Lessons Learned from Using SharePoint for Program ManagementPlanning and Implementing a PMIS for a Federal PMO (Mgmt 200)<...
Agenda<br />Program Management<br />Selection of SharePoint as a Program Management Tool<br />SharePoint for PMO Case Stud...
Program Management<br />3<br />         @brandondart   @morganfranklin   #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. A...
Selection of SharePoint as a Program Management Tool<br />In operating a PMO, We Sought a Toolset to Help Us:<br /><ul><li...
Facilitate communication and feedback
Foster inclusion and collaboration
Monitor, control, and report project activities
Analyze and forecast project performance
Develop reports and disseminate to relevant stakeholders
Automate business processes</li></ul>SharePoint Features Meet Many Common PMO Needs:<br /><ul><li>Document repositories
Meeting facilitation
Institutional knowledge capture and transfer
Program reporting capabilities
Controlled access (permissions)
Business process automation</li></ul>4<br />         @brandondart   @morganfranklin   #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin C...
SharePoint for PMO Case Studies<br />5<br />         @brandondart   @morganfranklin   #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin C...
Task tracking
Collaboration through team workspaces</li></ul>Federal PMO Focused on Enterprise System Acquisition and Implementation<br ...
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Lessons Learned from Using SharePoint for Program Management: Planning and Implementing a PMIS for a Federal PMO

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Lessons-learned from providing program management and SharePoint consulting services to a Federal Program Management Office (PMO). The presentation is based on work and lessons-learned implementing a Program Management Information System (PMIS) at a newly established office for a large agency, and for an existing PMO for an enterprise program. This presentation is geared towards business managers who are new to SharePoint and have just set-up, or considering using, SharePoint for program management.

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  • Program Management Office:“An organizational body or entity assigned various responsibilities related to centralized and coordinated management…responsibilities…can range from providing project management support functions to actually being responsible for the direct management of a project”* Project Management Institute (PMI) (2003) Guide to Project Management Body of Knowledge (2003)Key responsibilities of PMO:Set strategy and manage adherence to itReview and compile project data and communicate it to executive / SponsorManage program risks and issuesManage program communications and outreach to customers and stakeholdersIdentify and track dependencies between projects (Milestones, deliverables, issues…)Track and report on overall program objective, business case, benefits...Standardize methodology and improve processes (e.g.; approval…)Track action items and their completion
  • BPAin SharePoint offers perhaps one of the most important benefits to a PMO, however is also the most underutilized or cause of frustration.
  • -----Engage-----Engage an Executive Sponsor - (i.e., the Decision-maker, SharePoint Champion, and Steward) – someone who has power in the organization and who will actively work to see SharePoint succeed. Someone who can allow you to keep the project focused and free from extraneous requirements.Engage new users - Focus on the features and benefits, not the overall tool. What is in it for them?Develop power users - Show them how to use the technology to build their own solutions. This allows Administrators and Developers to focus on more complex solutions.SharePoint is a shared journey, don’t leave anyone behind - Remember Change Management success factors: Communicate, Reinforce, Build Capacity, and Role Model. Be prepared to retrain people on how they think about their work and how to roll daily activities into the technology.-----Guide-----Governance - Establish a detailed Governance Plan before building the site. Clearly define and manage to the site’s purpose.Advise against pet projects - Even with an established Governance Plan, an Executive Sponsor or Steering Committee may need to be reminded of the site’s overall purpose. Proposed changes should be tied to a specific business need or objective.Be a leader, manage expectations - The client will want fast and cheap. Work with the client to show that fast and cheap is mutually exclusive. Set realistic deliverables and try to surpass expectations.Avoid unnecessarily customized solutions - SharePoint provides a lot of solutions out-of-the-box. Customizations may not be necessary and may not take priority over more pressing needs.-----Plan-----Build for today and plan for tomorrow - Growth of the site is inevitable, so make sure your configuration can handle it (scalability).Be proactive, not reactive - Anticipate the needs of the client; don’t wait for the “I think it is a great idea if we” marching order.It takes a village, but you may only have a small team - The creation of a SharePoint site can require the talents of many IT and Communication professionals including: Administrator, Developer, Designer, Information Architect, Business Analyst, Project Manager, DB Optimizer, Writer/Editor, Communication Strategist. Be up-front with the client to make sure they understand what the team is able to deliver with the current staff and resources.-----Tactical-----Get the whole picture - When gathering requirements, understand content and design requirements, but don’t forget about permissions, navigation, and other elements that may impact your project. Avoid workflow errors - Before opening for use across your site, be sure to test all the scenarios that the workflow is used to make sure it works as intended.Version control is not instinctive - Once version control is turned on, distribute documentation to users on how to use major/minor versions and how to comment appropriately.Keep it simple - You never know who you’ll have to train to use it; develop your solutions with an eye towards the end users. Complicated solutions will require significant investments in training and support.
