Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World
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Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World

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Open source and cloud computing are two terms that everyone seems to be talking about. Powerhouses on their own, when paired together open source and cloud computing can create a developer’s dream ...

Open source and cloud computing are two terms that everyone seems to be talking about. Powerhouses on their own, when paired together open source and cloud computing can create a developer’s dream scenario.

In this session, Bret Piatt, technical alliances at Rackspace Hosting will discuss the history of open source software development and the spread of open source across the internet. Cloud computing providers are now incorporating open source into their business models through open APIs and contributions to various open source projects such as Cassandra and Drizzle, and Bret will discuss these developments while taking a close look at the intersection of cloud computing and open source to cover:

How cloud computing is changing open source
How cloud computing can benefit from open source
How open source will lead the interoperability push
How the success of cloud is tied to mass adoption that requires interoperability

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Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World Presentation Transcript

  • Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World Bret Piatt Rackspace Hosting
  • History of Open Source
  • GNU to Linux (1983-1992) "Bell Labs, the MIT AI Lab, UC Berkeley - these became the home of innovations that are legendary and still potent."1 GNU Project GNU GPL Linux 0.12 Founded (1983) Issued (1989) Released (1992) FSF Founded "The Hurd" (1985) Released (1991) "Linux was the first project to make a conscious and successful effort to use the entire world as its talent pool."1 1) Quotes from "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", by Eric Raymond
  • The Internet Boom (1993-1999) Linux becomes #1 server OS on the Internet1 OSS built in the boom continues today: 112 million websites running Apache HTTP Server2 24.23% of Internet browsing uses Firefox3 64.8M downloads of OpenOffice 3.14 1) http://leb.net/hzo/ioscount/data/r.9904.txt 2) As of 2/23/2010 http://blogs.apache.org/foundation/entry/the_apache_software_foundation_announces2 3) http://www.browser-watch.com/2010/03/02/browser-market-share-february-2010/ 4) http://marketing.openoffice.org/marketing_bouncer.html
  • Open Source Era (1999-Present) 138 projects 150 projects 300 members 164 member companies 2000 committers 1179 committers SourceForge.net® 230,000 projects 2,000,000 registered members 34,000,000 unique visitors monthly
  • The "hobby" of writing software SourceForge and bowling leagues have the same number of members1 Over 8,000 plug-ins with nearly 80,000,000 downloads for Wordpress® Over 4,000 add-ons created for World of Warcraft® listed on Curse.com 1) "More than 2 million compete regularly in league play certified by the USBC." http://www.bowl.com/about/index.jsp
  • Early in the life of OSS as a business Only two "pure OSS" companies have gone public VA Software (now Geeknet) Red Hat Examples of major "pure OSS" acquisitions MySQL (by Sun Microsystems) - $1B SpringSource (by VMware) - $362M SUSE (by Novell) - $210M
  • How Cloud Computing Benefits From Open Source
  • Communities form around problems Cassandra (Rackspace, Digg, Twitter, Reddit, Facebook) Hadoop (Yahoo!, Cloudera) Xen (Citrix, Oracle, Fujitsu, Intel, HP, AMD, & more) Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus, Canonical)
  • 1 "Release Early, Release Often" Cloud designed RDBMS Drizzle builds constantly with Hudson Service providers can patch software -- no waiting for vendors. Partners can do a complete integration and understand how. Customers can contribute bug fixes and additional features. 1) Quote from "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", by Eric Raymond
  • OSS & cloud isn't a one way street Many open source applications work great "once running". Cloud computing eliminates the need to be an expert to try using OSS. Time needed to get started reduced from hours to minutes. Cost to get started below the price of a Happy Meal(TM).
  • Open Source Is Leading Cloud Interoperability
  • Do you like to be a hostage? Don't design your system to use features or technologies tied to a specific vendor unless you want a life sentence. Let OSS abstract the underlying foundation so your application is portable across cloud providers.
  • OSS creates interoperability Deltacloud Libvirt Link virtualization & cloud Pick a hypervisor, any hypervisor Libcloud Write once, use many clouds jclouds Like Java, like many clouds? Rackspace Cloud APIs Specs any provider can use
  • Standards organizations cement it Standards only emerge when the result is available to everyone, de-facto proprietary is not a standard. Standards emerge slowly over time and should avoid trying to solve "world hunger", go domain by domain. Service Providers need to collaborate with the users in open discussion and debate, un-conferences are a perfect venue. http://www.cloudsecurityalliance.org/ http://www.cloudcamp.org/ http://www.opengroup.org/cloudcomputing/
  • Cloud Needs Mass Adoption To Succeed
