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Teacher work sample Teacher work sample Document Transcript

  • Unit Topic and Rationale In this unit based around the novel To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM), by Harper Lee, students will be immersed in a living history of the 1930’s as well as deep examination of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird. Through the use of, photos, video, Power Point, and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, students will be better able to grasp what it was like to live in a time of blatant discrimination and racism of all types. Through the characters within the book, they will see the struggles faced during the 1930’s, whether that be discrimination or poverty. This unit will also help students to compare this era to that of their own. It will allow the students to gain an understanding of how the events and mentalities of the 1930’s have shaped and or deformed the way we see the world today. To say that students today live in a far different world than that of the 1930’s and the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird, is a statement worth examining. This time period is one that is scarred with human injustices, depression, and violence against innocence. The 1930's were a time when racial discrimination ran rampant and poverty was known to almost all. But was this time period all that different from the situations that students face today. Do today’s students not know the face of discrimination, poverty, depression, human injustices, and violence against innocence? Can students not relate to the characters of To Kill A Mockingbird and those that lived through some of the most difficult times of United States history? With this unit I hope to show students that they face similar challenges and the world they live in is not that different from this tragic time in history. Sure their life is different, and the struggles the world faces today are not the same as they used to be, but are they not as important. Do not problems in the world
  • still need to be dealt with and solved? Yes, we have come a long way but there still is a distance to travel. It is with this in mind, that I hope to establish “connected ways of relating” as outlined in Peter Smagorinsky’s book Teaching English By Design. He describes connected ways of knowing as “ways of relating to other people and constructing knowledge that are more collaborative, less competitive, and more likely concerned with the relationships of the people involved” (Smagorinsky 15-16). It is in this spirit of connecting and relating that I hope to show students how to build relationships with each other and the past. Another major aspect to this unit is the understanding of characters within a novel. Many people have argued that the true strength behind Harper Lee’s novel is characterization. With unforgettable characters like Scout, and Atticus Finch, Lee tells a story of growing up. She not only paints us a picture of what life was like in the 1930’s but what it’s like within every one of us. Within every one of us is there not a piece of Scout with her desire to understand the world around her? Is there not a piece of Atticus, with his ability to stand for right in a world that seems so wrong? Do we not all look up to someone like Jem looks up to his father? In this novel Lee is presenting characters we all know and love she is showing us the world around us. It is with these ideas in mind that I hope to delve in to the characters within this book, looking at what they symbolize, how they change, and how they represent motifs of the world around us. Throughout this unit, as with all units I teach, I will also be integrating differentiated instruction in a hope to create a “quality classroom [that] evolve[s] around powerful knowledge that works for each student” (Tomlinson and McTighe 3). It is important that all of my students are being taught on a level that challenges them but does
  • not hinder them. At the same time I hope to provide instruction that will allow my students to come to a place where their “mastery and understanding come through, not after meaningful interaction with ideas” (Tomlinson and McTighe 8).
  • Work Cited Smagorinsky, Peter. Teaching English By Design: How to Create and Carry Out Instructionl Units. New Hampshire: Heinemann, 2008. Tomlinson, Carol Ann, McTigh Jay. Integrating Differentiated Instuction and Understanding by Design. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2006. Rozeman, Robert, Webb, Allen. Literature and the Web: Reading and Responding with New Technologies. New Hampshire: Heinmann, 2008
  • Lead Lesson, Discrimination Introduction Day 1 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: Standard 2 2.1 - write and speak for a variety of purposes. 2.2 - write and speak for audiences such as peers. Standard 4 4.2 – Students use reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing to define… problems. Standard 6 6.2 - read literature to investigate common issues and interests. 6.3 - read literature to understand places, people, events, and vocabulary, both familiar and unfamiliar;. 6.4 - read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience. 6.5 - read classic and contemporary literature of the United States about the experiences … of diverse ethnic groups. Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to provide a historical context for the students. In the 1930’s when TKAM was written, there was a lot going on in the United States. It is important that the students understand the racism and poverty that abounded in this time period. Necessary Materials:  Double Entry Journal Handout  Pretest  Pictures for Gallery walk
  • Sequence Material Activity Vocab 10 Min Have students work in their vocab books. Pre Test 10 Min Have students take the pretest Introduce Journal Introduce the double entry journal that the students will be keeping Activity throughout the reading of TKAM. This journal will be a way for students to respond to their reading as well as a place for them to 15 Min. keep all the freewrites we will do during this unit. Go over handout. Gallery Walk Hang 6 Pictures around the room. Assign groups of students to each picture. Tell them they are going to be going on a gallery walk in a 20 Min. clockwise motion around the room. As they look at each picture, they are to respond to the pictures using the graphic organizer located in their spring board books, page 343. Have them switch every 3 min. Regroup and -Have students sit back down and discuss what the wrote down. discuss. 10-15 min. -Come back together as a whole class and discuss the questions and observations. -Discuss the social, historical, geographical, and cultural aspects of the 1930’s and the time frame of the novel they are about to read. Introduce Novel 1. Have students examine the cover art and note their and begin reading. observations. 2. Ask them to describe the art and predict what the images might represent. 3. Have students predict based on the title, what the novel might be about. 4. Ask students whether they have herd of the author Harper Lee. What do they know about her. 5. Have them read the synopsis on the back. What insight about the novel does this provide. 6. Look at some of the reviews of the novel in the opening pages. Based upon the information they have gathered, what might the author have wanted to make readers think about. Start reading the book. On an overhead, model the Double Entry Journal. Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. At a future date I will grade the double entry journals. Reflection: I think things went really well with this lesson. The students were engaged, and seemed interested in the gallery walk. They wrote down some interesting information and observations based on the photos. I realize that I should have prefaced the whole lesson by telling them what not only what we were going to be doing, but why
  • we were doing it. Some of the students made comments about being in history class. Once I explained that I wanted to provide a context for To Kill a Mockingbird, they seemed to understand. Day 2 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • make predictions, analyze, draw conclusions, …, reading, speaking, listening, and viewing; • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. In order to meet this standard, students will • know and use literary terminology; • read literature to understand places, people, events, and vocabulary, both familiar and unfamiliar; • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; • read classic and contemporary literature of the United States about the experiences and traditions of diverse ethnic groups. Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to provide a historical context for the students. In the 1930’s when TKAM was written, there was a lot going on in the United States. It is important that the students understand the racism and poverty that abounded in this time period. Necessary Materials:  Sarah’s ppt on TKAM and the 1930’s  PPT handout. Sequence Material Activity Vocab Quiz 30 Have students take the quiz. Min.
