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Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
Classroom management 10 2011
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Classroom management 10 2011

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Classroom Management Techniques that utilize a Pro-Active Approach.

Classroom Management Techniques that utilize a Pro-Active Approach.

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  1. Classroom ManagementClassroom Managementand theand theDisruptive StudentDisruptive StudentA Pro-Active ApproachA Pro-Active ApproachOctober 6, 13, 20, November 3, 17 -2011October 6, 13, 20, November 3, 17 -2011Hunterdon Central Regional High SchoolHunterdon Central Regional High SchoolAdapted and Prepared by David M. Berger, MA, M.Ed.Adapted and Prepared by David M. Berger, MA, M.Ed.
  2. Picture Time….Picture Time….Now close your eyes and….Now close your eyes and…. Picture the student with whom you havePicture the student with whom you havehad the greatest difficulties in yourhad the greatest difficulties in yourclassroom…classroom… Picture the behaviors that studentPicture the behaviors that studentexhibited….exhibited…. Picture how you reacted to thosePicture how you reacted to thosebehaviors….behaviors…. Please turn to the person next to you andPlease turn to the person next to you anddescribe that student in terms of behaviorsdescribe that student in terms of behaviors
  3. Videos about ClassroomVideos about ClassroomManagement TechniquesManagement Techniques YouTube -YouTube -How To Maintain Classroom Discipline - GoodHow To Maintain Classroom Discipline - Good Dangerous Minds _Dangerous Minds _There is no victims in thisThere is no victims in this planet.flvplanet.flv Diane Sawyer –Diane Sawyer – A day with a teacherA day with a teacher The Substitute Movie (TomThe Substitute Movie (Tom Berenger).flvBerenger).flv Teachers (1983) Nick NolteTeachers (1983) Nick Nolte
  4. What is Classroom Management?What is Classroom Management? It’s effective disciplineIt’s effective discipline It’s being prepared for classIt’s being prepared for class It’s motivating your studentsIt’s motivating your students It’s providing a safe, comfortable learningIt’s providing a safe, comfortable learningenvironmentenvironment It’s building your students’ self esteemIt’s building your students’ self esteem It’s being creative and imaginative in dailyIt’s being creative and imaginative in dailylessonslessons And . . .And . . .
  5. . . . It’s different for EVERYONE!!. . . It’s different for EVERYONE!!WHY?WHY? Teaching StylesTeaching Styles Personality/AttitudesPersonality/Attitudes Student populationStudent population Not all management strategies are effectiveNot all management strategies are effectivefor every teacherfor every teacher Try different strategies to see if they workTry different strategies to see if they workfor youfor you
  6. Why is Classroom ManagementWhy is Classroom ManagementImportant?Important? Satisfaction and enjoyment inSatisfaction and enjoyment inteaching are dependent upon leadingteaching are dependent upon leadingstudents to cooperatestudents to cooperate Classroom management issues are ofClassroom management issues are ofhighest concern for beginninghighest concern for beginningteachersteachers
  7. Principles for successful classroomPrinciples for successful classroommanagementmanagement Deal with disruptive behaviors but also manageDeal with disruptive behaviors but also manageto minimize off-task, non-disruptive behaviorsto minimize off-task, non-disruptive behaviors Teach students to manage their own behaviorTeach students to manage their own behavior StudentsStudents learnlearn to be on-task and engaged in theto be on-task and engaged in thelearning activities you have planned for themlearning activities you have planned for them It is more natural to be off-task than onIt is more natural to be off-task than on
  8. Techniques for BetterTechniques for BetterClassroom ControlClassroom Control Focus attention on entire classFocus attention on entire class Don’t talk over student chatterDon’t talk over student chatter Silence can be effectiveSilence can be effective Use softer voice so students really have toUse softer voice so students really have tolisten to what you’re saying (Paradoxicallisten to what you’re saying (ParadoxicalResponse)Response) Direct your instruction so that studentsDirect your instruction so that studentsknow what is going to happenknow what is going to happen