  • High-level process for PMIS setup and management.-----Sponsorship and Business Case-----Executive Sponsorship Identify sponsor who can serve as the sponsor, an evangelist Garner resources and ensure support required from sponsorBusiness Case: Goals and Objectives Identify stakeholdersGather initial requirementsCreate a project charter and plan with major milestones (prioritize)Determine how success is defined-----Resource and Governance Planning-----Staffing and Resources Identify staff and other resource requirementsConsider the requirements and objectives Ensure appropriate staff commitment , resources, skills, and hardware configurationGovernance Plan Establishes policies, processes, standards, roles, and responsibilities to ensure successful PMIS managementDevelop a Governance Plan customized to your needs; not a blanket policy-----Design and Development-----Architecture Establish taxonomies and hierarchies Consider how information is organized Determine how users will navigate the site and how you will structure permission settingsWireframingMove the discussion from planning to implementation Provide the client with something more concrete to react to Acquire approval of design and mock-upsDevelopment Work through the project plan developed during business case phaseStart with high-priority items-----Train and Roll-Out Solution-----Launch and Training Launch prototype or base siteRoll-out additional functionality slowly or per client’s adaption rateTrain staff how to use common features Encourage power users to share information and discover new uses-----Maintenance-----Maintenance Ensure maintenance resources are in placeDefine tasks with regular maintenance requirements (e.g., maintaining dashboards) Document how to perform tasks so that maintenance can transition to others as needed
  • Lessons Learned from Using SharePoint for Program Management: Planning and Implementing a PMIS for a Federal PMO

    1. 1. Lessons Learned from Using SharePoint for Program ManagementPlanning and Implementing a PMIS for a Federal PMO (Mgmt 200)<br />SharePoint Saturday<br />Session Fri-S2C-114<br />August 12, 2011<br />1<br />
    2. 2. Agenda<br />Program Management<br />Selection of SharePoint as a Program Management Tool<br />SharePoint for PMO Case Studies<br />SharePoint Solutions and Challenges<br />Lessons Learned Overview<br />Discussion and Q&A<br />Process for PMIS Setup and Management<br />Resources<br />2<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    3. 3. Program Management<br />3<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />Program Management Office (PMO) Models<br />A variety of Program Management Office (PMO) models exist to meet different organizational needs.<br />
    4. 4. Selection of SharePoint as a Program Management Tool<br />In operating a PMO, We Sought a Toolset to Help Us:<br /><ul><li>Centralize and store information using document repositories (with controlled access)
    5. 5. Facilitate communication and feedback
    6. 6. Foster inclusion and collaboration
    7. 7. Monitor, control, and report project activities
    8. 8. Analyze and forecast project performance
    9. 9. Develop reports and disseminate to relevant stakeholders
    10. 10. Automate business processes</li></ul>SharePoint Features Meet Many Common PMO Needs:<br /><ul><li>Document repositories
    11. 11. Meeting facilitation
    12. 12. Institutional knowledge capture and transfer
    13. 13. Program reporting capabilities
    14. 14. Controlled access (permissions)
    15. 15. Business process automation</li></ul>4<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    16. 16. SharePoint for PMO Case Studies<br />5<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />Corporate Program Management<br />MorganFranklin is taking an enterprise program management approach to manage its business and leveraging SharePoint for:<br /><ul><li>Action management and approval workflows
