• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Museums and the Web 2014: Beyond the Screen: Creating interactives that are location, time, preference, and skill responsive
 

Museums and the Web 2014: Beyond the Screen: Creating interactives that are location, time, preference, and skill responsive

on

  • 771 views

This workshop was given by Bradley Baer of Bluecadet, Daniel Davis of the National Museum of the American Indian, and Emily Fry of the Peabody Essex Museum at the 2014 Museums and the Web Conference ...

This workshop was given by Bradley Baer of Bluecadet, Daniel Davis of the National Museum of the American Indian, and Emily Fry of the Peabody Essex Museum at the 2014 Museums and the Web Conference in Baltimore, Maryland. The presentation discussed giving museum visitors What they want, when they want, and how they want using various examples from various industries. The full paper can be found at: http://mw2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/beyond-the-screen-creating-interactives-that-are-location-time-preference-and-skill-responsive/

When we think of Responsive Design, a singular experience on various screen sizes is what most often comes to mind. However, it's equally important that interactives are designed to be responsive in regards to location, time, preference, & skill. Using examples from several museums and related industries, this talk will inform participants on how they can more effectively work with staff and vendors to design sites, apps, touchscreens, and environments that better respond to patrons.

Location-based
The success of push notifications and apps like Foursquare show us the importance of geo-location. By creating experiences that cater to a visitor's location we not only improve wayfinding but also make sure guests don't miss out on a nearby friend or something of interest.

Time-based
When we think of how many visitors experience museums, we realize that patrons typically allow a certain amount of time. While this might be an hour or a day, the goal remains to provide them with an experience that leaves them wanting more. Time-based designs can help craft bespoke experiences for each guest and even help them coordinate transportation to and from the venue.

Preference-based
Whether it's language preference, how we like to receive information, or even specific styles that we're drawn to, preference-based experiences help get the most out of a visit without having to dig through information that isn't of interest. While this concept is relatively new to museums, other industries from athletics to air travel allow us to make several decisions well before events.

Skill-based
One can look at a television remote to see the importance of "skill-based" design. While there is a portion of the population that uses every button, there are just as many that use only basic functions like power, volume, or channel. Technology and video game companies are now creating systems that allow users to select a skill level to provide a custom display without excess information.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
771
Views on SlideShare
626
Embed Views
145

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
7
Comments
0

3 Embeds 145

http://www.scoop.it 124
https://twitter.com 20
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Museums and the Web 2014: Beyond the Screen: Creating interactives that are location, time, preference, and skill responsive Museums and the Web 2014: Beyond the Screen: Creating interactives that are location, time, preference, and skill responsive Presentation Transcript