  9. Techniques for BetterTechniques for BetterClassroom ControlClassroom Control Set the tone when they walk through the doorSet the tone when they walk through the door Monitor groups of students to check progressMonitor groups of students to check progress Move around the room so students have to payMove around the room so students have to payattention more readilyattention more readily Give students non-verbal cuesGive students non-verbal cues Engage in low profile intervention of disruptionsEngage in low profile intervention of disruptions Make sure classroom is comfortable and safeMake sure classroom is comfortable and safe
  10. Techniques for BetterTechniques for BetterClassroom ControlClassroom Control Over plan your lessons toOver plan your lessons toensure you fill the periodensure you fill the periodwith learning activitieswith learning activities Come to class preparedCome to class prepared Show confidence in yourShow confidence in yourteachingteaching Learn student names asLearn student names asquickly as possiblequickly as possible
  11. Transition vs. Allocated TimeTransition vs. Allocated Time Allocated time: the time periods youAllocated time: the time periods youintendintend for your students to be engagedfor your students to be engagedin learning activitiesin learning activities Transition time: time periods that existTransition time: time periods that existbetweenbetween times allocated for learningtimes allocated for learningactivitiesactivities ExamplesExamples Getting students assembled and attentiveGetting students assembled and attentive Assigning reading and directing to beginAssigning reading and directing to begin Getting students’ attention away from readingGetting students’ attention away from readingand preparing for class discussionand preparing for class discussion
  12. Transition vs. Allocated TimeTransition vs. Allocated Time The Goal:The Goal: Increase the variety of learning activitiesIncrease the variety of learning activitiesbut decrease transition time.but decrease transition time. Student engagement and on-taskStudent engagement and on-taskbehaviors are dependent on howbehaviors are dependent on howsmoothly and efficiently teacherssmoothly and efficiently teachersmove from one learning activity tomove from one learning activity toanotheranother
  13. Dr. Fred Jones’ study of off-taskDr. Fred Jones’ study of off-taskbehaviorsbehaviors 99% of off-task behaviors take one of99% of off-task behaviors take one ofseveral formsseveral forms Talking out of turnTalking out of turn ClowningClowning DaydreamingDaydreaming Moving about without permissionMoving about without permission Antisocial, dangerous behaviors make upAntisocial, dangerous behaviors make upa fraction of the time students spend off-a fraction of the time students spend off-tasktask http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjSOmyFLKWAhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjSOmyFLKWA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcl1x4BrQ1ghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcl1x4BrQ1g http://www.fredjones.com/Positive_Discipline/Discipline_Intro.htmlhttp://www.fredjones.com/Positive_Discipline/Discipline_Intro.html
  14. Proximity and Body LanguageProximity and Body Language Eye contact, facial expressions, gestures,Eye contact, facial expressions, gestures,physical proximity to students, and thephysical proximity to students, and theway you carry yourself will communicateway you carry yourself will communicatethat you are in calm control of the classthat you are in calm control of the classand mean to be taken seriously.and mean to be taken seriously. Be free to roamBe free to roam Avoid turningAvoid turningback to classback to class
