Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
10 quadratics
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

10 quadratics

246
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
246
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Blogs Rube 1
  • 2. Unit 2 – Non­Linear Equations Lesson 2 – Quadratic Graphs and Equations Slow­Motion Tennis Ted White  This picture was produced in a dark  room, with a strobe light and a camera  that was capable of taking long exposure  shots (by keeping its shutter open longer).  The parabolic shapes brilliantly  demonstrate the relative time that it takes  for the ball to travel throughout the various  points of the image.   At the very top of  the parabola, the tennis ball images appear  very close together, therefore indicating  that the ball moved at a slower velocity.    Conversely, near the bottom of the  parabolas, the distances between the  images of the ball grow larger, therefore  indicating that the ball moved more space  per time interval as it descended toward  the racket.   This slow­motion tennis  picture helps one more easily visualize the  properties of parabolic motion, as defined  by Earth's gravitational force.    http://science.jburroughs.org/mschober/photo s/photocontest06/photocontest06­ Pages/Image12.html 2
  • 3. http://people.rit.edu/andpph/photofile­misc/coin­flip_4509.jpg 3
  • 4. http://people.rit.edu/andpph/photofile­misc/stroboscope­ppball_4980.jpg 4
  • 5. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bouncing_ball_strobe_edit.jpg 5
  • 6. The equation of a quadratic function is y = ax2 + bx + c y=ax2 + bx + c The shape of this function’s graph is a parabola. 6
  • 7. Some parabolas have a minimum and some have a  maximum. • If a is positive, the parabola opens upward, and the  parabola has a minimum. • If a is negative, the parabola opens downward, and the  parabola has a maximum. 7
  • 8. The zeros of a quadratic function are the x­coordinates where the  function intercepts the x­axis. They are found when y=0.  Parabolas may have 0, 1 or 2 zeros. 0 x­intercepts 1 x­intercept 2 x­intercepts 8
  • 9. The vertex is the maximum/minimum point of the parabola. The vertex is the place where the parabola changes direction. The vertex is identified by x­ and y­coordinates e.g. (­1.5,­1) 9
  • 10. If the vertex is identified by x­ and y­coordinates e.g. (­1.5,­1), then.. The axis of symmetry is the vertical line through the vertex.  Its equation is x = m where m is the x  value of the vertex. 10
  • 11. 11
  • 12. Investigation of Quadratics • In groups of 2 or 3, complete Investigation 2 12