  • Cloud promises economies of scale Wimshurst (19th Century) Nuclear (20th Century) (AKA "Typical IT Environment") (AKA "Clouds of the Future") VS. Small clouds will not have the size to financially outperform providers that can operate at massive scale. They won't be price or feature competitive in the end.
  • Cloud requires scale Cloud, like many other industries has high upfront costs in both expertise and one time development charges. OSS amplifies this as it has higher upfront implementation costs but no additional per unit license costs as services are scaled.
  • OSS driving interoperability will speed things up For Cloud to reach the desired scale rapidly... "Help me Open Source Software, you're our only hope..." Vendors with proprietary technology that believe they can corner the market have no incentive to interoperate. Service Providers, customers, and enthusiasts that want an open cloud computing world need to work together.
  • Short Attention Spans Meet the one minute summary
  • As promised, all in one minute Section 1 - The History of OSS OSS started in the early 80s and continues to grow today Business takes time to evolve, just understanding OSS now Section 2 - How Cloud Computing Benefits from OSS OSS helps cloud through collaboration Cloud helps OSS by making it easier to try and use Section 3 - OSS is Leading Cloud Interoperability Unless you want to be a hostage watch out OSS is creating interoperability today Standards organizations will cement it over time Section 4 - Cloud Needs Mass Adoption To Succeed Cloud promises economies of scale like the power grid Cloud has high one-time costs OSS driving interoperability will speed cloud adoption
  • Questions? Twitter: @bpiatt bret.piatt@rackspace.com
  • Backup This information may or may not be organized in a good manner..
  • Future of Open Source in a Cloudy World Open source and cloud computing are two terms that everyone seems to be talking about. Powerhouses on their own, when paired together open source and cloud computing can create a developer’s dream scenario. In this session, Bret Piatt, technical alliances at Rackspace Hosting will discuss the history of open source software development and the spread of open source across the internet. Cloud computing providers are now incorporating open source into their business models through open APIs and contributions to various open source projects such as Cassandra and Drizzle, and Bret will discuss these developments while taking a close look at the intersection of cloud computing and open source to cover: How cloud computing is changing open source How cloud computing can benefit from open source How open source will lead the interoperability push How the success of cloud is tied to mass adoption that requires interoperability
  • History of Open Source Software (OSS) 1983: GNU Project founded 1985: FSF (Free Software Foundation) founded 1989: First GNU GPL (General Public License) issued 1991: "The Hurd" released, first OSS Unix kernel 1992: Linux 0.12 released under the GPL 1993: The "BSDs" arrive under the BSD license 1994: Apache HTTP Server released 1997: The Cathedral and the Bazaar published 1998: Netscape Communicator released (Mozilla Firefox) 1999: Sun releases StarOffice under LGPL (OpenOffice) 1999: ASF (Apache Software Foundation) founded 1999: SourceForge launches 2003: Eclipse Foundation founded 2007: Sun releases OpenJDK under GPLv2 2008: Sun releases OpenSolaris
  • CatB's 19 "rules" (suggestions) 1. Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch. 2. Good programmers know what to write. Great ones know what to rewrite (and reuse). 3. "Plan to throw one away; you will, anyhow." (Fred Brooks, The Mythical Man-Month, Chapter 11) 4. If you have the right attitude, interesting problems will find you. 5. When you lose interest in a program, your last duty to it is to hand it off to a competent successor. 6. Treating your users as co-developers is your least- hassle route to rapid code improvement and effective debugging. 7. Release early. Release often. And listen to your customers. 8. Given a large enough beta-tester and co-developer base, almost every problem will be characterized quickly and the fix obvious to someone. 9. Smart data structures and dumb code works a lot better than the other way around. 10. If you treat your beta-testers as if they're your most valuable resource, they will respond by becoming your most valuable resource. 11. The next best thing to having good ideas is recognizing good ideas from your users. Sometimes the latter is better. 12. Often, the most striking and innovative solutions come from realizing that your concept of the problem was wrong. 13. "Perfection (in design) is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but rather when there is nothing more to take away." 14. Any tool should be useful in the expected way, but a truly great tool lends itself to uses you never expected. 15. When writing gateway software of any kind, take pains to disturb the data stream as little as possible - and *never* throw away information unless the recipient forces you to! 16. When your language is nowhere near Turing- complete, syntactic sugar can be your friend. 17. A security system is only as secure as its secret. Beware of pseudo-secrets. 18. To solve an interesting problem, start by finding a problem that is interesting to you. 19: Provided the development coordinator has a medium at least as good as the Internet, and knows how to lead without coercion, many heads are inevitably better than one.