  15. Cooperation throughCooperation throughcommunicationcommunication Verbalize descriptions of observable behaviors andVerbalize descriptions of observable behaviors andnever value judgments about individualsnever value judgments about individuals Verbalize feelings but remain in control – Use “I”Verbalize feelings but remain in control – Use “I”statements.statements. Speak only to people when they are ready to listenSpeak only to people when they are ready to listen DO NOT USE SARCASMDO NOT USE SARCASM Do not place labelsDo not place labels (good or bad)(good or bad) Do not get students hooked on praiseDo not get students hooked on praise Praise the work and behavior – not the students themselvesPraise the work and behavior – not the students themselves
  16. Classroom Rules For ConductClassroom Rules For Conduct Formalized statements that provide studentsFormalized statements that provide studentswith general guidelines for the types ofwith general guidelines for the types ofbehaviors that are required and the types thatbehaviors that are required and the types thatare prohibitedare prohibited A few rules are easier to remember than manyA few rules are easier to remember than manyrulesrules Each rule in a small set of rules is moreEach rule in a small set of rules is moreimportant than each rule in a large set of rulesimportant than each rule in a large set of rules
  17. Necessary classroom rules ofNecessary classroom rules ofconductconduct Maximizes on-task behaviors and minimize off-Maximizes on-task behaviors and minimize off-task (esp. disruptive) behaviorstask (esp. disruptive) behaviors Secures the safety and comfort of the learningSecures the safety and comfort of the learningenvironmentenvironment Prevents the activities of the class fromPrevents the activities of the class fromdisturbing other classesdisturbing other classes Maintains acceptable standards of decorumMaintains acceptable standards of decorumamong students, school personnel, and visitorsamong students, school personnel, and visitorsto the school campusto the school campus
  18. Ideas for Classroom RulesIdeas for Classroom RulesByBy Melissa KellyMelissa Kelly, About.com, About.com<http://712educators.about.com/cs/backtoschool/a/classrules.htm><http://712educators.about.com/cs/backtoschool/a/classrules.htm>1.1. Come to class on timeCome to class on time2.2. Begin the start up activityBegin the start up activitywithin 1 minute after thewithin 1 minute after thetardy bell.tardy bell.3.3. Attend to personal needsAttend to personal needsbefore coming to class.before coming to class.4.4. Remain in your assignedRemain in your assignedseat unless you haveseat unless you havepermission to get uppermission to get up5.5. Do not eat candy or otherDo not eat candy or otherfood in class unless youfood in class unless youhave been given specialhave been given specialpermissionpermission6.6. Bring required materialsBring required materialsevery day unless you areevery day unless you areotherwise directed.otherwise directed.7.7. Talk only when permittedTalk only when permitted8.8. Use polite speech andUse polite speech andbody languagebody language9.9. Do not cheatDo not cheat10.10. Follow the teachersFollow the teachersdirections immediatelydirections immediately
  19. Student Input for ClassroomStudent Input for ClassroomManagement PlanManagement PlanGoals –Goals – These are the desirable behaviors in ourThese are the desirable behaviors in ourclass-class- These are the rewards you can obtainThese are the rewards you can obtainfrom doing these behaviors –from doing these behaviors – These are the consequences if you don’tThese are the consequences if you don’tfollow our plan -follow our plan -
  20. Establishing a “Businesslike”Establishing a “Businesslike”AtmosphereAtmosphere. . . Or, “Don’t Smile until. . . Or, “Don’t Smile untilChristmas”Christmas”
  21. A Businesslike AtmosphereA Businesslike Atmosphere Take advantage of the first days of classTake advantage of the first days of class Establish an environment in whichEstablish an environment in whichachieving specified learning goals takesachieving specified learning goals takespriority over other concernspriority over other concerns It is much easier to establish thisIt is much easier to establish thisenvironment from the beginning ratherenvironment from the beginning ratherthan laterthan later Set up a seating chart….Set up a seating chart….http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQf_3_zc5Echttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQf_3_zc5Ec
