactions to Color The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising 5. Pink problem with foods, can only be sweet-candy, suggests undercooking, not well received 6. Green alive, cool, growing fresh cool greens, deep greens, and blue-greens 7. Blue favorite of most people cool, calm, comfortable, good for cold areas of merchandising 8. Purple very strong color, regal use sparingly-only as accent
    • 22. Social & Psychological Reactions to Color The “Soul” of Visual Merchandising 9. Brown earth, hearth, home, simple things, clay, wood, great for accents and various shades together 10. Gray depressing or cold can be sophisticated and elite (marble) needs to be clear color 11. White makes all other colors seem brighter, bigger, bolder, denotes cleanliness great for uses with foods 12. Black ultra-chic or ultra-depressing needs to be shiny to be clear
    • 23. At Sutton Place Goumet in Alexandria, Va Food is the Vehicle for Magnificent Color Photo by Martin M. Pegler Food Presentation & Display by Martin M. Pegler Displays with Color
    • 24. Displays with Color At Comito’N in Santiago Chile the colors are warm and homey Photo by MMR/RVC, Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler Book
    • 25. Color Influencing Factors
    • 26. Color Trends for 2005
      • Sources: Pantone Fashion Color Report & The Color Marketing Organization Forecast
      • Worldwide Color Trend - The Complete Red Family is RED HOT!
      • Worldwide - Greens are also going to continue to be very important. They make us feel tranquil, safe and secure.
      • America - softening, warming, returning to “earth tones”. A warm palette of yellows, golds, mustards and all hues of reds and greens.
    • 27. New Color Products
      • Soft Patina Wire Baskets
      • Earth-Tone Solid Red w/Verdigris-like
      • Displayware Ceramics Finish
    • 28. TEXTURE The “Touch and Feel” of Visual Merchandising
    • 29. TEXTURE
    • 30. Interesting Facts about Texture and Touch
      • Tactile experience is essential to humans, especially growing infants
      • The sense of touch develops before the sense of vision
      • Much later we learn to “feel” texture with our eyes Incorporating the feel of texture into displays is an important concept in Visual Merchandising
    • 31. Texture The “Touch and Feel” of Visual Merchandising Texture Basics 101 Texture The tactile qualities of surfaces; actual or implied Surfaces Smooth- reflect light and appear brighter Rough- hold light and appear darker Vehicles Food, Food Vessels, Props, Fabric and Furniture Effects Complementary Textures suggest familiarity Opposite Textures are attention grabbers; they bring humor, scale or shock to displays
    • 32. Texture The “Touch and Feel” of Visual Merchandising Meret Oppenheim’s Fur Covered Cup 1936 Photo Opposite Texture implied * attention grabber * shocks the viewer
    • 33. Social & Psychological Reactions to Texture 1 . Metals sleek, durable, permanent & clean 2. Glass, Ceramic elegant, classic 3. Plastic disposable, casual 4. Paper fresh, disposable
    • 34. Social & Psychological Reactions to Texture 5. Wood earthy, natural & wholesome shiny -sophisticated, elite rough- rugged, masculine 6. Marble elegant, sophisticated 7. Wicker friendly, informal, earthy and natural
    • 35. Texture Trends
      • Metals - Fashion Forward looks
      • Techno-natural - Creating irregular shapes that appear futuristic but echo natural patterns
      • Material Mixing - Pairing different materials such as porcelain and glass
    • 36. New Texture Products
      • Metal Grapevine Stainless Steel
      • and Bamboo w/Random
      • Baskets White Porcelain mixed Brushed Pattern
      • w/ Glass Plates
    • 37. Displays with Texture Quadrant (Bakery) Chicago, IL Mixed textures; natural woods, wicker baskets, glass shelves, & chrome signtags Says: Warm, homey and clean Sadin Photographers Food Presentation & Display by Martin M. Pegler
    • 38. Displays with Texture Cucina! Cucina! Seattle, WA Mixed Textures: stainless steel, smooth yellow tiles, knotty pine wood glass shelves Says: Friendly, casual, and fresh Photo by Martin M. Pegler Food Presentation & Display by Martin M. Pegler
    • 39. Displays with Texture La Ruche (Restaurant) Arnheim, Netherlands Mixed Textures; marble countertops, dark maple wood, mozaic tile, glass & food products Says: understated elegance, timeless, fun Photo by Ian McKinnell Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler
