Comparing the Ryan and Murray Budgets
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Comparing the Ryan and Murray Budgets

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The leaders of the House and Senate Budget Committees just released their proposed budgets for FY 2014. The two lay out very different budget priorities and paths to deficit reduction. Below is a ...

The leaders of the House and Senate Budget Committees just released their proposed budgets for FY 2014. The two lay out very different budget priorities and paths to deficit reduction. Below is a comparison of the two proposals in terms of how they treat hungry and poor people. All numbers have been calculated over a ten year period.

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 Comparing the Ryan and Murray Budgets Comparing the Ryan and Murray Budgets Document Transcript

  • Comparing the Ryan and Murray Budgets March 14, 2013The leaders of the House and Senate Budget Committees just released their proposed budgets for FY2014. The two lay out very different budget priorities and paths to deficit reduction. Below is acomparison of the two proposals in terms of how they treat hungry and poor people. All numbers havebeen calculated over a ten year period. Ryan Budget Murray BudgetProtecting hungry and Emphasizes reducing Includes as a core principle that deficitpoor people “dependency” of poor people on reduction must not increase poverty. federal anti-poverty programs. Includes an entire section on Acknowledges the need for a protecting the most vulnerable safety net, but focuses on making families. sure that assistance is temporary.Spending Cuts $4.6 trillion $975 billionRevenue Increases None $975 billionSequestration Leaves sequestration in place, but Replaces sequestration with a mix of shields defense and shifts those tax increases and spending cuts. cuts to nondefense discretionary programs.Defense $550 billion increase $240 billion cut (compared to sequestration)Nondefense $1 trillion cut $142 billion cutDiscretionarySpending Lowers the spending caps Lowers the spending caps established established in the 2011 Budget in the 2011 Budget Control Act and(Twenty-five percent of Control Act by $554 billion and stops sequestration.this spending goes to low- continues sequestration.income people throughprograms like WIC, PFDA,and Head Start)SNAP $135.5 billion cut No change(The Supplemental, Turns SNAP into a block grant, Protects SNAP.Nutrition Assistance hindering its ability to respond toProgram, formerly food spikes in need. Includes language about thestamps) importance and effectiveness of the Eliminates categorical eligibility program. and the “Heat and Eat” policies. Could force 8-9 million people from SNAP. 425 3rd Street SW, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20024 ● 1-800-822-7323 ● www.bread.org
  • WIC Not specified Not specified(The Special Supplemental Allows sequestration to continue, Cuts nondefense discretionaryNutrition Program for but cuts nondefense discretionary spending below the 2011 BudgetWomen, Infants, and spending below sequestration Control Act levels by $142 billion, butChildren) levels—putting WIC at risk of cuts replaces sequestration, protecting WIC in future appropriations bills. from those across-the-board cuts. Includes language about the importance of protecting WIC.International Affairs Not specified Increased by $10 billionAccount Doesn’t mention poverty-focused Replaces scheduled sequestration cuts, development assistance (PFDA). and increases funding by 22 percent over ten years. Allows sequestration to continue and cuts nondefense discretionary spending below sequestration levels—putting PFDA at risk of cuts in future appropriations bills.Earned Income Tax Ends 2009 improvements Makes 2009 improvementsCredit and Child Tax permanentCredit Leaves these credits vulnerable to further cuts in tax reform. Protects these credits in tax reform.Tax Reform Cuts the top tax rate from 39.6 Requires the tax code to remain at least percent to 25 percent. as progressive as it is now. Does not raise any revenue for deficit reduction. Does not include any protections for low-income families.Medicaid $810 billion cut $10 billion cut Also repeals Medicaid expansion Includes language on the importance of and turns Medicaid into a block protecting Medicaid for low-income grant, which would leave 40-50 families and vulnerable individuals. million more people uninsured.Agriculture Cuts $31 billion to agriculture $23 billion to agriculture programs programs No explicit protections for SNAP. No explicit protections for SNAP.Medicare Cuts $356 billion $265 billionEconomic Stimulus None $100 billion Invests in job training and infrastructure.Deficit Reduction $4.6 trillion $1.85 trillion Balances the budget. Stabilizes the debt by reducing it to 2.2 percent of the economy.