  22. 5 steps5 steps1.1. Take advantage of the new school year orTake advantage of the new school year orterm to set the stage for cooperationterm to set the stage for cooperation2.2. Be particularly prepared and organizedBe particularly prepared and organized3.3. Minimize transition timeMinimize transition time4.4. Utilize a communication style that establishingUtilize a communication style that establishingnon-threatening, comfortable environmentnon-threatening, comfortable environment5.5. Clearly establish expectations for conductClearly establish expectations for conduct
  23. Disclosure StatementDisclosure Statement Used to clearly communicate expectationsUsed to clearly communicate expectationsto students and parentsto students and parents Refer back to the guidelines throughoutRefer back to the guidelines throughoutthe termthe term Not a legally binding documentNot a legally binding document
  24. Components of DisclosureComponents of DisclosureStatementStatement Basic Course OutlineBasic Course Outline Grading ProceduresGrading Procedures Include procedures for making up missedInclude procedures for making up missedwork, extra credit, homework expected, etc.work, extra credit, homework expected, etc. Attendance Policies (should be consistent withAttendance Policies (should be consistent withschool policy)school policy) Other class rules, policies, proceduresOther class rules, policies, procedures Safety considerations as necessarySafety considerations as necessary Accommodation for disabilities statementAccommodation for disabilities statement Signature of student and parent/guardianSignature of student and parent/guardian
  25. Room/lab arrangementRoom/lab arrangement Make sure all students can see and hear clearlyMake sure all students can see and hear clearly(and you can see them clearly)(and you can see them clearly) Arrangement is determined by learning activityArrangement is determined by learning activity(lecture, class discussion, small group work,(lecture, class discussion, small group work,etc.)etc.) Allow room and easy access for proximityAllow room and easy access for proximitycontrolcontrol Think through class procedures and learningThink through class procedures and learningactivities and arrange the room in the bestactivities and arrange the room in the bestpossible waypossible way
  26. Top 10 Tips for ClassroomTop 10 Tips for ClassroomDiscipline and ManagementDiscipline and ManagementByBy Melissa KellyMelissa Kelly, About.com <http://712educators.about.com/od/discipline/tp/disciplinetips.htm>, About.com <http://712educators.about.com/od/discipline/tp/disciplinetips.htm>1.1. It’s Easier to Get EasierIt’s Easier to Get Easier2.2. Fairness is KeyFairness is Key3.3. Deal with DisruptionsDeal with Disruptionswith as Little Interruptionwith as Little Interruptionas Possibleas Possible4.4. Avoid Confrontations inAvoid Confrontations inFront of StudentsFront of Students5.5. Stop Disruptions with aStop Disruptions with aLittle HumorLittle Humor6.6. Keep High ExpectationsKeep High Expectationsin Your Classin Your Class7.7. OverplanOverplan8.8. Be ConsistentBe Consistent9.9. Make RulesMake RulesUnderstandableUnderstandable10.10. Start Fresh EverydayStart Fresh Everyday
  27. Top 10 Worst Things a TeacherTop 10 Worst Things a TeacherCan DoCan DoByBy Melissa KellyMelissa Kelly, About.com, About.com<http://712educators.about.com/od/teachingstrategies/tp/worstactions.htm><http://712educators.about.com/od/teachingstrategies/tp/worstactions.htm>1.1. Avoid smiling and beingAvoid smiling and beingfriendly with yourfriendly with yourstudents.students.2.2. Becoming friends withBecoming friends withstudents while they arestudents while they arein classin class3.3. Stop your lessons andStop your lessons andconfront students forconfront students forminor infractions inminor infractions inclassclass4.4. Humiliate students to tryHumiliate students to tryand get them to behave.and get them to behave.5.5. Yell.Yell.6.6. Give your control over toGive your control over tothe students.the students.7.7. Treat studentsTreat studentsdifferently based ondifferently based onpersonal likes andpersonal likes anddislikes.dislikes.8.8. Create rules that areCreate rules that areessentially unfair.essentially unfair.9.9. Gossip and complainGossip and complainabout other teachers.about other teachers.10.10. Be inconsistent withBe inconsistent withgrading and/or acceptinggrading and/or acceptinglate work.late work.