    17. 17. Task tracking
    18. 18. Collaboration through team workspaces</li></ul>Federal PMO Focused on Enterprise System Acquisition and Implementation<br />MorganFranklin team members served as PMO SMEs in designing and planning a refresh for the PMO’s SharePoint sites as the migrated to SharePoint 2007 and sought to support more PMO functions, incorporate external users, and more fully utilize SharePoint capabilities, including:<br /><ul><li>Document management using version control and libraries
    19. 19. Business process automation through workflows
    20. 20. Collaboration and meeting management through meeting workspaces</li></ul>Federal PMO in the Acquisition Domain<br />MorganFranklin was engaged to establish and manage a PMO for a large Federal headquarters office. This project includes supporting the development of a SharePoint Program Management Information System. Features requested and developed include:<br /><ul><li>Document management and libraries
    21. 21. Content roll-up and reporting
    22. 22. Metrics tracking for executives using dashboards
    23. 23. Custom lists and workflows
    24. 24. Task tracking
    25. 25. Training repositories for knowledge management and retention</li></li></ul><li>Challenges & Lessons Learned: Knowledge Capture & Transfer <br />Client Asked For :<br />Develop solutions to capture institutional knowledge; help the organization consolidate and share information as well as better withstand turnover and reorganization<br />We Delivered:<br />Formal and informal ways for institutional knowledge capture and transfer:<br /><ul><li>Centralized PMO library creates a space where users can post and collaborate on content
    26. 26. Utilized blogs to provide less formal ways to document and explain processes
    27. 27. Created discussion boards to serve as project-specific discussion spaces (keep the conversation out of your inbox)</li></ul>Challenge:<br />Getting everyone to participate, share, and document. May require users to learn a new (but more efficient) way of doing their job<br />Lesson Learned:<br />Don’t leave anyone behind, engage users; be proactive, anticipate turnover<br />6<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    28. 28. Challenges & Lessons Learned: Document Repositories<br />Client Asked For:<br />A document library in a centralized location, version control, metadata, effective permissions, document collaboration and electronic signature capabilities<br />We Delivered:<br /><ul><li>Centralized PMO library
    29. 29. Version control (versioning managed through a prescribed artifact management process)
    30. 30. Custom document type (so all column metadata is consistent across libraries)
    31. 31. Modified two out-of-the-box workflows (Collect Feedback & Collect Signatures) to handle collaboration and approval of PMO documents between us and the client</li></ul>Challenge:<br /><ul><li>Client had initial hesitation to utilizing managed metadata, so we worked with the client to create column metadata
    32. 32. Managing versions in SharePoint requires that everyone participates, and documents are not sent via email for review; this required changing ingrained habits and support/backup from business sponsor</li></ul>Lesson Learned:<br />Engage users / don’t leave anyone behind; avoid unnecessary customizations<br />7<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    33. 33. Challenges & Lessons Learned: Meeting Facilitation<br />Client Asked For:<br />The ability for users to easily create and manage their own meetings via SharePoint; roll-up of action items from the workspaces to an overarching site<br />We Delivered:<br /><ul><li>Meeting space prototype that could be replicated by users
    34. 34. Version control and easy access to documents for meeting
    35. 35. Action Item and meeting decision tracking and roll-up for recurring executive governance meetings