    • 40. LANDSCAPING The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising
    • 41. LANDSCAPING
    • 42. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs" of Visual Merchandising
      • Landscaping Basics 101
      • Landscaping
      • The blending of 6 basic design principles into a display
      1. Balance 2. Line 3. Emphasis 4. Proportion 5. Rhythm 6. Harmony
    • 43. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising Symmetry - (perfect balance) equal weight to each half of the display Asymmetry - (informal balance) each side achieves a sense of balance, though using different objects Top to Bottom Light weight or light colors to the top Heavier weight or dark colors to the bottom 1 . Balance
    • 44. Landscaping The Ups and Downs of Visual Merchandising Vertical - conveys strength, height, dignity line is elegant, forceful and direct Horizontal - conveys easy going, restful, calm can help smooth or cut vertical Diagonal - directs the eye to point usually left top to right bottom Curves - guides the eye adds flowing movement 2. Line
    • 45. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising 3. Emphasis - attention grabbers Size Large or unique shapes get noticed Repetition The eye focuses quickly on repetitive shapes Contrast Use of contrasting shaped items leads the eye Unique Placement Use pedestals or stands to elevate and create vertical sales space
    • 46. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising 4. Proportion (AKA - Scale) The comparative relationship of the design elements to each other must have a pleasing effect to the eye
    • 47. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising 5. Rhythm The flow or movement of the eye along the display Movement methods: Repetition- Use of same shapes Continuous Line- Identical rows of product Progression- Same shapes in increasing or decreasing order Radiation- Arranging merchandise to radiate from central focal point Alternation- alternating the shapes or patterns
    • 48. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising 6. Harmony When all the elements blend properly in a design to form a unified picture
    • 49. Landscaping The “Ups and Downs” of Visual Merchandising
      • Benefits
      • Necessary for optimal food product presentations; the “high rise” effect
      • Leads a customer’s eye through a display
      • Enables customer to quickly scan food selections
      • Enhances self-service
      • Allows food to be displayed at various heights or levels
    • 50. Landscaping Trends
      • New and unconventional items available to create height in displays
      • European influence of irregular, non-traditional shapes and lines
      • Must always use appropriate, front-of-the-house items for landscaping
    • 51. New Landscaping Products
      • Tiered FUNction
      • Multi Pedestal Z Riser Buffetware
      • Stand Stands
    • 52. Landscaped Grab & Go Table Displays Asymmetrical Balance, Vertical and Horizontal Lines, Use of Tabletop & Floor Space Photos by Jamie Padgett, Karant & Assoc. Food Presentation & Display by Martin M. Pegler
    • 53. Landscaped Countertop Displays Landscape Vehicles : Tiered Stands, Pedestal Bowls, Pedestal Stands Photos by Mark Ballogg , MMP/RVC Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler
    • 54. Landscaped Case Display Barefoot Contessa (Gourmet to Go) East Hampton, New York Vehicles : Pedestal Stands & Platters inside the Case Photo by Martin M. Pegler Food Presentation & Display by Martin M. Pegler
    • 55. COMMUNICATION The “Storyteller” of Visual Merchandising
    • 56. COMMUNICATION
    • 57. COMMUNICATION The “Storyteller” of Visual Merchandising Communication Basics 101 Communication The process by which knowledge or information is shared using a common system of symbols, signs or photos within a display Vehicles Signage, photos, price tags, labels Benefits Recognition, Highlight New Items, Product Differentiation and Pricing
    • 58.
      • Foodlife
      • at Water Tower Place Chicago, Illinois
      • Types of Signage
      • Destination
      • Menu Item & Price
      • Suggestive Sell
      • Photos by Mark Ballogg
      • Cafes & Coffee Shops
      • by Martin M. Pegler
      Displays with Signage
    • 59.
      • Foodlife
      • at Water Tower Place Chicago, Illinois
      • Types of Signage
      • Destination
      • Menu Item & Pricing
      • Informational
      • Photos by Mark Ballogg
      • Cafes & Coffee Shops
      • by Martin M. Pegler
      Displays with Signage
    • 60.