  28. WithitnessWithitnessWithitness refers to aWithitness refers to ateacher’s awareness ofteacher’s awareness ofwhat is going on in thewhat is going on in theclassroomclassroom
  29. Dealing with Difficult StudentsDealing with Difficult StudentsA proactive approach…A proactive approach…
  30. Functions of BehaviorFunctions of Behavior Every behavior has a functionEvery behavior has a function Four primary reasons for disruptiveFour primary reasons for disruptivebehavior in the classroombehavior in the classroom PowerPower RevengeRevenge AttentionAttention Want to be left alone (i.e., disinterestWant to be left alone (i.e., disinterestor feelings of inadequacy)or feelings of inadequacy)
  31. Functions of BehaviorFunctions of Behavior Many misbehaviors exhibited by students areMany misbehaviors exhibited by students areresponses to a behavior exhibited by the teacherresponses to a behavior exhibited by the teacher Do not tolerate undesirable behaviors no matterDo not tolerate undesirable behaviors no matterwhat the excusewhat the excuse Understanding why a person exhibits a behaviorUnderstanding why a person exhibits a behavioris no reason to tolerate itis no reason to tolerate it Understanding the function of a behavior willUnderstanding the function of a behavior willhelp in knowing how to deal with that behaviorhelp in knowing how to deal with that behavior Discipline Help: You Can Handle Them AllDiscipline Help: You Can Handle Them All
  32. A Proactive ApproachA Proactive Approach1.1. Stop!Stop! Don’t react to the behaviorDon’t react to the behavior2.2. AnalyzeAnalyze – What is really going on here?– What is really going on here?3.3. IdentifyIdentify the targeted behavior – must bethe targeted behavior – must beobservableobservable4.4. DevelopDevelop a corrective plan of actiona corrective plan of action5.5. ImplementImplement the planthe plan6.6. ReviewReview the plan for effectivenessthe plan for effectiveness7.7. ModifyModify and remain constant!!!and remain constant!!!
  33. Dealing with off-task behaviorsDealing with off-task behaviors Remain focused and calm; organize thoughtsRemain focused and calm; organize thoughts Either respond decisively or ignore it all togetherEither respond decisively or ignore it all together Distinguish between off-task behaviors and off-Distinguish between off-task behaviors and off-task behavior patternstask behavior patterns Control the time and place for dealing with off-Control the time and place for dealing with off-task behaviortask behavior Provide students with dignified ways to terminateProvide students with dignified ways to terminateoff-task behaviorsoff-task behaviors
  34. Dealing with off-task behaviorsDealing with off-task behaviors Avoid playing detective-Avoid playing detective- Don’t Ask Why?Don’t Ask Why? Utilize alternative lesson plans (Increase yourUtilize alternative lesson plans (Increase yourbag of tricks.)bag of tricks.) Utilize the help of colleagues – Second Set ofUtilize the help of colleagues – Second Set ofEyes…Eyes… Utilize the help of guardians- Positive ContactsUtilize the help of guardians- Positive Contacts 11stst!!!!!! DO NOT USE CORPORAL PUNISHMENTDO NOT USE CORPORAL PUNISHMENT A form of contrived punishment in which physical pain orA form of contrived punishment in which physical pain ordiscomfort is intentionally inflicted upon an individual for thediscomfort is intentionally inflicted upon an individual for thepurpose of trying to get that individual to be sorry he or shepurpose of trying to get that individual to be sorry he or shedisplayed a particular behaviordisplayed a particular behavior
  35. Modifying off-task behavior patternsModifying off-task behavior patterns Use the principle of “Shaping”Use the principle of “Shaping” Reinforce behaviors that are similar toReinforce behaviors that are similar tothe behavior to be learnedthe behavior to be learned Subsequent actions that are more likeSubsequent actions that are more likethe behavior to be learned than previousthe behavior to be learned than previousactions are reinforcedactions are reinforced Subsequent actions that are less likeSubsequent actions that are less likethe behavior to be learned than previousthe behavior to be learned than previousactions are not positively reinforcedactions are not positively reinforced
  36. Attention Seeking BehaviorAttention Seeking Behavior Attention-seeking students prefer beingAttention-seeking students prefer beingpunished, admonished, or criticized topunished, admonished, or criticized tobeing ignoredbeing ignored Give attention to this student when he orGive attention to this student when he orshe isshe is on-task and cooperatingon-task and cooperating ““Catch them being good!”Catch them being good!” – and let– and letthem know you caught themthem know you caught them
  37. Power Seeking BehaviorPower Seeking Behavior Power-seeking students attempt toPower-seeking students attempt toprovoke teachers into a struggle of willsprovoke teachers into a struggle of wills Diffuse interactionsDiffuse interactions - In most cases,- In most cases,the teacher should direct attention to otherthe teacher should direct attention to othermembers of the class away from themembers of the class away from theprovocateurprovocateur
  38. Behavior:Behavior: Rambling -- wanderingRambling -- wanderingaround and off the subject. Using far-around and off the subject. Using far-fetched examples or analogies.fetched examples or analogies.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:Refocus attention by restating relevant point.Refocus attention by restating relevant point.Direct questions to group that is back on theDirect questions to group that is back on thesubjectsubjectAsk how topic relates to current topic beingAsk how topic relates to current topic beingdiscussed.discussed.Use visual aids, begin to write on board, turn onUse visual aids, begin to write on board, turn onoverhead projector.overhead projector.Say: "Would you summarize your main pointSay: "Would you summarize your main pointplease?" or "Are you asking...?"please?" or "Are you asking...?"