    • RESPONSIVEDESIGN:BEYONDTHESCREEN BRAD BAER Bluecadet | EMILY FRY Peabody Essex Museum | DANIEL DAVIS National Museum of the American Indian Museums & the Web | April 4, 2014 Creating interactives that are location, time, preference and skill responsive
    • 1. An Introduction The basics of the discussion 2. Worksheet/Exercise Try out the process for your own museum 3. Digital Petting Zoo Try out the various interactives mentioned 4. Discussion & Questions Discuss findings and get feedback #BEYONDTHESCREEN
    • 1. An Introduction BRAD BAER Bluecadet
    • 49%of words get read on average of a 110 word web page 28%of words get read on average of a 593 word web page Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, The Associated Press (January 1, 2014)
    • “WE WANT TO MAKE THE BEST FOR THE MOST FOR THE LEAST” - Ray & Charles Eames -
    • (Now with technology) WE WANT TO GIVE PEOPLE WHAT THEY WANT, WHEN THEY WANT, & HOW THEY WANT.
    • The “Idea” PersonAn attraction to concepts, abstractions, & facts The “People” PersonAttracted to personal and emotional connection The “Object” PersonLoves to look at artifacts and their descriptions The “Physical” PersonLikes to do things Andrew Pekarik and Barbara Mogel’s IPOP Personas
    • AVERAGE ATTENTION SPAN IN 2000 AVERAGE ATTENTION SPAN IN 2013 12 seconds 8 seconds ?If your guests only takes away one thing, what do you want it to be?
    • 3. How do they want it? 2. When do they want it? 1. What do they want? Asking the correct questions:
    • 3. How do they want it? Focusing on the specific format they prefer receiving new information. One example might be viewing images as opposed to text, another might be viewing it via a tablet as opposed to a projection. 2. When do they want it? 1. What do they want? ! Asking the correct questions:
    • 3. How do they want it? 2. When do they want it? allowing visitors to experience something on their own time. This could mean dwell time (how long they spend at a specific piece) or what time of day they want to interact with something. 1. What do they want? ! Asking the correct questions:
    • 3. How do they want it? 2. When do they want it? 1. What do they want? Individually curating offerings based on specific preferences, tendencies, skills, or interests. Asking the correct questions:
    • 1. How do they want it? BRAD BAER Bluecadet
    • POLICYLAB WEBSITES policylab.chop.edu
    • LA INVENCIÓN CONCRETA http://lainvencionconcreta.org/
    • We’re a public institution, and so the art and objects we have are, in a way, everyone’s property.” ! -Taco Dibbits Director of Collections“
    • TYLER SCHOOL OF ART WEBSITE tyler.temple.edu
    • VIDEO TEXTATTRACT SCREEN INTERACTION SCREEN (Triggered by small sensor) MAP / DATA AUDIO 15’ Flatscreen Touch TOWER FEATURES • Multiple types of media • Incorporates motion sensor to transition from cinematic atttract screen to full interactive experience. • Allows for children/wheelchair users to interact by bringing information down to them (ADA Accessbile). • Can easily be rotated 90 degrees to become wall instead of tower • Makes use of only (1) touchscreen and (2) normal screens SEE VIDEO OF THE TOWER > vimeo.com/bluecadet/pennnav University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology INTERACTIVETOUCH-TOWERSfor the NATIVEAMERICANVOICESEXHIBITION Flatscreen
    • 2. When do they want it? DANIEL DAVIS National Museum of the American Indian
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GPS_Satellite_NASA_art-iif.jpg
    • Augmented overlays for smartphones-as-cursors make the physical city browsable.” ! -Malcolm McCullough “Ambient Commons; Attention in the Age of Embodied Information.” - MIT Press “
    • Global Positioning Satellite technology http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8d/ GPS_Satellite_NASA_art-iif.jpg/748px-GPS_Satellite_NASA_art-iif.jpg
    • FIELD TRIP A location based app that allows you to select key interests you like, that way the app shows you only relevant places and information.
    • WiFi Triangulation! bluetooth!LE!proximity!beacons! ! Bluetooth LE proximity beacons Hybrid systems images courtesy Laurie Stepp Indoor Location Positioning Technologies
    • MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION Philadelphia, PA
    • THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE WEBSITE Launching May 5
    • THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE WEBSITE Launching May 5
    • 3. What do they want? EMILY FRY Peabody Essex Museum
    • WHAT THEY WANT (Preferences, Skills, & Interests) Most critical piece: When it all comes together ! SONGZA MOBILE APP
    • DESIGNING FOR EMOTION • How can visitor emotion and preference shape the design and experience? • How can we create a customizable experience that reacts to visitors’ feelings? • How can we anticipate audience/user preferences before a visit?
    • LANGUAGE LOCALIZATION !
    • LANGUAGE LOCALIZATION !
    • Source: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672044/the-next-big-ui-idea-gadgets-that-adapt-to-your-skill#5
    • SKILL/AGE PREFERENCE Despicable Me: Minion Rush !