  • In class In class reading and journal writing time. reading/journal time Part of the 30 Min above. Reading Quiz Have them take a reading quiz based on previous nights reading. Putting the Text in 1. On a sheet of paper, have students write down any information Context 5.5 SB they know about the 1930’s. - Briefly discuss. 2. Read the except on page 346 of spring board out loud (Jim 30 Min Crow.) Have students mark the text by highlighting the statements that define the term “Jim Crow.” 3. Work with student to create a working definition of Jim Crow Laws. Move on to next activity. 1. Have students for into small groups of three or four. Give each group some butcher paper. ON the paper, they are to read the Sample Jim Crow Laws and form them into categories. Possibilities include Marriage, education, etc. 2. Make sure to have the students write down any questions they have about the laws. 3. Have a class discussion on what they have learned and what questions they have. Discuss the blatant racism of these laws. Discuss which ones they thought particularly shocking. 4. Follow up this discussion with the following freewrite. What impact does historical, cultural, geographical, and social context have on a novel and on the reaction of readers to it? 5. Discuss the their responses. TKAM ppt. Show the class the TKAM ppt. Take notes. Questions will be on test. 15-20 Min. If extra time: Work on R+J Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. At a future date I will grade the double entry journals. Also, students will have to present their categorization of the Jim Crow Laws for 20 points. Reflection: I really liked the discussion we had in this class about the Jim Crow Laws. The students seemed to know a lot about them already from their history classes. Some of the activity could have been on a higher level had I known how much they knew. Maybe I could have started out the day or the entire unit with a KWL to asses what background information they already knew.
  • Day 3 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as previewing, predicting, inferring, comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self-monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge of foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, symbolism, and other figures of speech; • adjust reading strategies for different purposes such as reading carefully, idea by idea; skimming and scanning; fitting materials into an organizational pattern, such as reading a novel chronologically; finding information to support particular ideas; and finding the sequence of steps in a technical publication; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • make predictions, analyze, draw conclusions, and …, reading. • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, or director; and Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to- • Identify the subplot of Boo Radley and examine the relationships between main characters, and secondary characters. With this lesson I want to begin the discussion of who Boo Radley is and what he is bringing to the story of TKAM. Ultimately I want to explore what possible symbols and metaphors can be drawn from his character. • Help students infer and make predictions based on what they have read. Necessary Materials:  TKAM Books  Springboard Books  Boo Radley Incidents and Detail sheet. Sequence Material Activity Vocab 10 Min. Vocabulary Work Reading Quiz 10 Take reading quiz Min. Map of Maycomb To help visualize the town of Maycomb, show two maps of 5-10 Min Maycomb Alabama.
  • Exploring Boo Have students read through some excerpts from the book that have to Radley deal with Boo Radley (See handout below). As the students read 15 Min through these excerpts have them respond on the right to the following questions. How are the reactions of Jem and Scout changing to Boo changing in the book? Make some predictions what you think will happen between the children and Boo Radley? In Class Reading In pairs, have the students start reading chapter 5. Have them 15 Min continue to make predictions in their double entry journals, and see if any of their previous predictions have been verified, or not. In Class rehearsal time. All remaining time Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. At a future date I will grade the double entry journals. Home Work: Read Chapters 5-6 for tomorrow. Reflection: The students really seem to be interested in Boo Radley. They are making some great predictions based on textual evidence. I am interested in seeing what they are writing in their dialectical journals. Boo Radley Incidents Involving Boo Radley Details from the Text, and Predictions Chapter 1: What happens in these pages? Radley place and family story are described – Page 12, paragraph starting with “But by the end of August our repertoire…” and ending at the end of the chapter. Children are afraid of Boo because they only know about him from listening to gossip and What are the Rumors involving Boo? rumors about the Radley place.