  39. Behavior:Behavior: Shyness or Silence -- lack ofShyness or Silence -- lack ofparticipationparticipationPOSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Change teaching strategies from group discussionChange teaching strategies from group discussionto individual written exercises or a videotapeto individual written exercises or a videotapeo Give strong positive reinforcement for anyGive strong positive reinforcement for anycontribution.contribution.o Involve by directly asking him/her a question.Involve by directly asking him/her a question.o Make eye contact. (Culturally Appropriate)Make eye contact. (Culturally Appropriate)o Appoint to be small group leader.Appoint to be small group leader.
  40. Behavior:Behavior: Talkativeness -- knowingTalkativeness -- knowingeverything, manipulation, chroniceverything, manipulation, chronicwhining.whining.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Acknowledge comments made.Acknowledge comments made.o Give limited time to express viewpoint or feelings, and thenGive limited time to express viewpoint or feelings, and thenmove on.move on.o Make eye contact with another participant and move towardMake eye contact with another participant and move towardthat person.that person.o Give the person individual attention during breaks.Give the person individual attention during breaks.o Say: "Thats an interesting point. Now lets see what otherSay: "Thats an interesting point. Now lets see what otherother people think."other people think."
  41. Behavior:Behavior: Sharpshooting -- trying toSharpshooting -- trying toshoot you down or trip you up.shoot you down or trip you up.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Admit that you do not know the answer and redirectAdmit that you do not know the answer and redirectthe question the group or the individual who askedthe question the group or the individual who askedit.it.o Acknowledge that this is a joint learningAcknowledge that this is a joint learningexperience.experience.o Ignore the behaviorIgnore the behavior..
  42. Behavior:Behavior: Heckling/Arguing --Heckling/Arguing --disagreeing with everything you say;disagreeing with everything you say;making personal attacks.making personal attacks.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:Redirect question to group or supportiveRedirect question to group or supportiveindividuals.individuals.Recognize participants feelings and moveRecognize participants feelings and moveone.one.Acknowledge positive points.Acknowledge positive points.Say: "I appreciate your comments, but IdSay: "I appreciate your comments, but Idlike to hear from others," or "It looks like welike to hear from others," or "It looks like wedisagree."disagree."
  43. Behavior:Behavior: Grandstanding -- gettingGrandstanding -- gettingcaught up in ones own agenda orcaught up in ones own agenda orthoughts to the detriment of otherthoughts to the detriment of otherlearners.learners.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Say: "You are entitled to your opinion, belief orSay: "You are entitled to your opinion, belief orfeelings, but now its time we moved on to the nextfeelings, but now its time we moved on to the nextsubject," orsubject," oro "Can you restate that as a question?" or"Can you restate that as a question?" oro "Wed like to hear more about that if there is time"Wed like to hear more about that if there is timeafter the presentation."after the presentation."
