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masterclass service design update

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Increasingly you read about Service Design and Design Thinking in the media. But what does it actually mean? What can Service Design mean for a company or organization? Sign up for an introductory …

Increasingly you read about Service Design and Design Thinking in the media. But what does it actually mean? What can Service Design mean for a company or organization? Sign up for an introductory Master Class and find out.

This hand-on course will take 4 hours during which time you will get introduced to the theory and several service design tools and methods.


Services are quickly becoming the most important factor in increasing competitive advantages and strong sustainable customer relationships. This is the central theme when we discuss what Service Design has to offer. During this Master Class we will share our professional experiences, knowledge and insights. Our aim is to share all the theoretical and practical information you need to put Service Design into practice.


Program:

Background: What is Service Design? Where does it come from and why now?
Critical questions: Why is it a unique design discipline? Or not. What are the challenges?
Situation: What are the main 'Schools of thoughts "within Service Design? What are the key cases? Where can you find more information?
Practice: Working with tools and methods such as Context Mapping, Emotional Journey Mapping, Priority Grid, Scenario Design.

Published in: Business, Technology

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Transcript

  • 1. WELCOME
  • 2. SERVICEDESIGN?
  • 3. DESIGNTHINKING?
  • 4. A LITTLEHISTORY...
  • 5. Industrial Consumer Experience Knowledge Transformationeconomy economy economy economy economy1900>> 1950>> 1980>> unfolding Future
  • 6. Industrial Consumer Experience Knowledge Transformationeconomy economy economy economy economy1900>> 1950>> 1980>> unfolding Future
  • 7. in the transformation economy: the world is getting more and more complexit becomes harder for organisations to differentiate on technology alone organisations need to deeply understand their customer organisations need to understand value networks organisations need to adopt a culture of openness and transparency
  • 8. DESIGNTHINKING?
  • 9. www.designthenewbusiness.com
  • 10. design thinking:being comfortable with uncertainty & complexity defining the problem is part of the problem future oriented and optimisticusing an interative approach to solving problems visualising as a means to understand issues prototyping to get closer to the solution by no means limited to designers
  • 11. business thinking: design thinking: creative thinking:analysis both analysis and synthesis synthesislinear interative chaoticneeds defined problems handles ill defined problems needs undefined problemsnumbers as goal visuals as means visuals as goalwithin silos across silos outside of silosobservations of the past scenarios of the future personal projection
  • 12. SERVICEDESIGN?
  • 13. SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT?well, it isn’t new!The great economic law is this: services are exchanged forservices...it is trivial, very commonplace; it is nonetheless, thebegining, the middle, and the end of economic science.!!- Fredric Bastiat 1848"The integrated design of material components (products) andimmaterial components (services) can be documented andcodified using a service blueprint to map the sequence ofevents in a service and its essential functions in an objective andexplicit manner."- Shostack 1982"
  • 14. SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT?service design is based on the notion that the development ofnew services should be approached in the same way we designproducts or environments:"- as a creative process"- that requires research, design, prototyping, testing"- in a human centred approach"- and that is embedded in the organisation’s innovation cycles
  • 15. SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT?THERE ARE MANY INTERPRETATIONS...FROM VERY PRACTICAL TO VERY HOLISTIC...ONE IS NOT MORE ‘TRUE’ THAN THE OTHER…IN FACT THEY NEED EACHOTHER…BUT IT REALLY HELPS TO KNOW WHICH END OF THESPECTRUM YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT.