  • Chapters 2 and 3: What is you response to their running? Jem and Scout run past the Radley place on their way to school. In a knothole in the tree on the Radley What do you infer from these passages? What property, Scout finds two pieces of chewing do you think is likely to happen in the future of gum. – Page 37, paragraph starting with “As the book? the year passed…” Ending with “Wrigley’s Double-Mint.” In the knothole, Jem and Scout find a box with two pennies in it. Page 39, paragraph starting with “As we came to the live oaks…” Scout ends up on the Radley front porch after the tire hits the house. Jem retrieves the tire. – Scout hears someone laughing when she gets Page 42, paragraph starting with “I ran to the out of the tire. What do you think of this? back yard…” Jem thinks up a new game – Boo Radley. – The kids reenact the Radley Story. Scout
  • doesn’t want to play. What do you think will come of this game? What do you think might happen between Boo and the kids? Day 4 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as previewing, predicting, inferring, comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self-monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge of foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, symbolism, and other figures of speech; • adjust reading strategies for different purposes such as reading carefully, idea by idea; skimming and scanning; fitting materials into an organizational pattern, such as reading a novel chronologically; finding information to support particular ideas; and finding the sequence of steps in a technical publication; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • make predictions, analyze, draw conclusions, and …, reading. • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, or director; and Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to- • Identify the subplot of Boo Radley and examine the relationships between main characters, and secondary characters. With this lesson I want to continue the
  • discussion of who Boo Radley is and what he is bringing to the story of TKAM. Ultimately I want to explore what possible symbols and metaphors can be drawn from his character. • With this lesson, I also want to bring together all the evidence we have found from the text regarding Boo Radley and create an interpretation of who this character is and why he is included in the story. Necessary Materials:  TKAM Books  Double Entry Journals Sequence Material Activity Compare/Contrast Workshop time essay workshop 30 Min Reading Quiz 10 Take reading quiz Min. Continuation of 1. Have students get out their double entry journals. Boo Radley 2. Ask students to share what predictions they had written down Discussion. Based in regards to Boo, from the last discussion. upon their Double 3. Ask for examples of how their predictions have either come entry journals. true or not in their recent reading of chapters 5-8. This will 20-25 Min include discussing what has happened in these last few chapters. 4. Discuss the following questions. a) What has been Atticus’s role in the children’s relationship to Boo? b) What is Harper Lee’s purpose in including this story of the children and Boo Radley? c) How has the relationship of the children and Boo Radley changed in these first 8 Chapters? d) And what do you think the children are learning from this experience as they are coming of age in Maycomb? e) Discuss the following quote and how they thing it has come into play so far in the story. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view— until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” Reading time if any I would imagine that the discussion would take up the rest of class, left. but if there is time have them read or write in journals.
  • Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. At a future date I will grade the double entry journals. Home Work: Read Chapters 9-10 for tomorrow. Reflection: I was really nervous about this lesson, considering class discussion is not my expertise. I like kids to work in groups and on projects, but Mrs. Schendel wants them to have more discussions, so I am giving it a try. I think the discussion went well, although I feel I need to get more class participation. I find myself calling on the same students over and over again. I need to try and call on other students. Otherwise, things went well. Day 5 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as previewing, predicting, inferring, comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self-monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge of foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, symbolism, and other figures of speech; • adjust reading strategies for different purposes such as reading carefully, idea by idea; skimming and scanning; fitting materials into an organizational pattern, such as reading a novel chronologically; finding information to support particular ideas; and finding the sequence of steps in a technical publication; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, or director; and STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. In order to meet this standard, students will • know and use literary terminology; • read literature to understand places, people, events, and vocabulary, both familiar and unfamiliar; • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to-
  • • To consider the meaning of the title and how it connects to the text as a whole. Also to look at how it is used as a Motif and or metaphor in the story. • Today’s language has changed a lot since the 1930’s. With this lesson I hope to explore the language of the time period, and discuss how Harper Lee is using this language to convey meaning, and setting. • Necessary Materials:  TKAM Books  Double Entry Journals Sequence Material Activity Vocab Review 15 Min Reading Quiz 5 Book Quiz, if you have it you get points Min. Discussion of Discuss quiz questions as a way to review their reading? chapters 9-10 Why is Scout no longer ashamed of her father? 10-15 Min Discussion of title Read out loud page 94 regarding the Mockingbird. As a class discuss the following questions: 15-20 1. What does Atticus mean by saying that it is a sin to kill a Mockingbird? 2. How does Miss Maudie’s information about mockingbirds add to Atticu’s comment that “it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird” 3. Based upon what we have just read, what do you think might happen in the novel? 4. Why do you think Harper Lee named the novel like she did? 5. Discuss Motif: Motif: A recurring important idea or image. A motif differs from a theme in that it can be expressed as a single word or fragmentary phrase, while a theme usually must be expressed as a complete sentence. 6. Discuss Symbols: Symbols are objects, characters, figures, and colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. 7. What is the difference between the two. (A Motif is basically the recurring symbols of a text for example if the texts had ravens in several scenes then it would be a motif as it would keep popping up.) 8. What symbols have we seen so far in the book. (The Mockingbird, the dog, Boo Radley) 9. What do these symbols represent? (The Mockingbird can be seen as innocence, Boo can also be seen as the good that can be found in people. Despite what he has been put through his