      • West Broadway
      • Coffee Shop
      • Vancouver, Canada
      • Types of Signage
      • Menu Item & Pricing
      • Coffee Bean Identifiers
      • Product Tags in Case
      • Melnychuk Photography
      • Cafes & Coffee Shops
      • by Martin M. Pegler k
      Displays with Signage
    • 61. Communication Trends
      • Non-traditional signage holders
      • and unique shapes
      New labels printed by the unit on the computer
    • 62. New Communication Products
      • Benz Tag Holder Page’Up Originals
      • Versatile Metal
      • Counter Sign Holders
    • 63. DECOR The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising
    • 64. DECOR
    • 65. Decor The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising Decor Basics 101 Decor The enrichment of displays by the addition of elements that contribute splendor and/or style Vehicles Props, Fabric, Furniture, Food Vessels and/or Food Effects Create Ambiance/Excitement Provides Attention Grabber Supports Theme
    • 66. Decor The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising Creates Ambiance or Excitement Photo from Steven Spielberg’s “ Dive” Restaurant featuring the “look” inside a Submarine Photo by Martin M. Pegler
    • 67. Decor The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising Grabs Attention Ex. Jumbo Replica Vegetables will complete a look of freshness Their large size draws the eye and captures the viewer’s sight
    • 68. Decor The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising Supports a Theme Countertop Props, Shoji Lamp and Chinese Dragon support an Asian Theme
    • 69. Decor The “Icing” of Visual Merchandising
      • Benefits
      • Changes the look for different dayparts
      • Simplest way to get customers’ attention
      • Encourages repeat purchasing
      • Doesn’t detract from food
      • Completes your merchandising plan
    • 70. Décor Trends
      • Minimalist influence on décor, coupled with societal need for authenticity
      • Linens, silks and replicas have given way to ceramics, glass and metals . Replicas and silks can still be used as accents in small amounts
    • 71. New Decor Products
      • Organic Burlap Natural Decor
      • Bags Filled Jar Sets Products
    • 72. Displays with Decor Foodlife at Water Tower Place Chicago, IL Vehicles: cloth curtains, glass filled jars, large bulk canned goods, replica garlic & pasta, sunflower and shelf displaware Photo by Martin M. Pegler Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler
    • 73. Displays with Decor Foodlife at Water Tower Place Chicago, IL Vehicles: Chicken Figurine, Leaf Garland, Sunflower in Tin Vase Photo by Martin M. Pegler Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler
    • 74. Displays with Decor Harley Davidson Café New York, NY Vehicles: floating American Flag, motorcycle component light sconces, & HD motorcycles Photo by Norman McGrath Cafes & Coffee Shops by Martin M. Pegler
    • 75. Foodservice Trends 2005 Bakers Dozen
    • 76. Health Wellness and Low Carbs
      • 64% of Americans are overweight or obese
      • 32 million Americans are on low-carb diets
      • Two-thirds of people who are not on a diet want fewer sugars, carbs and fats in their food.
      • Customers want post nutrition information
      1
    • 77. Convenience
      • C-stores, express units, and grab-and-go outlets are enjoying renewed popularity
      • On college campuses, 60% of traditional foodservice transactions take place at these convenience operations
      • Ready-to-eat, no prep, handheld, no clean-up meals
      • Single serve, bite-sized, re-sealable, portion-control, snack foods that are portable
      2
    • 78. Healthful Drink Options
      • Water
      • Beverages that are low in carbs and caffeine free
      • Drinks with “all natural” claims
      • Antioxidant tea products
      3
    • 79. Global Comfort Foods
      • Steak and potatoes, chicken noodle soups, mashed potatoes and pot roast
      • Mexican and Asian dishes
      • Beans, tortillas and sticky rice have become staples
      4
    • 80. Food Customization
      • Diners impact the ingredients used to cook their food or add different flavorings
      • Mongolian grills stir-fry wok stations, made-to-order sandwich stations, omelet stations
      • People like to have their own healthful food options
      5
    • 81. Ethnic Diversity
      • I ncreased desire for authentic, cultural cuisine and restaurant-style quality
      • Southeast Asian
      • Tunisian and Moroccan
      • Strong, flavorful types of cuisine
      6
    • 82. The Small Plate
      • Smaller portions of foods
      • Customers want to put together a tasting plate of three or four items
      • Savor different flavors and styles of cuisine in one seating
      • Because the servings are smaller and cheaper, people are spending and eating less
      7
    • 83. Hot Sandwiches
      • Transforming cold-wrap sandwiches into heated sandwich programs
      • More upscale breads like focaccia
      • More zesty toppings such as pesto spread
      • Filling lettuce with hot meat fillings
      8
    • 84. Breakfast: Most Important Meal
      • The popularity of high-protein diets like Atkins and South Beach, customers are demanding more protein in their meals
      • The average American ate more than 254 eggs this year
      • Omelets that include ham, cheese and sausage
      9
    • 85. Food Safety
      • Hepatitis, E.Coli, and Mad Cow Disease have kept food safety in the forefront of consumers’ minds
      • Easy-to-clean and sanitize equipment and utensils, automated cleaning systems, cleaning agents, HACCP programs, tractability, country of origin labeling (COOL) and well- trained, food safety-certified
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    • 86. Clean Food Independence
      • Consumers are becoming educated through new Web sites and are demanding alternative clean foods
      • Requires food that is different
      • Raw food enthusiasts believe that heating food above 118 degrees kills enzymes that are key to life
      • Nearly six million adults in the United States currently pursue a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle.
      • Pesticide free, responsibly grown, locally grown, and environmentally friendly food products
      1 1
    • 87. Entreé Salads
      • More healthful selections
      • Quick-service restaurants saw orders for entrée salads rise 12%
      • More restaurants like Chick-fil-A, Church’s Chicken and Blimpies are adding entrée salads
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    • 88. Healthier Kids
      • Resize product packages, formulations and serving sizes to suit children’s needs
      • McDonald’s stopped super-sizing its foods
      • Canteen Vending Service introduction of Balanced Choices
      • A mix of healthful snacks, sugar-free and caffeine-free beverages, low-carb foods, salads and fresh and dried fruit
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    • 89. Questions and Answers
    • 90. Suggested Resources
    • 91. VISUAL MERCHANDISING Presenters: Brenda Hamm / John Becker Hubert LLC

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