  • 16. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 17. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 18. DESIGNING FOR SERVICES. EG A WEBSITE FOR A SERVICEPROVIDER. THIS OFTEN REQUIRES A MORE INTEGRATEDAPPROACH THAN SEEN IN REALITY.
  • 19. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 20. OFTEN FOCUSSED ON AFTER SALES SERVICE. BUT THERE ISMUCH MORE! THE ENTIRE CUSTOMER JOURNEY OFFERSOPPORTUNITIES FOR SERVICE!
  • 21. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 22. HOT TOPIC: TU DELFT, CRISP, FES, PIEKEN IN DE DELTA, THEINTERNET OF THINGS. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES AREINTERTWINED, OFTEN VIA IT TECHNOLOGY
  • 23. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 24. THIS REQUIRES A TRULY MULTIDISCIPLINARY INTEGRATEDRESEARCH, DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH. DESIGNSUPPORTS HUMAN INTERACTION
  • 25. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 26. CONNECTING VARIOUS STAKEHOLDERS, SERVICES, PARTNERS,LOCATIONS, TOUCHPOINTS INTO AN ECO-SYSTEM WHERE VALUE ISCREATED
  • 27. PRACTICAL SERVICE DESIGN, WHAT IS IT? HOLISTIC
  • 28. THE SERVITISATION OF VALUE: FROM OWNERSHIP TO GETTINGJOBS DONE. TOUCHPOINTS ENABLE VALUE CO-CREATION.PRODUCTS SUPPORT SERVICES
  • 29. SERVICE DOMINANT LOGICOLD PARADIGM: SERVICES ARE WHAT’S LEFT OVER IF YOU REMOVE ALL PRODUCTS THIS IS PRODUCT DOMINANT LOGICNEW PARADIGM: EVEN PRODUCTS ARE PART OF A SERVICE IN THE END THIS IS SERVICE DOMINANT LOGIC Vargo & Lusch 2004, http://www.sdlogic.net/publications.html
  • 30. SERVICE DESIGN ACCORDING TO SERVICEDOMINANT LOGIC=DESIGNING ECO-SYSTEMS OF CONNECTEDPRODUCTS, SERVICES, COMMUNICATIONSAND ENVIRONMENTS, WITH PEOPLE ANDFOR PEOPLE, THAT ENABLE THE CO-CREATION OF VALUE.
  • 31. TOOL: STAKEHOLDER MAPPINGWhat is it?a method to visualize and understand the relationship ofyour business with relevant groups of stakeholders andtheir relationships amongst eachother.see also http://slidesha.re/stakeholdermapping
  • 32. TOOL: STAKEHOLDER MAPPINGWhy is it useful?•  it is an effective way to develop a clear overview of your internal and/or external stakeholders,•  to indicate how their needs match yours and to manage these relationships with respect to your brand offering.•  it can help you provide the right products or services for the right customer segments•  it can help you to gain insight in the value networks you operate in, and it can help you develop new business models.
  • 33. UNITS OF VALUE EXCHANGE (www.boardofinnovation.com) product! service! experience! exposure! reputation!product service experience exposure reputation rights credits money! less money! data! right! credits!money discount data
  • 34. TOOL: CUSTOMER JOURNEY MAPPING What is it? Customer Journey Mapping is the process of creating a graphical representation of the experience that your customers have with your brand, product or service over time. see also http://slidesha.re/customerjourneymapping and http://bit.ly/iuXPY8
  • 35. TOOL: CUSTOMER JOURNEY MAPPING Why is it useful? •  The relationship between an organisation and their customers is not based on a one-time experience but on a flow of experiences over time. •  A customer journey map will give you an overview of the whole journey your customer goes through when choosing, buying and using your products or services. •  It will help you identify the white spaces in the customer journey and unlock opportunities for innovation.
  • 36. THE HORIZONTAL AXIS:•  Don’t think in touchpoints or channels but in experience stages•  The design of the horizontal axis is a worthwhile process in itself•  a typical sequence may look like this:•  orientation – choice – purchase – installation – use – dealing with issue – renewal - ...
  • 37. THE VERTICAL AXIS:•  what does the customer want to achieve in that stage?•  what emotions does the customer have in that stage?•  Who does the customer interact with in that stage?•  What does the customer interact with in that stage?•  What should you do to help the customer achieve their goals in that stage?•  What can you do to improve the customer’s experience in that stage?•  what can you do to fulfil your brand promise in that stage?•  what can you do to achieve business goals in that stage?
  • 38. THANK YOU