  • inner heart is good.) Relate this back to the quote of walking in someone’s skin. ) 10. Which of these are Motifs? 11. Tell them to keep paying attention to the symbols and motifs they come across in the book. Have them note them in their double entry journals. 12. Which characters have we met so far that are like mockingbirds and why? In class reading of Have a student read to the class the “Incident” by Countee Cullen. the “Incident” After the reading, have students write in their journals a response to the poem. What where their thoughts and feelings when the poem 15 Min. was being read? After they write, read the poem again, and have some students read their responses. Class Discussion Have a class discussion on what they have just read and responded to. First, ask students if they came across any language in their 25 Min. reading that they would like to talk about. If a student doesn’t bring it up read the passage from Pg. 41 where the word “nigger” appears. Here are some possible questions to ask: What did you think when you came across that word? Where you surprised? Shocked? Indifferent? Discuss the appropriateness of the word, then and now. Discuss some other words that are considered racially derogatory. Discuss modern words that are considered derogatory or even politically incorrect. Such as “retard” or “gay.” Discuss how authors use language to convey meaning, and setting. a) Discuss denotation b) Discuss connotation Reading Time Reading time if any. Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. At a future date I will grade the double entry journals. Home Work: Read Chapters 9-10 for tomorrow. Reflection: The discussion we had on the use of the work nigger could have gone a little better. I feel that the kids were having a hard time with it. When I asked for modern words that could be considered derogatory, some of the students answers were a little uncalled for. Next time I need to be a little more sensitive I think. Maybe just bring up myself the words retarded or gay, instead of having the students come to the conclusion. Other wise the discussion went well and the students seemed interested.
  • “Incident” by Countee Cullen Once riding in old Baltimore, Heart-filled, head-filled with glee, I saw a Baltimorean Keep looking straight at me. Now I was eight and very small, And he was no whit bigger, And so I smiled, but he poked out His tongue, and called me, "Nigger." I saw the whole of Baltimore From May until December; Of all the things that happened there That's all that I remember. -Countee Cullen (1925) Some Questions regarding chapters 9-10 1. Why does Scout fight with Cecil Jacobs? 2. What reason does Atticus give for not using the word, "nigger"? 3. From what he tells Scout, does Atticus believe he will win the case he is trying? 4. Whose arrival was one of the good things about Christmas? 5. What is Atticus' brother's occupation? 6. T/F Atticus disapproves of the children getting air rifles for Christmas. 7. What relation is Francis to Aunt Alexandra? 8. How does Uncle Jack protect Scout? 9. Why does Atticus not tell Scout to go to bed earlier when he is talking with Jack? 10. What complaint does Scout have regarding Atticus? 11. Why, according to Miss Maudie, does Atticus believe it's a sin to kill a mockingbird? 12. What target does Scout want to shoot at? 13. Identify Tim Johnson. 14. Why is the incident with the dog unusual for February? 15. What does Atticus do which flabbergasts the kids? 16. What was Atticus' nickname at the Landing? Day 6 of Unit Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will
  • • use comprehension skills such as previewing, predicting, inferring, comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self-monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge of foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, symbolism, and other figures of speech; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author. Objectives: The objectives for this lesson are to- • Analyze Atticus Finch, a character in TKAM based on textual evidence. • Determine what kind of character he is and what he might symbolize in the story. • Necessary Materials:  TKAM Books  Double Entry Journals  3X5 Cards Sequence Material Activity Vocab Unit Exam / Exam time Reading Time 30 Min. Hand in Double Entry Journals Hand in Double Entry Journals Workshop Rough Workshop Rough Drafts. Drafts 30 Min Analysis of Atticus Explain what we are going to be doing, and why. What is the 30 Min purpose? Determine what kind of character he is and what he might symbolize in the story. We want to determine why Harper Lee has written him the way he is, and possible what she is criticizing through his character. Split the class into 6 groups. Give each group a small stack of 3x5 cards. Assign each group roughly 2 chapters. Inform them that they are to look through their 2 chapters and find any quotes in which Atticus gives advice, makes a significant comment, or comments by others that show his character. On their 3X5 card they will write this quote followed by a sentence or two on why they think it is significant, and what it is teaching the children. When they finish a card, one member of their group will come up to the board, and post their card on an outline of Atticus (made out of butcher paper). They will choose an appropriate palace to put their
  • card, so for instance if it is a place where Atticus is being saying something from the heart, they would place the card on his heart or chest. If he is being logical they could put it on his head and so forth. When they are finished, discuss. Look at quotes and what students wrote. a) How would you describe Atticus as a character? b) How do you think he is doing as a father? c) Would you like to have Atticus as a father? d) What would you say Atticus is a symbol of? (Morality, Reason, Integrity) e) What does he do for the story? Why is he in there? Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation. They will have handed in their journals on this day, and I will grade those out of 50 Points. Home Work: Read Chapters 12-13 over the weekend. Reflection: This is my favorite lesson so far. The students really got into pinning the quotes on Atticus. By the end of the period, we had upwards of 50 quotes pinned on the large cutout of Atticus. I am still struggling a little with class discussion, but I do feel I am getting better. I am trying to call on more students so that I can make sure all the students are paying attention, but sometimes when I am up there teaching, I just get tunnel vision and only focus on those who are eager to participate. This is something I need to work on. Day 7 of the Unit Standards that will be addresses: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as …comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self- monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge …symbolism. • make connections between their reading and what they already know, and identify what they need to know about a topic before reading about it; STANDARD 2: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  • In order to meet this standard, students will • write and speak for a variety of purposes such as …presenting analytical responses to literature, conveying technical information, explaining concepts and procedures, and persuading; • write and speak for audiences such as peers, teachers, and the community; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • make predictions, analyze, draw conclusions, and discriminate between fact and opinion in writing, reading, speaking, listening, and viewing; • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, or director; and STANDARD 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources. In order to meet this standard, students will • paraphrase, summarize, organize, and synthesize information; STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. In order to meet this standard, students will • know and use literary terminology; • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; • read classic and contemporary literature, representing various cultural and ethnic traditions from throughout the world; and Objectives: - So far we have spent a lot of time analyzing some of the key characters in the novel, for instance Boo, Jem, Scout, and Atticus. - The start of the second part of TKAM lets us delve a little deeper into two characters we have not explored yet, Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra. - With this lesson I hope to delve a little deeper into these characters and the contrast and shifts between the two. - With this discussion I hope to have the students synthesize their discussion with having them write thematic statements, in an attempt to link textual evidence with thematic ideas. Necessary Materials: TKAM Books Spring Board Books
  • Sequence Material/Activity Sequence Vocab 10 Min Vocab TKAM Quiz 10 Min Take quiz Quiz Discussion Discuss the questions from the quiz as a way to review what they 10-15 Min have been reading. Changing the Explain the purpose of this lesson to the class so they have a context Scene 40-50 Min for why we are doing what we are doing. - So far we have spent a lot of time analyzing some of the key characters in the novel, for instance Boo, Jem, Scout, and Atticus. - The start of the second part of TKAM lets us delve a little deeper into two characters we have not explored yet, Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra. - With this lesson I hope to delve a little deeper into these characters and the contrast and shifts between the two. - With this discussion I hope to have the students synthesize their discussion with having them write thematic statements, in an attempt to link textual evidence with thematic ideas. Start of Lesson - Have students open their Spring Board books to page 387. - Split the class into groups of 3. - Assign each group a question to answer from page 387. Have them discuss and write down their answers. - When they are finished, make new groups of 6 or so in which one person from each group are present. Have them discuss what they previous groups came up with. (As an alternative, maybe have each group present what they came up with to the class, so we can discuss it further.) - Make new groups of 3 or 4 and have them work through the questions on page 388. (This explores the shift between Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra) - When they are finished discuss their answers as a class. Thematic With the remaining time have the students Complete the thematic Statements statements below and discuss. 15-20 Min Reading time if any left.
  • Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on my observations of class participation and class discussion. Reflection: So I made sure today to start the class off with a little explanation of what we are going to be doing, as well as why we are doing it. This is something that I have been forgetting to do in previous lesson. I felt it was good to kind of recap what characters we have talked about and discuss the reason we have been discussing them. The students seemed to come to a better understanding of what we are doing. The lesson itself went well. I really liked the thematic statements at the end. Additional Material: Thematic Statements: (On Overhead) 1. Character: Aunt Alexandra’s fascination with family history symbolizes… 2. Conflict: The confrontation between Calpurnia and Lula shows that… 3. Setting: The trip to Calpurnia’s church reveals that… Day 8 of Unit Standards that will be addresses: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as …comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self- monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge …symbolism. • make connections between their reading and what they already know, and identify what they need to know about a topic before reading about it; STANDARD 2: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences. In order to meet this standard, students will • write and speak for a variety of purposes such as …presenting analytical responses to literature, conveying technical information, explaining concepts and procedures, and persuading; • write and speak for audiences such as peers, teachers, and the community;
  • STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. In order to meet this standard, students will • make predictions, analyze, draw conclusions, and discriminate between fact and opinion in writing, reading, speaking, listening, and viewing; • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author, or director; and STANDARD 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources. In order to meet this standard, students will • paraphrase, summarize, organize, and synthesize information; STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. In order to meet this standard, students will • know and use literary terminology; • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; • read classic and contemporary literature, representing various cultural and ethnic traditions from throughout the world; and Objectives: So far we have been analyzing the main characters in TKAM. We have looked at Boo, Jem, Scout, and Atticus. As we have delved deeper into who these characters are, we have tried to see who they are as people, what they might symbolize in the novel, and how and why Harper Lee has included them. For this lesson I want to further examine these characters and one other (the town, represented through the mob), and see how they are portrayed in a film version compared to a textual one. Necessary Materials: DVD TKAM TKAM books Worksheet Sequence Material Activity Vocab 10 Min Discussion 10 min. discussion as a review of what they have been reading.