  44. Behavior:Behavior: Overt Hostility/Resistance --Overt Hostility/Resistance --angry, belligerent, combative behavior.angry, belligerent, combative behavior.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Hostility can be a mask for fear. Reframe hostility as fear toHostility can be a mask for fear. Reframe hostility as fear todepersonalize it.depersonalize it.o Respond to fear, not hostility.Respond to fear, not hostility.o Remain calm and polite.Remain calm and polite. Keep your temper in check.Keep your temper in check.o Dont disagree, but build on or around what has been said.Dont disagree, but build on or around what has been said.o Move closer to the hostile person, maintain eye contact.Move closer to the hostile person, maintain eye contact.(Use your discretion!!!)(Use your discretion!!!)o Always allow him or her a way to gracefully retreat from theAlways allow him or her a way to gracefully retreat from theconfrontation – both emotionally and physically. (Cagedconfrontation – both emotionally and physically. (CagedTiger Syndrome.)Tiger Syndrome.)
  45. Behavior:Behavior: Overt Hostility/Resistance --Overt Hostility/Resistance --angry, belligerent, combative behaviorangry, belligerent, combative behavior(continued)(continued)POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:Say: "You seem really angry. Does anyone else feel thisSay: "You seem really angry. Does anyone else feel thisway?" Solicit peer pressure.way?" Solicit peer pressure.Do not accept the premise or underlying assumption, if it isDo not accept the premise or underlying assumption, if it isfalse or prejudicial, e.g., "If by "queer" you meanfalse or prejudicial, e.g., "If by "queer" you meanhomosexual..."homosexual..."Allow individual to solve the problem being addressed. He orAllow individual to solve the problem being addressed. He orshe may not be able to offer solutions and will sometimesshe may not be able to offer solutions and will sometimesundermine his or her own position.undermine his or her own position.Ignore behavior –Ignore behavior – unless threat to self or others!!!unless threat to self or others!!!Then Dial “0”…Then Dial “0”…Talk to him or her privately during a break.Talk to him or her privately during a break.As a last resort, privately ask the individual to leave class forAs a last resort, privately ask the individual to leave class forthe good of the group.the good of the group.
  46. Behavior:Behavior: Griping -- maybe legitimateGriping -- maybe legitimatecomplaining.complaining.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:o Point out that we cant change policy here.Point out that we cant change policy here.o Validate his/her point.Validate his/her point.o Indicate youll discuss the problem with theIndicate youll discuss the problem with theparticipant privately.participant privately.o Indicate time pressure.Indicate time pressure.
  47. Behavior:Behavior: Side Conversations -- may beSide Conversations -- may berelated to subject or personal. Distractsrelated to subject or personal. Distractsgroup members and you.group members and you.POSSIBLE RESPONSES:POSSIBLE RESPONSES:Dont embarrass talkers.Dont embarrass talkers.Ask their opinion on topic being discussed. DrawAsk their opinion on topic being discussed. Drawthem into the lesson.them into the lesson.Ask talkers if they would like to share their ideas.Ask talkers if they would like to share their ideas.Casually move toward those talking.Casually move toward those talking.Make eye contact with them.Make eye contact with them.Standing near the talkers, ask a near-byStanding near the talkers, ask a near-byparticipant a question so that the new discussionparticipant a question so that the new discussionis near the talkers.is near the talkers.As a last resort, stop and wait.As a last resort, stop and wait.
  48. What do you do?What do you do? Scenarios A – F will be presentedScenarios A – F will be presented While working with a group of 4 or 5 discuss howWhile working with a group of 4 or 5 discuss howyou would deal with the student.you would deal with the student. Have one person in each group prepare toHave one person in each group prepare toreport out to the class as to your plan of action.report out to the class as to your plan of action. Please use modalities presented from this in-Please use modalities presented from this in-service.service.
  49. Scenario AScenario AEvery day one student in class keepsEvery day one student in class keepsmoving around the room socializing withmoving around the room socializing withother students. Once redirected – theother students. Once redirected – thebehavior corrects until the next transitionalbehavior corrects until the next transitionalactivity. Negative consequences have notactivity. Negative consequences have notseemed to work.seemed to work.