    • PLANNING RESPONSIVE CONTENT • Opting information early: visit as a continuum • Identify needs • Identify motivation • Show empathy • Customize • Adapt
    • • Longer Dwell Time • Deeper, relevant engagement • Accessible, inclusive experiences MORE SKIN IN THE GAME Creating personal connections !
    • 1. Start Small 2. Journey maps: understand visitor’s museum expectations and adjust the experience 3. Crowdsource from your target audiences 4. Involve community voices: visitor panels, focus groups PLANNING RESPONSIVE CONTENT Most critical piece: When it all comes together ! T h e S o u t h M a l l V i s i t o r J o u r n e y S UMMARY OF VISITOR MOMEN T S Start Places to Meet & Rest Bathrooms Cafe Gift shop Alcoves Benches Transportation Metro Taxis Parking Garage Bus Dropoff Walk Tourism Industry Guidebook Travel websites (e.g., TripAdvisor) Concierge Travel agent Affiliate museum Word of Mouth Family Friends Fellow travelers Marketing Email Ads Smithsonian Channel SI Resources Telephone Line Direct Mail Website Mobile apps Digital Planning Tools Search Engines Web Mapping Services Transit apps (Hopstop, Bikeshare) Signs & Maps Streetlight banners Sidewalk exhibits Sidewalk signs Campus maps Museum banners Entry Logistics Security Bag check Coat check Meeting point Bathrooms Orientation Help Info desk Info cart Touch screens Brochures 3D map of mall Mobile apps Building Exit Exit signage Security Doors South Mall underground Escalators Garden People Staff Other visitors Back to the World Metro station Parking garage Taxi Sidewalk signage Campus signage Memories Photos on phone, camera Souvenirs & Gifts Collected pamphlets Artifacts from interactive exhibits Share Conversations with friends and family Review sites (e.g., Yelp) Facebook (and other social networks) Exhibits Collection objects Interactive exhibits Textual placards Projections Exhibit audio Theaters Next Steps Mobile phone Guidebook Takeaways Maps Info desk Other visitors Mailing list Other SI Buildings Mobile Device Photo apps Check-in apps (e.g., FourSquare, Facebook) Inter-building transit Escalators Underground Walkways Grounds Garden Outdoor exhibits Mmetro i EXIT TOUCHPOINTS
    • QUESTIONSACTIONS Hear about on news media Learn via word of mouth Consult family and friends Consider fit with other DC activities Discuss with concierge Negotiate with group Pick a day Get driving directions Research nearby food and entertainment options Seek specific academic exhibits Select items to bring: bag, coat, etc. Undergo bag screening Look for bathroom Find or gather group Understand what exhibits and public programs are available Plot a path through the building Pick an exhibit Read, experience, learn Eat Use audio tour, mobile devices, printed materials, etc. for more info Split up; rejoin Walk around building Consider membership Seek directions to freeway Arrange cab or Uber Look for restaurant or bar Find bus/Metro Seek a break area Judge experience for later sharing Wander grounds Look across mall at other options Travel between museums Lunches on quad Look at photos Discuss experience on social media Join SI social media pages Post yelp review Chat about experience with family EMOTIONS Seek first building or visitor center Walk from Metro Drop off passengers Park car, walk back from garage Ask for directions Follow trip leader Figure out current location in building Lose group Follow group leader Excitement to see famous exhibits Wonder about what will happen Worry about grandma's stamina Worry kids will get bored High expectations Stress of planning it all Anticipation of finally visiting the Smithsonian Respect for collections and brand Sheer excitement Relief at level of organization Hope and anticipation that the exhibits will be fun Anxiety and annoyance about security checks, esp. repeated Fatigue after previous museum Surprise and happy that entry is free Tired, overstimulated Awed by beauty of buildings Impressed by exhibits Hungry Annoyed by other peoples' pace High satisfaction with exhibit content Pride in new learning Mental fatigue Some frustration that couldn't see everything Annoyance at distance to food options Sense of completion Uncertainty about safety Enjoyment of lovely Haupt Garden Confusion by [insufficient] wayfinding Great memories of specific exhibits Satisfaction about the visit in general Disappointed about how it turned out Stress of parking while keeping everyone happy Excitement to see specific famous exhibits "Dusty childhood nostalgia" Impressed by the Castle Wonder about how far to walk How does Smithsonian compare to other destinations? How do I keep group happy? Where do I find more info? What are the [hidden] costs? How long will it take? Can I bring my camera? Do I really need to plan?Do they have accessible bathrooms? Where do I get tickets? How long are the distances? How much can I do in one day? How do I get there? Where do I park? What is security screening like? What is this exhibit? What else should I pack in? How much time do we have left before the kids tire? Can I get on a mailing list? Where can we get food nearby right now? What other attractions are