  • Compare Print to Explain Purpose: So far we have been analyzing the main characters Film 60 Min. in TKAM. We have looked at Boo, Jem, Scout, and Atticus. As we have delved deeper into who these characters are, we have tried to see who they are as people, what they might symbolize in the novel, and how and why Harper Lee has included them. For this lesson I want to further examine these characters and one other (the town, represented through the mob), and see how they are portrayed in a film version compared to a textual one. Activity: • Assign each student a character to track as we do a reading of the latter half of chapter 15. Have them take notes on their character, based on the worksheet provided. They will be looking for things like what the characters says, and how, what they do, how they look, and others reactions to them. • After reading, give them a minute or two to complete their notes. • When they are finished, have them watch the film version of the same point in the story. Have them complete the same chart based on the film. • Once they are finished with the chart, have them take some time to answer the questions on the back of the worksheet. • Then form groups with one person represented in each group. In their group have them discuss their answers to the questions on the back of the worksheet. (For Worksheet See Below) Assessment: For this lesson, students will be handing in their Comparing Film to Text for 30 points. Reflection: The students didn’t seem to be into this as much as I thought they would. They liked watching the film, but they didn’t really fill out the worksheet too well. They also didn’t seem to be into the discussion too much either. I don’t know if it was the day or what. Maybe next time I could have less questions and only focus on a couple of characters rather than all of them. Additional Material: Comparing Novel to Film Name of Character: The Novel Version The Film Version What your character says and how
  • What your character does What your character looks like What others say to your character and how How was your character portrayed differently and or similarly in the film compared to the printed text?
  • What changes in dialogue were made? Why? What do you think was the effect of these changes? What significance did your character play in the role of the outcome of this scene? What might your character symbolize in this scene? TKAM Lesson 9 Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. • recognize, express, and defend points of view orally and in writing; • identify the purpose, perspective, and historical and cultural influences of a speaker, author • evaluate the … relevancy of information. STANDARD 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources. • paraphrase, summarize, organize, and synthesize information; STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience.
  • • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; • read classic and contemporary literature of the United States about the experiences and traditions of diverse ethnic groups. Objectives: • A second half of this story, is mostly focused on the trial of Tom Robinson, the climax of this case comes when Atticus delivers his closing arguments. For this lesson, I hope help the students analyze Atticus’s closing argument, by looking at rhetorical appeals, as well as connections between the audience, context, and speaker. Necessary Materials: Sequence Material Activity TKAM Quiz Quiz – Discuss answers as a review of what they have read. 15 Min. Read Atticus’ Read Closing argument out loud. (Done the Previous Day) Closing Argument out loud Worksheet Go over the worksheet below with the students (Overhead). Have 20 Min them work in pairs of two to complete the worksheet. Make sure to emphasize that they are to really delve in to the argument. I don’t want simple one sentence answers. Discussion Discuss what they came up with by working through the worksheet. 15-20 Min One more question to ask during the discussion, as a So What? What is the point of all this? Why did we do what we just did? What might the audience (the town) be learning through Atticus’s closing argument? What about the children? What might some internal thoughts be from the town? Film Version If there is time, watch the film version of the closing arguments. Depending on time, either this activity, Have them look for any changes in the words of the argument. or the one below. How did these changes affect the message of the speech? How do director’s choices affect the way we respond to the scene? Work on Test If there is not enough time to start and finish the film activity, have Review Sheet the students work on their review sheets to prepare for tomorrow’s test. Assessment: - At the end of class, students will hand in their work on Atticus’ Closing
  • argument. This will mostly be a participation grade worth 15 points. If they did a good job they will get full credit. If they didn’t take the time to really complete it, they will get half credit. Reflection: This lesson went pretty well, except for the group work time. The problem was that I let them work in groups of their choice. For my other classes this would work, but this one can’t handle it. When I recognized this I should have done something about it, but I didn’t. I just kept trying to get them to work. This involved a lot of effort on my part which wasn’t necessary. Next time I will assign the groups myself. Analyzing Atticus’s Closing Arguments Author-Receiver Relationship: Atticus is the author of this argument, and the jury his audience. 1. What is the relationship between Atticus, the jury, and the audience? 2. What is Atticus trying to do with his closing argument? 3. What attitudes and assumptions does his target audience hold towards Tom Robinson? 4. What attitudes and assumptions does the jury hold towards Atticus? Technique: How does Atticus use Aristotle’s appeals of Pathos and Logos? 1. Pathos is an appeal to the audience’s emotions. Does Atticus use any statements that are meant to get an emotional response from his
  • audience? What are some examples? What is his desired response? 2. Logos is an appeal to logic. Does Atticus use any statements or appeals that are logical? What are some examples? How do these appeals to logic affect his message? Language: What are some specific words or phrases used by Atticus, and how do they affect his message? Summarize: Summarize Atticus’s closing arguments. What is his message? Analyzing Atticus’s Closing Arguments Author-Receiver Relationship: Atticus is the author of this argument, and the jury his audience. 5. What is the relationship between Atticus, the jury, and the audience? The jury and the audience is made up of the towns people as well as people from the surrounding countryside. These are not city men, but simple country people. 6. What is Atticus trying to do with his closing argument? Most of these people have already convicted tom in their minds and hearts. With this closing argument, he is trying to get them to see past their prejudices. He is confronting them face to face with their prejudices. He is using factual evidence to do this. 7. What attitudes and assumptions does his target audience hold towards Tom Robinson? They know he is black and for them that is all they need to know. This in their minds is enough to convict him. They see him as less than them, almost inhuman. They see him as carnal and fully capable of committing this crime in spite of his arm. It is because of this that they see him as guilty, not because of any evidence.