  50. Scenario BScenario BEvery day a student comes to class right asEvery day a student comes to class right asthe bell is ringing –racing through thethe bell is ringing –racing through thedoor- noisily taking his/her seat. Afterdoor- noisily taking his/her seat. Afterrummaging through his/her bag, andrummaging through his/her bag, andgetting situated (which usually takes 5getting situated (which usually takes 5minutes) the student is ready to learn –minutes) the student is ready to learn –until you ask for the homework to beuntil you ask for the homework to beturned in – and then the procedure startsturned in – and then the procedure startsall over again…all over again…
  51. Scenario CScenario CSeveral students are sub-grouping in classSeveral students are sub-grouping in classwhile they are suppose to be working on awhile they are suppose to be working on acooperative project. They are socializingcooperative project. They are socializingwith other groups and claim that they arewith other groups and claim that they arealways on task when you ask them to getalways on task when you ask them to getto work…to work…
  52. Scenario DScenario DIts Monday morning and a student entersIts Monday morning and a student entersyour class extremely agitated. S/he isyour class extremely agitated. S/he isaggressively posturing with other studentsaggressively posturing with other studentsaround him. The students around her/himaround him. The students around her/himare feeling threatened but one studentare feeling threatened but one studentkeeps coming to the aggressors aidekeeps coming to the aggressors aidetelling everyone to “lay off”. The behaviortelling everyone to “lay off”. The behaviorseems to be decreasing but the tension inseems to be decreasing but the tension inthe room is a distraction from the lesson.the room is a distraction from the lesson.
  53. Scenario EScenario EEvery time you have the students do in-class seatEvery time you have the students do in-class seatwork, one student becomes exasperated andwork, one student becomes exasperated andstates that he/she doesn’t need to do it. “What’sstates that he/she doesn’t need to do it. “What’sthe point of all this anyway? We don’t need thisthe point of all this anyway? We don’t need thisstuff in the real world…” When you redirect thestuff in the real world…” When you redirect thestudent’s attention the situation escalates andstudent’s attention the situation escalates andbecomes hostile. The student’s grandstandingbecomes hostile. The student’s grandstandinghas placed a rift in the class as to who is inhas placed a rift in the class as to who is incharge?charge?
  54. Scenario FScenario FA student received a failing grade. FeelingA student received a failing grade. Feelingthis was unjust, he/she attempted to getthis was unjust, he/she attempted to geteven with the teacher by sabotaging theeven with the teacher by sabotaging thelessons. S/He would refuse to answerlessons. S/He would refuse to answerquestions or do any work. Instead s/hequestions or do any work. Instead s/hewould lean back in the chair, with daggerswould lean back in the chair, with daggersin his/her eyes, and sneer at you. Otherin his/her eyes, and sneer at you. Otherstudents are feeling the tension in thestudents are feeling the tension in theclass.class.
  55. ReferencesReferences Cangelosi, James S. (1988).Cangelosi, James S. (1988). Classroom Management Strategies: GainingClassroom Management Strategies: Gainingand Maintaining Students’ Cooperationand Maintaining Students’ Cooperation.. New York: Longman.New York: Longman. Cantor, Lee,(1990) “Assertive Discipline and Beyond”, Santa Monica, CACantor, Lee,(1990) “Assertive Discipline and Beyond”, Santa Monica, CA Charles, C.M. (1989)Charles, C.M. (1989) Building Classroom Discipline: From Models toBuilding Classroom Discipline: From Models toPracticePractice. New York: Longman. New York: Longman Johnson, David, & Roger Johnson,Johnson, David, & Roger Johnson, Learning Together and AloneLearning Together and Alone, (1975), (1975)Englewood Cliffs, NJ : Prentice- HallEnglewood Cliffs, NJ : Prentice- Hall Jones, Fred, “Jones, Fred, “Classroom ManagementClassroom Management””<http://www.usu.edu/aste/ag_ed/inservice/ntafiles/unit04/classroom_manag<http://www.usu.edu/aste/ag_ed/inservice/ntafiles/unit04/classroom_management.ppt#257,2,What is Classroom Management?) 28 January 2007.ement.ppt#257,2,What is Classroom Management?) 28 January 2007.

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