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Effective Academic Support for College Student-Athletes

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In this presentation, part of the Fall 2013 training for assistant learning specialists, I explain a theoretical model of academic success for student-athletes and discuss the way learning services …

In this presentation, part of the Fall 2013 training for assistant learning specialists, I explain a theoretical model of academic success for student-athletes and discuss the way learning services can fit into that model.

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  • 1. Effective Learning Support for College StudentAthletes Fall 2013 ASPSA Learning Services Training Bradley Bethel August 12, 2013
  • 2. Objectives • Explain Comeaux and Harrison’s (2011) model of academic success for Division I student-athletes. • Discuss the relevance of Comeaux and Harrison’s model to our roles as learning services staff. • Describe the Learning Engagement and Enhancement Program (LEEP).
  • 3. Comeaux and Harrison’s (2011) Model of Academic Success for Division I Student-Athletes Comeaux, E. & Harrison, K. C. (2011). A conceptual model of academic success for student-athletes. Educational Researcher, 40 (5), 235-245.
  • 4. Purpose of the Model • Synthesize three decades of research on the student-athlete experience. • Challenge models of academic support that focus on mere eligibility. • Identify and explain the factors that lead to academic success for Division I student-athletes.
  • 5. The Student-Athlete Experience • Student-athletes often spend more than 40 hours per week on sports-related activities. • Mental fatigue, physical exhaustion, and injuries often persist beyond those 40+ hours. • Consequently, student-athletes are often isolated to varying degrees from the rest of campus. • In addition, student-athletes are more likely to feel pressure from media than typical college students. • Student-athletes also have specific academic requirements and other regulations from the NCAA that non-student-athletes do not have. • Last, some student-athletes are significantly less prepared for college than their classmates and consequently may feel alienated when their struggles become apparent to them.
  • 6. Structure of the Model Pre-college Factors Initial Commitments Environmental Factors • Family background • Educational experience and preparation • Various individual attributes • Educational Goals • Sport • Institution • Academic Integration • Social Integration Developing Commitments • Educational Goals • Sport • Institution Academic Success
  • 7. Commitments • Educational goals: students’ educational plans and the highest level of education they hope to attain • Sport commitment: the amount of physical and psychological time a student-athlete devotes to her or his sport • Institutional commitment: a student’s expectation of satisfaction with the institution and the importance placed on graduating from the institution
  • 8. Environmental Factors • Social integration: student-athletes’ (1) engagement in extracurricular activities other than their sport, (2) interaction with faculty, and (3) socializing with peers other than their teammates • Academic integration: student-athletes’ grades and intellectual development
  • 9. Structure of the Model Pre-college Factors Initial Commitments Environmental Factors • Family background • Educational experience and preparation • Various individual attributes • Educational Goals • Sport • Institution • Academic Integration • Social Integration Developing Commitments • Educational Goals • Sport • Institution Academic Success
  • 10. In light of Comeaux and Harrison’s model, the goal of every academic support program should be to increase studentathletes’ commitments to their educational goals, their sport, and their institution by helping them integrate into the academic and social life of the college.
  • 11. Questions/Comments?
  • 12. How is Comeaux and Harrison’s model relevant to learning services?
  • 13. Learning Services Take two minutes to write down how you think Comeaux and Harrison’s model is relevant to learning services or how learning services fits into the model.
  • 14. The Learning Engagement and Enhancement Program (LEEP)
  • 15. Mission and Philosophy Mission: To help academically challenged student-athletes become goal-directed, strategic, and self-regulated learners. Philosophy: Our philosophy is both student-centered and learning-centered. We believe all students can succeed when provided an environment in which learning is the central value. The following five principles underscore our service to studentathletes: • Every student is a learner and has the potential to learn. • Every student already possesses valuable knowledge and skills. • Every student will make her or his own learning choices. • Learning is an active process. • Learning can be strategically enhanced.
  • 16. Goal and Objectives Our overall goal is that every student who participates in the Learning Engagement and Enhancement Program will maintain eligibility in the major of their choice and advance to graduation. By meeting the following objectives, we believe we can accomplish that goal. Objective I: Students will demonstrate increased levels of self-regulated learning. Objective II: Students will demonstrate increased reading comprehension levels and fluency with college-level vocabulary words. Objective III: Students will demonstrate increased ability to compose college-level texts.
  • 17. Both grades and intellectual development can be improved through self-regulated learning. Therefore, by helping student-athletes develop as self-regulated learners, we believe we will help them integrate into the academic life of the university. We thereby demonstrate effective learning support.
  • 18. Questions/Comments?
  • 19. Conclusion During this workshop, we accomplished the following objectives: • Explain Comeaux and Harrison’s (2011) model of academic success for Division I student-athletes. • Discuss the relevance of Comeaux and Harrison’s model to our roles as learning services staff. • Describe the Learning Engagement and Enhancement Program (LEEP).
  • 20. Next Workshop: “Introduction to SelfRegulated Learning” presented by Dr. Jeff Greene

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