    36. 36. Collaboration on meeting agenda items </li></ul>Challenge:<br />While client liked the idea, they were concerned about usability by executives, and public posting of information. The meeting space was not used for the recurring executive governance meetings, but proved to be a good collaboration tool for internal PMO teams<br />Lesson Learned:<br />Re-engage the executives/leaders for each new feature roll-out; consider information-sharing concerns and sensitivity of client and address them early on<br />8<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    37. 37. Challenges & Lessons Learned: Program Reporting<br />Client Asked For:<br />Develop a way to support and facilitate the reporting of information (e.g., dashboards, status reports, logs, etc.); make the reports useful, interesting, and visual<br />We Delivered:<br /><ul><li>A site to maintain tracking sheets/logs in SharePoint custom lists with workflows that automate alerts when certain thresholds are met
    38. 38. Dashboards built with Chart Web Parts used to display program data—requires SharePoint Server 2010 Enterprise; also used Easy Tabs (JavaScript) to help consolidate the look and display more information</li></ul>Challenge:<br />Obtaining clear requirements related to how data should be displayed and how workflows should work<br />Lessons Learned:<br />Build in sufficient time: out-of-the-box SharePoint provides some powerful features (e.g., Chart Web Part), but not always intuitive. Recently established PMO’s may have more revision cycles as they are establishing baselines and rethinking elements<br />9<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    39. 39. Challenges & Lessons Learned: Controlled Access (Permissions)<br />Client Asked For:<br />A role-based permission hierarchy that is able to accommodate sensitive information, but also avoids fine-grained permissions<br />We Delivered:<br /><ul><li>Careful balance between creating sites to avoid fine-grained permissions, but also preventing the need for users to click around to find content
    40. 40. Utilized 3rd party permission management tools (CodePlex Permissions Manager 2010) to audit our permission levels and keep it clean</li></ul>Challenge:<br />Keeping permissions clean and organized and avoiding fine-grained permissions for library items<br />Lesson Learned:<br />Permissions; governance<br />10<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    41. 41. Challenges & Lessons Learned: Business Process Automation<br />Client Asked For:<br />Replace existing, cumbersome processes with automated solutions. More efficient and cost-saving ways to coordinate meetings, maintain communication with stakeholders, and report on ongoing progress<br />We Delivered:<br />Automated workflows to facilitate processes for document approvals that span across business units<br />Challenge:<br />Some clients had trouble using version control; the process wasn’t initially designed to consider all the possibilities of use<br />Lesson Learned:<br />Get the whole picture; build for today and plan for tomorrow<br />11<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    42. 42. Lessons Learned Overview<br />Engage<br /><ul><li>Engage an Executive Sponsor
    43. 43. Engage new users
    44. 44. Develop power users
    45. 45. SharePoint is a shared journey, don’t leave anyone behind</li></ul>Guide<br /><ul><li>Governance
    46. 46. Advise against pet projects
    47. 47. Be a leader, manage expectations
    48. 48. Avoid unnecessarily customized solutions; keep it simple</li></ul>Plan<br /><ul><li>Build for today and plan for tomorrow
    49. 49. Be proactive, not reactive
    50. 50. It takes a village, but you may only have a small team</li></ul>Tactical<br /><ul><li>Get the whole picture
    51. 51. Avoid workflow errors
    52. 52. Version control is not instinctive</li></ul>12<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    53. 53.
