Properties Of Matter

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Based on first section of Properties of Matter chapter in McDougal Littell 8th grade science series

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Properties Of Matter

  1. 1. 2.1 Observable Properties of Matter Ms. Wells, Science
  2. 2. Property Types <ul><li>Physical : properties that can be observed without changing the IDENTITY of the matter </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical: property of a substance that changes it into a NEW substance (changes the identity of the substance) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Examples of Physical Properties <ul><li>Volume, mass, color, texture, shape and density </li></ul><ul><li>Great example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stretching a rubber band may change its color and shape, but its still made of rubber and is still a rubber band! </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. More about Density <ul><li>Density = amount of matter (mass) in a certain amount of space (volume) </li></ul><ul><li>Density is constant (does not change for one substance) </li></ul><ul><li>Different substances = different densities </li></ul>
  5. 5. U.S. Population Density
  6. 6. Calculating Density (D) <ul><li>Formula: D = m / V </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mass (m) = kilograms (kg) or grams (g) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Volume (V) = cubic centimeters (cm 3 ) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sooo…. Units for density are g/ cm 3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Said “ grams per cubic centimeters ” </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The Clay Example: Density = Constant <ul><li>You have a 200g piece of clay with volume of 100 cm 3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>V = 200g/100 cm 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>V = 2 g/cm 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you break it in half, you have 2 pieces of clay that are 100g and 50 cm 3 each </li></ul><ul><ul><li>V = 100g/50cm 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>V = 2 g/cm 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SAME DENSITY! </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Examples of Chemical Properties and Changes <ul><li>Describe how substances form into new substances </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: rusting, combustibility (burning), tarnishing, sometimes cooking, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical REACTIONS = Chemical Changes </li></ul>
  9. 9. Physical Changes <ul><li>Any change that does not change the actual substance itself </li></ul><ul><li>Changes in states of matter are physical (melting ice, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Other examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Breaking an object </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wool on a sheep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or a wool sweater </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>is still wool </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Signs of a Chemical Change <ul><ul><li>Odor – new smell (rotting meat, burning smell) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Temperature change – log goes from wood to ash, feel the heat! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Color change – not always chemical, but often </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New solids from liquids (called precipitates ) – clams make shells by mixing seawater substances and substances in their bodies </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Pictures of Chemical Changes <ul><li>Precipitates forming (new solids from different liquid substances) </li></ul>
  12. 12. Pictures of Chemical Changes <ul><li>Water and salt of </li></ul><ul><li>sweat reacts with oils </li></ul><ul><li>and substances on </li></ul><ul><li>your skin = body odor </li></ul>
  13. 14. THE END OF 2.1 Properties of Matter in Matter and Energy

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