  • 8. What attitudes and assumptions does the jury hold towards Atticus? They see him as a “lover of black people,” and because of it many of them are upset with him. I think in a way they still respect him because of what he does for the community, but in this instance they don’t. Technique: How does Atticus use Aristotle’s appeals of Pathos and Logos? 3. Pathos is an appeal to the audience’s emotions. Does Atticus use any statements that are meant to get an emotional response from his audience? What are some examples? What do you think is his desired response? Nothing but pity in my heart for the chief witness. She kissed a black man Atticus try’s to create sympathy for both Mayella and Tom 4. Logos is an appeal to logic. Does Atticus use any statements or appeals that are logical? What are some examples? How do these appeals to logic affect his message? All the evidence. Tom being right handed, their civic duties in the latter half of the argument. Language: What are some specific words or phrases used by Atticus, and how do they affect his message? Quiet, respectable, humble negro. They point out his place in society. …”but in this country our courts are the great levelers, and in out courts all men are created equal? He is reminding them of historical ideals, and what the country was founded on . Summarize: Summarize Atticus’s closing arguments. What is his message? TKAM Lesson 10-11 Review Due to the shortened periods, this lesson will take 2 days to complete.
  • Standards that will be addressed: STANDARD 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials. In order to meet this standard, students will • use comprehension skills such as previewing, predicting, inferring, comparing and contrasting, re-reading and self-monitoring, summarizing, identifying the author's purpose, determining the main idea, and applying knowledge of foreshadowing, metaphor, simile, symbolism, and other figures of speech; STANDARD 2: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences. In order to meet this standard, students will • write and speak for a variety of purposes such as telling stories, presenting analytical responses to literature, conveying technical information, explaining concepts and procedures, and persuading; • write and speak for audiences such as peers, teachers, and the community; STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. • recognize, express, and defend points of view orally and in writing; STANDARD 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. In order to meet this standard, students will • know and use literary terminology; • read literature to understand places, people, events, and vocabulary, both familiar and unfamiliar; • read literature that reflects the uniqueness and integrity of the American experience; Objectives: • To continue the context behind the novel, and as a way to help students learn more about the book, I will have the students take notes on Harper Lee, and her inspiration for the book. • In an attempt to summarize and review all that we have discussed with TKAM, I will have the students complete a character profile poster and have them summarize each chapter. Necessary Materials: • Large Pieces of butcher paper • Markers • TKAM Book Sequence Material Activity
  • TKAM Quiz Have students take quiz 15 Min Notes on Harper Have students take notes off overhead on Harper Lee and The Lee and Scottsboro Scottsboro trials. (See Below) Tiral 15 Min Start Chapter • Split the class up into 6 groups. summary and • Assign each group 5 chapters, and 1 character. character profile • Give each group a large piece of butcher paper and some Remaining Time, markers. and all of the next • Have the students draw a line down the center of their paper. day as well. Label one side Chapter Name and Summary, and the other Character Profile • Give the following instructions ( also included below as an overhead.) As you have been reading, you may have noticed that the chapters don’t have names, but instead have numbers. What I want you to do as a group is to take the 5 chapters that you have been assigned, and give them a name (Make sure to make a group of students who have finished the book for the end chapters.) This name should reflect somehow the content within that chapter. Once you have given them a name, write a brief summary about that chapter. Include important events, characters introduced, and anything else you feel should be in the summary. All of this is to be done on the left side of your butcher paper under the heading Chapter Name and Summary. You will be presenting these when completed. • On the right side of your paper, you are to complete a character profile. Each group has been assigned a character from TKAM. What I want you to do on the right side is to draw a picture of your character. This can be abstract, or realistic. Once you have a picture, write a physical description of your character. Use textual examples. Then list several adjectives describing your characters values, and motives. Once this is completed, then write a brief explanation of the function of your character in the novels plot, like what they symbolize, etc., a quote about your character from another character, and a quotation from your character that reveals their values. The following day when they complete this project have each group present their posters.