open around here? What do we do with the kids while getting the car? Where will we eat lunch? What else at SI might interest me? Is SI closed? How do I get between South Mall museums underground? What did I miss? When can we go back to see what we missed? How can we improve our next visit? What should I see? What should we do first? How do I get to the parking lot? Where is the info desk? Where is the [specific] museum? Do I need cash? Is this the entrance? Is this "the Smithsonian?" Where is [a particular] exhibit? Is there Wifi? Where are the bathrooms? What is the difference between Freer & Sackler? BACK HOMEEXIT CAMPUSLEAVE A BUILDINGEXPERIENCE A BUILDINGARRIVE AT BUILDINGARRIVE AT CAMPUSORGANIZE THE TRIPCONSIDER GOING Undergo bag screening Look for bathroom Find or gather group Understand what exhibits and public programs are available Plot a path through the building Pick an exhibit Read, experience, learn Eat Use audio tour, mobile devices, printed materials, etc. for more info Split up; rejoin Walk around building Consider membership Seek directions to freeway Arrange cab or Uber Look for restaurant or bar Find bus/Metro Seek a break area Judge experience for later sharing Wander grounds Look across mall at other options Travel between museums Lunches on quad Loo Dis Joi Po Ch enter age Figure out current location in building Lose group Follow group leader Relief at level of organization Hope and anticipation that the exhibits will be fun Anxiety and annoyance about security checks, esp. repeated Fatigue after previous museum Surprise and happy that entry is free Tired, overstimulated Awed by beauty of buildings Impressed by exhibits Hungry Annoyed by other peoples' pace High satisfaction with exhibit content Pride in new learning Mental fatigue Some frustration that couldn't see everything Annoyance at distance to food options Sense of completion Uncertainty about safety Enjoyment of lovely Haupt Garden Confusion by [insufficient] wayfinding Gre Sat Dis ng mous What is this exhibit? What else should I pack in? How much time do we have left before the kids tire? Can I get on a mailing list? Where can we get food nearby right now? What other attractions are open around here? What do we do with the kids while getting the car? Where will we eat lunch? What else at SI might interest me? Is SI closed? How do I get between South Mall museums underground? What did I miss? Wh mis How ? m? Is this the entrance? Is this "the Smithsonian?" Where is [a particular] exhibit? Is there Wifi? Where are the bathrooms? What is the difference between Freer & Sackler? Gift shop Alcoves Benches Entry Logistics Security Bag check Coat check Meeting point Bathrooms Mobile apps Building Exit Exit signage Security Doors South Mall underground Escalators Garden People Staff Other visitors Back to the Wor Metro station Parking garage Taxi Sidewalk signage Campus signage Exhibits Collection objects Interactive exhibits Textual placards Projections Exhibit audio Theaters Check-in apps (e.g., FourSquare, Facebook) i EXIT EXIT CAMPUSLEAVE A BUILDINGEXPERIENCE A BUILDINGARRIVE AT BUILDINGPUS Undergo bag screening Look for bathroom Find or gather group Understand what exhibits and public programs are available Plot a path through the building Pick an exhibit Read, experience, learn Eat Use audio tour, mobile devices, printed materials, etc. for more info Split up; rejoin Walk around building Consider membership Seek directions to freeway Arrange cab or Uber Look for restaurant or bar Find bus/Metro Seek a break area Judge experience for later sharing Wander grounds Look across mall at other options Travel between museums Lunches on quad Figure out current location in building Lose group Follow group leader Relief at level of organization Hope and anticipation that the exhibits will be fun Anxiety and annoyance about security checks, esp. repeated Fatigue after previous museum Surprise and happy that entry is free Tired, overstimulated Awed by beauty of buildings Impressed by exhibits Hungry Annoyed by other peoples' pace High satisfaction with exhibit content Pride in new learning Mental fatigue Some frustration that couldn't see everything Annoyance at distance to food options Sense of completion Uncertainty about safety Enjoyment of lovely Haupt Garden Confusion by [insufficient] wayfinding What is this exhibit? What else should I pack in? How much time do we have left before the kids tire? Can I get on a mailing list? Where can we get food nearby right now? What other attractions are open around here? What do we do with the kids while getting the car? Where will we eat lunch? What else at SI might interest me? Is SI closed? How do I get between South Mall museums underground? What did I miss? Is this the entrance? Is this "the Smithsonian?" Where is [a particular] exhibit? Is there Wifi? Where are the bathrooms? What is the difference between Freer & Sackler? EXIT CAMPUSLEAVE A BUILDINGEXPERIENCE A BUILDINGARRIVE AT BUILDING
    • 1. Your Turn.
    • THANKYOU BRAD BAER @Bluecadet / brad@bluecadet.com EMILY FRY @EmilyLewBlack / emily_ fry@pem.org DANIEL DAVIS @Bigenola / DavisDan@si.edu