    54. 54. Process for PMIS Setup and Management<br />14<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />Maintenance<br />Sponsorship and Business Case<br />Resource and Governance Planning<br />Design and Development<br />Train and <br />Roll-Out Solution<br />
    55. 55. Process for PMIS Setup and Management<br />15<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />Maintenance<br />Sponsorship and Business Case<br />Resource and Governance Planning<br />Design and Development<br />Train and <br />Roll-Out<br />Implement Solution<br />Maintenance <br /><ul><li>Ensure maintenance resources are in place
    56. 56. Define tasks with regular maintenance requirements (e.g., maintaining dashboards)
    57. 57. Document how to perform tasks so that maintenance can transition to others as needed </li></ul>Staffing and Resources <br /><ul><li>Identify staff and other resource requirements
    58. 58. Consider the requirements and objectives
    59. 59. Ensure appropriate staff commitment , resources, skills, and hardware configuration</li></ul>Governance Plan <br /><ul><li>Establishes policies, processes, standards, roles, and responsibilities to ensure successful PMIS management
    60. 60. Develop a Governance Plan customized to your needs; not a blanket policy </li></ul>Launch and Training <br /><ul><li>Launch prototype or base site
    61. 61. Roll-out additional functionality slowly or per client’s adaption rate
    62. 62. Train staff how to use common features
    63. 63. Encourage power users to share information and discover new uses </li></ul>Architecture <br /><ul><li>Establish taxonomies and hierarchies
    64. 64. Consider how information is organized
    65. 65. Determine how users will navigate the site and how you will structure permission settings</li></ul>Wireframing<br /><ul><li>Move the discussion from planning to implementation
    66. 66. Provide the client with something more concrete to react to
    67. 67. Acquire approval of design and mock-ups</li></ul>Development <br /><ul><li>Work through the project plan developed during business case phase
    68. 68. Start with high-priority items </li></ul>Executive Sponsorship <br /><ul><li>Identify sponsor who can serve as the sponsor, an evangelist
    69. 69. Garner resources and ensure support required from sponsor</li></ul>Business Case: Goals and Objectives <br /><ul><li>Identify stakeholders
    70. 70. Gather initial requirements
    71. 71. Create a project charter and plan with major milestones (prioritize)
    72. 72. Determine how success is defined</li></li></ul><li>Resources<br />Books<br /><ul><li>SharePoint for Project Management: How to Create a Project Management Information System (PMIS) with SharePoint by Dux Raymond Sy
    73. 73. Microsoft® SharePoint 2010 Unleashed by Michael Noel and Colin Spence</li></ul>Websites<br /><ul><li>CodePlex – Open Source Community: http://www.codeplex.com/
    74. 74. Currently utilize Permissions Manager 2010: http://permissionsmanager.codeplex.com/
    75. 75. Microsoft® TechNet Library: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/default.aspx
    76. 76. MSDN Library: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms123401.aspx
    77. 77. EUSP (End User SharePoint): https://www.nothingbutsharepoint.com/sites/eusp/Pages/default.aspx
    78. 78. Lynda.com (requires subscription): http://www.lynda.com/ </li></ul>Other Helpful Resources<br /><ul><li>Dux Raymond Sy: http://sp.meetdux.com/default.aspx
    79. 79. Susan Hanley: http://www.susanhanley.com/
    80. 80. Laura Rogers: http://www.sharepoint911.com/blogs/laura/default.aspx
    81. 81. Corey Roth: http://www.dotnetmafia.com/blogs/dotnettipoftheday/default.aspx (detailed post on how to use the Chart Web Part)
    82. 82. Jim Adcock: http://dlairman.wordpress.com/
    83. 83. Christophe Humbert: http://www.pathtosharepoint.com (Easy Tabs)</li></ul>16<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
    84. 84. <ul><li>Founded in 1998
    85. 85. Headquartered in the Washington, D.C., area with a regional office in Chicago
    86. 86. European operations established in London in 2007
    87. 87. Diverse full-time workforce comprised of over 360 industry, global consulting, Big Four, former military,and government professionals
    88. 88. CPA, CIA, CISA, CISSP, MCSE, RCDD, MBA, Ph.D., PMP
    89. 89. Unique blend of industry and government clients
    90. 90. Industry recognition as a top consulting firm in the U.S.
    91. 91. Recognized for industry-leading workplace best practices</li></ul>17<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />About MorganFranklin<br />
    92. 92. Contact MorganFranklin<br />Corporate Headquarters<br />1753 Pinnacle Drive<br />Suite 1200<br />McLean, VA 22201<br />www.morganfranklin.com<br />Presenters<br />Amee Shah<br />Director, National Security Solutions<br />703.564.7525<br />amee.shah@morganfranklin.com<br />http://www.linkedin.com/in/shahamee<br />Brandon Dart<br />Senior Consultant, National Security Solutions<br />703.564.7525<br />brandon.dart@morganfranklin.com<br />www.linkedin.com/in/brandondart<br />@brandondart<br />18<br /> @brandondart @morganfranklin #spstcdc<br />2011 ©MorganFranklin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.<br />
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