  • Assessment: For this lesson, students will be assessed based on class participation and their presentation of their poster. Reflection: This is a lesson I have done before that has worked very well. I really get the kids thinking and engaged. This class was no different. They really seemed to be in to the project and made some great connections. As a culmination project, it was a great way to review the characters and symbolism in the story. The students didn’t seem to be that into the presenting part of the project, but it still went well. Notes on Harper Lee & The Scottsboro Boys
  • Born Nelle Harper Lee on April 28, 1926, in Monroeville Alabama. • The youngest of 4 children, she grew up as a tomboy. • Her father was a lawyer, a member of the Alabama State Legislature. • For most of Lee’s life her mother suffered from mental illness, and rarely left the house. • One of her closest childhood friends was another famous writer, Truman Capote. • Capote lived with his mother’s relatives in town after largely being abandoned by his own parents. • After graduating high school, Lee attended the all female college Huntingdon College in Montgomery Alabama to study English Literature • Later transferring to the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa Lee was known for being a loner and an individualist. • After a brief time of trying to study law, Lee went back to writing which she felt was her true calling. • In 1949 Lee moved to New York City to become a writer. • In 1956 Michael Martin Brown a friend told her that he would support her for one year so that she could work on her writing. • During this year she wrote To Kill a Mockingbird, first titled Go Set a Watchman, then Atticus, and eventually TKAM. • TKAM was finally finished in 1959 and published in 1960 • A year later, the book won the Pulitzer Prize • Soon after she began assisting Truman Capote as he worked on In Cold Blood, which Capote dedicated to Lee. • By the mid 60’s Lee was reportedly working on a second novel, but it was never published. • Lee continues to live a quiet and private life in New York City and Monroeville. She still usually avoids anything to do with her still popular novel. Biography.com A&E Television The Scottsboro Trials
  • “Lee was only five years old in when, in April 1931 in the small Alabama town of Scottsboro, the first trials began with regard to the purported rapes of two white women by nine young black men. The defendants, who were nearly lynched before being brought to court, were not provided with the services of a lawyer until the first day of trial. Despite medical testimony that the women had not been raped, the all- white jury found the men guilty of the crime and sentenced all but the youngest, a twelve-year-old boy, to death. Six years of subsequent trials saw most of these convictions repealed and all but one of the men freed or paroled. The Scottsboro case left a deep impression on the young Lee, who would use it later as the rough basis for the events in To Kill a Mockingbird.” New York Post
  • Chapter Name and Summary Character Profile • Name each chapter you have • Draw a picture of your been assigned. character. This can be • This name should reflect the abstract, or realistic. content within that chapter. • Write a physical description • Write a brief summary under of your character. Use textual each chapter title. Include examples. important events, characters • List several adjectives introduced, and anything else describing your characters you feel should be in the values, and motives. summary. • Write a brief explanation of the function of your character in the novels plot, like what they symbolize, etc. • Write a quote about your character from another character. • Write a quotation from your character that reveals their values. Name: Bigfoot? Pre AP 9th Grade: English
  • To Kill a Mockingbird A. Matching (1 points each): Match each character’s name in the left column with the appropriate character description in the right column by writing the CAPITAL letter next to the character in the left column. Make sure you use capitals. Please. Thank you. 1. Scout 2. Jem 3. Calpurnia 4. Atticus 5. Dill 6. Heck Tate 7. Bob Ewell _____ 8. Tom Robinson _____ 9. Miss Maudie 10. Aunt Alexandra A. one-shot B. Didn’t take Mayella to a doctor C. Considered Trash by Atticus D. Victim of the novel E. Quieted the mob F. Jem and Scout’s neighbor G. Wished to be just like Atticus H. Married to Heck Tate I. Atticus’ sister J. According to Scout, lived a double life K. Scout’s fiancé L. Atticus’ aunt
  • B. Quote Identification (8 points each – 2 points for speaker, 3 points situation, 3 points Significance): For each quote, please, 1) identify what the quote is saying, 2) explain the situation surrounding the quote, and 3) explain the importance of the quote to the novel as a whole. 11. “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him. . . . When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was because he had breathed on them.” 1. 2. 3. 12. “When a child asks you something, answer him, for goodness' sake. But don't make a production of it. Children are children, but they can spot an evasion quicker than adults, and evasion simply muddles 'em.” 1. 2. 3. 13. “Mr. Cunningham’s basically a good man, he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us. . . . So it took an eight-year-old child to bring ‘em to their sense, didn’t it?” 1. 2. 3. 14. “If you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view . . . until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” 1. 2. 3. C. Short Answers (4 points each): Please answer each question in complete sentences with completely awesome answers written in completely awesome complete sentences.
  • 15. What is Scout’s most significant change from the beginning to the end of the novel? Support your answer with evidence from the novel. 16. In what ways are Atticus’s confrontation with the rabid dog and his confrontation with the jury in Tom Robinson’s trial similar? Support your answer with evidence from the novel. 17. Discuss the importance of the Mockingbird in the novel? 18. What is a Jim Crow Law, and name 3 examples? 19. Who is the author of To Kill a Mockingbird and what are some similarities between her life and the novel? D. Long Short Answer (20 points each): Select two (2) of the following questions and respond in a well developed short response that uses specific textual examples (2-3 paragraphs). Please write on your own college-ruled, blue-lined, non-scraggly edged notebook paper.
  • 24. How does symbolism play a role in the novel? Use at least two separate examples of symbols in order to respond to this question. 25. Select one (1) theme from TKAM and explain the importance of this theme as it applies to the overall novel. Use of textual examples is a must. 26. Harper Lee clearly is using TKAM as social criticism and/or commentary. Select two (2) examples/targets of her criticism and explain the potential impact of her message on the American society. 27. Many experts have asserted that the true strength of TKAM has to do with its characterization. Defend or refute this claim with multiple examples and textual support.